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HIDE
 Front Cover
 Front Matter
 Title Page
 Table of Contents
 Faculty and curriculum
 Student life
 Sports
 Organizations
 Underclassmen
 Seniors
 Advertising
 Index
 Back Matter
 Back Cover
 Spine
PCANAL
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00093680/00005
 Material Information
Title: Caribbean
Physical Description: Serial
Language: English
Creator: Cristobal High School
Publisher: Yearbook House
Place of Publication: Kansas City, Missouri
Publication Date: 1970
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Canal Zone
Yearbook
Genre: serial   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 463018377
System ID: UF00093680:00005

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front cover
    Front Matter
        Front matter
    Title Page
        Page 1
    Table of Contents
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
    Faculty and curriculum
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
    Student life
        Pages 36 and 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Pages 40 and 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Pages 52 and 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
        Page 65
    Sports
        Pages 66 and 67
        Pages 68 and 69
        Page 70
        Page 71
        Page 72
        Page 73
        Page 74
        Page 75
        Page 76
        Page 77
        Page 78
        Page 79
        Page 80
        Page 81
        Page 82
        Page 83
    Organizations
        Pages 84 and 85
        Page 86
        Page 87
        Page 88
        Page 89
        Page 90
        Page 91
        Page 92
        Page 93
        Page 94
        Page 95
        Page 96
        Page 97
        Page 98
        Page 99
        Page 100
        Page 101
    Underclassmen
        Page 102
        Page 103
        Pages 104 and 105
        Page 106
        Page 107
        Page 108
        Page 109
        Page 110
        Page 111
        Page 112
        Page 113
        Page 114
        Page 115
        Page 116
        Page 117
        Page 118
        Page 119
        Page 120
        Page 121
        Page 122
        Page 123
        Page 124
        Page 125
        Page 126
        Page 127
        Page 128
        Page 129
        Page 130
        Page 131
        Page 132
        Page 133
        Page 134
        Page 135
        Page 136
        Page 137
        Page 138
        Page 139
    Seniors
        Pages 140 and 141
        Page 142
        Page 143
        Pages 144 and 145
        Page 146
        Page 147
        Page 148
        Page 149
        Page 150
        Page 151
        Page 152
        Page 153
        Page 154
        Page 155
        Page 156
        Page 157
        Page 158
        Page 159
        Page 160
        Page 161
        Page 162
        Page 163
        Page 164
        Page 165
    Advertising
        Pages 166 and 167
        Page 168
        Page 169
        Page 170
        Page 171
        Page 172
        Page 173
        Pages 174 and 175
        Page 176
        Page 177
        Pages 178 and 179
        Pages 180 and 181
        Page 182
        Page 183
        Pages 184 and 185
    Index
        Page 186
        Page 187
        Page 188
        Page 189
        Page 190
        Page 191
        Page 192
    Back Matter
        Page 193
    Back Cover
        Page 194
    Spine
        Page 195
Full Text











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CARIBBEAN 1970


CRISTOBAL HIGH
COCO SOLO
CANAL ZONE
VOLUME 53


.r.t4c ,efeetPcn ev 4 (4*


SCHOOL


-wavd













STUDENT
LIFE
36


SENIORS
140


SPORTS
66









ORGANIZATIONS
84


UNDERCLASSMEN
102


ADVERTISING
166


INDEX
186








A JOURNEY OF
A THOUSAND MILES
BEGINS WITH ONE STEP


A freshman may casually decide to join
the Dramatics Club or the Nurses' Aid, and
yet his decision could lead to a career as
an actor or a playwright, as a nurse or a
doctor.
Aspiring to make the first string of the
football team, a determined freshman may
apply himself to a year of practice and
study, and yet he may not play in one game.
If he pursues his .goal in his sophomore year
he may see action for only five or ten min-
utes all season. By the time he is a junior,
he may have acquired the skill and season-
ing to become a valued member of the team.
Perhaps he may not secure a key position
in the starting lineup until he is a senior.


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gins with one step," and that first step
can be the most crucial and difficult
of all, for then, the goal seems scarce-
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FACULTY AND






Teachers and what they teach are
a large part of a student's life.
Through knowing teachers and be-
coming interested in the material pre-
sented, a student comes to choose the
field he will pursue in his journey of
life.












CURRICULUM







ADMINISTRATION


-- "---B

CRISTOBAL JUNIOR-SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL: One of two U.S. high schools operated by the Civil Affairs Bureau of
the Canal Zone Government.


MR. MAEDL PAYS TRIBUTE TO TIGER SPIRIT

Cristobal High School has long enjoyed a reputa-
tion for having an exceptionally fine school spirit.
This has been in evidence not only at athletic con-
tests but in many -other areas of school life as well.
As one example, this past year the seniors ex-
pressed the desire to obtain for themselves additional
privileges in school and during the lunch hour. To I-
show that they understand that responsibility must
accompany privilege, they appointed a committee
which carefully worked out a code of conduct which
they would adhere to and which they felt would be
acceptable to the school and the community. The ad-
ministration not only accepted the guidelines the stu-
dents had set up, but applauded them for their
achievement and for the fine spirit in which they had .
carried it out.
This is the Tiger Spirit at its very best. It is hoped
that in the future years there will continue to be even CAR'
greater demonstrations of this spirit. jA L






CARL F. MAEDL
ENDS ILLUSTRIOUS
ADMINISTRATIVE TERM

MR. CARL F. MAEDL will long be remembered
for his dedication to the students and to education
at CHS for the past thirty-two years.
Mr. Maedl was born in South Dakota, Jan-
uary 14, 1909, and moved to Minnesota when
he was four years old. He attended teachers col-
lege in Moorhead, Minnesota, and played football
and hockey while in college. He taught in Daven-
port, North Dakota, and Sauk Rapids, Minnesota,
before coming to Cristobal in the fall of 1938.
Mr. Maedl met his wife Alfhild at Sauk Rapids
where she taught with him for three years. They
were married in August, 1938, in Minneapolis.
At CHS Mr. Maedl taught 7th and 9th grade
science, biology, was a counselor, assistant prin-
cipal, and principal.
The gratitude of all the students you have
helped shape goes with you on your retirement,
Mr. Maedl.


MR. MAEDL MR. PFAU
MR. JAMES PFAU will be our new principal next year.
Mr. Pfau has mastered the position of Assistant Princi-
pal for five years. His job consisted of counseling stu-
dents and assisting Mr. Maedl with administrative duties.
Mr. Pfau came to the Canal Zone in 1953. Before
becoming Assistant Principal he taught physics, mathe-
matics, and chemistry. He was also the Student Associ-
ation sponsor for ten years.
Mr. Pfau is an active member in the choir of the Union
Church, and enjoys reading, music, fishing, and photog-
raphy.


SUPERINTENDENTS STAFF, U.S. SCHOOLS: Mr. Ross Anderson, Supervisor, Physical Education and Athletics, U.S. Schools; Dr.
Kenneth Lake, Director of Curriculum; Mr. Stewart Brown, Supervisor, Swimming Pools and Safety; Dr. Charles Latimer, Deputy
Superintendent of Schools; Mr. James Cook, Supervisor of Instruction, U.S. Secondary Schools; Mr. George Willingham, Supervisor
of Instruction, U.S. Secondary Schools; Mr. F. A. Castles, Superintendent of Schools (seated); Mr. Vernon Caturia, Supervisor of In-
struction, U.S. Elementary Schools; Dr. Victor Herr, Supervisor of Music, U.S. Schools; Dr. James Wolf, Coordinator, Special Education;
Mr. David Speir, Assistant Superintendent, U.S. Secondary Schools; Mrs. Shirley Makibbin, Supervisor of Instruction, U.S. Elementary
Schools; Mrs. Frances Sampsell, Assistant Superintendent, U.S. Elementary Schools; Mr. Zander Krowitz, Administrative Assistant; Mr.
Robert Dahlstrom, Supervisor, Educational Data Processing.







OFFICE STAFF


Our fine office staff provided quality service
by cooperating fully with teachers, students, par-
ents, and other people in the community. Their
secretarial duties included keeping records, typ-
ing and printing tests for teachers, and giving out
information to students and parents.
Mrs. Marion Taylor has worked at CHS for
twelve years. In her spare time she enjoys bridge
and golf.
Mrs. Joanne G. Allen is in her fifth year at
CHS. Her hobbies are sewing and singing with
the Sweet Adelines.
Miss Jacinta E. Griffiths has worked here for
three and a half years and she devotes her spare
time to swimming and playing the organ.
Our secretaries were noted for their courteous
service and friendly manner. We are proud of
our office staff.


MRS. TAYLOR


CLINIC


MRS.


McDONNEL
McDONNEL


Mrs. Jo McDonnel, R.N., was on duty at the Cristobal
High School Clinic on a scheduled basis and she was as-
sisted in the clinic by Mrs. Delorita Stevens.
Students who were ill reported to the nurse. If she deemed
it advisable, they made arrangements to go home or to the
hospital dispensary. Students were permitted to rest in the
clinic a maximum of two class periods.
The school health program's major purpose was to pro-
vide screening examinations, identify students with various
health problems, and suggest appropriate referrals. Visual
acuity determination, dental examination, tuberculin skin
testing, physical examinations, hearing examinations, health
education activities, and counseling services were all part of
the program.


MISS GRIFFITHS


,' ,:t ,.
MISS ELISA MUNOZ and MRS. STEVENS



MISS ELISA MUNOZ and MRS. STEVENS


MRS.






Counseling was the primary guidance service pro-
vided at CHS. In the student-counselor relationship
the student freely expressed his ideas and feelings
and the counselor showed how interest, aptitudes,
and abilities work together.
Through various activities the counselors provided
information about careers and the various opportun-
ities for post-high school education. They provided
facts about the many available technical schools, ap-


GUIDANCE


prentice programs, and vocational programs. They as-
sisted students in selecting colleges, applying for
admission, and applying for financial aid.
The guidance center also administered standardized
tests and College Entrance Board exams such as the
PSAT, SAT, and the ACT.


MRS. BRIGHT


Allan Farnsworth learns how to study from a Dukane projector.


ADAMARY A. BRIGHT--Girls' Counselor
Mrs. Bright's home state is Florida. She has been a full
time counselor in the Cristobal High School for the last
six years. In her leisure time, Mrs. Bright enjoys cooking,
and collecting coins and stamps.

ROBERT L. MOWERY-Boys' Counselor
Mr. Mowery comes from Indiana and has been in CHS
for six years. He previously taught in Los Angeles.
California and in Indiana. He lives in Coco Solo with
his wife and three children. His hobbies are boating and
photography.

LUKE C. PALUMBO-Attendance Counselor
Mr. Palumbo has taught for twenty-seven years at CHS.
He taught PE, General Science, Life Science, Earth
Science, American History, American Government, Sales-
manship, and coached many sports. Mr. Palumbo lives in
Coco Solo and his hobbies are golf and collecting insects.


Ft 'i'11


MR. PALUMBO SR.


MR. MOWERY








The students of CHS have a well equipped library
for their study and research use. The Cristobal High
School Library is combined with the public library
and students with special permission may use both
during school hours. After school hours the library
is often crowded with students and adults of the
community doing research or reading.
This year CHS had a new librarian, Mr. Wells.
Students doing research work found that Mr. Wells
and his able student helpers were always ready to
assist them when help was needed.


N


MR. WELLS


DAYTON N. WELLS-Librarian
This is Mr. Wells' first year at CHS and in the Canal
Zone. He comes from the state of Washington and says
he is enjoying the tropics. Mr. Wells lives in Margariti
and his hobbies are traveling, fishing, camping, and
riflery.


Junior High students make use of the library.


sr -~t *'.\SS .i"*.*'


Barbara Grier, Zan Green, and Tom Kredell.


LIBRARY


41


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Mike Behre gets help.








SPECIAL EDUCATION


GRACE S. PFAU-Remedial Reading
Mrs. Pfau has taught in CHS since 1954. She teaches
reading and is the sponsor of the Civil Defense and Nurses
Aides Club. Mrs. Pfau lives in Margarita and enjoys
sewing, cooking, reading, and traveling as hobbies.

EARL C. SHARICK-Special Education
Mr. Sharick has been teaching in CHS for fourteen
years. Previously he taught in Cristobal and Coco Solo
elementary schools. He is from the state of Illinois and
presently lives in Coco Solo. His hobbies are swimming,
fishing, and camping.


MRS. PFAU MR. SHARICK

CHS added Special Education Classes to the
curriculum in 1960. In special education stu-
dents received extra help in their academic stud-
ies, learned crafts, and learned the perspectives
pf human relationships and civic responsibility.
Many of these students received additional help in
certain scholastic courses.
Excellent reading skills are required for aca-
demic success. The remedial reading program at
CHS provided special instruction to improve read-
ing skills and help assure a student of success in
keeping with his ability. Seemingly average stu-
dents have improved the quality of their reading
skills and thereby became quite outstanding stu-
dents in their chosen field.


--- p_~9


A~- k


Richard Beall and Ester Marsh point out a geographical location for
Mr. Sharick.


Il














Patricia Mansfield and Dalys Pe-
rez are using the Keystone Tachi-
stoscope overhead'projector.


/' "A







ART


MR. KOZIOL


EDWIN M. KOZIOL-Art 7, 8, I, and II
This is Mr. Koziol's seventh year at CHS. Besides teach-
ing art he was the Caribbean and Art Club sponsor. He
enjoys playing bridge, golfing, bowling, and reading. His
home state is Michigan.



Arnaldo Mendez and David Teves compare drawings. Other members of
the Art I class are Dennis Hurlbut, Robin Hartshorn, Marian Crouch, and
Gerald Wall (between pictures).

ART EDUCATION PROVIDES OPPORTUNITIES


Art enriches human happiness and promotes sound
personality and character. To some degree everyone
needs to be creative.
The objective of the Cristobal High School art
program is to increase the opportunity and desire


to create, and to develop the individual's potentials
for creating, understanding, and appreciating.
Students had the opportunity to perform creatively
in a variety of methods and media. Drawing, paint-
ing, craft work, and art history was covered.


Stained-glass windows was one of the Christmas projects of the advanced art class.
Vicki Springer, Donna Valentine, Karen Cash, Donald Gott, Marcella Stanbridge,
and Alice Crouch admire one of the windows.


Brenda Gibson shows members of Art II, III, and
IV how to draw horses.








RICHARD D. GOCHENOUR-Typing, Bookkeeping, Short-
hand.
Mr. Gochenour's home state is Virginia. This is his
first year in the Canal Zone. He has been teaching with
the Department of Defense Overseas Dependent Schools in
France, Germany, Philippines, Japan, and Taiwan. Mr.
Gochenour lives in Margarita and his hobbies are travel-
ing, sightseeing, reading, and photography.

BRENDA CAROL STONE-Typing and General Business.
This is Mrs. Stone's first year at CHS. She is sponsor
of the freshman class. Mrs. Stone lives in Ft. Gulick and
enjoys sewing and ceramics as hobbies.


MR. GOCHENOUR


MRS. STONE


Being the only boy, Bill Deaton gets a lot of attention-in Mrs. Stone's General
Business class.

All of us, regardless of age or occupation, come
in daily contact with business. Students need to
understand business as it functions in our economic
system. We are all obligated to society to produce
the needed goods and services, and to ourselves to
earn a satisfactory income.
The above were some of the ideas students under-
stood after taking General Business. The CHS com-
merce program offered the student many vocational
and personal opportunities. College bound students
benefited especially by learning typing skills.


Edith Smith gets help in shorthand from Mr. Goche-
nour, and Debbie Duncan is having her problems too.
a or A


RIGHT: Typing II students
at work.


COMMERCE


Tf






ENGLISH

FIVE NEW TEACHERS JOIN STAFF

English is required in all four years of high school. The student's suc-
cess in his chosen field is determined largely by his command of the
English language, both spoken and written.
Mr. Adcock, Mr. Cheshire, Mr. Dobbins, Mrs. Elfers, and Mrs. Wilferd
were new teachers in the English Department this year. This meant new
sponsors for the school paper, the Thespian Society, and the Debate Club.
The new teachers brought with them new outlooks and attitudes making this
a very successful year.


MR. ADCOCK


MR. DOBBINS


Roberta Cole, Mary Norval, Stephan Fugleberg, Debbie Boswell, Cindy Cottrell, Brian Allen.
Makeup practice in Mrs. Elfers' class.


MR. FATTOROSI


MRS. ELFERS















CARL F. ADCOCK--Znglish I, and II, Speech, Drama.
Mr. Adcock comes from Ohio, where he taught prior
to coming here. He lives in Coco Solo with his wife and
daughter. His hobbies are reading, stamp collecting, and
fishing.

HERBIT CHESHIRE-English 7.
Mr. Cheshire comes from Missouri. He lives in Coco Solo
with his wife and two children. Hunting, swimming, skin
diving, and fishing are his hobbies.

JOEL B. DOBBINS-English I and II, Journalism.
Mr. Dobbin's home state is New Jersey and he had
previously taught in Virginia. He lives in Margarita and
enjoys skin diving, writing, sailing, and reading.

JANE K. ELFERS-English II
Mrs. Elfers comes from Illinois. She is the sponsor of
the Debate Club and the Spanish Club. She lives with
her husband in Coco Solo and enjoys painting, drawing, Bru
reading, writing poetry, tennis, and practicing guitar. "Are yo

LOUIS J. FATTOROSI-English III and IV.
Before coming to CHS, Mr. Fattorosi taught in his
home state of New Jersey. This is his thirteenth year at
CHS. Mr. Fattorosi is the senior class sponsor.

MARTHA I. PHILLIPS-English 7 and 8.
This is Mrs. Phillips' second year at CHS. She is the
sponsor of the Girls' Drill Team. She lives in Gatun.

DOROTHY H. SMITH-English IV.
Mrs. Smith heads the English Department and sponsors
many senior activities. She lives in Margarita and enjoys
reading, music, gardening, cooking, and sports.

ELIZABETH TYSKA-English 8.
Mrs. Tyska is from New Jersey. She is the sponsor of
the Jr. High Drama Club. Mrs. Tyska lives with her
husband in Margarita and enjoys music, reading, and art.

UGOLENA WILFERD-English I, English 7.
This is Mrs. Wilferd's first year in the Canal Zone. rCs- S al
She comes from Pennsylvania. Mrs. Wilferd lives in Coco
Solo. Petel
"I'm
















MRS. PHILLIPS MRS. SMITH MRS.TYSKA
MRS. PHILLIPS MRS. SMITH MRS. TYSKA


ce Bacon and Marlene Rice
u sure that's a Roman haircut?"


r Winkeller talks to the class.
glad you brought that up!"


MRS. WILFERD









FOREIGN LANGUAGES


ANNE D. GEGG
Mrs. Gegg sponsors the French Club and Caribe Club in addition to
teaching French and Latin. Mrs. Gegg enjoys living in the Canal Zone;
she likes the students, the climate, and the opportunities to meet interesting
people. Mrs. Gegg resides in Colon and has four children; three are CHS
graduates.

TELMA I. HOWARD
Mrs. Howard was born in Panama City and now resides in Gatun. She
has taught at CHS for three years, having previously taught in New York
City. She teaches Spanish and sponsors the Pink Girls. Her hobbies are
reading and sewing.

DOROTHY J.MEEHAN
This is Mrs. Meehan's seventh year at CHS. She teaches Spanish and is
in charge of bulletin boards. Mrs. Meehan spends her spare time
as a rockhound.

STELLA C. RIEFKOHL
Mrs. Riefkohl teaches French and Spanish at CHS. She is the French
Club assistant. Mrs. Riefkohl lives in Coco Solo and lists reading and sewing
as her hobbies.

JAMES E. STEARNS
In his twenty-fourth year at CHS, Mr. Stearns teaches Spanish II, III,
and IV, and devotes many hours to preparing for and teaching his seventh-
period Russian I Class. In addition, he is Chairman of the Foreign Language
Department and Director of the Language Laboratory. His hobbies are stamp
collecting and fishing.


MRS. HOWARD
MRS. RIEFKOHL


MRS. GEGG
MRS. MEEHAN
MR. STEARNS


MR. STEARN'S SEVENTH-PERIOD RUSSIAN I CLASS: Hank Goldmann, Ivette Martinez,
Lana Boone, Mary Spivey, Peter Goldmann, Kathy Brown, Cindy Williams, Marc Denis,
Stephen Fugleberg, and Kenneth Hill.

























Places of interest in Caesar's
Gaul are pointed out by Latin
student Jean Geer to the
amusement of Sheila Endara.


RUSSIAN I STUDENTS: Kathy
Brown, Hank Goldmann, and Ter-
ri Overstreet practice reading Rus-
sian as Mr. Stearns teaches Ken-
neth Hill and Stephan Fugleberg
some of the finer points in the
operation of the lab console.


Mr. Steam's fifth-period Spanish II class listens to structure
drills in the language lab.


Language students at CHS have a wide variety of
courses to choose from. Among these offered this year -I
are Spanish 7, 8, I, II, III, and IV; French I, II, and III;
Latin II; and Russian I. Many students are bilingual
and an increasing number are trilingual. Most languages
are taught by the Audio-Lingual Method; oral work in
the Language Laboratory being stressed as an aid to
pronunciation and understanding of the language.







Marian Kredell, Lynn Gregg, Anne Gonzales, and Carol
Ross prepare to listen to drill in Mrs. Howard's Spanish
II class.





HOME ECONOMICS


The Home Economics program at Cristobal has been greatly extended
under the direction of the instructor Mrs. McNaughton.
Home Ec. I students learned how to use a sewing machine, and made
skirts and blouses. At Christmas the girls did projects which were used
to decorate CHS. In the second semester the girls cooked puddings, pizzas,
and many other dishes.
Home Ec. II students made clothing according to their ability, such
as a dress, jacket, or even an evening gown. In the second semester
the girls learned how to prepare a meal.


MRS. McNAUGHTON


ELIZABETH McNAUGHT9N-Home Ec. 8, I, II
This is Mrs. McNaughton's fourth year at CHS. Besides
teaching home economics, Mrs. McNaughton is the Nurses
Aides' assistant sponsor and the "official mending expert"
to all in need. Her hobbies include sewing, water skiing,
and family activities.


Home Ec. II sewing projects are displayed by Ann Werthen, Barbara
Betcher, Patty Robson, Anna Reyes, and Gloria Reyes.


-

Debbie Cole, Pam Moebus, and Sandy May prepare to do
some baking.


Debbie Gosney, Linda Arnheiter, and Carol Wertz model
their pant suits.


Mary Byrd, Diane Dancer, Paula Vaught, and Kim Marohl test their own
cooking.







INDUSTRIAL ARTS


MR. HOLLOWAY


Peter Winkeller, Manuel Munoz, and Miguel Johnson are
busy at their drawing boards in Drafting I class.


PAUL J. JEFFRIES-Mtl Shp, WW I, WW II
Mr. Jeffries taught in Colorado, California, and American
Samoa before coming to CHS. He enjoys living in the Canal
Zone where there are many things to occupy and entertain
him. His spare time hobbies are golf and collecting insects
and imbedding them in plastic. Mr. Jeffries is the audio
visual sponsor.

JESSE C. HOLLOWAY-Mech. Dr. I, II, Inc. Arts
Mr. Holloway came to CHS four years ago from Saudi
Arabia. He teaches mechanical drawing which is popular
with both boys and girls. He is also the assistant audio
visual sponsor..Mr. Holloway's hobbies include woodwork-
ing, building mini-bikes, insect collecting, and fishing.

ERNEST D. HOLMGRAIN-Ind. Arts, Science
This is Mr. Holmgrain's first year at CHS. He enjoys
living here because of the tropical climate. Before coming to
CHS, Mr. Holmgrain taught at Pine Ridge, South Dakota.
His hobbies are hunting and fishing.


MR. JEFFRIES




LEARN BY DOING


Practicing arc welding are James
Kunkle, David Robertson, and Mike
Finneman.


The industrial arts curriculum is planned for pupils
who are especially interested in the broad field of
trade and industrial occupations aside from the im-
mediate vocational aspects. For some pupils this cur-
riculum may be the means of developing a worth-
while leisure activity, while for others it may be a
method of determining aptitudes and abilities in


trade and industrial pursuits. Other outcomes are cre-
ative activity, the practical application of mathe-
matics and science, and the development of common
skills everyone should possess.


MR. HOLMGRAIN







MATHEMATICS


I ,





M.B -


MR. BOCK


RICHARD W. BOCK
Mr. Bock has taught at CHS for 11 years. Prior to this he taught
at Riverdale in North Dakota, his home state. He teaches Algebra II,
Introduction to Analysis, and Calculus. He also heads the math de-
partment. Now living in Coco Solo, Mr. Bock enjoys boating and playing
bridge in his leisure time.

LAWRENCE A. COWLEY
In his second year of teaching at Cristobal, Mr. Cowley taught Algebra
I and Geometry and sponsored the Junior Class. Originally from Texas,
he earned his B.S. at Trinity U. and his M.A. at Southeastern State.
He enjoys tennis and skiing.

RANDALL H. GRUBBS
Before coming to Cristobal, Mr. Grubbs taught in Missouri. He has
earned his B.A. and teaches math. He enjoys sports of all kinds and
previously taught physical education.

ROY E. HOWELL
Mr. Howell has taught math at CHS for 2 years. He taught in Mary-
land and Florida before coming here. Mr. Howell is Sophomore Class
Sponsor. Numismatics, hiking, travel, and reading are his hobbies.

BERNARD R. MAZZONI
For 16 years, Mr. Mazzoni has taught mathematics at CHS. He lives in
France Field and lists photography, music, and traveling as his hobbies.

CHARLES T. REEVES
In addition to physics, Mr. Reeves also teaches Junior High Math.
After school, he teaches Driver Training and sponsors the safety club.
Originally from Arizona, he has taught at CHS for 13 years.


MR. GRUBBS


MR. COWLEY


MR. HOWELL


MR. MAZZONI


"Now class, finding the area of a trapazoid is really very simple," explains Kathy Karus.


MR. REEVES
MR. REEVES


r).

Lwsvi








CRISTOBAL
MATH STUDENTS
WIN ANNUAL
QUIZ SHOW
BY SCORE OF
360 TO 95


Ringing the victory bell to celebrate their defeat of Bal-
boa in the Annual Science and Engineering Quiz Show are
James Cox, John Carlisle, Gary Robertson, and Joe
Gattis.


Mr. Bock provides students with individual instruction when necessary.
Here he assists Christy Loizeaux in Algebra II.



Mathematics is an integral part of the Cristobal High
School curriculum. Courses offered include general math,
Algebra I, Algebra II, geometry, analysis, and calculus.
Students in these classes battled the facts and figures to solve
baffling equations and theorems. Protractors, compasses, and
slide rules constituted the equipment carried by students as
they tested their logic while solving problems. The knowledge
gained will prepare students for college and provide the
math background essential for many careers.


Leslie Marek demonstrates the correct method for graphing
a trigonometric function.


k







MUSIC

The music program provided courses in the following areas: (1) 7th
and 8th grade chorus; (2) Beginning Instrumental Class; (3) Intermed-
iate Instrumental Class; (4) Senior Band; and (5) Senior Chorus.
This year the music department provided music for assemblies, foot-
ball games, pep assemblies, and graduation. They provided a Christmas
concert, a Spring concert, and a concert for the elementary schools.


e-, \ % Kd A4


BEGINNERS BAND


MEMBERS OF THE BAND
Flutes Tenor Sax
Ann Lauritzen Robert Tschumy
Dionisia Nieves Robin Pritham
Cindy Williams Baritone Sax
Heidi Sweeney Roman Herrera
Sharon Golden
Chris Benson Trumpet
Oboe Ed Forsythe
Jim Gray
Cathy Terwilliger Ron Palser
Gerianne Blanchett Steve Aponte
Bassoon Robert Tuck
Susan Willis Allen Richardson
Eb Clarinet Craig Robertson
Ed Brings Pedro Simmons
Ed Brings Peter Swain
Ann Cirulli Peter Swain
Ralph Zachry
Clarinets Timothy Blanchard
Christy Loizeaux Dan Chin
Linda Merrick Ed Golden
Ann Terwilliger Cheryl Olsen
Libby Palser
Emily Daniel French Horn
Barbara Bloemer Lydia Santiago
Debbie Jaketic Raymond Hernandez
Marie Faris Trombone
Linda Hess Beverly Olsen
Larry Martin Bill Gillespie
Debbie Meeker Scot Loizeaux
Debbie Pate George Rivera
Patty Rodriguez Nancy Gregg
Sylvia Vamprine Baritone
Alto Clarinet Mike Bjorneby
Mardette Garner Brian Love
Susan Ridge Bass
Bass Clarinet Don Olsen
James Barr Guy Damiani
Alto Sax Ron Forsyth
Luis Lee Charles Christian
Robert Byrd Drums
James Childress Billy Parker
Robert Ford Dan Valentine
Roy Gott Gaspar Sayoc
Ede Marsh


THE SENIOR HIGH BAND














EDWARD R. CARWITHEN-Band, Chorus
Mr. Carwithen's home state is Florida, and this is his
fourth year at CHS. Mr. Carwithen is a member of the
Discords and is active in Little Theater productions. In
his spare time he also enjoys painting, sailing, and skin-
diving.


MR. CARWITHEN

a . -,


GIRLS' GLEE CLUB: Front row: Noelia Ortiz, Jeannie Bassett, Beth Carter,
Nancy Ridge, Tita Cobb, Janice Domingas, Mounyen Lyman, Barbara Bassett,
Laureen Elizondo. Back: Patti Hauke, Letti Santiago, Barbara Banks, Kathy
DeRaps, Judy Dohle, Toni Klasovsky, Susan Zachry, Stephanie lilies, Jane
Dohle, Debbie Polite, Arelia Williams, Sharon Smith, Josephine Porbes,
Carmen Butler, Kathy Burgess, Alice Crouch, Patricia Hill, Karen Westerburg,
Jinx Rivera, Mr. Carwithen, Mary Norval, Linda Woods.






PHYSICAL EDUCATION

The aim of the Physical Education Department at CHS is: "to give
each student the skill and knowledge of activities and games so that he
may enjoy life and health through physical exercise." Teachers in the
department "try to cover fundamentals of all major sports and some of
the minor ones."
The girls studied basketball, softball, volleyball, swimming, track,
speedball, tennis, and golf. The boys participated in such sports as
swimming, wrestling, soccer, speedball, tennis, and basketball. Students
also took physical fitness tests which rate students in comparison with
others in their age group.


Junior high boys swim as Coach Litton
looks on.


Mrs. Fattorosi's fourth period gym class plays volley-tennis. Denise Foshee, Nancy Huson,
Faith Coad, Jeannette Cox, Debbie Christian, Kathy Dockery, Maria Lopez, Linda Arn-
heiter, Gloria Reyes and Sandra Alberga.


Kathy Dockery smashes the ball across the
net in an exciting game of volley-tennis.


Pete Winkeller pitches the ball as Coach Dedeaux supervises a baseball game and Ernest
Abresch plays second base.


1_R























MRS. CAMPBELL


MR. DEDEAUX


An unusual approach to a dive is
made by this student, but ...


BARBARA L. CAMPBELL
Mrs. Campbell is from South Dakota. She is a new teacher this
year and teaches seventh and eighth grade physical education. She
arrived at CHS as Miss Soliday. Mrs. Campbell sponsors tennis,
the Girls' Drill Team, and the G.A.A. She enjoys swimming, sewing,
reading, and traveling.

LOUIS DEDEAUX
Coach Dedeaux has taught in Canal Zone schools for 18 years.
He teaches boys' physical education and assists with various after-
school activities. Golfing and fishing are his hobbies.

JUNE FATTOROSI
Mrs. Fattorosi teaches girls' gym at CHS. In addition she coaches
volleyball, basketball, and various intramural sports. Her special in-
terests are collecting movie classics, dachshunds, and badminton.

JOAN F. HARRIS
Mrs. Harris was born in Ancon, Canal Zone. She teaches physical
education and coaches basketball and tennis. She is also the sponsor
of the GA.A. and of the play day at the end of the year. Mrs.
Harris is a spectator at all sports events, but baseball is a favorite.

DOUGLAS B. LITTON
Coach Litton is head of the Physical Education Department at
CHS. His home state is Mississippi and this is his seventh year
at Cristobal High School. His hobbies include sports of all types.


MR. LITTON


is is very well executed neverthe-
less.


Annie Crouch prepares to hit a homerun in Mrs. Fattorosi's junior high girls' gym
class.


MRS. HARRIS







SCIENCE


The science course in grade 7and grade 8 helped
the student understand his role in the interaction of
all living things and helped him develop an apprecia-
tion and understanding of his physical surroundings.
In the high school Introductory Physical Science
provided the student with a solid foundation for more
advanced courses. The student studied the means by
which scientific knowledge is acquired.
Biology stressed the relationship of all living
things in respect to their chemical and physical en-
vironment. Chemistry taught the atomic theory and
the nature of matter. Physics provided a study of mat-
ter and energy and their interactions. It also provided
practical applications of these concepts and princi-
ples in problem solving.


It's another busy day for the scientists in Room 251.


LABORATORY COURSES
PROVIDE AN APPROACH
TO KNOWLEDGE


UJ-a



Evelyn Legrand and James Butler prepare a solution as
Stephanie Illies watches with excitement.


MRS. KNIGHT MRS. MASON


.k~-p



MR. HIERONYMUS


MR. NORMAN












PAUL J. HIERONYMUS
Mr. Hieronymus has been a teacher at CHS for three
years. In addition to teaching 7th grade math, and chem-
istry he is the S.A. advisor. He lives in Coco Solo with
his wife and daughter. His hobbies include golf and
insect collecting.

CAROL J. KNIGHT
This is Mrs. Knight's first year at CHS. She teaches
both 7th grade science and 8th grade math in addition
to sponsoring the majorettes after school. Mrs. Knight
enjoys sewing and reading in her leisure hours.

EMMA L. MASON
Mrs. Mason has taught at CHS for five years and four
previous years as a substitute. Besides teaching 7th grade
science she sponsors the National Junior Honor Society.
She lives in Margarita, and her favorite pastimes are read-
ing and knitting.

JAMES D. NORMAN
Mr. Norman has been a teacher at CHS for over nine
years. He teaches biology and oceanography, and he is
also the Sophomore Class advisor. During his spare time
he enjoys gardening, skin diving, and reef studies.

LUKE T. PALUMBO
Mr. Palumbo, who is chairman of the science depart-
ment at CHS, teaches Introductory Physical Science. He
lives in Coco Solo with his wife and two children. Skin
diving is his favorite pastime.


"What do we have here?" Mr. Norman asks Katie McGilberry
during a lesson in dissection.


r 1











ABOVE: With a
Bernard.
BELOW: "I think
Tita Cobb.


MR. PALUMBO


grimace Richard Booth assists his partner Michael

I found it!" remarks Ann Worthen to her assistant






SOCIAL STUDIES


The social studies help the pupil acquire a knowledge of our social,
economic, and political inheritance. He learns to recognize the problems
present in today's society and studies the methods provided for solving
them. He also studies world problems and learns about the goals and dif-
ficulties encountered with other nations. His studies help him to develop
a respect for the worth and the rights of all individuals.


MR. BERGER


Mr. Gansen instructs interested students in a banking simulation. Class members are: Pat Riester,
Luis Wong, Robert Spilling, Joe Cronan, Jim Gray, Steve Cross, Dionisia Nieves, Randy Hull. Debbie
Lyman, and Dee DeLapp.


LEFT: "The most efficient
teachers come from this little
town."


MR. GANSEN


MR. HERBORN


MR. GREGG






ROBERT BERGER-Social Studies 8
This was Mr. Berger's seventh year at CHS. He enjoys
the tropical climate and the good clean living of the Canal
Zone. He advises students to get the most out of educa-
tion and make a better world. Mr. Berger sponsors the
Zephyr and in his spare time he enjoys playing golf.

MARY L. CONDON-World History
Mrs. Condon has taught in the Canal Zone for several
years. She enjoys the beautiful vegetation, bird life, and
fine people, both Ameiican and Panamanian. To students
she gives this advice: "Approach your studies in a posi-
tive frame of mind, and be genuine in your efforts."
Mrs. Condon was the assistant N.H.S. sponsor. Her hobbies
are cooking, reading, and traveling.

W, J. GANSEN-American Institutions, Math 8
Mr. Gansen has just returned to CHS after spending
a year studying at Purdue. He lives in France Field and
his most important hobby is work. He advises students to
try something new each year.

EUGENE T. GREGG-U.S. History
Mr. Gregg is the chairman of the Social Studies de-
partment. This is his seventeenth year at CHS. He was
born in Colon, Republic of Panama and considers Colorado
his home state. His interests are reading and politics,
and his hobby is scuba diving.

PETER M. HERBORN-Social Studies 8, World Geography
Mr. Herborn coaches intramurals besides teaching so-
cial studies. He enjoys living in the Zone and feels
American citizens have a great opportunity here to improve
relationships with the citizens of Panama. He advises his
students to be prepared to share their high material
standards of living with others both at home and abroad.

RONALD D. JACOBS-Social Sudies 7 and 8
Before coming to CHS Mr. Jacobs taught in Locust
Grove, Oklahoma. This was his third year teaching Junior
High social studies at CHS. Mr. Jacobs was also the
Junior High S.A. sponsor.

ROBERT E. McCULLOUGH-Social Studies 7
Mr. McCullough is the Safety Club assistant sponsor.
He enjoys living in the Canal Zone because outdoor ac-
tivities are possible nearly every day. His hobbies include
hiking, and collecting stamps and coins. His advice to
students: "You have started to be become what you are
going to be."


Jackie Parker, Linda Brock, Paule
in Mrs. Condon's World History class.


Jordi, and Mike McCann study art


Ann Lauritzen


MR. McCULLOUGH




























STUDENT IFE






Involved in the social activities of
his school, a high school student ad-
vances a step as a human being when
he learns to accept all manner of
things that are totally different from
what his past experience makes easy
to understand and like. A high school
society abounds with difference; it
not only offers the possibility of be-
coming tolerant, it makes it almost
impossible to ignore its lesson.







THUNDEROUS RAIN ACCOMPANIES
FRESHMAN SOPHOMORE BRAWL


With enthusiasm, the girls express their competitive spirit.


It was a rainy day and the field was muddy as the Fresh-
men and Sophomores competed on September 2, 1969.
Challenging cries were heard after school as each class
prepared for "battle." The girls screamed, the boys shouted,
and the "battle" was begun. The mud rose high to cover legs
and faces.
When the commotion subsided, the scores were tallied and
the Sophomore Class was declared the winner. The defeated
Freshmen, however, were already making future plans to
win at next year's brawl.
It isn't every day that we get to chase a giant ball of "yarn."
t~ssr a~aslb~lll II~IPP~ I I -ow


I- .l- .. ,A ,
p.*



4 lu
61e B


The rain poured, the mud splashed, but the girls' spirit
was not dampened.


















The gathering crowd anxiously awaits the burning of its foes spirits.


BONFIRE SPARKS C.H.S.
FOOTBALL SPIRIT
Silhouette of a cheerleader performing a
cheer before the thirsty Tigers.







S S








CANAL ZONE COLLEGE WINS 20th


Jamboree Queens, Stephanie DeHeart from B.H.S., Jeanne Marie Chance
from C.Z.C., and Ann Hirons from C.H.S., view the game from their
reserved area.


i.i, .
7~
." .. . :' ..,
r ..... ' ... .
Neil Patton, no. 13, from C.H.S. throws a forward pass.


ANNUALL FOOTBALL JAMBOREE


September 19, 1969 marked the twentieth time Canal
Zone College and Balboa High School crossed the fifty
miles of the isthmus to participate in the Football Jam-
boree.
Preluding the game, the Jamboree Queens were pre-
sented to the crowd from their reserved area in the grand-
stand. Cristobal's lovely queen was Ann Hirons.
The game was played in a constant downpour. In the
first quarter Balboa and College fought to a scoreless
tie. Amidst thunderous cheers, Cristobal defeated Balboa
in the second quarter 18 to 0, but in the final quarter
College downed Cristobal 6 to 0.
This year, for the first time, the winner was deter-
mined by the number of quarters won instead of the total
points scored. College won the Jamboree by winning one
quarter and tying one. Cristobal came in second by win-
ning one quarter and Balboa came in last losing one
quarter and tying one.


Coach ,Agee and Coach Dedeaux express anxious moments
along with the rest of the team.


ANN HIRONS!


~~i


REPRESENTS THE TIGERS


Attending the pep rally at Cristobal are Balboa's Stephanie De Heart, and
College's Jeanne Chance. Cristobal's Ann Hirons was unable to attend.










C'.T_

rr


Gary Robertson speaks to the students of his plans for the future. A convincing speech is given by
Robert Philips, candidate for vice-
president.
GARY ROBERTSON WINS S.A. PRESIDENCY


In April the S.A. held its annual Election Day. For several
weeks previous to the event, campaign posters hung from every
available space in the building. Hectic weeks they were for any stu-
dent running for office. Campaign speeches, passing out booster
tickets, promises of change, and making their stand known to the
student body were some of the preoccupations of the candidates. A
competitive atmosphere prevailed adding to the excitement as elec-
tion day grew near.
Amidst the confusion however, we successfully elected our S.A.
officers without any incidents. The results were satisfying to the stu-
dent body which for the 1969-70 school year elected Gary Robertson
President, Robert Philips Vice-President, Denise Ward Secretary,
and Nelson Escribano, Treasurer.


Candidate Wendy Flores is assisted by Susan
,'and Cinda Helmericks.


Donna and Daryn Barger prepare to execute the prisoner, Marggie Coffin, sentenced
to death by judge Randy Rainey for betraying her party.