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 Front Cover
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 Table of Contents
 Dedication
 Opening
 Faculty
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 Seniors
 Juniors
 Sophomores
 Freshmen
 Junior high
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PCANAL















Digitized by the Internet Archive
in 2010 with funding from
University of Florida, George A. Smathers Libraries













http://www.archive.org/details/caribbean1971 cris








9


Caribbeal 1971


Cristobal High School
Coco Solo


Canal Zone


Volume 54


4.


4pp







Dedication ..........
informa! ... ..........
Formal . . . . . . .
faculty and Curriculum..
Classes ............
Organizations ..... ..


. . . . 4
................ 6
............... 28
............... 30
............... 60
.............. 122


able

of

Contents


4


Jn Keeping With Che Modern 'rend towardd greater
f7leibility A yearbook Organization, Che CM S Annual
Staff Js lJtroduci/ng An 8tirely NVew And Different For-
mat Jn Che 1971 Caribbeai Departing From Che 'radi-
tional Concept Of Separate Sections, each iJtroduced y A
Division Page, On eacIh acet Of /Che School ife; Che
yearbook Js Divided Jntto Only Cwo MAain Sections, 7or-
mal And Jnformal. Appearing lJn Che Formal lalf Are:
Administration And Faculty, Class Pictures, Organization
Pictures, Ceam Photos, Queens Ad Ceerleaders, Adver-
tising, And Jdder. Ciis Section ContainsAll he Formai-
ty Required Of A Good yearbook. J1 (Che citing Jlfor-
mal Section, We l ave Attempted Co PresentAn llUinter-
rupted Candid Story O0 School Cife, fust As Vlou pe-
rieiced It.


Sports. ..................
Special Activities .............
Editor's Page .................
Uiger Roosters ................
Advertisements ................
Jider .. ...................


..... 140
.....158
.....169
.....170
..... 173
..... 187


I,





Dedication


I':

/


7


r


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-j


Mrs. Adamary grikht


400or








GuiddaHce

Counselor

Retires


After

36 years


At 8HS

The CHS annual staff wishes to
dedicate the 19'1 Caribbean to Mrs
Adamarv Anderson Bright, in recog-
Inition and appreciation of her man.
years of devoted service to the sru-
dents of Cristobal High School.
Mrs. Bright was born in Jackson-
ville, Florida She attended school in
Houston. Texas, during her earl)
years, but returned to Jacksonville to
complete her secondary education at
Duzal High School She received her
A.B. in Education at Florida State
College for Women in Tallahassee.
and completed her graduate work for
a degree in history at the Universitv
of Ann Arbor in Michigan
After teaching at Jacksonville Jun-


-v
m p7


T -


Kathie Danielsen smilingly receives assistance from Mrs. Bright in planning her college ca-


reer.

ior High School for a short time, she
came to the Canal Zone in 1935.
Since that time she has served capably
and well in many positions at Cristo-
bal High School. Among these are: a
teacher of seventh and eighth grade
English, social science, vocational
guidance, social studies, girls' advisor,
and the position as a Guidance Coun-
selor which she has held from 1951 to
the present. During her many years at
CHS. Mrs. Bright received a number
of Outstanding Service Awards for
her distinguished service to the Canal
Zone Schools Division.


In addition to teaching and coun-
seling, Mrs. Bright also sponsored a
number of school activities and orga-
nizations such as the National Honor
Society. It was Mrs. Bright who orig-
inated the Zephyr, and the Caribe
Club. She is truly an outstanding or-
ganizer; efficient, and hard-working.
Mrs. Bright has done a great deal
of traveling during her years at CHS,
visiting many countries in both Cen-
tral and South America, as well as in
Europe. Both faculty and students are
saddened by the journey Mrs. Bright
is about to make as she retires from
the faculty of CHS. Her guidance will
be long remembered by the countless
students whose educations and careers
she helped plan.









Mrs. Bright advises Shyla Miller on her
schedule for next year.


K'




















Elena Maxwell and Brenda FL',r r
If/


-I


Stephanic Illics. Almanubia Austin, Vivian Boseman, Jenn '.\ r and Carmen Butler.


Douglas Jeffries, Mr. Johnson, and Nancy
Edmonson.


A
jYew
year
/egits .


. .


IO\









































Mr Hieronymus (S.A. sponsor) and Mi-
chael Dexter (S.A. president).


icy Edmonson (S.A. secretary).

The halls of CHS were a mass of con-
fusion on September 1, 1970, as hun-
dreds of students congregated around
the bulletin boards on which homeroom
numbers were posted. Others lingered to
chat with old friends or to make new ac-
quaintances; summertime experiences
were shared and compared. The perenni-
al excitement of the "tirst day of school"
was in the air. This enthusiasm persisted
throughout the orientation assembly, in
which students were welcomed to CHS,
new teachers introduced, and the new
Student Association officers installed.
However, with the ringing of that first
bell, order began to emerge as students
fell back into the familiar routine of
school life. Another school year had
begun.


Debbie Meeker

















The deserted halls are quiet, a soft
breeze whispers through the empty
corridors there is no indication now
of the activities and incidents which
the coming day may bring.


~s~F~-r





















Suddenly, the stillness is shattered
by the slamming of a locker door, the
sounds of shuffling footsteps, shouted
conversations, and noisy greetings are
heard once more. A new day has
begun, the magic of the morning is
no more.








yeII KRilgs,
Seats Are
Assumed...


I.? tI


/
/, .-
I--


Patty Rodriguez, Linda Mendenhall
I


ml


K'


J


Ann Terwilliger, Dolores Santiago. Ivettc
( lrnnings, Carlos, Brown, Susann Zach-


ery, Susan
Bovland.


Burge, Christina Loizeaux, Rita


Issac Heres


Ckhe


AXL-W
-7.:z..






WAorfning
Routine
esumes . .


II


Mary Norval and Denise Foshee.


Senior High Band
Senior High Band











Upon entering the classroom, a student assumes more than a seat, he assumes all
the privileges and responsibilities which accompany his position in this place of
learning the school. Having brought together the teachers and the taught, the
school has fullfilled its function what follows is determined by these individu-
als.
Often, it seems, minds are more eager and alert as the day begins, and the op-
portunities afforded by the morning hours should not be missed. To bring to
each student success at last this is the goal of every morning class.


1I-1


L


Diane Carroll


Mike Hayden


r
























- '- A m
After a satisfying lunch, students head to
the student's lounge.


More complaints were heard con-
cerning the lunch hour than perhaps
any other facet of school life. Lunch
was served in four shifts; those on the
early shift complained that it was too
early to eat, and those on the late
shift complained that it was too late.
Once in the cafeteria, however, no
one seemed to have any real trouble
eating.
The lunch hour provided a brief
respite from classes which was wel-
comed by all. Juniors and seniors took
advantage of their open-lunch privi-
lege to "eat out" on alternate days. In


spite of this, and the many meetings
scheduled during the lunch hour, the
cafeteria was always filled with hun-
gry, noisy students; eating, chatting
with friends or doing a little last min-
ute studying. Those wishing to leave
the cafeteria early, spent their lunch
hour in the pleasant surroundings of
the student lounge located directly be-
neath the cafeteria.
In spite of the frequent complaints,
most students found the lunch hour
one of the most relaxing and enjoya-
ble periods of the school day.


W~~~8"
i;!J


Senior + Open lunch + Car = Happy
Heart.







iji ris:i^




Raymond Robertson. "I'll have a chili dog and please include the hot dog!"


_---------p -
Lr,










































Carol Wertz. Karen Currier. "Reservation made. Fork over!"


Denise Foshee. "It's the real thing ap-
petite!"

ff nI


K fL. .W
Lunchtime is a good time to make friends.


Sylvia Vamprine. "I can't help it! I'm hun-
gry'"







Students


Njaoy


Comforts


Of Remodeed

Cafeteria


.. and a lowered, insulated ceiling gave the cafeteria a new look of elegance. Included
among the comments of students were such remarks as ...


.i ..i got cla
M.%, it's got class!" .


"It's like eating in fancy r u
"It's like eating in a fancy rr *rauriar

















. "It almost makes eating here a pleasant
experience "


Then there were those who lust laughed, and .


... of course, those who couldn't wait to get away and ...


CFl



" al^'


S. enijo the beauties of the "great outdoor. "


restrul


-Y


















Refreshed from a relaxing lunch
hour, students returned at 11:30 to re-
sume their regular routine. Each after-
noon included three hours of classes
- with the exception of seniors with
sixth-period study hall, who were per-
mitted to leave early. For some, the
enthusiasm characteristic of the
morning hours appeared to wave;
while others seemed to have awak-
ened at least. All, however evidenced
an increased restlessness as the hour
approached 2:15 and the ringing of
the final bell.


U
ui~~-e~-
I'- -


SI. ..


r I
"- -I'-" lliln
Iim
n'"M


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gers
ENthusiasI


Display


Sager


Afternoon
Activities


Jose Medina and Mike McCann.


-r3 \O .

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Jor


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Q
- b~S
r 1
-w


































With the ringing of the final bell at 2:15, many students rush eagerly to the
waiting buses thinking only "Free! at last!" Others also hurry anxious to
begin the extra-curricular activities which play such an important role in the life
of a student. Enj. r'.in., the company of those who share similar interests; whether
it be an advanced math or foreign language class, sports, drill team, journalism,
or dramatics, it is a pleasant and profitable way to spend an afternoon.


Stephanie Illies and Denise Foshee.


jean Smith and Jose Medina.












'-V















!w
















































Lana Boone, Jay Alonis, Michael Dexter, Stephen Goulet.








Susan Mendenhall


















i


~4('
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yv 3


iI'

.:.


AIM-


The setting of the sun brought a change in the appearance ct bo(h the schooll
and the students. With the coming of darkness, another of tc man\ ftcctr of
CHS was revealed. The evening activities. This was the time t;r buntirce, and
football games; swim meets and track meets; hours of practice .nd re',.ic% tbr
ROTC cadets ...










TEEN CLUB DANCES ...


Neil Patton, Rosemary Christian, Wally Russon.



. AND FORMALS...


Jimmy Barraza













.. CONCERTS: Practice for the
cast and crew of various plays: Dra-
matic Productions ...


Luann WX'are, Chrimcini Loiiiiux. Linda Merrick


... all those activities without which
school life would be quite incom-
plete.


Hila Lsman. Robtrt PhI11ILP








A administration


-A-



'N


To the Yearbook Staff:
"Thanks for the Memories" is the
title of a song that was popular some
years ago. As we record in this book
the events of the 1970-71 school year
at Cristobal High School we can sure-
ly say with gratitude and even a bit of
pride, "thanks for the memories."
You who have studied hard and
have given of yourselves to school ac-
tivities have shown by your Tiger
spirit that the busiest people are also
the happiest people.
Best wishes to all of you as you
continue your education here or else-
where. Although your highest com-
mitment may well be to academic ex-
cellence, you would not be wise to
pursue scholarship at the expense of
the development of an honorable
character, physical well-bl'in., or a
pleasant personality. It is hoped that
the discipline of commitment to these
qualities will earn you a happy free-
dom of spirit and a sense of accom-


I


JAMES H. PFAU Cristobal High School Principal


plishment. May you continue to mark happy memories.
each milestone with satisfaction and
James H. Pfau
Principal


9


"I'm a firm believer in the 'Tigers'!"















PAUL I JEFFRIES BA Colr.id,
State College. M A Colur.ido St.irc Col.
lege; Graduate \\ork. Unix SiOuhern (-iCI
forma, Calif \''esttrn Unlicr-srs "Seck a
profession or oLcupation that i'. hallcing.
ing and enjosable Smile and be hipp "


L-
I SUPERINTENDENTS STAFF, U.S. SCHOOLS: Mr. Ross Anderson, Supervisor, Physical Education and Athletics, U.S. Schools; Dr. Ken-
neth Lake. Director of Curriculum; Mr. Stewart Brown, Supervisor, inimmnng pools and .afits. Dr. Charles Latimer, Deputy Superintendent
I of Schools; Mr. James Cook, Supervisor of Instruction, U.S. Secondary Schools; Mr. GoC rr.e Willinghl.in, Supervisor of Instruction, U.S. Sec-
I ondar, Schools; Mr. F.A. Castles, Superintendent of Schools (.,.u,./) Mr. Vernon Caturia, Supervisor of Instruction, U.S. Elementary Schools;
SDr. Victor Herr, Supervisor of Music, U.S. Schools; Dr. James Wolf, Coordinator, Special Edu, a, .n. Mr. David Speir, Assistant Superintend-
ent, U S. Secondary School; Mrs. Shirley Makibbin, Supervisor of Instruction, U.S. Schools; Mrs. Frances Sampsell, Assistant Superintendent
U.S. Elementary Schools; Mr. Zander Krowitz, Administrative Assistant; Mr. Robert Dahlstom, Supervisor, Education Data Processing.








Office Staff


The competent members of the
CHS office staff handled all general
clerical work for the administration
and faculty. Included among their
duties were official correspondence
and paper work. They were also in
charge of operating office machines
and the intercom system, and an-
swering the telephone. They main-
tained the record and files of each stu-
dent, mailed report cards, and sent
and received transcripts.












Jlific



The clinic was an important provi-
sion for the health and safety of Cris-
tobal High School students. The clin-
ic was staffed with trained nurses who
provided emergency first aid; and per-
formed certain routine checks on each
student. The clinic was also a place
for students to rest when unwell, and
for the storage of each students' per-
manent health records. The clinic also
sponsored tuberculosis and chest X-
rays for students in certain grades. Dr.
Levin, the Public Health Officer for
the Atlantic Side, visited the school
almost every morning. Dr. Chevelle,
the school physician for the Canal
Zone Schools, was available every
Wednesday.


.
MSIK
JkU^o W*


I


MRS. ALLEN, MRS. TAYLOR, MISS GRIFFITHS.


,4D\


DR. LEVIN, KAREN McKOWN, MRS. BLANCHETTE "Maybe this will cool your fever a bit."


I

A!


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m 4!*-








iLdmdallc


VIA


.-......__1
Mrs. Bright, Laurie Nairn "Your .ppointment i ii 11 ...I on Frida


in.


ADAMARY BRIGHT Counselor;
B.A., Florida State Univ., M.A., Univ.
of Michigan. "Life will never be dull
if you will continue to learn . "


Mr lower). I homas iehre. William S.in
tiago. Henry Boritlliono "You bt.i/ '%anr
to go to Kings' Poin "


I.
Mmiii


A final decision brings satisfaction to Ka-
thie Danielsen and Mrs Bri ht


Guidance is the process of helping
persons make the best possible de-
cisions concerning their lives, and aid-
ing them in solving their problems. It
includes helping students choose the
proper courses to take in school, and
aiding them in deciding what careers
to follow after their education is com-
pleted. Such decisions require that a
person have full and correct knowl-
edge about himself and his world.
The guidance counselors at Cristobal
High School aim to provide students
with information so that they may
make the best possible decisions in
life. The two principal methods used
for this are c_,unstling, and testing.
Counseling consists chiefly of discus-
sions between a student and his coun-
selor concerning his interests, apti-
tudes, and special problems. Testing
is an important guidance tool. Apti-
tude, personality, and intclligcnce
tests provide counselors with much


ROBERT MOWERY Counselor;
B.S. and M.S., Indiana State Univ.
"Take advantage of the opportunities
in high school."


LUKE C. PALUMBO Attendance
Counselor; B.S. Ed., N.W. Missouri
State. "There is no substitute for work
to be happy and successful."




useful information. Other important
guidance tools are books, p.imphliers.
and films used to help students decide
on courses of study and future careers.







Library
The library, with its vast collection
of books, was a familiar stopping
place for CHS students. Throughout
the year, they used the library and its
many resources. The quiet, academic
atmosphere made it the perfect place
for studying and peaceful solitude
found there provided an excellent


background for the reading of books.
Students made good use of the library
during homeroom and studyhalls;
checking out books for reports, using
reference books, or simply browsing
through the library's collection of pa-
perbacks and magazines.
Mr. Wells, the school librarian,


was always available for students who
needed help in locating a certain book
or in making a special report. There
were also at least two girls serving as
library assistants each period. They
helped students use the card catalog
and check out books.



I

^"1


DAYTON N. WELLS Librarian; B.S., University
of Idaho, M. Ed., University of Oregon. "Read to
help you become what you want to be."


"Peace at last!"


faith Coad, Patri Chr Jnna Lozea Terra Brown, Lana Boone, Clover Shoe, Barbara Yerxa Jeanne Calkins Library Assistants.
Faith Coad, Patricia Christian, Janna Loizeaux, Terra Brown, Lana Boone, Clover Shobe, Barbara Yerxa, Jeanne Calkins. Library Assistants.


11L_- I -








Special

Education


GRACE S. PFAU Reading; B.S.,
Valley City State College; M.A., Uni-
versity of Minnesota. "If talented, ca-
pable people can match their dissatis-
faction and concern with positive,
concerted action, they should be able
to correct the ills they so rightly de-
plore."


Duke Collins and De Jesus Ruperto help Mrs. Pfau correct papers.


EARL C. SHARICK- Special Educa-
tion; B.A., M.S., Illinois State. "Work
hard and stay in school."


The Special Education department
was added to the CHS curriculum in
1960. In Special Education, students
received extra help in their academic
studies, learned crafts, and learned the
perspectives of human relationships
and civic responsibilities.
The remedial reading program pro-


vided special instruction to improve
reading skills and helped assure a stu-
dent of success in kcpini with his
ability. Sccmingl% average students
improved the quality of their reading
skills with the help of the Special
Education Department.


Reading holds the interest t o the Remedial Rc.ihn.c l.in s


Mr. Sharick helps his class drill in math
with la',h cards.























EDWIN M. KOZIOL Art; B.A.,
Michigan State Univ. "Find out what
your responsibilities are and prepare
to meet them in order to gain control
of your life as rapidly and completely
as possible."


\ r i











Class Portrait


*f.~


Artists waiting for an inspiration!

-. -

" s ,* ..... f


Ak. tv


In creative arts, a student learns to
express himself through different
media. With this in mind, tile tl-
lowing courses were taugh t (-t CHS
this year. Art 7, an introductu. n to
drawing, painting, lettering. c r .mrnis,
crafts, covering techniques, and the
use of tools with emph.isi pl.ied
on developing skills, ima .in.mtrn. .ind
art judgement. Art 8, a rcintricme-nt
of knowledge gained in Art v.ith
greater emphasis placed on the balric
elements of design. Art I, a btai be-
ginning art course for ill ,tudcnt
grades 9-12 which empha.iizcd thrc de-
velopment of drawing skill and the
study of design concepts It Inl'etd
drawing, painting, lettering. po.stcr-
making and a variety of cr.itrt Art [I,
an advanced art course for ill rtudcnts
grades 10-12. It involved art apprecia-
tion and a deeper investigation of de-
sign and color theory with emphasis
placed on individual organization and
the carrying out of art projects. The
student had an opportunity to devel-
op skills in the area of his choice, Art
III, which included appreciation and
advanced creative work.


With a sweep of the brush, a masterpiece is created.


Art


Brenda Gibson.







aIfusitess Education



I


Would you believe the class average is 85 wpm? Would you believe 35 wpm with 3 errors?


DIANE FITE Typing I, 11, Soc.
Studies 7; B.S., East Texas State U.
Mrs. Fite likes her new home in
Panama, especially the tropical weath-
er. She is originally from Texas,
where she previously taught at Bowie
Jr. High in Irving.
Her favorite hobbies are water
skiing, boating, and fishing. Her ad-
vice to students? "Be individuals."


TNT M,




A:.70


The Business Education depart-
ment offered an excellent selection of
courses for the student planning a ca-
reer in business, as well as for the col-
lege-bound students. The skills and
knowledge taught by this department
will be useful regardless of the stu-
dent's future occupation.
General Business gave the students
a basic understanding of business
practices useful in daily living. Typ-
ing I gave students an opportunity to
develop speed and accuracy on a type-
writer. They were taught to type let-
ters, tabulated reports, manuscripts,
and business forms. Typing II was a
continuation of Typing I with em-
phasis on constant practice for in-
creased speed and accuracy. Seniors
taking Shorthand learned to read,
write, and take dictation. Another
course offered only to seniors was
Bookkeeping. In this course, students
learned the fundamentals of single
and double-entry bookkeeping and
were given practical problems for the
application of these skills.


'1
H I




tF <


George and John find girls more inter-
esting than bookkeeping.


CLARE W. JOHNSON Short-
hand, Bc.okkeeping. General Busi-
ness; B', Bemid)i State College;
M.Ed., Central Washington State Col-
lege.
During his first year at CHS, Mr.
Johnson was yearbook sponsor and
head of the Business Education De-
partment aside from his regular duties
as teacher.
He was born in Minnesota and
taught for seven year r,, lulrnt: being
principal at Adna High School in
Washington.
He enjoys fishing, bowling, and
scuba diving.
His advice is, "Spend more time
enjoying the good things about the
establishment and less time trying to
change it."


"This is almost as bad as Latin."


I"


- _t







8Nglish


U.,


J.B. DOBBINS English II, Jour-
nalism; B S., University of Virginia;
M.Ed., Univ. of Virginia. "HAM-
LET. Act I, Sc. iii Polonius to
Laertes."


English, an extensively wide field,
was one of the largest departments at
CHS. It was a required subject for all
students, since the ability to under-
stand and to use well his native lan-
guage deemed necessary for a stu-
dent's success in any endeavor.
Regular English classes included
the study of grammar, composition,
and literature. In addition to these
regular courses; the English depart-
ment also included journalism, speech
and drama, and remedial reading. In
journalism the student learned to
write in newspaper form and received
much practical experience. Speech
and drama was a course which taught
the students the art of oral expres-
sion. Besides this, the course required
a great deal of research work. Remc-
dial reading provided students who
required extra help an opportunity to
improve their reading ability.


Books read in the various classes
include; johnny Tremain, Great Expec-
tations, A Tale of Two Cities, The
House of Seven Gables, The Red Badge of
Courage, Wuthering Heights, Lord]im,
and The Moonstone.


Ij
1 ...i ,
Mrs. Smith. "My goodness' What are the
Seniors coming to'"


JANE ELFERS English III, Speech
and Drama, B.S., University of Wis-
consin. "Choose those goals most im-
portant to you and be perseverant in
achieving them. Don't be reluctant to
serve others and the community.
Don't be afraid to give of yourself
Aim high; prepare painstakingly;
serve; and work "













(


LOUIS J FATTOROSI English III. DOROTHY H SMITH English 12,
B.S, M Ed. Ruiger LIr,~trrir N1 B S Ohio No.rrh.rn i' M Drr'.rr
tyranny is more inmoltrabile thn ithji %I LlnIreltr%\
the seli-righteou rl'ormer .r the c]r
zealous philanthropist The o,:rlid nr, he
destroyed by too muh hatrcJ or t~i
much love, but the later is mote dnrger
ous because It Ii more nsidious "


d J
GLENDA STRONACH English and
Musi- B NMu E.d A., Trinity U.
Mrs Srr,..na.h i, from Texas and
raught in turundu before coming to
CHS She cnio., ielhgy, and sports. "To
th% oavn :ll be true'


MARTHA TANNER English; A.B.,
U.N.C. "Live everyday to the very fullest
- enjoy!"


4i


TONI WILFERD English; B.S., Flor-
ida State. ". 'these times' will be anoth-
er period that I will add as one I've lived
through."


Tha ome
"That was some Llais


Mr Dobbinm I deervc this rest


L


"I hope I don't forget the idc.e ot th.r pl.i befoNre Ja ii .our


REBECCA WILLIAMS Geography 7,
English 8 and 9; B.A., Anderson C..;:r:'
Mrs. Williams' home state is West
Virginia. She has traveled thrt Ul. many
states and enjoys reading and -" imn.;.'
"Use your head think! listen' rr d


Mrs. Elfers


-I


a









Foreign alguages


"Welcome to the camp."


ANNE D. GEGG French, Latin,
B.A., Cornell University, M.S. in Edu-
cation, Cornell Univ "Learn to do
things on time Make positive contri-
butions to school and your Lommunm-
ey"


STELLA RIEFKOHL Spanish.
French; B.A, New York Univ., M.A.,
Columbia Univ, N Y. "Never to
look back into the past always to
face each day as it comes without a
thought of the future "


When will they ever learn?


cc---


.. A


TELMA 1 HOWARD Spanish.
Business Eduauton. B A Hunter
College, M A., Hunter College. "Be
obedient and respectful ititens in
your communities and set good exam-
ples of morals to vour younger peers


1,

N.^


-_


4k~
-ah


Is it third declension, accusative, masculine, plural, or comparative? I'm mixed up!












1


/ M





JAMES E. STEARNS Spanish II,
III, IV, Russian II; B.S. Ed., M.A.,
University of Florida. "Spend more
time on the subjects that are hard for
you than on your favorites."


WILLIAM L. WILL Spanish 7 and
8, English 9; B.S. Econ., Xavier
Univ.; M. Ed., Univ. of Florida.
Mr. Will is a native Isthmian. He
taught in Florida before coming to
CHS. His hobbies are golfing, swim-
ming, team sports and reading. Life is
short, so be satisfied in what you are
doing."
,... ::. .,.' ,. ; i.
S o: ..., ,- ; ,;..,..


The foreign language department
at CHS was a wide and interesting
one. Its aim was to increase a stu-
dent's understanding of the history
and culture, as well as the language of
countries other than his own. In order
to fulfill this aim, CHS offered cour-
ses in three modern languages;
French, Spanish, and Russian. Three
years of each language were offered,
students being placed in the level ap-
propriate to their development. In ad-
dition, a second year course in Latin
was offered.
In all language courses, speaking,
writing, reading, and understanding
of the language were stressed. The
Audio-Lingual Method, ALM, was a
new system used to teach Spanish and
Russian. This system involved inten-
sive oral practice in the language lab-
oratory.


Toni Thomas. "It's right, isn't it?"


S I I I

"How can I concentrate on "Hablar" when I'm thinking of HIM?"


Mrs. Howard. "I'm no model!"


.x.

1(1~111111~







rome S economic


The homemaking program placed
emphasis on three areas: foods and
nutrition, clothing selection and con-
struction, and family living. It was
the aim of the department to provide
girls with knowledge helpful for their
futures as homemakers.
Junior high home economics stu-
dents learned the basics of sewing by
making simple household articles and
garments. They were also taught the
basics of cooking which included the
preparation and serving of formal and


informal meals.
Senior high students were offered
one semester of sewing which in-
cluded personal r..'.. nirn the plan-
ning and construction of tlk.thiinL.
and a study of personal and family
relationships. In the second semes-
ter's cooking classes, students were
taught the fundamentals of nutrition,
the use of recipes, meal planning,
m.Arkcirin, and various methods of
preserving food.


r


) Is


*1-


ELIZABETH McNAUGHTON Home Econom-
ics; B.S., Slate Teachers' College. "What you do (or
don't do) today affects your future."






















osefa Gonzalez and Anna Summerlin.
'You're off an inch!"


I p


Tina Bocanegra, Pat De Vault, Elisa Brown. "Do we have to stand in line to help
Tina Bocanegra, Pat De Vault, Elisa Brown. "Do we have to stand in line to help?"


\N


"Cookies". "It's messy but it's fun!"
"Cookies". "It's messy hut it's fun"'


17""








Ahdustrial Arts













RONALD FITE Mechanical JESSE C. HOLLOWAY Shop; RONALD LASSILA Shop; B.S.,
Drawing; B.S., East Texas State M.S., Oklahoma State College. "Get Los Angeles, Calif.; Lic. Sorbonne.
Univ.; M.S., East Texas State Univ. the best education you can." Mr. Lassila is a native Californian
Mr. Fire's home state is Texas. He and has taught in San Francisco, Eng-
is the Junior Class sponsor. He enjoys land, Turkey, Phillipines, and France.
the Canal Zone and his hobbies are His hobby is boating. His advice to
water skiing and hunting. students? "Work."



The Industrial Arts department at
CHS attempted to provide pupils .
with insight into their own interests;
Ito develop their abilities to work with
'their hands and with tools, and to
Sharpen their interest in creative
cratrs The Industrial Arts department
offered four groups of courses; Me-
chanical Drawing; Wood Working,
Metal Shop, and Plastics.
Mechanical Drawing I taught stu-
:dents to visualize how an object is put
together Neatness, correct lines, mea-
surement, and following instructions
were stressed. Mechanical Drawing II Students display varied attitudes toward mechanical drawing.
was a continuation of this course for
students planning to continue their
!education in this field. Woodworking
:students learned about tools, joints,
:shop safety, and the operation of
power tools. They used their knowl-
:edge to carry out projects. Metal Shop
'I taught the basic skills of bench-
:work, forging, welding, sheetmetal,
tand machine operation. Plastics stu-
dents learned the properties of plas-
tics and how to shape them into use-
ful objects.


"They didn't tell me about this when I filled out my class selection sheet," grumbles Robert
Johnson.








Mathematics


21


RICHARD W. BOCK Algebra II,
Analysis, Calculus. B.A, Univ of N
Dakota, M A, Univ of Houston
"Don't be trivial."




In this modern age, as well as in
the past, mathematics remains a basic
part of everyone's life. The CHS
math department offered all the math
courses required for success in college
as well as in the students' daily lives.
Five math courses offered were to
be taken in order as each was a pre-
requisite of the subsequent one.
These courses were Algebra I, Geom-
etry, Algebra II, Introduction to Anal-
ysis, and Calculus. General Math, and
Introduction to Algebra were also of-
fered for students not majoring in
math.
General Math captured the ele-
mentary forms of mathematics. It
pushed the students to have a mathe-
matical background.
Algebra I, the first step up the lad-
der to higher mathematics, caught the
principles of mathematics. Word
mastery of the language of mathemat-
ics was attained in this course.
Geometry dealt with the art of
drawing. Proving theorems was a
major part of geometry. The students
learned how to deal with space fig-
ures. Algebra I was also reviewed for
the students.
Algebra II taught the principles of
factoring, polynomials, logarithms,
and basic trigonometry. The pattern
of reasoning was also learned in this
course.


LAWRENCE A COWLEY Alge-
bra I, Geometry. BA., Trinity Univ.,
M.A., Southeastern State "Live life
yourself"


Introduction to Analysis went
deeper into trigonometry. Linear and
quadratic equations were studied in
great depth. Functions and relations
were the beginning notion of this
course.


RANDALL GRUBBS Math; B.A.,
William Jewell College, "Do not get
behind in life because it is hard to
catch up."


Calculus, the last step up a steep
ladder of mathematics in high school
was a college preparatory course in-
troducing the fundamentals of differ-
ential calculus.







1 -~F~~j~~~


z/ i
Math class is a time for many things, from studying to reading comic books.


son 000
































ROY HOWELL Alpebra IB. Gen
eral Math A, BS, Shippen'barg Si
College. I S. Florid) S re L'nirv
"Accept people on the basj c.l heir
actions. nor their ippearane


CAROL J KNIGHT Lale Since
". Mith jnd A. B Auburn L'r,,t
' Read a. much and J jaricd nri.rel
as ,ou p,.,.,ibl\ -.n


BERNARD R MAZZONI Math
6. Algebra I. B S. lr-bant.n \'lley
Cullree M .. Penn Srre L'nr, 'Ev-
endas hda uld be i i ucd da\ nd Jo-
mo.rro i a blerer J.i


Nancy Edmondson. "I g\te up, I've had


Calculus proves to be a .-h.llcngmin class







MEMBERS OF THE BAND


Aukwsic


EDWARD R. CARWITHEN -
Music; B. Fine Arts. Univ. Florida,
M Arts, Eastman School of Music.


The following courses were ,tlerc.l
this year in Music. Music 7 and 8; the
exploration of all kinds of music and
music skills with emphasis placed on
music fundamentals as a step to the
enjoyment of music. Beginning In-
strumental Class; a specialized class
for students desiring to learn the basic
techniques of a band or an orchestral
instrument. It is open to all tru ll-
but it is recommended that a student
wishing to participate in advanced
music classes begin the study of in-
struments in seventh grade. Educa-
tional values stressed are: -: iling of
musical notation, development of
good tone and the ability to express
oneself with confidence on a musical
instrument. Also stressed are pride in
personal achievement, concern for
group results, and the discipline of
concentrating on details to build con-
fidence and ability. Intermediate In-
strumental Class; a specialized class
for students having had one or two
semesters of work in !'.ti nningiih in-
strumental class. This class is open to
all grades. It provides a chance for
students to work with symphonic
music of easy to medium hll'ii Ilr.
The educational values stressed are:
continuing exploration of musical ex-
pression, -.uilJin., of confidence in
personal abilities, and striving to do
one's best. Senior Band is a special-
ized class for students with at least
one year or the equivalent of begin-
ning or intermediate instrumental


The Band relaxing before class begins.


class. This is an activity group. It
serves the school by providing music
for assemblies, football games, pep
assemblies, and other occasions. Con-
certs are planned to expose the stu-
dent to the classical and modern mu-
sical world. Students are encouraged
to participate in musical groups of all
kinds. These include college, commu-


nity, and jazz groups. Values stressed
are; self discipline, appreciation and
toleration of new sounds and musical
experience, and exploration of the
student's abilities in music. The
music program also provides courses
in 7th and 8th grade chorus and sen-
ior chorus where students learn how
to sing and read music.


Ted Si.rr and slte,. Ap.:ir.c perform at the elementary school.


"The important thing is to act nonchalant abx


My..* J IV 1C26
Ronald Palser. "Just six more measures to
go.


sai.iF AJ,


Fluses
Ann Lauriten
Kathy Deter
Linda Mendenhall
Deshea Mason
Ann Loyd
Chris Benson
Sue McCullough
06&
Gerry Blanchett
Cathy Terilliger
Susan Willis
Cherni Hieronymus
EbSp G.
F Br-pii
A r.. .'* r ,
Clannert
Linda Merrnk
Ann Terwilligcr
Barbara Bloemer
LuAnn Ware
Debbie JacLkeic
Emily Daniel
Colleen Johnson
Debbie Mheekr
Linda Hess
Debbie Pate
Patry Rodrigue
Thomas Wcslcy
Alice Sticbrin
Kathy Balmer
Jim Collins
Thomas Bchre
Alexis Coleman
Jeanette Hernandez
AMlo COaina
Suan Ridge
Sylvia Vamprinr
Bao Clarmnte
Tony Barr
Marlette Garner
Sop. Sax
Libby Palser
Alto Sax.
Jim Childsre
Karen Merrick
Roy Gott
Edythe Marsh
Joanne Reid
Tnor Sax
Robin Prstham
Ted Srott
Peter Sancher
Fe h Honr
Bonnie Willi
Rin Boyland
Willir Santigo
Buarilnt
James Bniecher
Mike Bjonceby
James Jones
Brian Love
Jimmy Huffman


46


Tramprl
Sneve Aponte
Cheryl Olsen
Ron Palser
Ed Golden
Jim Valentine
Pedro Simmons
Drummond McNaughton
Craig Robertson
Allen Richardson
Cheyenn Rivera
Tim Blanchard
Ray Jackson
Trmbouwe
Paul Bleicher
Billy Gilespie
Beverly Olsen
Nancy Gregg
Wayne West
George Riven
Friz Van Woondenberg
Bobby Hughes
Tuba
Don Olsen
Guy Damiani
Bas
Gregg Grist
Drum
Dan Valentine
Gaspr Sayoc
Mike Williams
Robert Fcrnandez
John Alexaitis


-'r..,, rt phcr -n .. ur m ~ni -l









Physical Education


BARBARA L. CAMPBELL Physi-
cal Education; B.S Ed., Black Hills
State C II :. Graduate Credit, Wash.
State Univ., Central Wash State Col-
lege and BHST "Be quick to criticize
- but if you do have a solution to
go with the criticism'"


LOUIS DEDEAUX Physical Edu-
cation, B.S., Oklahoma A&M Col-
lege; M.S., Oklahoma State Univ.
"Find out what you can do best as
early as possible, then take pride in
yourself that your doing it as well as
you can


p pi





JUNE FATTOROSI Physical
Education; B.S., Southeastern La.
Univ.; M.A., Univ. Southern Miss.
"Mature enough in developing inter-
nal discipline to gradually replace the
external disciplines required during
childhood."


V. -- -


JOAN F. HARRIS Physical Edu-
cation; A B, Canal Zone Jr College.
B.S., Barry College, M.A., New York
University. "Don't seek an escape
from the pressures accompanying
your youth through cheap thrills that
could ruin your whole life.. You
can't afford to throw away your young
years. The clock can't be stopped or
turned back."


\a


IDOUG LITTON Phy Ed ; Mas-
ter's, Miss State University "Keep
training rule and always beat Bal-
ho.i and (. i ,


Gym can be relaxing! .


S. Gym can be hard work!"


7.
.~~.'. ~
.-. ...,








A
-i-


s --
Maran Kredell. Carol Ross, Donna Graham. Shelley Lund, Jane Paulson,
PURPLE PASSION prescnring thcir t.imr.u' ait


The importance of physical. as
well as mental development in
achieving success in a high\ complex
society was stressed b\ the physical
education department Its aims were
to teach good sportsmanship and a
sense of fair plaN. to discipline the
mind, and to educate students in le,.
sure time activities which can be car-
ried into adulthood The department
strove to give each student, regardless
of his stage of development a chance
to develop his skills, his attitude. and
his physique.
During the year 19rO-'l. Crstobal
High School's girls' physical educa-
tion classes participated in basketball.
volleyball, rumbling, track. tenni,
and various other sports. The boxs'
physical education classes participated
in football, baseball, basketball, swim-
ming. weightlifting. and track
Through these activities as well as in-
tramural and varsir sports, the de-
partment succeeded in achieving its
goals.


L'


A


I J


"Ul


-- Aurelia Williams. Supergirl W'iich is at it
Beth Carter. The again!


Sa


I/ 7


I thought speedall was bad, but hockey beas them all
"I thought speedball was bad, but hockey beats them all."


"Keep your hands on your hips so your pants won't fall down."


::v 7,


g








ScieNce


PAUL HIERONYMUS Chemis-
try, Math; B.S., East Central State
College, M N.S., University of Okla-
homa. "Have an open mind and
then use it."


Michael McCann, Kenneth Hill. "Now this will make me healthy, wealthy, and r:,c


CHS boasted a wide-ranging
science curriculum. The student who
followed this program can be assured
of a solid foundation in scientific
knowledge. The courses offered were
Life Science, Earth Science, Introduc-
tory Physical Science, Bi1 .L:,, Chem-
istry, and Physics.
The seventh-grade Life Science
course taught the basis of life and the
student's role in the realm of living
things. Earth Science, offered to


eighth-graders, was an interesting
study of the structure and function of
the world and its surrounding envi-
ronment. Introductory Physical
Science was a preliminary laboratory
course. Students were taught the pro-
cedures of scientific research and dis-
covery. Biology offered a change from
the world of physical actions and
reactions. This course was highlight-
ed by three dissections during the
year. A basic course in Chemistry ac-.


quainted students with meth,,dh ,t
scientific thinking and problem _,.,b-
ing. Emphasis was placed on pcrtl.rrm-
ing laboratory experiments and r,.l h-
ing logical conclusions. Physis. the
science of measurement, dealt priim.r-
ily with practical applications r
science in daily life. Vector :.n.il\is
and other physical aspects of ierince
were the major concepts studied in
this course.


|i

EMMA LOUISE MASON -- l.
Science 7; A.B., Randolph-Mar..i
Woman's College, M.A, Col jl.:
Universirv. "In order for students ,.
learn they must be an active parti,
pant which requires much more tl .,
mere physical presence."


Mad scientists at work!


r

iG-
1~L









...
FTF"~7!Z


JAMES D. NORMAN Biology;
B.S., Michigan State Univ.; M.A.,
Oregon State Univ. "Live, love and be
happy for tomorrow we die." "Smile
and have a full life."


fitm
LUKE T. PALUMBO Introducto-
ry Physical Science; B.S., Northwest
Missouri State College; M. Ed., Univ.
of Florida. "Things could be better."


!



"Beware of this plant!"
















CHARLES T. REEVES Physics,
Earth Science, Mathematics, Driver
Education; B.S., B.A., M.A., Arizona
State University. "To thyself be hon-
est and think before you act."


Nai-Yuen Shum. "I think the one I just
cut up is the one I needed.'


The formula for problem No 2 is nor on the hlck'


--








Social Sciences


yjliap.


ROBERT BERGER Soc. Studies;
B.A., Michigan State U.; A.C., Grand
Rapids J.C. "Get the most education
you can and try to make this world of
ours a better place in which to live.


The purpose of the social science
courses offered at CHS was to help
students learn about their world; its
past, its present, and its relation to
them both now and in the future.
The aim of the social studies in-
structor was to aid the student in
learning to view history in a objective
and unbiased manner, and to give
him a broader approach to such prob-
lems as national and international
relations. Social Science courses of-
fered at CHS included Geography,
World History, U.S. History, and


MARY CONDON World Hist.,
U.S. Hist.; B.S., Northern Michigan
College. "Be sincere about everything
you do, particularly about getting an
education."


American Institutions.
Geography dealt with the study of
maps, climates, and the physical fea-
tures of various countries. World His-
tory was the study of the different na-
tions' pasts and their relationships to
one another. U.S. History provided
the student with knowledge of our
nation's past and its accomplishments
and led him to a better understanding
of our nation. American Institutions
taught the student about the work-
ings of government and the basic


WILLIAM J. GANSEN American
Institutions Social Studies 8; M.A
University of Michigan; M.A.T.E
Purdue Univ. "Treat others as yo'-
would like to be treated."


principles of economics.
The objective of all social science
courses was to lessen misundcrs.mnd-
ing of the people of other nati,.n s and
to help the students learn to rtspect
cultures other than their own.
This year, CHS social science
teachers attended a special workshop
conducted by Dr. Edwin Tent,:,n ut
Carnegie Mellon University. Pittrs-
burgh, Pennsylvania. He was an adi-.
cate of the use of original source ma.
trial in the teaching of social studies


Cheryl Cocm.an, Mrs Condon, Michael

wiho 1i on th. ono sMiide
wh~o i\ o~n thec to~n side''"


-1-
J-
F~..
si
c
9,\


Dr. Fenton gives a lecture to a U.S. History class.
Dr. Fenton gives a lecture to a U.S. History class.


-w


rvC


Ski j























EUGENE T. GREGG U.S. Histo-
ry; A.A., C.Z. College; B.A., Colorado
State; M.A., Univ. of Colorado.
"Strive to become rich."


mtE
ROANALD JACOBS World Ge-
ography; Bachelors, Southeastern
State College; Masters, Northeastern
State College. "Make the best of what
ever situation you are faced with."


ROBERT McCULLOUGH Social
Studies; B.S., St. Cloud State College;
M.A., Univ. of Northern Colorado.
"Be kind to animals."


real classroom with real students!


Mr. Gansen. "This is an example of a good
screen."


Long live democracy!


Now this is a







KO Z'C uilds ,Men Helps Students


The Reserve Officers Training
Corps at CHS was established to help
prepare high school students for fu-
ture careers in the Armed Forces, and
for ROTC in college, should they de-
cide to take it. It's chief aim was to
help students achieve the maturity
necessary to become officers and lead-
ers of men.
This year the ROTC was headed
by CPT. Juan F. Mata, who was as-
sisted by SFS Murphy, SFC Picoli,
and SSG Alford. The ROTC unit at
Cristobal consisted of "E" Company,
"F" Company, Color Guard, Drill
Team, Rifle Team, and the Battalion
Staff. The staff this year included Bat-
talion Commander Major John Mar-
tin; Battalions sponsor, 1Lt. Hila
Lyman; S1, 2Lt. Donald Byrd; S2,
2Lt. Daniel Valentine; S3, 2Lt. Jaime
Darraza; and S4, 2Lt. Lewis Valdez.
The Drill Team was commanded by
1Lt. Eligio Thomas, and sponsored by
1Lt. Jean Smith. "E" Company was
commanded by 1Lt. Dennis Maxwell
and sponsored by 1Lt. Jackie Spring-
er. "F" Company was commanded by
1Lt. Isaac Heres and sponsored by
1Lt. Denise Foshee.
Reviews were presented by the
ROTC each nine-weeks during the
school year. A large and important re-
view was Field Night, held on March
27th. Among the types of competi-
tion included were: personal, squad,
platoon, company, and most exciting
of all, Drill Team competition. An-
other exciting competition of the
school year was the Brigade Review.
In order to make competition fair, the
Brigade Review and Field Night are
held on the Atlantic and Pacific sides
on alternate years.


"E" Company


"F" Company








become Officers And Leaders


CAPTAIN MATA ROTC; B.A,
Pan American College. "Accomplish
what you set out to do at all cost,
with whatever resources available."
I


.-- -


SFC MURPHY ROTC. "Don't
make the same mistake twice. Do it
right the first time and you won't
have to do it again."


SFC PICOLI ROTC. SSG ALFORD ROTC.


"There's really nothing to it," claims Denise Foshee with a confident grin."


ROTC cadets and sponsors attend Jungle Operations Training Center.


Steve Aponte. "Gee, it doesn't look like a
very long drop to me are you sure I need
a parachute?"





























ROTC Drill Team


ROTC Color Guard


Major John Martin, iLt. Hila Lyman, ILt. Eligio Thomas.


Steve Aponte, George Rivera, Tony Lyons.


ROTC Girls' Drill Team








rUe Cighter Side Of 02 ife


Cadets steal a moment of relaxation during ten grueling days at leadership school.


"Hear no evil, speak no evil, see no evil."
S* -- .
4.. II
I. .. .
.%... ~~ ..:., :. .

'*.tN,> *1'
S . '
.,U^'"x-"'; .I ** "'**
"'* B -"*'' ,.l., ",i V' ' 1* ', ''- m t .. v
" ;" '.." ",:. ..',, . *.**,, .*, . ,,*'*. ; "" '-
.* -"-" ,^ ., .; a. L .. ** .- .. . .: a ,
.. '- .',,,' ^ ^ ^ ^,, ..... ''..... *.* -.


'- ,,p,' _r
-., r*r-' ,
-.: -:'. '01^


"So this is what they teach you at leader-
ship school."


..C
a
I *
*1*
'dl. .: *


.- '', .
. .*.- .-



..- r- ..
"F" Company Commander Isaac Heres "drops for ten" with a smile.


I1


)i









,irls' Drill ream Wins


Veteran


Day Parade


The 1971 Girls' Drill Team at
CHS consisted of twenty-nine girls.
They were under the expert leader-
ship of Commander Jan Bjorneby.
The girls performed during halftime
at all home football games in the
Tiger Stadium. They also marched in
the quarterly ROTC Reviews. As an
additional activity, they participated
in the annual Veteran's Day Parade.
At this time, they were selected as the
outstanding girls' drill team on the
Irshmus The girls considered this an
honor which made the long hours of
after-school practice well-worth the
time and effort it required.
The Drill Team also helped with
Orientation Day for the new students
of CHS. They provided guidance and
assistance when necessary.


1 Roberta Cole
(quad leader)
2 .vnn Gregg
o-nimmandcr)
A. Nance Edmondson
(squad ieadcr)
4 Linda Brotk
s Pattc Hauke
6 Kaith 1)erarps
Viana Ostrrca
s Ann T .
Ann A( nnalcs


10. Kathy Milligan
11. Kathy Pursley
12. Marian Kredell
(squad leader)
1 Carol Ross
14 Barbara Bloemer
15. Janet Brandenburg
(squad leader)
16. Donna Graham
17 Sherry Coleman
18. Mounven Iyman


9. Terry Overstreet
. Gigi Colon
1. Katie McGilberry
. Mary Norval
. Cathy Gercich
i. Nina Gercich
i. Regina Dominguez
i. Ellie Blevins
SCarol Wertz
. Marrianne Verruno
SJan Bjorneby
(co-comdr.)


7 1



63 t



















Forward March . About Face!


AMajorettes Perform Durieg

h basketballl


wames

Despite uverm helming odd,
against them, the majorettue Pattr
Hill and Tit.i Cobb, presented J tine
performance on the 1.irt Junior \'arsi
ry game. Thct carried on their trrdi
tion by performing at the bajkectb.ll
games To be a majorette. one must
be willing to devote intensive hour-
of practice over the 'ummtr, and .il-
most regular practkie .iter bhlnil
when school begins.
Tryouts were held during tlh.
month of April


Pairr Hill and Tita Cobb









CommeHces

Vear U/tbf
-t icAr New


teachers

NEW TEACHERS: Mr. Lassila, Mr Johnson, Mrs. A \llm, n, Mr. Fire, Mrs. Stronach.
m i4 11 i \\ i lll ri ii I I1.171ii
ff '1_ '
Cristobal High School teachers ir i
began the 1970-71 school year on Au- iij ii
gust 31. On this date, the faculty at- -
tended a special meeting at which
school policy and plans for the comrn-
ing year were discussed. Mr. Speir, as-
sistant Supervisor of U.S. Secondary r .. i
Schools and Mr. Cook, Supervisor of ,
Instruction, U.S. Secondary Schools
attended and were introduced to the '
faculty. Following speeches by Mr.
Pfau, Mr. Jeffries, and Mr. Speir; cof-
fee was served to the new teachers in
the home economics room.


We must be prepared, for a new school year begins.



44








Varying cxprcssions reflect the faculty's concern for the new school year. of the faculty.
7 ;


J, 1 ^ &~
A' h "j l) ;c ;ig

f/'aw "L ."^



Vadrvine exp~re~ssio~n reflect the faculty's concern tor the new school year. of the faculty.


I
-Ai
last
rest







Caribe Club Spoasors Cultural exchange

Program With ColoH Jtigh Schools
7 In order to provide students from
- I H a Panamanian school with an oppor-
i M tunity to observe the workings of the
U.S. school system, the members of
the Caribe Club invited the students
of St. Mary's and St. Joseph's acade-
mies in Colon to visit CHS. On the
S., morning of December 9th, the entire
senior class of St. Mary's Academy
and a number of students from St. Jo-
o seph arrived by bus. Each girl was as-
SA signed to a member of the Caribe
Club and whom they accompanied to
class. They had originally planned to
leave at noon, but refreshed by a
Lunch provided by the Caribe Club,
S'. they attended afternoon classes as
well. Both Panamanian and American
I students agree that they had profited
from this cultural exchange.

"I knew I should have brought my lunch'"











fi



II I
," B, I












"Mrs Fartorosi won't let u o(n the pm tloor in our i,\ttrd "
"You're kidding' I'm _,id I came so I can
catch up on the news."








Seiaors


SANDRA ALBERGA
June 26, 19 51
Colon, Republic of Panama
Entering CHS in the second semester of her junior ecar
Sandra quickly became an active member of her class. She
served as treasurer of the Language Lab Club and secretary of
the Spanish Club. Sandra graduated in January 1971, and left
for Riverside City College where she plans to major in busi-
ness.

JAY ALONIS
January 25, 1953
Ancon, Canal Zone
Jay has attended Canal Zone schools for twelve years, six of
these were at CHS. In his senior year, Jay was a member of
the Caribe Club and the varsity track team. He plans to study
engineering and computer science at Louisiana Polytechnic
Institute after graduation.

ALMANUBIA ( AR MI N AUSTIN
October 13. 1952
Colon, Republic of Panama
Alma came to CHS in her junior year, having previously
attended St. Joseph's in Colon. She was a member of the
Spanish Club, and participated in *11. I.ll intramurals.
Alma plans to attend Canal Zone College and major in medi-
cal . .., e ..

PATRICIA YAMILET AUSTIN
December 13, 1952
Colon, Republic of Panama
Athletics have occupied much of Patsy's time in high
school. She was a member of the basketball and ,'.I .L.ll
teams in her freshman year and captain of both in her sopho-
more year when she also participated in tennis. In her junior
year, she lettered in three sports and also served as president
of the GAA and co-captain of the Powder Puff speedball
team. Patsy plans to attend CZC and major in physical educa-
tion.

TERRI LYNN BAKER
November 6, 1952
Anchorage, Alaska
This was Terri's first year at CHS. She participated in varsi-
ty volleyball, Her future plans include studies at the Universi-
ty of Arkansas.

ROBERT EARL BARR
March 18, 1952
Charleston, South Carolina
Robert has attended Canal Zone schools all his life, six
years at CHS. He plans to become a policeman.


Fatrlcia Y Austin


\r


Almanubia C Austin


Robert E. Barr


Sandra Alberga

















Jay Alonis







JEAN LYNN BASSETT
June 9, 1953
Jeannie has attended C.Z. schools for ten years, five of
these at CHS. During her high school years, she was a
member of the Spanish Club, the swimming team, and the
Girls' Chorus. Her future plans include attending the Col-
lege of Bible in California, hopefully on a music scholar-
ship.

MICHAEL FRANCIS BEALE
July 16, 1953
St. Petersburg, Florida
Mike came to Cristobal High School in the second se-
mester of his sophomore year. He was a member of the
varsity basketball team. In his senior year he was elected
Homecoming "king". Mike plans to attend college in the
United States.

JAN TERI BJORNEBY
April 26, 1953
Bremerton, Washington
Jan has been an active member of the class of '71. She
was a member of the Girls' Drill team for three years, and
served as commander in her senior year. She was an S.A.
alternate in her freshman year. As a junior, she was a mem-
ber of the French Club and class treasurer. In her senior
year, she served as secretary of the GAA and as a member
of the Senior Privilege Committee. Sports have occupied
much of Jan's time. She participated in speedball, volley-
ball, tennis, band, basketball intramurals, and was a mem-
ber of the varsity volleyball and tennis teams. Jan plans to
attend college in the U.S.

ELIZABETH BLEVINS
January 2, 1952
Colon, Republic of Panama
Ellie has attended Cristobal High School throughout
her high school career. She participated in intramural
speedball during her freshman and sophomore years, and
in basketball and volleyball during all four years. As a sen-
ior, she was a member of the Girls' Drill Team. Her future
plans include study to become either an airline stewardess
or a veterinarian.

LANA GAYE BOONE
July 10, 1953
Abingdon, Virginia
Lana has been an active member of the senior class at
CHS. She was a member of the Caribe Club, and served as
treasurer of the Language Lab Club in her senior year. She
was a member of the yearbook staff for three years, and as
a senior, served as copy editor. In her junior year, she be-
came a member of the National Honor Society, and was
elected president. As a freshman, she received an Outstand-
ing Student Award, and in her junior year, an award for ex-
cellence in the Russian language. As a junior, she partici-
pated in the NSF SST Program at Loyola University. In
her senior year, she was a member of the Senior Class Ad-
visory Council and Board of Directors, and served as secre-
tary of the Student Advisory Committee. Lana's future
plans include majoring in computer science at Loyola Uni-
versity in New Orleans where she received a four-year
scholarship.

VIVIAN VICTORIA BOSEMAN
February 25, 1948
Colon, Republic of Panama
Vivian has attended CHS for each of her four years in
high school. Her future plans include the possibility of a
modeling career.


Senior Homecoming "King" Mike Beale is
escorted on royal walk around the gym.


Jean Lynn Bassett


W,

iF -


Michael Francis Beale


Jan Teri Bjorneby


Elizabeth Blevins






KATHRYN RACHElL BURGFESS

SYokolhama. Japan
K.athli has attended (CII throughout her high school
career, and has been a; member of the Girls' (Glie (lub for
four cars, and the (irls' Drill Team for two. Atter gradu-
ation, KathN plans to attend ;i College of Arts and Music,
i in preparation for a musical career.

CARMEN LUISA BUTI.ER
SNarnelbcr 12. 1952
Colon, Republic of Panama
Carmen has been a participant in many organizations
and clubs during her years at CHS. She served as secretarv-
treasurer of the Caribe and Nurses's Aide Clubs, Historian
of the French Club, Vice-President of the Language Lab
Club, and treasurer of the senior class. She also served on
various committees and the Senior Class Board of Direc-
tors. In her senior year, she was elected to the National
Honor Society. Carmen plans to enter Barry College in
Miami and study computer science.

DONALD PATRICK BYRD
June 0, 1952
Balboa, Canal Zone
Donald has attended Canal Zone schools all his life.
S Throughout his high school years, he has been interested
in dramatics, playing leading roles in several Thespian pro-
ductions, and serving as treasurer of the Thespian Society
in his senior year. In the summer of 1970, he attended a
S summer institute in drama. Donald plans to attend Canal
Zone College for a year, and then transfer to the U.S.


Cirmnn I ,ei RIurler


"Cubby" Clement, Kathy Kraus. "Seniors
just naturally have beautiful legs."


a-


Armando Cabrera


hliiabeth Paulece Carter


Raul Eduardo Castro


ARMANDO CABRERA
April 26, 1953
Santurce, Peurto Rico
This was Armando's first year at CHS. He previously at-
tended Antilees High School In Puerto Rico where he par-
ticipated in varsity track. His future plans include the
study of accounting and business administration at the
University of Puerto Rico.

ELIZABETH PAULETTE CARTER
Marc 3, 1953
Gartersville, Georgia
Beth came to CHS from Georgia where she was active
in athletics and other school activities. She participated in
soccer, softball, badminton, and archery intramurals, and
was co-captain of the varsity soccer and softball teams. She
was also a cheerleader, a member of the FHA, vice-presi-
dent of the FTA, secretary of the Debate Club. and a mem-
ber of the yearbook and newspaper staffs. She was vice-
president of her freshman class, and secretary of her sopho-
more class. This year she was a member of the Senior Class
Advisory Council and Board of Directors. Beth plans to
study psychology, planning a career in social work or per-
haps teaching.

RAUL EDUARDO CASTRO
July 20, 1953
Colon, Republic of Panama
Raul has participated in many clubs during his five
years at CHS. He was a member of the Caribe Club, the
French Club, the yearbook staff, and served as president of
the Art and Spanish Clubs and vice-president of the Lan-
guage Lab Club. Raul served on the committee for the Jr.-
Sr. Prom, and as a member of the Senior Class Advisory
Council and Board of Directors. Raul plans to attend Am-
herst College in Massachusetts and take a liberal arts
course.


I" 1


Kathryn Rachel Burge


rT


Ac









Class

Officers

4iemplify

"Senior


Spirit"


SENIOR CLASS OFFICERS: Kathy DeRaps, Vice President; Robert Phillips, President;
Judy McLain, Secretary; and Carmen Butler, Treasurer.


The 1970-71 school year was one
of innovation for CHS seniors. Under
the leadership of capable class offi-
cers, and with the expert guidance of
their sponsor, Mr. Fattorosi, the sen-
ior class set out to do great things.
The first project was to secure an
open lunch. A committee was estab-
lished to prepare and submit for ap-
proval a list of regulations, and the
privilege was granted. In order to pro-
vide a sounding board for the com-
plaints and suggestions of seniors, the
Advisory Council, consisting of
twenty representative seniors was es-
tablished. Another new group was
the Senior Board of Directror. made
up of representatives elected by stu-
dents in the senior class. Both groups
worked hard to make the year a suc-
cessful one.


Among the special activities of the
year were a trip to the other side to
visit Canal Zone College, the Senior
Banquet, and the Junior-Senior Prom.
School events of special significance
to seniors were the Jamboree where
Wendy Flores reigned as queen, the
homecoming game victory and the
dance which followed with Rosemary
Christian as queen, and the Christmas
formal at which the Hall of Fame
winners were announced.
It was a year which included those
once in a lifetime events which are so
much a part of being a senior; se-
lecting invitations and cards, senior
skip day, baccalaureate, and of course,
graduation. Altogether, it was a great
year one which the Class of '71
will never forget.


CLASS SPONSOR
Mr Loui, Faru r.i.si









PATTY ANN CHRISTIAN
June 20, 1942
Bluctield, West Virginia
Patty was a member of the Pep Club at her school in Vir-
ginia before coming to CHS. She was a member of the year-
book staff here, and in her senior year, served as publicity
chairman of the Thespian plays. Patty plans to return to Vir-
ginia after graduation, and enroll in a beautician school.

ROSEMARY CHRISTIAN
October 5, 1953
Coronado, California
Rosemary has attended Cristobal High School for three
years. She participated in "B" League basketball in her sopho-
more year, and the Girls' Drill Team in her senior year. As a
senior, she was selected queen of the Homecoming Dance.
Rosemary plans to attend Texas A&I University where she
will pursue the study of medicine.

CALEB CLEMENT
October 17, 1953
Gatun, Canal Zone
"Cubby" is one of the outstanding athletes in the class of
'71. He has participated in football, baseball, basketball, and
track intramurals, and was a member of the varsity football,
baseball, basketball, and track teams. He was a member of the
"21" Club in his freshman year, and of the "C" Club for the
other three years. "Cubby" plans to attend Canal Zone Col-
lege.

FAITH EMILY COAD
February 26, 1953
Flint, Michigan
*, Faith entered CHS in the second semester of her junior
year. She was a junior varsity cheerleader at her former school
S in Michigan. After graduation, Faith plans to become a travel
agent.

FREDERICK COLE
April 13, 1953
Balboa, Canal Zone
ROTC has occupied much of Fred's time in high school.
He was a member of the Boys' Drill Team, and as a senior, a
member of Batallion Staff. He was also a member of the Na-
tional Honor Society and the Senior Class Board of Directors.
Fred's future plans include attending college.

GARY LEE COLLINS
November 13, 1952
Hampton, Virginia
Gary was president of his freshman class at CHS. He was
a member of the "21" Club in his freshman and sophomore
years. Gary participated in intramural and varsity basketball
during all four years in high school. He was a member of the
Student Advisory Committee and the Inter-school Dress Code
Committee. In his senior year, he was initiated into the Na-
tional Honor Society. Gary plans to attend Case Institute of
Te I L, ..I c., in Cleveland, Ohio.


Class


Visits


ZoIe


Frederick Cole














Gary Lee Collins
Gary Lee Collins


Pot,- Ann Chrcrl n


Kosemarv (hnrlstan


\ i


Caleb Clement Jr.









Of '71


Canal


College


JEANNETTE RAMONA COX
August 31, 1952
Managua, Nicaragua
Jeannette was a member of the French Club for four years.
She was a member of the Nurses' Aides Club, and served as
secretary for two years. She was also active in Pink Girls.
Jeannette worked on the year book during each of her four
years in high school, and in her senior year, served as editor.
Jeannette was a member of the National Honor Society, and
served as secretary. She was also a member of the Student Ad-
visory Committee and the Philosophian Society. Jeannette
plans to attend Canal Zone College and later the University
of Florida, studying for a career in medicine. She also plans to
study Spanish during the summer, before attending CZC, in
Mexico or Spain.

KATHLEEN ANNE DERAPS
June 25, 1953
Ancon, Canal Zone
Kathy was a member of the Caribe Club for three years,
and was a member of the advertising staff for the yearbook in
her senior year. Kathy participated in volleyball and speedball
intramurals and was a member of the junior Powder Puff
team. She worked on many committees, and was vice-presi-
dent of the senior class. K.irh\ plans to attend college in San
Antonio, Texas where she will obtain her Bachelor of Science
degree for her career as a registered nurse.

MICHAEL EDWARD DEXTER
July 1, 1953
Fort Benning, Georgia
Mike came to CHS in his junior year, and rapidly became
an active member of the class of '71. In his senior year, he was
president of the CHS Student Association. Mike continued his
participation in athletics at CHS, playing on the varsity tennis
and baseball teams. Mike was a member of the Caribe Club,
the "C" Club, and the National Honor Society. Mike plans to
study engineering at William and Mary or the University of
New Mexico.

PEDRO JUAN DIAZ
February 26, 1952
San Juan, Puerto Rico
Pedro attended CHS for three years. He was a ROTC pla-
toon leader, and a member of the Boys' Drill team. Pedro
plans to enlist in the Army's Special Forces, and Ranger train-
ing, and to attend Officer Candidate School.

WENDY MARIE FLORES
November 1, 1953
Leesville, Louisiana
Wendy was the 1970 Jamboree Queen. She was a member
of the Girls' Drill team in her sophomore year. W\t nd was a
member of the Senior Advisory and Jr.-Sr. Prom Committees.
She plans to attend C.Z.C. for two years, and then transfer to
the United States.

DENISE ANNETTE FOSHEE
February 24, 1953
New Orleans, Louisiana
Denise was a cheerleader and an ROTC sponsor in her sen-
ior year. She lettered in tennis in eleventh grade. Denise was
vice-president of the Caribe Club, and a member of the
French Club and the National Honor S.x, icn Denise plans to
attend college and earn a teaching degree.


Pedro Juan Diaz


Wendy Marie Flores


Denise Annette Foshee










--,9






rl ^


'I
ri



1 .


John B. Funderburk


2\








Brenda Lee Gibson














Stephen Armand Goulet


Catherine Ann Gercich


haron Louise Uoioen


John Michael Hannah


JOHN B. FUNIDERBURK
January i, 1953
Tucson, Arizona
John particip ated in varsity track and ..il.III during his four ,. irs
at CHS. He served on the Jamborec Party (Committee. John plar 10
become either a machinist or a diesel mechanic after graudation.

CATHERINE ANN GERCICH
January 1. 1953
Lynnwood, California
Cathy has attended CHS for four years. She participated in N 1.Ik'bil
intramurals during her freshman and sophomore years. As a senior, ,he
was a Member of the Girls' Drill Team. Cathy also served on theJr.-Sr.
Prom Committee. Her future plans include study at a college in Cali-
fornia or Florida.

BRFND4 LEE GIBSON
December 6, 1953
Fort Bragg, North Carolina
Brenda entered CHS at the beginning of her sophomore year. Sh
participated in swimming, tennis, basketball, and volleyball intrami
rals, and was a member of the varsity tennis team. After graduation
Brenda would like to attend a junior college, travel extensively, an
pursue a career in hairdressing and art.

SHARON LOUISE GOLDEN
April 15. 1953
Anniston, Alabama
Sharon was a member of the CHS senior band for five years, playing
the flute. She officiated at varsity basketball games in her "r. ,-lirn
year. After graduation, she plans to attend a a nursing school i: Mlhi imi,
Florida.

STEPHEN ARMAND GOULET
September 22, 1952
Somerville, Massachusetts
Stephen entered CHS at the beginning of his senior year. At his for-
mer high school he was a member of the A.F.S., the Chess Club-. he
Math League, and the Science Club, and received an award f,.r bingI
the best chemistry student in the junior class. He also particip.l. d in
varsity track and football. Stephen plans a career as a math ten. h.r

PATRICIA GUTIERREZ
July 20, 1952
Fayetteville, North Carolina
Pat has attended CHS for each of her four years in high scJ.. .I she,
was a member of the Drama Club and assisted with various Tih.-pan
productions. Pat plans to become a woman jockey.

JOHN MICHAEL HANNAH
June 26, 1953
Waynesville, North Carolina
John enjoys motorcycling. He was active in ROTC during hi. trc'h-
man and sophomore years. He served as a cheerleader in the P-.ader
Puff game, and as a member of the Jamboree Party Committt. Il hn
plans a career in aeronautical engineering.

ALLEN SCOTT HARMON
September 23, 1952
Annapolis, Maryland
Art is one of Allen's major interests. He was a member of rlc .Ar
Club for two years, serving as president in his junior year. He :. iIso
art editor of the newspaper and the yearbook in his senior year Allen
was also active in the French Club and Drama Club. He partic:p tIEId in
several plays, and became a Thespian in his senior year. Allen ,.. the
"Voice of Democracy" contest at CHS in his junior year. He I n- to
attend the U.S. Merchant Marine Academy, or Chapman FloatirnL im-
pus in California. He would like to become an architect or a I..mmn er
cial artist.


'I~a~l~~ .


1


Allen Scott Harmon







Caribbean College Club


Iosts "Senior Yight"


Diane Frcnes Hauke





_.U
14


Isaac Her Mk Sep Heng


Isaac Hcrts Mark Srephern Herrmng


DIANE FRANCES HAUKI:
August 21, 1951
Colon, Republic of Panama
Diane has been an active member of many clubs and organizations
at CHS. She was a member of the French Club, the Spanish Club, the
Philosophian Society, the Nurses Aides, the Yearbook staff, and the
Senior Board of Directors; cr' inE as an officer in several of the clubs.
She also served on the Cafeteria, Senior Advisory, and various dance
committees. Diane plans to pursue a course in business administration,
with plans for a career as an executive secretary.

PAUL HERBERT HEADY
March 6, 1953
Olney, Illinois
Paul attended CHS for only two years. At his former high school in
Salem, Illinois, he was a member of the Spanish and Pep Clubs, and
the varsity track team. He participated in the ROTC program at CHS.
Paul plans to major in Public Arts in college with a job in a radio or
television studio in mind.

ISAAC HERES
January 4, 1953
Puerto Armuelles, Chiriqui
Isaac was active in ROTC throughout his high school years, partici-
pating on the Boys' Drill team, and in his senior year, serving as com-
mander of"F" Company. He participated in basketball intramurals, and
as j tre-hrrijn .nd sophomore was a member of the varsity football
team Alrtr gradu.ai.n, Isaac plans to attend Florida State University.

MARK STEPHEN HERRING
)frr I ., 19i;
Ancon. Canal Z, ne
Mark has attended Canal Zone schools all his life. Six of these years
were at Cristobal High School. After graduation, Mark plans to learn a
trade


4 L







LCdr C W Murphy, Mrs. Linda Nelson, Capt. A. L. Gallin, Miss Leslie Berger, Mr. Mer-
rick E Banks, and Dr. Levin.


On Tuesday, January 19th, at 7:30
p.m., at the Women's Club Building
in Margarita, the members of the
class of '71, their parents, and friends
attended "Senior Night." This activi-
ty is sponsored annually by the Schol-
arship Committee of the Caribbean
College Club.
The program included a panel of
speakers from various vocational
fields and was stimulating and inter-
esting for all.
Following the meeting, refresh-
ments were served. At this time, the
seniors were given an opportunity to
question each of the speakers individ-
ually concerning his or her special in-
terests.


i








Senior Class Elects


'I,
F ,


Frederick John Highley
















Stephanie Bridiga ies
Stephanie Bridiga Illies


FREDERICK JOHN HIGHLY
October 19, 1953
Colon, Republic of Panama
Fred has attended Canal Zone schools all his lite, including six years
at CHS. He participated in football intramurals.

NANCY HUSON
May 1, 1953
Colon, Republic of Panama
Nancy was in Nurses Aides for three years, and was a Pink Girl for
two years. She was homeroom representative in her sophomore year.
She participated in volleyball intramurals and in the Powder Puff
Speedball Game. Nancy plans to attend Brigham Young University.





STEPHANIE BRIGIDA ILLIES
October 2, 1953
Colon, Republic of Panama
Stephie was in the Spanish Club, Language Lab Club, and the Girls'
Glee Club. She took part in volleyball and speedball intramurals. Ste-
phie plans to go to college and become an occupational therapist.

ERIC THOMAS IRION
July 27, 1953
Oceanside, California
Eric attended CHS for five years. He participated in basketball intra-
murals in his sophomore year. Eric plans to go to I..ll.gi


Eric Thomas Irion


ROBERT RUDOLPH JOHNSON
January 8, 1953
Minneapolis, Minnesota
Robert has been at CHS for three years. He plans to travel after
graduation.

SHERRY ANN KERN
Jlu/ 19, 195i
Mobile, Alabama
Sherry was in the Caribe Club and was an S.A. representative. She
participated in Volleyball and was on the Drill Team. Sherry plans to
attend C.Z.( then go to the States to earn a degree in data processing.


RvcI t R d.l -ph J4 ......1f.


Shrr) Ann Krrr


f 1 IF









koard Of Directors



ANTONIA KLASOVSKY
March 12, 1953
Cristobal, Canal Zone
Toni was on the Student Advisory Committee and the Board of Di-
rectors. She plans to attend a junior college in Florida and major in
humanities.

FREDERICK EUGENE KNAUSS
October 15, 1952
Nashville, Tennessee
Fred was on the Swim Team and earned his letter. He plans to join
the Army and become a helicopter pilot. He wants to go to Vietnam.


Antonia Klasovsky Frederick Eugene Knauss





NEAL A. LaROCHE
August 28, 1952
England
Neal attended CHS for only one year. He plans to become an art
teacher. -

ANN MARIE LAURITZEN
May 24, 1953
Baltimore, Maryland
Ann Marie was in the Caribe Club and the Band. She plans to attend
college and major in Biology and Oceanography.



Neal A. LaRoche Ann Marie Lauritzen











I-j










SENIOR BOARD OF DIRECTORS
Front Column: Diane Hauke, Carmen Butler, Mike Dexter, Judy McLain. Center Column: Robert Phillips, Wendy Flores, Raul Castro, Kathy
DeRaps. Back Column: Lana Boone, Beth Carter, Dennis Maxwell, Denise Foshee.








RODRIGO LINDO
V ., April 25, 195.3
Panama City, Republic of Panama
f "Rod" was a member of the Spanish Club for four years and was sec-
retary-treasurer in his sophomore year. He worked on several commit-
-D a tees. Rod plans to attend college.

SSHELLEY MADISON LUINI
r June 10, 1953
Buffalo, New York
Shelley was a cheerleader for two years and participated in ikf rl.ill
and volleyball. She was a member of the G.A.A. and the Caribe Club.
Shelley plans to attend college in New York and become an English
teacher.

Rodrigo Lindo Shelley Madison Lund
HILA P. LYMAN
October 14, 1953
L Bremerton, Washington
Hila lettered in swimming in both her sophomore and freshman
years. She was secretary of the junior class. Hila was on the Girl's Drill
Team, and was Drill Team and Battalion sponsor. Hila plans to attend
SSecretarial School.

JOHN HARTLEY MARTIN
March 14, 1953
Panama City, Republic of Panama
John was president of the junior class. He was ROTC Battalion and
... iDrill Team Commander. He played intramural basketball for four

lF years. John plans to attend a Military Academy or join the Armed
f 1^ Forces.

Hila P. Lyman John Hartley Martin


JAIME MARTINEZ
August 5, 1952
Colon, Republic of Panama
O tt Jaime was active in ROTC and was on the first Drill Team to com-
Spete in the States. He plans to join the Army as an officer after college.

S" DENNIS PAUL MAXWELL
SApril 19, 195.3
New York City, New York
Dennis was vice president of his sophomore class. He was in ROTC
four years and was "E" Company Commander. Dennis plans to study
Architecture at the University of Florida.


Jaime Martinez Dennis Paul Maxwell


JUDY ANN McLAIN
April 27, 195.3
SColon, Republic of Panama
Judy was in Nurses' Aides and the Thespian Society, and was presi-
S- dent of both in her senior year. Judy won several acting awards and had
parts in several plays. She plans to attend college.

SARAH LOUISE McLEAN
December 9, 1952
h Cristobal, Canal Zone
Sally played basketball and volleyball. She worked on the Junior
Privilege Committee and the Senior Advisory Council. Sally plans to
travel in Europe after graduation.


Sarah Louise McLean


Judv Ann McLami







JOSE JAIME MEDINA
March 29, 1953
San Jose, California
This was Jose's first year at CHS. He was an S.A. representative, a
member of the Tradewind and Caribbean Staffs, and a ROTC platoon
leader. He was also a member of the varsity football, baseball, and bas-
ketball teams.

SUSAN WARD MENDENHALL
December 23, 1952
I Springfield, Ohio
I Susan has attended CHS for only two years. She was very active in
athletics and other school functions in the U.S. and continued her in-
terest at CHS. She participated in varsity and intramural -*,.imn'irn'.
II i tennis, basketball, and volleyball, and was a member of the GAA.
Susan plans to attend Miami University in Oxford, Ohio, majoring in
lose Jaime Mcdini Susar3 Ward Mendernhll physical education.
"...,:' ..... KATHRYN MARIE MILLIGAN
April 23, 1953
S Bozeman, Montana
S Kathy was a member of the Nurses' Aides Club, and of the Pink
Girls. She served as a student assistant. Kathy played volleyball in her
S freshman year. She also served on various decorating and publicity
Committees for plays and dances. In her senior year, she was elected
Carnival Queen. Kathy plans to attend Canal Zone College or Monta-
4. na State University, majoring in elementary education. After college,
she plans to attend airline stewardess school.

ALEIDA MONTENEGRO
February 14, 1953
Colon, Republic of Panama
"Monty" attended CHS for two years. She was a member of the
Spanish Club and participated in volleyball and basketball intramurals.
Kathrvn Marie Mllliin Alcida Montenregro Monty plans to attend college and pursue a career as a computer pro-
grammer.

WILLIAM A. MURPHY
July 7, 1953
Fayetteville, North Carolina
"Murph" attended CHS for two years. He participated in basketball
intramurals and varsity basketball and football. He was active in
ROTC, and a member of the Boys' Drill Team. He was selected out-
( standing MI for the fourth nine weeks. He was also a member of the
senior privilege committee. "Murph" plans to specialize in electronics
., -- in college.

DON ALME OLSEN
June 6, 1953
Whitefish, Montana
Don was active in the sports program at CHS, particip.iing in varsi-
Wllham A Murph, Don Alme Olen ty football and swimming and football intramurals. Don plans to at-
tend Canal Zone College, and perhaps transfer to an oceanographic
school.

NEIL CLIFFTON PATTON
February 7, 1952
Colon, Republic of Panama
Neil was one of CHS's most outtanding athletes. He participated in
varsity baseball, track, and football, and lettered every year. He was se-
lected most valuable player of the 1i;,i,.70 school year. and also made
the All Zone Football Team. Neil plans to become an aviator or a den-
tist.

JANE MARY PAULSON
April 10, 1953
Ancon, Canal Zone
Jane participated in volleyball, basketball, and speedball intramurals.
She worked on committees for the Sadie Hawkins Day Dance and the
Neil Cliff on Panton Jane Man Paulson Jr.-Sr. Prom. Jane plans to attend secretarial school.






ROBERT RANDOLPH PHILLIPS
March/ 16, 1953
Montgomerv, Alabama
Robert has been in CHS for three c car., and in this time, had be-
come president of the Caribe Club, Vice-'resident of the NHS, a "C"
Club member, President of the Senior Class, and ROTC Battalion Ex-
Sr ecutive 011l... He lettered in football twice, and twice in baseball. He
S also attended the University of Florida for a NSF program, and attend-
ed the Naval Post-graduate School at Monterey, California. Robert
Plans to study pre-law and then go on to Law School.


Robert Randolph Phillips


Josephine Marie Porbes


Toby Ray Phillips


Ingrid Portier


TOBY RAY PHILLIPS
December 1953
Burgaw, North Carolina
This has been Toby's first year in CHS and he has lettered twice in
track. His future plan is to become a marine biologist.


JOSEPHINE MARIE PORBES
June 11, 1953
New Orleans, Louisiana
Josie has attended Canal Zone Schools tor two years. After gradua-
tion, she plans to get a job and plans on going ahead with her musical
education in piano and chorus.

INGRID PORTIER
September 28. 19 53
Djakarta, Indonesia
Ingrid has attended CHS all through her high school years. She was as-
sistant stage manager in the play, "Bell, Book, and Candle" and "The
Black Flamingo." She plans to go to the States and get a job.







4 -- 11 I
:,.- -:. jr: .' i
Ono


"Actually, it was worth breaking my leg just to be able to put my feet up in Mr. Bock's class," comments senior, Wally Russon.


o-0-
























Chris Bailey Richardson


Dann% Ras Robinson


Jasmin Anna Rivera


Nescor John Rodriguez


Picture


Not


Available


"aren Lsnn Sihill


CHRIS BAILEY RICHARDSON
December 26, 1952
Seattle, W''ahigton
Chris participated in varsity and intramural volleyball during her
three years at CHS. She received a "Driver of the year" award for the
year '69-'70. In her senior year, she was sponsor of"E" company. Chris
was married and plans to continue her education.

JASMIN ANNA RIVERA
October 31, 1953
Cham, Germ.in
Jasmin was a member of the French Club at CHS. F. .11. iri, gradua-
tion, she plans to attend college, major in ln.u.i .t. and then travel.





DANNY RAY ROHIN,0)N
April 20, 1953
Covington, Kentucky
Danny was a member of the Tradewind Staff, the Caribbean Sports
Parachute Club, the Civics Club, the Drama Club, and the choir. He
played basketball in his sophomore year. Danny plans to attend college
in Texas, Kcnruk'. or North Carolina.

NESTOR JOHN RODRIGUEZ
September 18, 1953
Santurce, Puerto Rico
Nestor has attended CHS for two and a half years. He plans to study
music and architecture after graduation.




KAREN LYNN SCHILL
April 25, 1953
Galion, Ohio
This was Karen's first year at CHS. She was a member of the Span-
ish Club, the G.A.A., and the newspaper staff. In her senior year she
was editor of the second page (editorial page) of the Tradewind. She
also played tennis in her freshman and senior years. Karen plans to
major in medical tlhn-,il, ,\ at Canal Zone College.

NAI-YUEN SHUM
September 17, 1953
Macau, China
Nai-Yuen has attended CHS for two years. He hopes to become a
chemist.


Nai-Yuen Shum


JAMES H. SPANGLER
March 18, 1953
San Pedro, California
This was Jim's first year at Cristobal High School. He participated
in intramural and varsity track at his former school. After ior ,lu..;i. n.
Jim plans to become an automobile mechanic.

JACQUELINE FAITH SPRINGER
December 8, 1953
Ft. Eustis, V'ireini:
Jackie was a member of the Caribe Club. She marched with the
Girls' Drill Team, and in her Senior year, was the sponsor of "E" com-
pany. Jackie plans to become an x-ray technician.


Jacquehne Fallh Springer













DOUGLAS ROBERT STEVENS
April 11, 1953
Panama City, Republic of Panama
Doug was a member of the Spanish and Language Lab
Clubs. In his senior year, he served as historian of the first,
and vice-president of the latter. He lettered in baseball in
both his junior and senior years. Doug plans to attend col-
lege in Texas, majoring in languages and history with
plans for a career in the diplomatic corps.

ELIGIO FERNANDO THOMAS
January 7, 1951
Panama City, Republic of Panama
Eligio was active in ROTC at CHS, and in his senior
year, was commander of the boys' Drill Team. He also par-
ticipated in junior varsity basketball. Eligio plans to join
the army, and perhaps later attend college.

LEWIS EDWARD VALDEZ
November 19, 1953
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
ROTC and dramatics have occupied much of Lewis'
time in high school. He has attended Leadership School
and participated in several Thespian productions. He
played football in his junior year, and was also elected to
the National Honor Society. Lewis plans to attend college,
and perhaps later join the army.

JOSE F. VALENCIA
June 8, 1953i
San Juan, Puerto Rico
Joe was a member of the varsity baseball, track, and
swimming teams. He was also active in ROTC, marching
on the Boys' Drill Team, and in his senior year, serving as
executive officer of "F" Company. Joe plans to attend
Brooklyn College in New York.

DANIEL PAUL VALENTINE
October 1I, 195,3
Detroit, Michigan
Danny was the yearbook photograph or t or our years.
He was a homeroom alternate in ninth and tenth grades,
and in his junior year, served as treasurer of the SA. He
was also active in ROTC. Danny plans to attend college,
join the Air Force, and pursue a career in the field of avia-
tion.

SYLVIA ANN VAMPRINE
Novoeher 1, 191,i
New Orleans. Louisiana
Sylvia was a member of the Nurses' Aides Club and
served as historian for one year. She played in the CHS
band for four years, and was a member of the Tradewind
Staff. She served on various dance committees, and was a
varsity cheerleader in her senior year. Sylvia plans to major
in law at LS.U.


Jose F. Valncia


iir


Jenny del Milagro Winz


SA i




Pridla Ann Zavinsky


Douglas Robert Stevens


Eligio Fernando Thomas


Lewis Edwand Valdez


LINDA ALICE VEST
November 6, 1952
Ft. Clayton, Canal Zone

THOMAS KENNETH WALLENIUS
April 24, 1952
Helsinki, Finland

TERRY LEE WALLINE
November 22, 1953
Fort McClellan, Alabama
Terry participated in swimming and water polo. He was
active in ROTC, a member of the Color Guard in his jun-
ior year, and of the Boys' Drill Team in his senior year.
Terry plans to attend college in California, majoring in ar-
chitectural engineering.

KAREN WESTERBERG
August 15, 1953
Flint, Michigan
During her high school years, all of them at CHS,
Karen was a member of the Caribe Club, the swim team,
the Girls' Chorus, and the Tradewind Staff After gradua-
tion, she plans to study computer programming.

JENNY DEL MILAGRO WIRTZ
March 18, 1951
San Jose, Costa Rica
Jenny was a member of the Spanish Club, and served as
treasurer during her junior and senior years. She partici-
pated in varsity ,. 11 I. .I during her freshman and sopho-
more years. Jenny plans to become a nurse.

PRICILLA ANN ZAVINSKY
January 22, 1953
Terrell, Texas
This was "Penny's" first year at CHS. She was a mem-
ber of the Nurses' Aides Club. In her junior year, she re-
ceived a $25 savings bond for her bookkeeping. Penny
plans to attend F ,tirr. Il, Beauty College.









?aces Without o acts


Sr"


Ralph Ender


George Scheibe
George Scheibe


Alexis Normandia


MICHAEL R. ANDREE
June 5,. 1953
Annapolis, Maryland

/DAVID RAYMOND DIAZ
September 9, 195 i
Baltimore. Maryland
David played varsity football during his junior year at CHS, and
helped plan the Jamboree party. He plans to attend technical school
after graduation.

DANIEL '. I 1I Y FERGUSON
June 26, 1951
Macon, Georgia

RICHARD ALLEN KRESGE
October 9, 19 s
Ancon, Canal /one
Rickv plans to attend trade school after graduation.


THOMAS ADDISON PURSLEY
July 9, 1952
Suffern, New York
Tom was active in sports during his high school years, participat-
ing in intramural I. ..-- iII and wrestling, and playing on the varsity
football team. He was a member of the "C" Club, and in his senior
year, served as secretary. He was also a member of the Math Club
and the Rifle Team, and was active in ROTC. Tom plans to attend
the United States Military Academy at West Point, New York.

DANNY DALE TWEEDY
December 23, 1952
Victervillc, California
Danny was a homeroom representative in his sophomore year.
He plans to enter an apprenticeship program in Tucson, Arizona,
planning a career as a carpenter.

MARIA DE LOS ANGELES ZAYAS
January 4, 1952
Mayaguez, Puerto Rico
Maria was a member of the Spanish and Pep Clubs. She plans to
become a psychologist.


. .


Davie Teves


. .


And acts Without aces.





Senior faces Display 1axy Uoods ...


rc-)


---


Danny Robinson


I









-, 1- CrHH
John Martin, Dennis Maxwell


Stephanie Illies


Danny Valentine, Sherry Kern, Mr. Reeves





Camera Capturses grief Iimpses Of Senior ic. .
PARADES . ELECTIONS
I fmm \6


Ellie Blevins, Jane Paulson, Rod Lindo, Shelly I nd. ( irnm, i
Denise Foshcc, Dennis Maxwell. Cathy Gercich, '.' .,,I. I I. .-
CONVERSATIONS ..


I
Q ..:' n K rl,. |.Ii.ll In
,n.r l .0r i rr,..r


Dine Hjukc jnd S',ndri Alhcrei


N ii ut u rn hun.. NM r ,mirrli. 1)..L 'r.'.(n ". .t' ( l.nn md I. l. rr,-


Aleida Montenegro, Jeannie Basset, and
Vivian Boseman.
AND MORE CLASSES ...


...'" _, | l-- -,- -.._ - ,: ^

A -_- -

Alma Austin. Lana Bonne, Ingrid Portier, Jenny I r .\ I ,I-r. rrL \\X'illin, i i rpI ,. I int. PIUl n. .rnl.,n (il r.iL: I,.hCl





JAtroduciH . .
Uhe Jtall Of lame


'-El


ft


~~~~~~.-- N..4r',**rt ~ fJ~IPr~(~







I- t.


Mr.


and Miss CHtS


MAiciael Veter


- Class


Of


'77


. 4 .


'4


'I--


-C4


D)iae -Hauke


















aMost Jntellectual


Robert Phillips


e


aua booae


i


1 II '


most
Michael Dexter


Likely


Z'o Succeed


Denise ?oshee


--


J~pwr~

iB .-






*r L
liit
eejiB cTy
..^^ .-jl ? fti,


p.


Rest
Dressed
Carame Kutler
Rodrigo indo


Rest
lookihq
foknm iHfnderburk
Wendy olares








Rest
Dancers
Carmen Hutler
Raul Castro


Friendliest

H1ila Cyman
Dennis Jlawell
Denise foshee








Most
ralelted
Judy IMcCldai
gDomald Yyrd


most
Athletic
Patsy AAusti
NVeil Pattoe


IIIru






Also PreseHtiHg RuHers-Up . .


Vqm


1st Row: Robert Phillips Mr. CHS, Most Likely To Succeed; Shelly Lund Miss CHS. 2nd Row: Michael Dexter Most Intellectual; Lana
Boone Most Likely To Succeed. 3rd Row: Raul Castro Best Dressed; Wendy Flores Best Dressed. 4th Row: William Murphy Wit-
tiest, Best Dancer; Beth Carter Best Dancer. 5th Row: Jose Medina Best Personality; Susan Mendanhall Most Athletic. 6th Row. Allen
Harmon Most Talented; Rodrigo Lindo Best Looking.

AMd Chose Jot Pictured ...


Wittiest
Patricia jutierrez
,Mark J-erriln


KunnHers-up.
Sandra Alberga Most Intellectual
Rosemary Christian Best Looking
Toni Klasovsky Best Dressed, Most Talented
Sherry Kern Wittiest
"Cubby" Clement Most Athletic
Hila Lyman Best Personality


hJest

Personality
jfam jorneby
Dennis JMawell
























Time i te life of each girl
and boy
A time o sorrow, and yet of

radmuation realization
brings,
Of tke end of many things
Classes, dances, football
games will be no more,
the magic of the kigh
school year is o'er
though some may consider
all things done,
Chey soon will lare
(ife's just begun










Juniors


r.


4 /


C,


5zizI z7Z


s'
-







It A-
6 r ,.


- IW


vj)a tie
Alger
( 7lcn
Bakcr
Frank
Berrn
Ril aird
Boot h


Brian
Allen
Barbara
Banks
Barbara
Betcher
Henry
Borscllino


At\


Iw^ ,O


-w r


Sheila
Alheriga
Paul
Baiwl
Wilhu n
B Mahri
Bonom


Martha
Anton
Mithacl
Barger
Gerianne
Blanchette
Debra
Boswcll


Michael
Apodaca
Jai me
Barraza
Robert
Bloemer Jr
Rita
Boyland


1


i\/




































J.-.


*


4"
#


I A: U


",I I


N\ ", ,
r


Janet
Brandenburg
Helen
Castro
Frank
Cicchetto
Mark
Collins


Linda
Brock
Cheryl
Caudill
Pamela
Coad
Sonia
Colon


Carlos
Brown
Jay
Caudill
/Aminta
Cobb
Wayne
Couts


Catherine
Carlisle
Deborah
Cheshire
Roberta
Cole
Ivette
CumminiL'"


Mary
Cash
Randy
( I, .i; .. .
.,/Chcryl
Coleman
Karen
Currier


F












I--, -. r


ii-,

'it


re


Emilie
Daniel
/Clifford
Ferrell


" t


John
Day
Maria
Fontanez


.:/ <-












fd t



t 1ff


Jimmy
( xxwin
Ann
(;on al/lt


William
Gillespie
Zan
Green


Nadia Robles, "The feminine mystique
at work!"


k


Shelia
Dancer
Brenda
Egger


.-i

kI
William
Deaton Jr.
Andrew
Foshee


I


Nancy
Edmonson
Stephan
Fugleberg


Mardcttr
(i,.n icr
(Grcnorg
GoLucn


m




















CLASS OFFICERS: Harry Townsend (Vice-President), Cathy Carlisle (president), Patricia
Paine (Treasurer), Jackie Parker (Secretary).


The class of '72 was the largest and
one of the most active and spirited
classes of Cristobal High School.
Through the efforts of class officers
the Juniors obtained an open lunch
on Tuesday and Thursdays of each
week. Another highlight of the year
was the selection of the class ring
which was round with a gold stone.
The Juniors will long remember
PSAT and NMSQT which are among
the many tests they took in prepara-
tion for college. The girls in the Jun-
ior Class organized and presented a
fashion show which demonstrated the
do's and don't of pants wear. Juniors
also planned and presented a Junior


Class Assembly. They were also re-
sponsible for the annual Junior-Senior


Prom
iors.


honoring the graduating Sen-


Carol Ross, Marian Kredell, Jackie Parker, Lynn Gregg, Sheila Alberga, Cathy Carlisle, Mary
Norval, Titi Cole, Karen Currier, Nancy Edmondson. The do's and don't of dress wear.


Barbara Grier Raymond Gsell
Joseph Herring Kathleen Hess


Edwin Hammond
Kenneth Hill II


Mark Hanly
William Huffman


Marian Gregg
Patricia Hauke

















U'


C-~ 'V





0r



*1


M W .
K.^ar^
fiA'1' }


June Ilund
Katherine Kraus
Kathleen MiGilbcrry


yuniors


Irrna Mon clova
Patricia Paine


'I





Kc
.Il


James Jackson
Marian Kredell
John Meeker


Douglass Jeffries
Christina Loizeaux
Shvla Miller


Paulette Jordi
Donald Mans
Michael Minchart


Daniel Knauss
Michael McCann
Dale Mitre


granted Open uinch Zwice A Week


John Musser 11
Louise Palmer


Mary Norval
Ronald Palser


L'


Beverly Olsen
Marc Parker


Stanley Oster
Deborah Pate


44//


'dl


S

.- I 1
4


cu--
r


.11






















Robin Pritham
Marlene Rice


Raymond Ramos
Susan Ridge


Jose Recio
Randy Robinson


Carmen Reed
Nadia Robles


Lourdes Reyes
Carol Ross


Class


Of


'72 Picks Vellow Stone 7or Ring


Deborah Rowley Joseph Romeski Juan Sanchez Gary Sheibe Frank Scott
Michael Scott Arthur Serig Higinia Shaffer p-James Shafkfr irStephen Shobe
Ronnie Sills Judith Simmons Valarie Simms Jean Smith Michael Snider






fJuiors


Display


rCheir


zCalents


funior


Class


Assembly


I.


I
WI


Kathryn Stephens Peter Swain
Loisa Thomas Harry Townsend


Reggie Southerland
Catherine Tcrwilliger
Robert Tschumn


Mattia Spagna
Dorothy Terwilliger
Carol Wertz


Michael Spagna
Ehukai Teves
Aurelia Williams


The one and only, Brenda Egger!


Susann Zachry Maribel Zayas


At


Michael Wood Ann Worthen


Marisol Zayas






latecomers


Douglas Jeffries. "I'm standing like this be-
cause there's no ball."


Linda Brock, Ann Gonzalez, Mary Norval. THREE FOR THE ROAD.










Sophomores


Nil 6
- I



; iAA


f- 1




\w ^


4


J r


S '


S-.-


/I


Donna
Baker
,~ Timothy
Blancihard
Jcttrcv
Briem
Susan
Burge
-Gicrald
C otfin


amrncs
Barr
Paul
Bleichcr
Edward
Brings Jr.
Kathrvn
Bush
Lourdcs
Colon


I


Nilkit.it
Adam.n,


R()h.iii. i\
Bctinu iirt

Blocnimr
Mclind.i
Brow n
Jlll lc'
('hi Id rc.


(,ii

I ) nl 1 .


H < k
in Para
I.iilu
(imino


Stephen
Aponte
Michael
Bjorneby
"iJ Pam
Bridwell
Karl
Bundv

Cirulli


Marilyn
Baxter
Veffrv
Blevins
Kathleen
Brown
y/Diane
Caroll
v'/Kathleen
Colpe


B`ddl


kL -- i


U

)


;e. I
:_rrrr"4
!:31; .tr
;r.:-




































































I/Lavera
Cooke
Brian
Deraps
-"Joseph
Ender
Robert
Ford
Edward
Golden


/Leland
Cummings
Jane
Dohle
Kathryn
Fj rrirn ..nr
Ronald
Firi trh Jr.
VHenry
Goldmann


vA anda
Cummingr
John
Dohle
fKathleen
Fauber
Lisa
Furr
v/Peter
Goldmann


/Guy
Damiani
/Judy
Dohle
Edna

v'Nina
Gercich
V/Patrice
Gonier


Kathie
Danielsen
Rosita
D,,minruc.',
Estelica
Ferris
Mark
Gibson
Esther
Gonzalez


;-i

;;;hi
F


j. :d
rg


Marc
Denis
Harry
Dowell
Pedro
Fontanez
Cornelius
Goeberrus

Gonzalez


























A
Ci


Susan
Helmerichs
Donna
Jackson


I/Roy
Gscll
Dennis
Hurlbut
' Paul
Kilmcr
Srot
Loilcaux
VEdythe
Marsh


Toni the TIGER!


v Michael
Hayden
Harold
Hunter


S"-


S1~


r- 4


Dcbra

Linda.


lakcn,
v/ K.itic
Krmius
V A\


V Rv
( att

L morn
1 N H,
iti rit


/ .uman
I r nan


L, Nancv
G I -d. i- %
t/ Linda
Huff
Mkhclc

John
Lecc
SLa.wrentc
Macts .,


7_./


\
s,
J -


Igo


\CNN


r,









kr+1'C


~3~f g ~e
~1 ..i
II







Sophomore Nloat J tHomecomting Parade


CLASS OFFICERS: Beth Wainio (vice-
president), Nancy Ridge (president), Deb-
bit Meeker (Sec.-Treasurer).


This year's sophomore class was
outstanding both as a group and as
individuals. Scott Loizeaux and Paul
Bleicher received High Honors dur-
ing the first semester.
The sophomore class was active
both in special class activities and
school events as a whole. They organ-
ized a float for the Homecoming
Game Parade, choosing Debbie
Meeker and Jan Janosik as their rep-
resentatives.
In cooperation with the Freshman
class, the sophomores sponsored the
Freshman-Sophomore dance on Feb-
ruary thirteenth. Ted Scott and Barba-
ra Bloemer became king and queen
for the evening.
Another sophomore worthy of
mention is Edythe Marsh winner
of the "Non-French Student" contest
sponsored by the French Club during
the French Week.
The enthusiastic sophomore offi-
cers planned several exciting events
for the spring


CLASS SP NM',(
Mr. Norman


.MarriaNobel Art


Marrianne Verruno. Proud \'nner of"Nobel Art Award".


Judy Dohle. Pr..iuiny for the future?


Sw


ii6


~l~nsr ~









C


Kathryn Smith. "Maxis forever!"


v Elena Maxwell
Judith Menges
V/Barbara Moody
Viana Ostrea


Sheila Mayani
Linda Merrick
Manuel Munoz
Terri Overstreet


I L
Mark McKenney L/Debra Meeker
vPeggy Miller Jack Mohlman
Robert Nordstom Myrta Olivera
L.Peter Pacheco Elizabeth Palser


Ada Ortiz
Paul Peralta
Warren Phillips


v/Noelia Ortiz
Rosa Pcrcz
Betty Queen


Paul Bleicher tries his hand at typing.


I I


W OW- 1































George Rivera. Working up an appetite!


Ronny Ramos
4Joann Reid
Nancy Ridge
,-Carolann Roach


Bonnie Ramos
vMllan Richardson
v4brge Rivera
Raymond Robertson


r


Debra Meeker. "You can't say she wasn't warned!"


Elsa Sanchez Paul Sanchez Jr.
Vickie Schaub Diane Schloredt
Theodore Scott Pedro Simmons
Al Simms ioseph Smith






Sophomore Class Consists Of
I A:--- Na w


141


Students


I I


Patricia Snider
Yvonne Thomas


Jame Collins. An example of utmost concentration


Mary Spivey
Judith Tomlinson


VAA

II



'LI
k r ^ B


Jose Torn L/Mlaria Toro
Elizabeth Wainio Luann Ware


*''

c
C J
S-


Mlarianne Verrunc
Susan \Willis


vM4artha Vest
v Linda Woods


Michele Kessler. "If I
stand this!"


could only under


.I


I'"
1""


r .s I unomh


Ct.


o()cmarI BctanIOurt. "I dare vot'"


1b








latecomers


Some people just don't know how to pose!


Jeff Melinda
Brien Brown
.,Denise /George
Bullinger Cruz


NOT PICTURED:
Juan Buen
iWVilliam Branner
III
Carl Couts
Marian Crouch
Robin Hartshorn
Jan Janosik
LAngeline LaRoche
Angel Torres
.-Damaris Torres

















V


Sue Ltinda
Enangelas Huff


Henry
Dingman
t/Toni
Torres


Elaine
Dusin
Ralph
Zachanr










I ",


Edythe Marsh, Kathy Brown, Michele Kessler. "Come now, it can't be that boring "


*h-T vE It" 4 1P"
Mardette Garner, Patrice Gonier. "Are you
two tip-tluein thr'ouLgh the tulips iinr



































( rf
A A





A '


2



.tpa


U).


Charles

Carol
Baker
Arnaldo

Robert
Brockman

BIut her


Deborah
Alberga
Evelyn
Barraza
C.arl
B >\vers
Amber
BAilr,
iM rd
Bx ,d


John
Alexaitis
Rodger
Beale
Charlotte
Bovland
L/De-bra
Brown
BI~iov n
leanne
Calkins


William
Andree
Christopher
Bensen
George
Brannen
Donald
Brown
Deborah
Care\


Susan
Arbaugh
Paula
i i ll. I lettC
,ifPamela
I .1 l .. II
Debra
Budd
Alan
Cheshire


i ,onald
Austin
David
Bleicher
L/aura
Brock
VElizabeth
Burgess
Choe
Christian


Freshlmei


t 4
xS. I






































































Debra
Coe
V/Mark
Davila
STrina
Ferguson
Barbara
Goodwin
Karan
Harden


Alexis
Coleman
Ted
Deaton
Thomas
Finneman
'Karen
Goulet
Kimberly
Hartshorn


William
Ciccolo
Laveda
Dancer
Ramon
Diaz
Rebecca
Gewin
Gregory
Grist


Renee
Cliette
Michelle
Darcy
Karen
Fauber
Maria
Gonzalez
Francisco
Hamilton


James
Collins

Del Busto
Steven
Fo'r % di
Daniel
Green
Brian
H ,J'.,


Anne
Crouch
Raymond
De Vault
Clifford
Gabriel
Clarissa
Grr CL .r
Cynthia
Heath


I
S


..44
























Melody Hoffman Parry Holt
Bruce Jackson 6y ce Janosik


James Huffman
V/Michael Jeffries


V~-- -I
'4


Iris Hernandez Anne Herring
Marcia HumphreytPamela Husband
jennv Jimcncz William Jimenez
Karen Jones Sandra Kaufer
D)a\id Lec Victor Lee


Cheryl Hieronymus
Leif Irion
vjames Jones
Cheryl Kresge
Ann Lovd


Eager Freshmen impossible to hold still.


,au ..,





tura
Iinr Iiia


T -



Tonv Lyons


Kim Marohl Deshea Mason


Sandra May \Susan Mccullough






,March 25 Speedball iame aives


Freshame Ckance


Zo Show Class Spirit


I






Cherri Hieronymus (secretary-treasurer), Victor Lee (president), Carol Baker (vice presi-
dent).


"Be sure you get all the crumbs tt "


The freshman class this year partic-
ipated in the Homecoming parade,
the Freshman-Sophomore Brawl, the
Fresh-Soph Speedball Game, and the
Fresh-Soph Dance.
The Freshman Queen, Laura
Brock. Her escort was Phil Miller.
Reigning at the dance was Princess
Carol Baker and Prince Fred Wanio.
The Speedball game was held on
March 25. The Freshman girls played
the Sophomore girls, and half time
entertainment was provided by the
Cheerleaders.


'p~L


"If you ask me, I think you two have it all wrong!"


. I


"I


I


John Dohle, Gerald Coffin. "Will you stop goofing off and get to work?"


Sand\ MA. "This is really Ltr..


I
I


3LC~_I i~ip~;
















i .' rrr K -



rip ~


l'lvan Normandia
Thomas O'Donnel
Samuel O'Nca


Rober McNaughton
l.-rinda Mendenha!l
Karen Memrrk
John Merler
Phhip Miller




Danriel Mincharr
Patrmia Mocbus
Pedro Monlora
Jane Moore
,,Cnrcobal Munon


K


Wayne West
"Straight down the hall, it's the last room on the right."


1,1


S l-Ip


L3,llham Orrego
l- Wanda Onriz
Jorge Padro
Marvann Palmer
Wrillham Parsonr





-" Charles Porbcs
RIta Reduga
Orlando Rces
Cathermne Rish
Jose R-vera


Mal^

,I. -dI













Alfonso Robinson
Deborah Robinson
Tony Robinson
L-'dna Robles
Isaac Ruiz









Luis Ruiz
Sheryl Ruoff
Arthur Rurledge
Peter Sanchez
.Ssdra Sanchez


tt"a~b .M...W -



"I thought all Indians were on reservations these days!" Juan soni, wilhU sntiago
Jerry Shannon Alizabeth Simmons
Michael Simms Kathym Smith


I Mauk Spangler
Robert Stem
Alice Stiebriz
Rhonda Strube
Joe Swoan









Susan Swnstrnom
L--David Tare
Kamanki Teves
Vicki Tipton
L-Ana Ubben


a.,L O


109



























Debbie Carey, Cherrie Hieronymus. Cin-
derella never had it so good.


I' -


mmwIl


Debbie Carey. "It
time."


better evaporate in


David Welch Walter Weslic Wayne West
fMargl ita W.lmons l le Wdlson lDOnnrs Wood


T h


Si -








Paula V\augh t, Rcncc Cliettc. "L.t' s ce, a
tcw boiling hips r was it salt i rostals>"


-9.


Fr.ts Woudenbcrg
FredrLk Waimo


Rmon bben Jrame Vlcnine
tiirnen VCD Ramona Vidrt


i.-Paull Vaught
,-'atherine Weigart


L-Clffford Welch
Vicks Whipple


C






































NOT PICTURED Ravmond Abtec
Rand\ Amburn, Carl Bojer. Fjrl Bunls.
Elizabeth Cimino, Mliihatl E..ins. Est-r
Gonzalez, Lorraine CGuiltb le. Mirk Honcr-
baum, Bobby Hughes. Ron.ild Hurlburi


Debbie Cares, Cherrie Hieronrmus "%X'e arc I' ouing on 21


Charlotte Boyland. "I just hope that balloon can take it!"


Vick) Tipton "Hou did I e er g r .iu.k in
this rut?"


atecotmers


L"O rb, A.: n brn
Ro J..,i, klh ,.








Seventh And eighth traders Are


VFron Row: Robert Austin, Lawrence Moochler, Roger Welch. William Cronan, Jeffrey Carwithen, Ricky Lyons, Mario Ubben. Center Row:
Marccla Montiva.i, Margarita Zamarripa, Norccn Kauter, Linda Loizeaux, Karon Mittc. )Doris Tomlin, Eileen Robles, Mary Mills, Susan
NMcndo/,a. Back Row: Ch eryl Williams, James Dexter, Patricia Sanchez, John BarritCau Jr., Margaret Bradbury, Leslie Gibson, Anthony Ware,
Juan Claramunt, Margarita Young.


F:r, n Ri: Murra( ebb. lames Mu,,ecr. MI.rk Perusse. Rex janscn. Paul Hopkins, Antonio Scott, Angel Irizarry. GCntlr Row: Gail Gregg, Bil-
lic Brown, Kimlberx MN u ell. Mona Christi.an Rcnce Nay, N lMarv Jo Beale, Katherine Mever. BRad- Rim: Carol Fluharty, Gloria Olivarez, Linda
.ir Ir,A lnics Butler. Y~'nne Smith, .Madeline Pujals, Cin(d Ferguscon, Linda Stamper, Manr LaRoche, PI. ..II Husband, Evelyn Withrow,
!mla i,,mnnon. Lumanne Swisher








Overwhelmed With Ziger Spirit


Front Row: Doyle Dancer Jr., Andrew Wick, Patrick Daniel, Jody Short, John Bridwell, Andrew Norval, Allan Rodriguez. Center Row: Yolanda
Hunnicut, Noreen Will, Desiree Budd, Janet Katsumoto, Donna Reifsnyder, Julie Moebus. Back Row: Robert Ramirez, Steven Boswell, Lester
Forsgren, D. LaPorta Jr., Robert Austin, David Mitte, Joseph Weichert, Anthony Spooner, Kurt Bullinger.


Front Row: Donald Jeffries Jr., Thomas Gabriel, Richard Hoagland, Robert Nicholson, Alberto Wilmont, Walter Guilt;.' I\. Thomas Wilder,
Robert Moats, James Campbell. Center Row: Cheryl Evans, Patricia Colpe, Marilyn Barnett, Carmen Bringas, Nayra Mon, Kay Housley. Kim-
berly Wuodi:,k. Patricia Loyd, Kip Holloway. Back Row: Robert Br.n]b\. Charles Murphey, Diane Ruoff, Maria Ramirez, Anne Richardson,
Karen McKown, Amelia Smith, Lisandra Ruiz, Diane Baker, Dennis Stephens, Theodore De Boor.


























S' Frst Rowu Steven Brock. Robert Day, Mi-
chael DeVault, Brvan Simpkins, Edward
Stroop, Michael Collins. Ricky Wilson.
l^ |Second Row: Donna Deaton. Shawn Ander-
Sr4 1 son, Elizabeth Smith, Pushpa Mayani,
.. Ruth Hudgins, Brenda Goodwin, Margaret
f Weigart, Margaret Jaketic, Marcia Coffin.
As- :. Third Row: Paris McIlwain. Nancy White,
S'I Stephanie Mowery, Devonv Dandridge.
Tilda Edwards, '\, Ik Tom, Sharon
S' McCann, Glenda Mika.

-r IV
".-4. ..

'." .-W r" . *-. .. -., .. '

"For-r-r-r-e!"













Aft



lint Row:. Scott Parker, Richard Sli.iaui, Anthon Burbine, Glen Hess, Jimmy Cash, Leslie Recio, Jeff Gcsney, Mike Romero. Second Row:
Nancv W'iliford, I.aura Gregg, Pat MOlN I)oris Hfogaboam, Terri Brown. Marjorie Blair, Diana Ruiz. Third Row: Mike Cliette, Robert Wil-
mont. Rav Wheeler, John Shobe, Steve Kardonski, I)avid Thompson. Robert Fernandez, David Woods, John Moncivais, Alex Nieves, Dave
FI.rnsworth. Eunice Zaihrv. (indd Apoda a.




































First Row: Peter Barr, Mike Ridge, Greg Cooper, Cheyenne Rivera, Robbie Currier, George Fryer, Richard Dowell. Second Row: Kathy Balmer,
Violanda Godinez, Kathy Murphy, Patty Valentine, Mary Richmond, Lisbet Coe, Kathy Dexter. Third Row: Barbara Yerxa, Ann O'Donnel,
Elisa Brown, Philip Wilkins, Sue Gilbert, Vicki May, Mario Pino, Pat Newbury, Leslie Nicolaison, Cathy Perret, Evelyn Hernandez, Ann
Mills, Cherri Schwindt.


First Row: Rene Ramirez, Roberto Young, Nestor Hernandez, Brian McCann, George Medina, Dee Dillin, Johnny Scott, Reggie Robinson.
Second Row: Mike Orrego, Vicki Kiyonaga, Debra Hughes, Margaret Kienzle, Susie Munoz, Barbara Higgins, \\'iler Cummings. Third Row:
Wayne Dailey, Patrick Moods. Dan Reifsn\dtr Rocky Lu.gr. Eddie Solas, Jose Vega, Frank Rorke, Bill Vest, Carl Anderson.

























Front Rou': Billy Scott, Karl Simms, Carlos Coronado. Luke Green, Steve Barger, Mike McDonnell. Center Row: Anna Summerlin, Josefa Gon-
zales, Mary Moncivais, Caroline Price, Sherry Hill, Joanne Baronne, Sonia Tellefsen, Elizabeth Snider. Back Row: Sarah Rosado, Lawrence Es-
cobido, Hubert Hammond, Michael Dockery, Clyde Adams, Steve Herring, Robert Lee, Deborah Harden.


Alue Scores


Sl


qs*~.


,: ". ,. .. T

" 'T. 7. e t, r. Wiv.
Front Row: Anthony Parker, Angel Toro, Robert Day, Robert Oster, Scott Parker, Russell
Gillespie. Center Row: John Austin, Robert Austin, Reggie Robinson, Karl Simms, Thomas
Gabriel, Mike Romero, George Dejesus. Back Row: Cheyenne Rivera, Carlos Coronado,
George Medina, Steve Brock, Alfred Sandrock, Eward Morrell, Mario Pino, Paul Baker,
Glvnn Moore.



A



S -

. -. ^^^ ^a -^ ^ v.


. fwf.


Front Row: Mark Pruse, Pat )Danicl, Anthony Spooner, Alberto Wilmont, Robert Currier,
Glen Hess. Center Raw: Nestor Hemrandccz, Icffrey Carwithen, John Cruz, James Dexter,
James Fauber, Craig Dohle, William Allen, Steve Barger, Alexis Nieves. Back Row: James
Bird, Clyde Adams, Robert Wilmont, Bill Vest, John Barriteau, David Alger, David Gonier,
Philip Wilkins, Michael Ridge.


Victory Over


Qold
Football has always been an ex-
tremely popular sport with the junior
high school boys at CHS. This year,
for the first time, they played regula-
tion 11-man football. In September,
over eighty seventh and eighth grade
boys tried out for the team. Of these,
fifty-six were chosen and divided into
two teams, the Blue and the Gold.
The two teams practiced on ailtrrnte
days and competed against one anoth-
er in three games. The first game
ended in a tie, with a score of o.6
The Blue Team won the rtm.iining
games, with scores of 22-0 and 14-6
respectively.
Outstanding players for the Blue
Team were: George Medina (quarter-
back), Glenn Moore (fullb.,k).
Mario Pino (end), and linemen Paul
Baker, Alfred Sandrock, Reggie Rob-
inson, Michael Romero, Carlos Coro-
nado, and Edward Morrell. Our- rand-
ing players for the Gold Team were:
Alexis Nieves (quarterback), Philip
Wilkins (fullback), Craig D.,hle
(flanker), and linemen James Bird,
Michael Ridge, Robbie Currier,
David Alger, and Bill Vest.


r M..,


IIE "








Skit Opens National uinior


Honor Society Iitiation


On December 17, five new mem-
bers were initiated in the National
Junior Honor Society. The old mem-
bers presented an amusing skit, ex-
plaining the qualities of scholarship,
leadership, character, citizenship, and
service required for membership in
this organization. Following the skit,
a "tapping" ceremony was held. The
selected students were escorted to the
stage for the traditional candlelight-
ing ceremony. Mr. Pfau congratulated


the newly initiated eighth-graders and
presented them with pins and certifi-
cates of membership. A reception,
honoring the new members and their
proud parents was held in the home
economics room following the cere-
mony.
The National Junior Honor Socie-
ty held its spring initiation in March.
At that time, seventh-graders were el-
igible for membership.


Mr. Pfau hands out certificates of member-
ship to the initiates.


Mario Pino, Margaret Kienzle, Cathy Perret, Barbara Baitel, and Sheryl Smith. HAPPY MO-
MENT.


Alfred Sandrock, Cherri Danielsen, Susan
Gilbert, and Brian McCann. "They call us
the BRAINS'"


Parents of the initiates relax at the recep-
tion.


Brian McCann, Cherri Danielsen, Susan Gilbert, Janna Loizeaux, Alfred Sandrock, and Kath-
leen Dexter. Old members wait patiently to begin the i-pTini ceremony.







Yurior 1 igh Debate Club Presents Assembly
The Junior High Debate Club was
organized in an effort to provide stu-
dents with an opportunity to express
their thoughts and feelings on various
issues. Many of the topics discussed
were based on events currently in the
news. The sponsor of the club was 1I
Mr. Berger. i
This year the Debate Club debated
for the different Junior High home-
rooms. The students served as judges
of these debates. The club also pres-
ented an assembly for the entire Jun- ;
ior High student body. The judgment
of this debate was left to the audi-
ence.




Sitting: Lori Flores (vice-president), Cheri
Danielsen (president), Susan Gilbert (sec-
retary). Center Row: Susan Styles, Sheila
Brannan, Margaret Jaketic, Beth Bleicher,
Donna Reifsnyder, Josefa Gonzalez, Mr.
Berger (sponsor). Back Row: Valerie
Owen, Clover Shobe, Sonja Tellefsen,
Janna Loizeaux, Deborah Hughes, Carl
Andersen, Philip Wilkins, Alfred
Sandrock.

Susan Cilbert, Lori Flores, Margaret Jaketic, Donna Reifsnyder, Beth Bleicher, Sheila Baran-
nan. "Now what was I saying?"


I IA'


Front Row: James Snider, Leslie Sills, Nelson Sanchez, Russell Gillespie, Edward Blount, Francisco Burac, Surse Pierpoint. Center Row: Melanie
Hames, Vickie Alger, Janet Mize, Barbara ( I I *, Barbara Bliznik, Sylvia Voight, Cindy Watson. Back Row: Andre Perret, Leo Cimino, Dino
Scott. William Tschumv, Donald Tomlin, Bruce Hunter, Robert Oster.








~II,


Front Rou. Mlichitl C.in. PulI Austin. 1.uinni- A.lcn P.ul Lih]l. Anrit] Turn. Armindo Lun.i Rik% DuI ia ,i.' R .*. Kim \WX'-cl. [akie
Johnson. Gloria G.od Suic Rig,. Lu. Bhunt. ,rl nrlth. luh., R.betrit.r. N,.1i S'i.n. ',.ni.i Th.:.nma- Ba1 i R.,u hMih.il Nmith. P.ul
Baker, Mikt Oburn. Jimm Bird Carl;s- Gicrrcru. (..irlns, Bm.,. EJIdie M"irrcll


Front Row: Garry Ilund, Michael Williams, George DeJesus, Jeff Hoffman, Dean Couts, Lori Flort.. Maurie Moore, Susan Styles. Center Row:
Charles Hughes, Michele Vrey, Jimmy Feeley, Buddy Fauber, Janet Srnti.iLa.. Mary Fluh.irr\.Jill Paulson. Back Row: Billy Kern Jose Rodri-
guez, Valdez Chavis, Susan Austin, Sarah Polite, Peggy \\hippl. Cheri Danielsen, Cindy Runion, Ralph Stone, David Evans, Guy \X'W-r














Front Rouw John Collins, Ricky Phares, Jim
McCarrick, Barney Norton, Duke Collins,
Jonathan Brown, Randy Goss, Luke Skra-
ble. Center Row: Gary Ferns, Thomas Sni-
der, Yvette Rodriguez, Clara Stone, Beth
Bleicher, Angel Olivera, Ralph Vasquez.
Back Row: John Austin, Richard Ramos,
Dan Kelly, Kelvin Gregory, Juan Viera,
Jack Tate, James Amason, Forest Kinsey,
Gus Coronado, John Davison.


Front Row. Michael Boswell, Anthony
Parks, John Cruz, John Kiyonaga, Barry
Simpkins, Craig Dohle, Robert Bramlett.
Center Row: Deborah Baker, Ada Norman-
dia, Janna Loizeaux, Clover Shobe, Cynthia
Smith, Sheri Alexaitis, Janet Brown. Back
Row: David Gonier, John Stephens, Gary
Moore, Juan Laboy. Glynn Moore, Alfred
Sandrock, George Brannan, Paul Garner.


Front Row: Paul Lucas, David Alger, Joe
Phillips, Ronald Grist, William Allen. Cen-
ter Row: Valerie Owen, Patricia DeVault,
Andrea Pacheco, Elizabeth Rivera, Alice
Ferns, Barbara Baitel, Ann Rutledge. Back
Row: Rita Castro, Karen Tahey, Tina Bo-
canegra, Bonnie Willis, Linda Hernandez,
Karen DeBoor, Aida Rodriguez.






Yunior H1igh Student Association Serves


As lrifying force 3or Students
The Student Association is the
backbone of any school. This is true
of the junior as well as the senior
high school. The Cristobal Junior
High School Student association
served as a unifying force for the stu-
S dents and afforded them an opportu-
Si (nity to voice their thoughts and opin-
Sions on various issues. Through the
I S.A., students were able to participate
'- actively in the government of their
.k r school and thus aid in making it a
a more pleasant place in which to learn.
The year 1970-71 was a highly suc-

,High Student Association. Continu-
Sr-ing from the point it stopped last
11 'year, it went on to make this an active
and exciting year. Among the activi-
ties planned and carried out by the
S.A. were the Blue and Gold Intra-
mural Football games, and various
drives and dances held throughout
Front Row: Kathleen Dexter, James Dexter, Sherry Schwindt. Back Row: Mr. Cheshire (spon- the school year.
sor). Brian McCann, Surse Pierpoint, Linda Garcia, Patty Valentine, Patty Colpe, Janet Kat-
sumoto. Karen Mitte, Barbara Yerxa, Debbie Harden, Susan Austin, Eunice Zachry, Patricia
Sanchez. Carmen Bringas, Nancy White.




The Zephyr was the Junior High
counterpart of the CHS Tradewind.
The staff was composed of seventh
and eighth grade students interested
in learning the fundamentals of jour-
nalism while providing a valuable ser-
vice to their fellow students. Under
I' the guidance of their sponsor, Mrs.
Tanner, these students published a
paper once each month. Each issue
contained articles concerning events
and topics of interest to junior high
students as well as an advice column,
cartoons, and letters to the editor.




Front Row: Charles Hughes, Dee Dillian, Mark Perusse, Allen Rodriguez, Mark Novak,
Karhy Murphy. Back Row: Donna Reifsnider, Sheila Brannon, Mrs. Tanner, Glenda Mika,
KathN Meyer, Margaret Jaketic, Surse Pierpoint, Anne Richardson, Margaret Whipplc. Ruth
Hudgins, Ka[h\ Balmer, Debbie Hughes, Barbara Yerxa, Sherry Hill. Sherry Schwindt.







S.A. SEcourages Student Partici


The Student Association has been
an important part of the school life at
Cristobal High School for many
years. It was organized in 1932 to en-
courage the exchange of ideas among
students, to create friendlier relation-
ships among students, and to increase
student participation in school activi-
ties. Its primary purpose is to func-
tion as an organization in which stu-
dents may practice realistically the
basic principals of democracy and
learn to handle the responsibilities
which accompany the privileges of
self-government.


Nancy Edmonson (Secretary), Michael
dent), Michael McCann (Treasurer).


Dexter (President), Douglas Jeffries (Vice-Presi-


Sitlln: I)i Dummond Ne Naughton. Judy Tomlinson, Sherry Kern, Toni Thomas, Kathy Kraus, Mike Fvans. CGlter Rou': Diane Dancer, Kathy
Farlrington, Kathy Danielson, Cherri Hieron\mus, Ann G(on/alic, Rita Bovland, Marlcne Rice. Beth Carter, Diane Hauke. Back Row: Edward
Brininga. Charlotte Boland, George Riveri. Rod Lindo, Greg Go guen, John Martin, Gary Scheibe, Gil Apodaca.







pation After Riotous Campaipf


Michael McCann, "Good things come in
little packages!"


Buddy Short, James Kunkel, Brandt Irion, and
ington started out this way?"


Rita Boyland, Jackie Parker, Heidi Sweeney, Beverly Olsen, Brian Allen, and Debra Gosney.
"George, George, George of the Jungle."


Denise Foshee. "Are you sure GC.'ric- Wash-

Each year a nominating committee
considers long and carefully the quali-
fications of various students and then
selects those best suited for the job as
S.A. officer candidates. These candi-
dates then enter the exciting competi-
tion known as "Campaign Week."
Each candidate strives to obtain the
students' votes by hanging posters,
coining slogans, and passing out but-
tons and tags. The highlight of the
week is the campaign assembly, dur-
ing which candidates and their man-
agers speak and various amusing or
informative skits are presented. On
election day, students vote for the stu-
dent they feel is best qualified for the
job, realizing that the election be re-
sponsible for running CHS the fol-
lowing year is much more than a
mere popularity contest.


Chris Cox, "I'm only doing it for a friend!"


Katie McGilberry and Mark Hanley. "This doesn't compare with a mini-bike trail!"








Race rom aatun Co Pina J(hil)ghts "C" Club


utitiation


Stting: Andrew Foshce. Mike Spagna, Car-
los BrowF n Harry Townsend, Ernest
Ahbrcsth, Frank C ilchctto. Standing: Coach
Dcdaux (.sponsor) Bill Deaton. Jim Jack-
son, Will Huttman. Peter Swain, Robert
Blcincr., Mike Apodaca. Mike Snider.

Outstanding male athletes at CHS
were eligible for membership in the
"C" Club. This organization gave rec-
ognition to those who excelled in
football, swimming, track, basketball,
or tennis. All lettermen were invited
to join during one of the two initia-
tions held during the year. Aspiring
members were required to perform
humorous and often embarrassing
feats. On the final day of the initia-
tion period, the future members ran
from Gatun to Pina where they com-
pleted their "ordeal."
The "C" Club collaborated with
the GAA in presenting the highly
successful Homecoming Dance for
the victorious CHS Tigers.


Af










"That's it, Apodaca, up and down." orders Bill, Deaton.







P.A.. Composed Of 'Cop iirl Athletes


The Girls' Athletic Association
was the female equivalent of the "C"
Club. The members were girls who
demonstrated outstanding athletic
ability through their participation in
the CHS athletic program. Aspiring
members were required to participate
in all intramural sports and letter in
at least two varsity sports. In addi-
tion, these girls had to pass a grueling
initiation, similar to that of the "C"
Club. Members of this club, under
the direction of their sponsor, Mrs.
Harris, served as officials at all intra-
mural games.
The G.A.A. cooperated with the
"C" Club in sponsoring the annual
Homecoming Dance. This year for
the first time they also competed
against Cristobal's male athletes in
the "Olympics."


Front Row: Jean Smith (treasurer), Shelly Lund (vice-president), Aurelia Williams (presi-
dent), Jan Bjorneby (secretary), Marlene Rice. Back Row: Nancy Edmonson, Jane Dohle,
Roberta Cole, Barbara Bloemer, Sue Mendenhall, Judy Dohle, Karen Currier, and Marian
Kredell.


"Up, up and awa\'"










Chespians Present 'Cwo Outstanding Plays


Sitting: Debbie Pate, Cathy Carlisle, Judy McLain, Diane Hauke, Mrs. Elfers (sponsor). Standing: Donald Byrd, Allen Harmon.


The purpose and aim of the Inter-
national Thespian Society was the ad-
vancement and improvement of thea-
ter arts in secondary schools. The
CHS chapter attempted to arouse in-
terest in the dramatic arts and gave
students interested in drama a chance
to work with its many facets; make-
up, direction, and acting. Any high


school student who earned ten points
was eligible to become a thespian.
Mrs. Elfers was the sponsor.
This year the International Thespi-
an Society at CHS produced two plays
presented to the public in the CHS
auditorium, one in November, and
one in March. The fall dramatic pro-


duction was the romantic comedy -
Bell, Book, And Candle. The cast in-
cluded veteran actors, Judy McLain
and Donald Byrd and newcomers,
Diane Carroll, Lewis Valdez, and An-
drew Foshee. The play was well re-
ceived by both CHS students and the
general public.







Debate Club Iroades Jlinds

The Debate Club was organized
with the aim of providing students
with an opportunity to express their
views on controversial issues of the
euthanasia, and other topics provided
0 subjects for weekly debates.
For each debate, the club members
SIII were divided into two groups, pro and
con. Either the sponsor, Mr. Gregg,
1 i .or one of the students served as a
.judge. Each team member was given
one minute in which to present his
/ -arguments, then the opposing team
offered its rebuttal.
The highlight of the year for this
club was the Speech Festival, in
which they competed with a debating
team from Balboa.
Steve Shobe, Mike McCann, Patri la Paint. Mr Gregg (:ponsor)., Bevrhl Olen. NliLharl
Snider, Jimmrn Gewin, Rica B,,l.ind. Kcnncrh Hill. MNaria Bonc



Safety club Hcourafes Safety Practices







The Safety Club was formed in "
order to encourage safety practices "
among the students of CHS. Mr.
Reeves and his assistant, Mr. McCul-
lough, aided the student members in
carrying out their aims. Among these
aims were the organization of month-
ly fire drills and demonstrations of
correct methods for putting out small
fires. These fire drills and demonstra-
tions played an important part in
keeping CHS students prepared for
emergencies, not only at school, but
also at home and elsewhere.




Sitting: Mr. Reeves, (safety advisor), Mr. McCullough, (safety assistant advisor). Standing.:
Carl Anderson, Mike Osborn, Diane Hauke, Peter Pacheco, Patty Valentine.







Caribe Club MAlimbers Zeach


for 6Etire School Day



f 7 Ti


Fro u Ro': Martha Anto(n. Nancy Edmond-
son, LMar Norval, Patti Haukc (historian),
Robert .,'IIli I (president), Lana Boone,
Deborah Pate, Susan Burge, Jeannette Cox.
CGntur Roiu' Ann Gonzalcz, Ann Lauritzen.
JaIkic Parker, Paulette Jordi, Sheila Alber-
ga, Aurclia A. i, 11i. ,, MNaritza Thomas,
Christy Loizcaux, Cathv Carlisle. Barbara
Blocmer. Patti Painc. Rita Bovland, Io-
lores Santiago. Mrs. G. ..( (sponsor). Back
Rou.: Gil Apodaca, Elaine Austin. Elizabeth
Wainio, Cornelius Gocbertus.. Joseph
Rozmeski, Warren Phillips. Harry Town-
send, Shelly Lund, ludv Tomlinson. Jackie
Springer, Linda Hess. Maria Boone, Nancy
Ridge.


*


Kathy Kraus and Kathy Deraps welcome parents on Visitors' Day, on October 27.


The Caribe Club (Future Teachers
of America) was formed for the pur-
pose of promoting a better under-
standing of the teaching profession.
All students with a "B" average were
invited to join following the second
semester of their freshman year. On
November 18, 1970, the new mem-
hers were initiated at the Initiation
Banquet held at the Brazos Heights
Golf Club.


In February, the Caribe Club spon-
sored Teacher Appreciation Day in
honor of the faculty of CHS. This
was the sixth year for the club to
sponsor this activity. The members
also sponsored the successful Student
Teacher's Day on April 22. This year
was the first time that the students
taught classes for the entire day. All
agreed that this was a challenging and
rewarding experience. The club also


visited Coco Solo Elementary School,
and a Latin American school in
Colon, Republic of Panama.
Another activity of the Caribe
Club was their tutoring program.
Members aided weaker students who
needed help in their studies. Fre-
quently, members took over entire
class periods for teachers when substi-
tutes were not available.


I






Circle raH ais"

Promotes


Interest



7rance


Dolores Santiago, Susann Zachry, Susan
Je l'aime!"


Burge, and Rita Boyland. "French is not that hard!


"Le Circle Francais" met twice a
month in order to stimulate student
interest in the language, history, and
culture of France. To achieve this
aim, special guest speakers or selected
members presented reports on various
subjects.
The club was sponsored by Mrs.
Gegg. Only those students who ob-
tained a "B" average in French were
eligible for membership. These stu-
dents were initiated at a banquet held
at the Brazos Heights Golf Club.
Each initiate was required to recite a
poem, sing a song, or perform a skit.
The French Club members were
involved in a number of interesting
activities during the year. They spon-
sored French Week and elected the
annual "Miss France." They also vis-
ited the famous passenger liner, "The
France."


Front Row: Ivette Cummings. Susann Zachry, Martha Anton, Cornelius. Goebertus, Paulette Jordi, Jackie Parker, Linda Hess, Susan Burge,
Jeannette Cox. Center Row: Nancy Edmondson, Patricia Hauke, Mary Norval, Debbie Pare, Aurelia Williams, Maritza Thomas, Sheila .\Alb ria.
June Ilund, Nancy Horn, Rita Boyland, Terri Overstreet, Dolores Santiago, Mrs. Gegg. Back Row: Stephen Aponte, Brian DeRaps, Frank
Berry, Edward Bringas, Robert Nordstrom, Bill Gillc.pic. Melinda Brown, Patrice Gonier, C.uir Hess.


'I e


r i r


Idi i c






JVurses Aides Jtupart ChristiNas Spirit

ZCo People Of agarterita


First Row: W. Ortiz, R. Strube, B. Olsen, A. Ortiz, M. Olivera, R. Vidro, I). Robinson, R. Betancourt, E. Ferguson, K. Harden. Second Row: T.
Ferguson, M. Garner, R. Hartshorn, T. Overstreet, P. Hauke, A. \ Ili ii,-, N. Ridge, M. Thomas, J. Parker, P. Jordi. Third Row: Mrs. How-
ard (Sponsor), Jimenez, M. Gonzalez, T. Torres, O. Gonzalez, M. Toro, S. Vamprine, J. Cox, A. Coleman, M. Wilmont, S. Willis, D. Gos-
ney, D. Gosney, J. Ilund, J. Tomlinson, M. Fontanez. Fourth Ro': I. Cummings, D. Dancer, T. Cobb, N. Ortiz, V. Whipple, R. Cliete, M.
Humphreys, N. Horn, P. Paine, K. Stevens, T. Thomas, B. FLr ', M. Brown, D. Meeker, C. Smith, R. Munoz, E. Marsh, I. Monclova, S. May-
ani.


The Nurses' Aides Club was a very
popular organization at Cristobal
High. Its members were girls inter-
ested in nursing or another medical
profession. The club encouraged and
stimulated this interest by inviting
guest speakers, showing films, and
planning field trips to hospitals.
The most important field trip this
year was the annual visit to La Gar-
terita in Gatun Lake, on December
12. The purpose of this trip was to
give Christmas gifts to the people on
the island, especially the children


The Student Association assisted the
Nurses' Aides club this year in col-
lecting food and used clothing for
this purpose. The police division pro-
vided the club with a launch as trans-
portation.


In order to become a member of
the Nurses' Aides Club, one must be
a freshman girl, wear a cardboard
nurse' cap on the day of the initiation,
and say the pledge with the other ini-
tiates during a special meeting.


NEW INITIATES
























Mrs. Hoard, Brenda Ege r. Bcrc Pr I
Olsen, Debra Go'nev. Jacquelinc Pirker. Pi/Ak ir W ork
Nancy Ridge. Olga Gonzjlcz. N5clih
Orriz 125 Hours


The Pink Girls helped their corm
-muniry greatly during the summer
months. They voluntarily offered
their services at Coco Solo Hospital
In order to be eligible tor this pro-
gram, each girl was required to take a
two-week first aid course. In addition.
a one-week training period, during
which the basics of hospital work
were taught, was required The girls
learned how a hospital functions and
how to care for patients with various
needs.
In order to become a full-fledged
Pink Girl, each girl had to work a
total of 125 hours. In the hospital, the
Pink Girls were casually referred to as
"Pinkies They were expected to ad-
here to the commands and advice of
their superiors who were registered
nurses. The fun-filled summer of
hard, but rewarding work was cli-
maxed by a private graduation cere-
mony attended by the group's spon-
sor, Mrs. Howard. and various civic
minded citizens.


Ada Onrz resusiiates "Annie "


Mr Bird intrurit the Pink (.irl, n Firt Aid


,ii
~o OBo~o -:






Spanish Club Participates Jl Carnival Parade


Seated, 1st Row. Cornelius Goeberrus, Judy Tomlinson, Jackie Parker, Jenny Wirtz, Paulette Jordi, Jeannie Basset, Mike Minehart. 2nd Row:
Marta Anton, Susan Zachery, Doug Stevens, Diane Hauke, Raul Castro, Sandra Alberga, Patty Hauke, Maria Fontanez, Ivette Cummings.
Standing: Kathy Pursley, Rod Lindo, Isaac Heres, Paul Baitel, Ralph Ender, Mary Norval, Mark Hanley, Joseph Ender, Greg Goguen, Stepha-
nie Ilies, Sheila Alberga, Debbie Pate, Debbie Alberga, and Spanish Club sponsor, Mrs. Elfers.


The Spanish Club at CHS was or-
ganized for the purpose of encourag-
ing Spanish-speaking students to be-
come active in various activities, and
to increase their understanding of the
Latin American countries. Meetings
were held twice each month, and mat-
ters of interest to members were dis-
cussed. All discussions were conduct-
ed in Spanish.
The officers of the Spanish Club
this year were: Raul Castro, Presi-
dent; Diane Hauke, Vice-President;
Sandra Alberga, Secretary, and Jenny
Wirtz, Treasurer.
The club was sponsored by Mrs.
Elfers who helped with the organiza-
tion of various activities and attended
all meetings.


id


^~'"*


Who said that Spanish had to


be spoken only at Spanish Club meetings?




































Karen Currier, Catr
Russon. Jeannette C

*4


Student Advisory Committee Provides

Sounding Aoard Yor Student Opinion







S. j The Student Advisory Committee
4 -.- was organized at the suggestion of
S- Mr. Pfau, with the cooperation of
Michael Dexter, President, and other

School Student Association. The pur-
"- Imembers of the Cristobal High

:pose of this group was to serve in an
.n advisory capacity to the principal of
CHS. Members were carefully select-
ed in order that each club and organi-
zation in the school, and each class,
might be represented. Members
served as a sounding board, bringing
to the attention of Mr. Pfau the com-
plaints, comments, and suggestions of
their fellow students. Jose Medina
served as chairman of the group, and
Lana Boone acted as recording secre-
tary.
Meetings were held on the first
hv Carlisle, Michael Dexter. Lana BLxne (recording secretary) Wall Monday of each month. Among the
ox, Robert Phillips, Nancy Ridge. and \'ictor Lee topics discussed were the reasons be-
hind school regulations and the possi-
--. l ll ability of changing them, modifica-
tions in the dress code, and possible
changes in the athletic schedule.
Members cooperated with other orga-
nizations in planning and carr ing
out activities and projects of interest
to the majority of the student body.
Among these were: a special assembly
in cooperation with the Canal Zone
Youth Council, the 'Olvmpics" in
which the GAA and "C" Club partic-
ipated, and the Powderpuff Speedball
Game in which the Junior and Senior
girls participated.


l K. .' '. ^^^1Uk f
A -- I


"Why didn't somebody tell me there was a meeting today?" queries Chairman Jose Medina as
he and Robert Phillips hurry to a meeting.


133







Phlaosophian Society Js formed


A new club at CtIS this year, the
Philosophian Soiicty was formed by
a group of students interested in intel-
lectual and literary pursuits. The
club's aiim was to provide students
with an opportunity for discussion
and exploration of the various aspects
of philosophy and literature. It en-
couraged studerrts to develop and im-


prove their ability to express them-
selves; either through group discus-
sion, or individually through rI iding'.
creative writing, or poetry.
Membership was open to all high
school students, but was limited to
fifteen at any one time. Interested stu-
dents applied through Mr. Fattorosi,
the club's sponsor, or through any


two members. Regular meetings were
held twice each month, with various
extra meetings scheduled for after
school and on weekends. These extra
meetings were planned for places
such as the beach, which offered an
atmosphere of informal association
that helped the club members to dis-
cuss freely and honestly.


It


i: '

Debbie Pate, Diane Hauke, Denise Foshee, Mike Dexter, Judy McLain, Shelia Alberga, Lana Boone, Allen Harmon (vice chairman), Jeannette
Cox, Donald Byrd, Robert Phillips (chairman), Maria Boone, Thomas Pursley, Kathy DeRaps (secretary), Mr. Fattorosi, Patti Hauke.


CIS Offers 3

Drivers' Sd.

Sessions
Drivers' Training was an extreme-
ly popular course among CHS stu-
dents. It was offered three times dur-
ing the school year. Each session last-
ed six weeks. Meetings were held
after school in room 341 for one hour
and forty-five minutes, Monday
through Friday. The instructor, Mr.
Reeves, presented lectures and films
in order to give students the back-
ground in traffic laws, safety, and
automobile mechanics necessary to
enable them to become good drivers.
In addition to classroom instruction,
ten hours of behind-thc-wheel driving
wer re ruired before students were el-
igible to take the road test and obtain
a license.


Driver education students brace themselves for another "horror movie."


-;I


C'






























Sitting on Floor: Douglas Stevens (vice-president). Sitting: Raul Castro, Diane Hauke, Ralph Ender, Sheila Alberga (president), Lana Boone,
Patricia Hauke, Sandra Alberga (treasurer). Standing: Jenny Wirtz, Kathy Brown, Maritza Thomas, Stephanie lilies, Deborah Pate, Deborah
Alberga, Edithe Marsh, Terri Overstreet.
The LANGUAGE LAB CLUB is
aH uafe Lcab Club an organization for tri-lingual stu-
dents who are skilled in the operation
Proaymates terest of the language lab equipment. These
students assist the teachers of the var-
ious foreign languages by setting the
^ ei^ 1vfat-s equipment in the lab and taking con-
y Aforeign Nations trol of the console.
Members attend bi-monthly meet-
ings held in the language laboratory.
i Matters of interest are presented to the
members by the officers, and lively
Discussions often result. The sponsor,
l;.. Mr. Stearns is always present to make
certain that order is maintained.
Several interesting field trips are
Scheduled during the year. Members
visit passenger liners of the countries
whose languages the members have
studied. These excursions provide the
members with an opportunity to con-
verse with native speakers and to
learn something about their culture.


Language Lab members operate the lab for the benefit of other students.







Kevered Payae u est Speaker At 7all Jnitiation Of National lionor Society


Jeannette Cox, Michael Dexter, Robert Phillips, 1
begins, old members of the NHS relax on stage.


Mai, Ami
fe ^j~Ilk


Mrs valdez, Jeannette Cox, Lewis Valdez, and Rev. Clarence Payne, admit the approving
smiles of interested onlookers as the initiate lights his candle.


Mrs. Valdez, Carmen Butler, Mrs. B
Mike Dexter, Rev. Payne. The candle


like Dexter lights the green
.adership, symbolizing growth.














Sremony continues.


NATIONAL HONOR SOCIETY MEMBERS: First Row: Jeannette Cox (secretary-treasur-
er), Lana Boone (president), Robert Phillips (vice-president). Second Row: Carmen Butler,
Denise Foshee, Michael Dexter. Third Row. Lewis Valdez, Fred Cole.


candle of Membership in the National one each semester. At the fall initia-
tionf onl senor ma be induted


Honor Society has become nationally
recognized as one of the highest hon-
ors which may be bestowed upon a
high school student. The Canal Zone
Caribbean Chapter was formed for
the purpose of providing recognition
to those students who have excelled
in all aspects of Cristobal High
School life.
Students who have a minimum
grade point average of 3.00, and have
demonstrated outstanding leadership,
character, and service are eligible for
membership in this society.
Two initiation assemblies are pre-
sented to the student body each year,


tion, only seniors may be inducted.
This year, the assembly was held on
November 19th. The theme for the
program was, "Where do we go from
here?" and Reverend Clarence Payne
from the Canal Zone Youth Council
spoke on the subject of young rebels.
New members announced at this time
were: Sandra Alberga, Carmen Butler,
Fred Cole, Gary Collins, Denise
Foshee, and Lewis Valdez. At the
spring initiation, not more than 15%
of the senior class, and not more than
5% of the junior class may be consid-
ered for election.


plw


T:

































Sitting: Karen Schill, Kathy Farrington. Irma Monclova, Maritra Thomas (managing editor). Karen Westerberg. Standing: Michael McCann,
Jose Medina, Michael De)xtr, Toni Thomas, Allen Harmon, Paul Bleicher.


Pink Iaw Gives ZCradewind


Jisight Zao CHS

This year's TRADEWIND staff
worked toward faster publication and
a more entertaining newspaper. Work
sessions were held after school three


days a week. The editors, reporters,
typists, and photographers devoted
many hours of their own time to the
paper.


In order to get the entire student
body involved in making the
TRADEWIND a vital and inter-
esting part of our school, new ideas
were necessary. One such idea was
THE PINK BOX. This box served
as a "catch all" for school happen-
ings. Students were encouraged to
drop in letters to HELP (the new ad-
vice column), letters to the editor,
poems, bits of gossip, and anything
they felt might be interesting and
amusing for their schoolmates.
Mr. Dobbins was TRADEWIND
advisor this year; it was his second
year in this position. He devoted
much of his time and energy to pub-
lishing an interesting, informative
newspaper.
The staff consisted of many mem-
bers, each with varied and vital tasks
to perform. The hours of hard work
required for the publication of a good
paper all seemed worthwhile when
the TRADEWIND returned from
the press.


*


The answer to CHS problems?'"







ZChe Clck Qave Jin, /ut

Ghe Vearbook Staff

Worked On


The yearbook staff had the chal-
lenging responsibility of producing
and editing the CHS yearbook, the
Caribbean. The staff consisted of a
group of efficient students who
worked tirelessly) after school in order
to meet the deadlines established by
the publishing company. With the
guidance of their sponsor, Mr John-
son, and the help of an ambitious
group of photographers, the staff ac-
complished their duty without unnecc
essary dela.
The staff introduced many innova-
tions this year. One was a new vsstem
of editing, whereby the staff mem
bers, excluding the editor and the


copy editor, were unassigned. Each
staff member did the work which had
to be done, regardless of the subject
matter. This new system proved to be
very practical. Another innovation
was an entirely new arrangement of
the Caribbean itself. Also in order to
compensate for shortage of funds, the
staff sponsored a number of contests
to stimulate yearbook sales. As a re-
sult, staff membership enlarged to in-
clude junior as well as senior high
school students. This was done in ap-
preciation of their generous donations
and enthusiastic sales of Tiger Boost-
ers.


Alien Harmon "The subjlei is marvelous, Maritza Thomas, Jeannette Cox. "Put it
but the photography is louss'" here." "No, here."


Sheila Alberg.i "Stop grinning and get to
work!"


(17)
r
a^


Mr Johnson (sponsor). Rita
(copy editor). Beth Bleiiher.


Bo\ land, Maritza Thomas, Maria Boone, Allen Harmon, Jeannette Cox (editor), Sheila Alberga, Lana Boone
Thomas Pursley, Kathy Deraps, Debra Pate.


4)


139


-i








Cristobal High School Produces



V


. .. -. .. .- ; .



Front Row: Paul Baitel, Bill Deaton, Mike Snider, Stephan Fugleberg, Toby Phillips, Ralph Richmond, Frank Cicchetto, Carlos Brown, Juan
Sanchcz. Second Row: Caleb Clement, J imJackson, Joe Rozmeski, Andrew Foshee, Harry Townsend, Frank Berry, Warren Phillips, Mike Bar-
ger, Bill LeDoux, Arthur Serig, John Musser, Mike Spagna. Third Ru'w: Neil Patton (co-captain), Jose Medina, Robert Phillips, Don Olsen,
John Day, Brian Allen, Mike Apodaca, Mattia Spagna, Robert Bloemer, William Huffman, Peter Swain, Ernest Abresch, Wally Russon (co-
captain).


This year's interscholastic Champi-
on Tigers will long be remembered as
the best team ever to play in the
Canal Zone. They achieved what no
other team has an undefeated sea-
son all the way from the Jamboree to
the Palm Bowl.
Cristobal's first taste of victory
came in the Jamboree. In the first
quarter the Tigers defeated the Bull-
dogs when quarterback, Neil Patton,
threw for 41 yards for the only touch-
down. The College Devils were una-
ble to stop the mighty Tigers in the
second quarter and once again Cristo-
bal came out on top 7-0.
The first game of the regular sea-
son once again brought victory to the
Tigers when they overpowered Canal
Zone College by a score of 22 to 6.


The quality of the performance in
that first game was typical of that in
the games which followed.
Balboa's homecoming was
smashed when Cristobal outplayed
and outscored them 33-8. This was
the high scoring game for the Tigers
this year. Touchdowns were made by
Neil Patton, Billy Deaton, Robert
Phillips, and Willie Huffman, who
scored twice.
The first home game for the Ti-
gers proved a thriller for all. The
game was undecided until the last few
seconds when "Cubby" Clement in-
tercepted a pass from College quarter-
back, Russ Bowen, thus continuing
the winning streak to three straight
wins.
The final season game, between


Balboa and Cristobal, again displayed
the Tiger superiority as they crushed
Balboa with four wins and no losses.
Cristobal became the Interscholastic
Champions for the year 1970-71.
The Annual United Fund Palm
Bowl Game brought the Tigers up
against a strong team consisting of
outstanding players from both Balboa
and College. The "Devil-Dogs" were
determined to obtain revenge for the
losses suffered at the claws of the Ti-
gers. Yet even their combined efforts
was not enough to stop the powerful
Cristobal machine. Determined to
keep their undefeated record, the Ti-
gers slipped by the All-Stars to win
7-0. It was a fitting climax to a foot-
ball season which Cristobal Tigers
will not soon forget.






Record-4reaking football


Ceam


Lone hours of diligent practice ...


Enthusiastic support from fans at bonfires, students at pep assemblies, and fathers at football
games ...


Able leadership .


And expert coaching. ..


combined to produce results visible from the moment the team .







ZNger


Victory At Palm / owl


Appeared on the ticld . throughout
the season, beginning with victory in
the Jamboree . and continuing


with victories in each of the regular
season games, the defeat of the All-
Stars in the annual Palm Bowl ...


Co-captain, Neil Patton, Queen Wendy Flores, Co-captain Wally









Climates IUdefeated Season


the presentation of trophies at a spe-
cial assembly honoring the victorious
Tiger football team ...


And finally the selection of seven Tigers for the All-Zone team.


TIGERS SELECTED FOR ALL-ZONE TEAM: Willie Huffman, Jose Medina, Neil Patron, John Day, Peter Swain, Robert Phillips, and
"Cubby" Clement.


Jamboree: SCORES
Sept. 18
Sept. 25
Oct. 9
Oct. 16
Oct. 30
Palm Bowl:
Nov. 13
CHS 14 ......... CZC 6
CHS 22 ......... CZC 6
CHS 33 ....... BHS 8
CHS 13 ........CZC 12
CHS 26 ..........BHS 8
CHS 7 ........ All-Stars 0
BHS 0







Cheerleaders.

Power Rehiud Zigers


Lying. Kathy Kraus and Sylvia Vamprine. Back Row: Cathy Carlisle, Karen Currier and Den-
ise Foshee. CHS Cheerleaders


It has been said that behind every
successful man there is a woman -
certainly this must also be true of a
successful team. The 1970-71 school
year included a history making foot-
ball season for the CHS Tigers. Their
victories certainly gave Cristobal's
five lovely young cheerleaders some-
thing to cheer about as they remained
undefeated in game after game. Be-
fore each game, however, these ener-
getic girls practiced for many long,
hard hours perfecting new cheers and
routines to cheer their team to victo-
ry. They painted posters, planned pep
assemblies, sponsored contests, and
distributed spirit ribbons in an effort
to increase student interest in athletic
events, and school spirit in general.
These girls, with their smiling faces
and attractive uniforms, were indeed
an asset to their team and to their
school.


V17-

I





- -' 9 V

-< 5


"We've come to sing a praise, a hearty
cheer to rise . ."


"Do it, do it, all right!!!"


O w







tA-Ceague Hasketball ueam Captures


Championship fame With Score 0)


Front Row: Barbara Bloemer, Roberta Cole, Aurelia Williams (captain), Marlene Rice, Linda
Hess, Nancy Gregg, Susan Zachry (manager). Back Row: Susan Mendenhall, Marian Kredell,
Jean Smith, Emilie Daniels, Beth Wanio, Kathy Hess, Estelita Ferris (manager).


r28-21


At the close of the intramural bas-
ketball season, those girls who dem-
onstrated the greatest skill and ability
were selected to play on the Varsity
of A-League Team. Each team mem-
ber had to be a junior or senior and
maintain a "C" average.
This was a year of innovation for
the Cristobal High School Girls' Bas-
ketball team. It was the first year in
which a team was composed of only
five girls. Also, for the first time
numbers appeared on the front of the
uniforms.
The 1970-71 season commenced in
September and continued until the
end of October. The girls played
teams from Balboa High School and
Canal Zone College twice each and
remained undefeated throughout the
season. To climax their successful sea-
son, the girls went on to a 28-21 vic-
tory in the championship game.


Sr
"Whatsoever you ask for you shall receive."


SCORES

CHS 35 ................ BHS 33
CHS 23............... CZC 19
CHS 33............... CZC 22
CHS 28 ................BHS 21




A dripping but happy Mrs. Harris is pulled
from the pool following her "victory dunk-
ing."


''1


Ill v






"A3" Ceague Places 2nd Jnf Rasketball




I .AN.


"CZC obviously doesn't offer ballet!"


The B-League Junior Varsity Girls'
Basketball team was composed of
freshmen, sophomores, and some
younger, less experienced juniors.
The procedure for selecting team
members was the same as that for A-
League. These girls wore the same
uniforms as their varsity counterparts,
and practiced many long, hard, hours
after school in an effort to improve
their skills and teamwork. They
played only two games, both against
Balboa. They lost both games, but
some of these girls will undoubtedly
prove an asset to next year's A-League
team because of the experience they
have gained.





r ;; 4Wl


CHS tigresses "jump for joy" as another basket is made.


"You girls get dried off and go take a shower."


Emilv Daniel executes a free-throw.






reUnis Cream Composed Of tournament Winners


t


PII


9


1st Row: Rodrigo Lindo, Ralph Richmond, Douglas Jeffries, Michael Jeffries, Paul Bleicher, and Jese Johnson. 2nd Row: Coach Hoffman, Mi-
chael Snider, Michael Dexter (captain), and Eric Irion.


A:t


Coach Hoffman provides extra insurance by covering the backcourt as Paul Ble
Mike Snider prepare to receive a serve.


Members of the Cristobal High
School varsity tennis team were se-
Slected by means of a preliminary
elimination tournament. Those boys
winning a sufficient number of
---- matches, and meeting the minimum
'" scholastic requirements were eligible
for the team. Practice sessions were
held each afternoon after school from
2:45 until 4:30 at various tennis
courts throughout the community.
.-.. Tennis competition this year cons-
isted of two interscholastic matches
and a triangular meet in which Cris-
eicher and tobal, Canal Zone College, and Bal-
boa participated.


II *~I



I r Pr"a'


After a hard day of practice, the members of the tennis team relax.


SCORES
CHS 6 ........ ...... CZC 1
CHS1 ............ BHS 6
CHS2 ...... ....... BHS 5
CHS ............. CZC o


e







hI lidley And freestyle RKlays



















Seated: Cheryl Hieronymus. Debbie Carey, Cheryl Olsen, Christy Loizeaux, LuAnn Ware, Maria Boone, Edythe Marsh, and Carol Baker.
Standing: 1st Rowuu: Scott Loizcaux, Joe Smith, Gerald Coffin, Fred Knauss, Beverly Olsen, Barbara Goodwin, Robert Bloemer, Mike Spagna,
Drummond McNaughton, and David Blcicher. 2nd Row: Chris Lasher, Paul Bleicher, Ronnie Ramos, Sharon Smith, Judy Simmons, Susan
M!rlndri, ill. Richard Booth, and Bill LeDoux.

The 1970 Swimming season began
in late October. Practices were held
each day after school for two hours.
The individual work-out totaled al-
most a mile, and the swimmers also
did sprints and relays.
CHS had looked forward to a very
promising season, but they only man-
aged to capture second place. Individ-
ual performances, however, were out-
standing on both the boys' and girls'
teams; and CHS captured a large
number of first places in medley and
"Swimmers, take your marks, get set ... freestyle relay competition through-
out the season.
Quite a number of swimmers
earned letters this year. In order to
earn a letter, a swimmer must earn an
average of approximately three points
per meet, and must attend practice
sessions regularly.
CHS had a number of good swim-
mers this year. With the help of these
veterans and a number of promising
young freshmen, next season may
well be a victorious one.


GO!" They're off, swimming rapidly until ...


148








SwimmiHg Ceam Captures first Places


Edythe Marsh ... one comes up for air.


Later, interested spectators watch from the stands as a graceful diver ...


Judith Simmons ... prepares to execute a
reverse gainer.


SCORES

CHS ....... BHS ........CZC
73 ......... 159 ......... 24
89 ......... 150 ......... 15
71% . ...... 138 .........11%
83 ......... 169 ... . .. 20


And after the meet . the triumphant, or perhaps only hopeful, swimmers, relax and enjoy
the long train ride home.





Scenes


ehlid Sports


-- ~a'or~itc


Zime Yor Many Students
I


Dan Tweedy, Dan Valentine, Eric Tucker, Mike Apodaca, Mike Barger.


Cathy Carlisle, Sylvia Vamprine, Katie
Kraus. "Don't be mad, Cathy."


Robert Phillips


A bench eye-view of the game.


4irs' Zennis
Tryouts for girls tennis were held
in February and the season ran from
March 5 to March 26. Practice was
held everyday after school at various
courts in the community. This was
done to give the girls practice on dif-
ferent courts where the ball bounced
differently and the direction of the


wind varied. General qualifications
were dedication to this individual
sport, self-discipline, and endurance.
Many hours of hard practice were
necessary to make a good tennis
player. The girls' equipment was fur-
nished by the school except for the
rackets which the girls supplied
themselves.
A new scoring system was intro-
duced in which play continued until


one girl won six games. It there was
a 6-6 tie, one game called "sudden
death" was played, the winner of
which was declared the winner of the
match.
Four matches were played this
year. Two against Balboa, and two
against Canal Zone College.


LS


..-*-
=a


~n:
i i B








C/IS Co-Ckampiwo JIu balboa Relays









_ ....l -----'







"Well, Billy, I'll tell you what you do..." advises Coach Agee.

"P 7 -, ....
1.1 ( i h k


'. I


"This is the part of track we like best," sign Ernest Abresch, Frank Ciccheto, and Billy
Deaton.


*' -U
c* *
r... '-

"Eat your heart out, Nureyev!" exclaims
Cubby Clement.

SCORES
CHS...65 BHS...72 CZC ....
CHS...53.5 BHS...91.5 CZC.....3
CHS 65 BHS.. 78 CZC .....3


One week before the beginning of
the track season, a meeting was
called, and all interested persons
asked to attend. Those willing to at-
tend the two-hour daily practice ses-
sions became members of the varsity
or junior varsity teams, depending on
their ages. CHS participated in three
interscholastic meets this year. Track
events at each meet included: hurdles,
relays, sprints, and distance running.
Field events included: the shotput,
the pole vault, the discus throw, and
the long and high jumps. In addition
to the regular meets, CHS also partic-
ipated in the two-day Balboa Relays.
They were co-champions with Balboa
in this special event in which Rain-


Smiling Billy Deaton displays trophy he
won as outstanding participant in the Para-
iso Balboa Relays.


bow City, Panama City, and Colon
teams participated.
The 1970-71 track team was one of
the best ever from CHS. Willie Huff-
man broke the record in both the dis-
cus throw and the shot put. Members
of the record-breaking 880-yard relay
team were: Billy Deaton, Neil Pat-
ton, Ed Bringas, and Frank Cicchetto.
The outstanding runner of the season
was junior, Billy Deaton. His success
as due to natural ability, dedication,
hard work, and a willingness to be
coached. An excellent team combined
with the expert coaching of varsity
coach, Robert Agge, and jr. varsity
coach, Randy Grubbs, to produce a
very successful track season.






'A4 "AMd "'" Ceague Players


"A" LEAGUE
Standing: Sherry Kern, Manager; Judy Dohle, Susan Mendenhall; Debbie Rowley; Teri Baker; Barbara Bloemer; and Jenny Wirtz. Kneeling:
Aurelia Williams and Cathy Stevens, co-captains.

K,


" 1U


Debbie Rowley practices "set-ups"


Jenny Wirtz, Cathy Stevens, Judy Dohle, Barbara Bloemer, Aurelia Williams. "Judy, this is
no time to be doing jumping j ik -







Attend Volleyball Clinic

At the conclusion of the intramural
volleyball season, the varsity volley-
ball teams, A and B League, were se-
lected. Older, more experienced girls
made up the A League team while
girls new to the sport were placed on
the B League team. The girls drilled
and practiced every day after school
from 2:15 until 4:30. Emphasis was ....
placed on bump and set drills. The
achievement of power with control in
all areas of play was stressed.
A new feature in volleyball play
this year was the selection of a "Most
Valuable Player" for each game. Win-
ners for this year were: Aurelia Wil-
liams, Susan Mendenhall, Barbara
Bloemer, and Gigi Colon. Another
"first" of the 1971- volleyball season
was a clinic presented by an AAU
rated official, Sgt. Escobido.
Managers of this year's team were
Stella Ferris and Sherry Kern. Mrs.
Fattorosi was the coach for both A
and B League teams.
A League players pause for a moment of prayer before the game begins.

























"B" LEAGUE
Standing: Linda Hess, Beverly Olsen, Patty Snider, Linda Huff, Jane Dohle, and Gigi Colon. Kneeling: Beth \\.nim. and Titi Cole, co-captains.


153






1970


Varsity Ald Yumiar Varsity koys'


Kneeling: Dee DeLapp, Wallace Russon, William Huffman, Mitchell Blanchette, Walter
Ilund, David Robertson. Standing: Mike Jeffrics (asst. manager), Coach Dedeaux, James
Kunkel (manager).


Now
]i 7


"O.K., you guys, you have to get this right!"


An awkward position does not prevent Dec DeLapp from shooting for the basket.


VARSITY
SCORES
CHS 48 .. BHS 51
CHS 27 .. ..... CZC 55
CHS 41 ..... BHS 53
CHS 40 .. .... CZC 55
CHS 36 .. BHS 40
CHS 39 ....... CZC 50


\\. llal n, tH ul n.t.,r, H I'l... \\ I.ll,., h Fiilhcr'






Basketball tave Active Season






















SSitting: Mike Jeffries (manager). Kneeling:
Members of the Cristobal igh Pedro Simmons, Caleb Clement, Carlos
School Varsity Basketball team were Brown, Michael Beale, Paul Baitel, Gary
selected by the athletic coaches from Collins. Standing: Coach Hoffman, Francis-
those boys who demonstrated out- co Gonzalez, Andrew Foshee, Robert
standing performance in intramurals Bloemer, Joseph Herring, George Scheibe,
g pe r. Eligio Thomas.
or who demonstrated unusual ability Eligio Thomas.
during special tryouts. Each team
member was required to meet certain
qualifications in regard to scholar-
ship, height, and speed. He also had -
to be willing to attend afternoon or
evening practice sessions. All high
school boys were eligible for varsity,
but seniors could not play on the jun- A
ior varsity team which was selected in
the same manner.
This year, the Tigers competed in
six interscholastic games three
each against BHS and CZC. In addi-
tion, they participated in numerous
practice games against Rainbow City
High School and the U.S. Navy. A
highlight of the year's competition
was the Canal Zone Invitational
Tournament.
The coaches this year were: Coach
DeDeaux (Varsity), and Coach Hoff-
man (Junior Varsity). Dee Delapp
was named Most Valuable Player.


Joe Herring, George Scheibe. "Give me the
ball!"


"Look, look at that ball go!"








igcers Play Close baseball Seasoat


















Sitting, Ist Rouw: Joe Rozmeski, Ralph Richmond, Isaac Heres, George Cruz, Pedro Simmons, Mike Snider. 2nd Row: Ernest Abresch, Frank
Ciccheto, Jose Medina, George Scheibc, Paul Baitel, Cubby Clement. Standing: Willie Huffman, Jim Jackson, Doug Stevens, Robert Phillips,
Mike Dexter, Donald Mans, Neil Patton, and Coach Litton.
The 1971 baseball season was from
January 10 to March 19. CHS played
four games against BHS and four
against CZC. Also, a practice game
i against the alumni was held about
twice a month.
Tryouts were held the first week of
the baseball season. The qualifica-
1 P. I tions for each position were different,
but in general the following qualities
were desired: a good eye, long, good,
/ arms, skill in throwing and catching,
and a quick reaction. Practice was
held after school or in the evening for
approximately two hours.
SAfter the regular eight-game sea-
son, the All-Stars played the Inter-
scholastic League Champions.
This years baseball coaches were
CHS Tigers "warm the bench". Mr. Litton and Mr. Agee.


Frank Ciccheto prepares to hit a homerun.






"C" Club Wins Smashing

Victory f I1st "Olympic


.


B... -.... - a "

Robert Phillips. "Determination pays!"



WI t *r I r



LI3[ 14
I^ieif-


Games")


Mike Spagna. "No wonder the girls won
this event!"


Titi Cole, Marlene Rice, Jean Smith, Sue
Mendenhall. "Ready girls?"


Mike Spagna sails into the air for two
points.


Jose Medina, Marlene Rice, Titi Cole, Joe Rosmeski. "The victors display their prize ribbons
while the defeated displa\ good sportsmanship."


Another first in the 1970-71 school
year was the Olympics held in the
CHS gymnasium on December 23,
1970 at 7 pm. This competition be-
tween the outstanding male and fe-
male athletes at Cristobal was organ-
ized through the combined efforts of
the GAA and the "C" Club.
The boys were divided into two
teams, the "Globe Clappers" and the
"Gungarias." The girls were also di-
vided into two teams, the "All-Ameri-
cans," and the "Bunnies."
The evening included competition
in basketball, battleball, volleyball,
and various relays. Sophomore girls
under the direction of Mrs. Harris ref-
ereed the games. The girls succeeded
in capturing only eight points, and
the boys scored a smashing victory
with a total of twenty-two points.
A good time was had by all, partic-
ipants and spectators alike, and it is
hoped that this competition may be-
come an annual event.







21st Amnual yamboree Dedi


Janie Souder, Robert Will, Wendy Flores, John Sanders, Darlene Daly. "Sometimes it all seems worthwhile!"


The twenty-first annual Jamboree
provided the kickoff for the most suc-
cessful football season in Tiger histo-
ry. In Tiger Stadium on September
18, 1970, the CHS football team had
its first taste of victory in this tradi-
tional pre-season game.
The first Jamboree was held
twenty years ago. It was first con-
ceived by former CHS coach, Luke
Palumbo, as an exhibition game for
the three participating teams: BHS,
CZC, and CHS. Over the years, it de-
veloped into its present form, in
which the team scoring the most
points is presented with a trophy.
Play is divided into three quarters -


each team playing the other two once.
This year the Jamboree was dedi-
cated to two former CHS students,
John Sanders and Robert Will. These
two young men were both injured
while serving their country in Viet-
nam.
The cheerleaders, color guard, the
drill teams, the football teams, and
the spectators were all part of the ex-
citement which was highlighted by
the presentation of the Jamboree
queens: Janie Souder, BHS; Wendy
Flores, CHS; and Darlene Daly, CZC.
The pomp and splendor displayed
made the Jamboree a memorable
event as always, but it was the victory


of the Tigers over both their oppo-
nents that made it a perfect evening.
In the first quarter, Cristobal
downed Balboa when quarterback,
Neil Patton threw a pass to Willie
Huffman, who ran 41 yards for a
touchdown. Cubby Clement then
kicked the extra point, and the quar-
ter ended with a score of 7-0.
In the second quarter, Cristobal
again came out on top when Neil
Patton scored a touchdown on a pass
interception.
The third and final quarter played
by BHS and CZC ended in a scoreless
tie.








cated ro Vietnaim Veterans


Kathy Kraus. "Paper tigers can't compare
with the real thing, but they do boost
school spirit before the gimrc'"


JAMBOREE QUEENS: Janie Souder of
Balboa, Wendy Flores of Cristobal, and
Darlene Daly of Canal Zone College; at
the pre-game pep jn'ihl. with their es-
corts: Caleb Clement, Jose Medina, Neil
Patton, Wallace Russon, Thomas Pursley,
and Robert Phillips.


Kathy Kraus, Karen Currier, Denise Foshee, Neil Patton, and S-, 1 ia Vamprine. The game's
leading rusher, Neil Patton, who carried the ball 12 times for 61 yards, has his moments of
apprehension.


Wendy Flores. Queen of the 21st Annual
Jamboree.







Queen Rosemary Greets Victorious


)~u


-


Caleb Clement, Jane Paulson, Shelley Lund, Mike Dexter, Wally Russon, Queen Rosemary, Jose
Phillips, and Hila Lyman. The queen and her court.


Each year, following the Home-
coming Football Game, a dance, hon-
oring the members of the team and
returning alumni, is held. This year,
the dance was an exceptionally joyous
occasion as it was celebrated the day
after Cristobal's third undefeated
game of the season, a 26 to 8 victory
over arch-rival, Balboa High School.
A completely transformed cafeteria
was the scene of this festive event on
Saturday, October 31, 1970. The
dance officially began at 8:30 with the
presentation of the court by Master of
Ceremonies, Wally Russon. This
year's queen was the lovely Rosemary
Christian. Accompanying her were
four other attractive girls from the
class of '71, especially selected by the
members of the football team to pre-
side at this special dance. They were:
Princess Cathy Gercich, Princess
Shelley Lund, Princess Hila Lyman,


ti
j6


I'


Medina, Cathy Gercich, Neil Patton, Robert


and Princess Jane Paulson. Acting as
escorts for the queen and members of
her court were: Neil Patton and
Wally Russon, Jose Medina, Michael
Dexter, Robert Phillips, and Caleb
Clement.
Music for the evening was pro-
vided by "The Cheese," a rock and
roll band composed of Cristobal High
School students. A large number of
students attended the dance, spending
much of their time at the refreshment
counter where they consumed copious
quantities of soft drinks and other re-
freshments. A pleasant evening was
enjoyed by all who attended.
The girls' Athletic Association and
the Letterman's Club, co-sponsors of
this annual event, are to be commend-
ed by the many hours of hard work
necessary to make this dance an out-
standing success.


QUEEN ROSEMARY


:i t

: 7
z
i.


19


u


Ir






Tigers At Iomecomxiug Damce


I l^A SwV : l



I3
~I.

L~W


Harry Townsend "Where are the mem-
bers of the Pepsi Generation'"


Princesses, Jane Paulson, Hila Lyman,
Shelley Lund, and Cathy Gercich, and their
escorts join Queen Rosemary Christian and
her escort, Neil Patton in the traditional
"Queen's Dance."


"THE CHEE.F" Jimmy Barraza, Rolie
Manns, David Diaz, and Julio Aponte.


A transformed cafeteria provides an ideal setting for the Homecoming Dance.







Witches And UWarlocks JHaunt C/S


CAST: Diane Caroll, Donald Byrd, Andrew Foshee, Judy McLain, Lewis Valdez.


The annual fall dramatic produc-
tion of the CHS International Thespi-
an Society was John van Druten's ro-
mantic comedy, Bell, Book, and Can-
dle. Van Druten takes an apparently
simple love story, peoples it with
some delightful modern-day witches,
and creates an aura magic in a prosaic
New York apartment building. The
talented young actors and actresses
succeed in bringing some of this
magic into the CHS auditorium on
November 6 and 7. Audiences were
enchanted by the story of Gillian
Holroyd, a beautiful young woman
with the power to cast spells and per-
form supernatural teats. She used her
powers to win the love of Shepherd
Henderson, the unattached young
publisher living upstairs, but forgot


one important fact a witch in love
may lose her powers. This is exactly
what happens to Gillian and audience
sympathizes with her attempts to ad-
just to life as an ordinary mortal amid
the teasing of her Aunt Queenie and
her warlock brother. All are delighted
when Gillian finally wins her man
and the play closes on a happy note.
The outstanding performances in
the demanding roles of this play by
CHS actors, three of whom were new-
comers to the stage, received much
deserved applause. Credit for the suc-
cessful presentation of this play also
goes to the hardworking students
who designed and constructed the set,
h-ndllkl publicity, make-up, 'i'hting,
programs, and props, and to Mrs. El-
fers.


Faith oad The Finishin Touch.
Faith Coad, The Finishing Touch.


.AiN







Auditorium f Mell, aook And Candle


Diane Caroll and Donald Byrd, "No peek-
ing!"

CAST
Gillian Holroyd .........
Diane Caroll
Shepherd Henderson .......
Donald Byrd
Miss Holroyd (aunt Queenie)..
Judy McLain
Nicky Holro d ............
Andrew Foshee
Sidney Redlitch ............
Lewis Valdez
Pyewacket ...............
"Sinbad"
D director ................
Mrs. Terence Elfers
Stage Manager ............
Sue Mendenhall
Assistant Manager ..........
Ingrid Portier


Diane Caroll and Donald Byrd, "Now, this is my Grandmummy's secret brew!"

j IsHal


Judy McLain and Donald ByrdOoh This chair feels lumpy"
Judy McLain and Donald Byrd, "Ooh! This chair feels lumpy!"


" ,1;


Robert Ford, Jeff Briam, and Ronnie Forsyth, THE LIGHT CREW.








hall Of fame Named At Christmas formal


Lewis Valdez, Judy McLain, and Sandra Al-
berga. "Don't they ever stop talking?"


The Christmas Formal, held at the
Sky Room on December 19, 1970 was
the climax of many weeks of hard
work for the members of the Senior
Class Advisory Council and Board of
Directors who made up the commit-
tees which organized and planned this
successful dance. Students danced to
the music of the "What For" amid
decorations on the theme "Right
Down Santa Claus Lane." The pre-
sentation of the Senior Class Hall of
Fame made this event one of the
most memorable of the school year.


Mark Herring, John Funderburk, Rod Lindo, Carmen Butler, and Wendy Flores. Hall of
Fame Winners.


4-,


NlfdiaeilDexter, "Mr. CHS."


- i I off -
Denise Foshee, Hila Lyman, Dennis Maxwell, Jan Bjorneby, Donald Byrd, Judy McLain,
Mark Herring. Hall of Fame Winners.





Jiternatiaoal Christmas;

Seme Of Christmas Comcert
















U.. W u I ian Mr. Fattorosi. "The Legend of Babushka."


The Intermediate Band At 7:30 Tuesday evening, Decem-
ber 22nd, the Cristobal High School
auditorium was the scene of the annu-
al Christmas Concert. Participating in
this traditional event were the Inter-
mediate Band, the Senior High Band,
and the Girls' Chorus, all under the
direction of Mr. Edward Carwithen.
This year the concert had an inter-
national flavor; songs and musical se-
lections from such countries as
France, Germany, Russia, and Spain
were presented. Mr. Louis Fattorosi,
an English teacher at CHS, .2a e read-
ings from the literature of these
countries, which aided in setting the
mood.
The Intermediate Band, composed
of Junior High School students, pre-
sented a number of selections which
were well received by the audience.
The Girls' Chorus Following their performance, the Sen-
ior High Band played a number of
unusual and difficult selections. A
highlight of the concert was the ap-
pearance of the Girls' Chorus, who
were dressed in formals, .dding a fes-
tive note to the occasion. Among
those deserving mention for solo per-
formances are; Ronald Palser, Judy
McLain, and Jean Bassett.

The Senior High Band







RKOC Cadets And Sponsors

A ttend 0. O C.


Thomas Pursley


For seven days on several week-
ends in the month of February, the
jungle surrounding Ft. Sherman be-
came the temporary "home" of a
number of students. These students
were ROTC cadets and sponsors from
Balboa and Cristobal High Schools
who were participating in the ROTC
program. The purpose of this pro-
gram was to train students to move,
shoot, communicate, and sustain
themselves in a jungle environment.
The army provided equipment and


instructors; participants paid for their
own food. The training included sev-
eral hours of classroom instruction,
numerous excursions to nearby Fort
Sherman, target detection, airborne
training, boat training, river crossing,
and a trip to the mock Viet Cong vil-
lage located on the French Canal. Par-
ticipants who graduated from the
course were given the title, "Honor-
ary Jungle Expert". This year's out-
standing graduate from CHS was
cadet corporal Orlando Reyes.


"b9 ~b:











ps


I op__ -.






Iatnquet oanoors CUS


Cettermen


Mike Dexter receives a letter in tennis
from Coach Dedeaux.


"It's not often that athletes get a
The final athletic event of the this!"
1969-70 school year was the annual
Lettermen's Banquet. On this occa-
sion the outstanding athletes in all
sports received recognition of their
ability and awards for their service to
CHS. The Banquet was held on May
9, 1970, at the France Field American
Legion. Dinner was served and a film
of the 1969 Palm Bowl was shown.
Cristobal High School's coaches, Lit-
ton and Dedeaux presented the boys
with letters in basketball, baseball,
football, tennis, and track. The most
valuable player in each sport received
a trophy. Among the honored guests
at the banquet were the cheerleaders,
and the guests which each boy
brought.


Ann Hirons presents Coach Litton with a
token of the team's appreciation.


"Well, we can't all win a trophy!"















Dear Readers.
Today is the da\ I and the other members of the ,earbook s .itt
ha.e long dreamed of reaching It marks the .rmpletion of the tre
mendous task of compiling and editing the 1ir I L.arb'l.in. As 1 help
our sponsor. Mr.Johnson, with the packaging ot our final shipment ot
cop), I recall the events, people, and places which are recorded in
these pages I also think of .a number of indil iduals a ho a ssied with
the many essential, but often unrecognicd tasks in'coled in the su,.
cessful production ot a \earbuok On behalf of the carbook staff. I
wish to extend a special thank you to Mrs. Condon who supervised
the sale of advertisements, and to Mr Gansen whu dedicated much of
his time to the photography department I also wish to thank the Tav.
lor Publishing Company. Compagnani Aleman and Quelqucicu. S A
tor their collaboration, and the busines- tirms tor their patronage
The yearbook staff had only a limited amount of time in which to
record an almost unlimited number of events, but eey effort was
made to make our coverage of the school tear as complete a.i possible
I sincerely hope that \ou have received as much pleasure in reading
this book as we did in editing it


\'er\ trul\ \our-



Jeannette Cox
Editor




Sponsor ................... ............... Mr. Johnson

Business Manager ..................... Mrs. Condon

Editor ....... ....................... .Jeannette Cox

Copy Editor.................. .............. Lana Boone

Assistant Editors ................. .......Maritza Thomas
Rita B.,\ land
Maria Boone
Margaret Jacketic
Beth Bleicher

Typist ................................... Sheila Alberga

Photographers .......... ....... ...... Danny Valentine
Debbie Pate

Artwork .................................. Allen Harmon
Advertisements ..................... .... Kathy DeRaps
Jeannie Bassett 169
Raul Castro


-


Mar>h 12. 1( 1









rNjer


MIs \W B Abrhtsth
Routn Atn ido
MS(, t11 Adams
Bob and |.in Acc
I ul Ah\ndstx
Lu1 A ltibi>\
Mr and Mrs ( A::.
M r and Mrs. .. Aill .,,
Shci l. Alber .: A
Mr and NMrs ( aiin Ra Aldridgei
Mr and Mrs I I.. Alger
Mrs Allen
Mrs Joanne Allen
Mr. and Mrs. \:' I.,i Alonms
Georgia L. Anderson
Fred R. Andree
Capt. and Mrs. R M. Andrews
Capt. and Mrs. M. Annen
Mr. and Mrs. ). Austin
Mr. and Mrs Nclson Austin
Robert L Austin and Family
Apodata Family
Gloria A. Aponte
John W. Askew
D. Bailey
Mr. and Mrs. Floyd Baker
M rs. R. B l...
Doris Ban
T. W. Bannes
Mr. and Mrs. I Gonzalez Barbosa
Mr. and Mrs. lack Barger
Mrs. Barr
Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth Bassett
Mr. and Mrs. Diina E. Beach
Mr. and Mrs. D. E Bell and Daughter
L. F. Bell
Mr. and Mrs. Belland
R. W. Beninghoff
Mr. and Mrs. Ed Bensen
Mr. and Mrs. Bobby Bentley
Mr. and Mrs E. J. Berger
Mr. and Mrs. A. J, Best
Mrs.J. R. Best
Mrs. A. Betaniourt
C hris Betamnourt
Mr and MrsN A Bialkowski. Sr.
Mr and Mrs. Alfonso Bisax
Dennis Bight
Fred Binghami
Mr. and Mrs. J Biornebx
Dora Blainthard
Mr. and Mrs. Robert Blai(hettc
Mr. and Mrs Harold E Blake
Mary Blennerhasset
Mrs. Stanley I. Bli/nik
Mr and Mrs Ruithard W.t Bo k
Mr ind Mrs F J Boer
Maria Boon
Mrs ( B oarc tome
Mih B0,m in an Id FaIn l
I .urldt' A Bostman


Esther Boxd
W I II
Venus Brannan
Mr, and Mrs J. Bressel
Mrs. Bringas
Elvia P. Bringas
Allen S. and Celia S. Brown
Mrs. Calvin E. Brown
Mr. and Mrs. Fay M. Brown
Mr. and Mrs. William M. Brown
Mr. and Mrs. I) Bruce
Mr. D. F Bullinger
Mr. and Mrs. Bunnel
Mrs. R. I. Bunnel
Mr. and Mrs. T. J. Burbine
Mr. and Mrs I. N. Burgess
G. Bur,'a
Mr. and Mrs. Michael Burza
Mr. and Mrs. Raymond G. Bush
Gloria Buswell
Mr. and Mrs. W. R. Byrd
Martin Caballero
Mrs. A. Cabicca
Mr. and Mrs. R. L. Calclasure
Mr. and Mrs. William C. Calkins
E. B. Callomn and Family
Mr. and Mrs. Camacho
Mr. and Mrs. C. R. Campbell
Jim Campbcll
Mr. and Mrs, H. H. Carey
Capt. and Mrs. T. H. Carlisle
Mrs. Helen I. Carroll
Delia E. Carter
Mr. E R. Carwithen
Mr. Roland Casanova
W. T. Cash
Mr. and Mrs. Larry Celluci
Mr. G. F. Chaser
Mr. and Mrs. H. Cheshire
C. H. Childress
CSM and Mrs. W. H. Childress
SFC H. Childress
Mr. and Mrs. Joe Childress
Lou B. Childress, Jr.
Mr. and Mrs. E. Cirulli
Tony (Cixbhll
Mrs. Barbara I. Clark
H. Clark
Caleb C C(lement
Joyce Cleven ger
SCGT and Mrs. Jimmy D. Clowersi
Mr. and Mrs. J, Coffin
M. J. Cole
Mr. and Mrs. George W. Coleman
Mrs. Joann Collier
Mr. and Mrs. All.., B. Collini
Mark Collins
W alter A. ( II, ....
Mr and Mrs. Colon
E Comertfrd
Mr and Mrs. J. C Compter


Mary Condon
Mr. and Mrs. Conwax
Mrs. Maria A. Coroke
Mr. and Mrs. J. S. Cossigan
Mr. and Mrs. William H. Cox
Jeanne Criess
Mr. and Mrs. John L Croix
M. Currier
Alden Curtis
Damiani
R. J. Danielsen
R. Ieaton
W. M. Deaton and Family
Deesus
Mr, and Mrs. David Dempscy
Mr. and Mrs. D. C. Denis
Angelica S. Derickson
Mr. and Mrs. H. B. DeVolt
Mr. and Mrs. Aurelio DeWitt
Mr. and Mrs. F. Diaz
Mr. and Mrs. H. A. Dockery
L. Doke
H. R. Domenech
Mrs. Doney
Mrs. Zona V. Dowell
Debra Dunkins
Mr. and Mrs. William Eggeb
Mr. and Mrs. George FeL'ii. Jr.
Mr. and Mrs. George R. Egolf
Mr. and Mrs. T. Elfers
Frank Ender
Eric Ernest
Leonora Escobido
M. Estes
Mr. and Mrs. D. R. Fall
Mr. and Mrs. Joe Fallett
Kathy Fauber
SFC and Mrs. Jose Fernandez
Mrs. Ferguson
Dorothy Ferro
Gilbert R. Ferro
D. Finley
Mr. and Mrs. Ronald Fire
Pat and Lankv Flores
Mr. and Mrs. Charles W. Flyn
Mr. and Mrs. Robert Forsythe
LTC and Mrs. G. Foshee
Mr. and Mrs. S. T. Frankel
John and Sue Frensley
Mr. and Mrs. K. O. Fuglebcrg
Mr. and Mrs. Richard i .....
Mrs. Galloglier
SGT. and Mrs. G. W. Gantcr
Mrs. Maria Garcia
SSG and Mrs, Paul Garibay
Enrique Garza
Mr. and Mrs. Gecr
Mr. and Mrs. Robert Gegg
Mrs. Helen J. Geroih
Capt. and Mrs. W. Gillespie
Gilbert Gilmore








boosters


Maritza Gitz
Mrs. Povide Gitz
Cornelius Goebertus
Carol O. Goerra
Mr. and Mrs. Howard Golden
Jeanne J. Goldman
Mr. and Mrs. Henry Goldmann
Gabrielle H. Gonzalez
Ed Gordon
Debra Gosney
Mr. and Mrs. Gott
Capt. and Mrs. Thomas W. Goves
Mr. and Mrs. Randall H. Grubbs
Mr. and Mrs. William R. Graham
Roger A. Graham
W. Grant
Robert Greer
Gene Gregg
Mr. and Mrs. Grtg.rn
Mr. and Mrs. D. E. Grier
Miss Jacinta E. Griffiths
Mrs. Grist
Mr. and Mrs. Juan J. Guevara
Tirama Hall
Mr. and Mrs. Arnold F. Hames
Mr. and Mrs. Eugene E. Hamlin, Jr.
SGT and Mrs. D. H. Hammond
Mr. and Mrs. Robert J. Hancock
David R. Harburger
Ronald L. Hargis
Mr. and Mrs. P. B. Hartwell, Jr.
Diane Hauke
Mrs. James Hauser
Thomas Head
R. J. Helmericks
L. Hess
Mr. and Mrs. Paul Hieronymus
Mr. and Mrs. T. H. Higgins
Mr. and Mrs. L. G. Highley
Mr. and Mrs. Roy Hill
Mr. and Mrs. \\Wli.im G. Hill
Richard Hines
Maj. and Mrs. Vernon W. Hinkel
Mr. and Mrs. R. M. Hirons
Capt. and Mrs. L. H. Hixon
Insula Hogaboam
Mr. and Mrs. M. Holcomb
Mr. and Mrs. \Vltrcd Hold Jr.
Judy and Bob Holden
Emilia Holgerson
James L. Homer
Mr and Mrs. Hopkins
Mr. M. C. Howard
Mr. and Mrs. Charles W. Howe
Mr. Roy Howell
R. F. Huldtquist Jr.
Mr. and Mrs. Dennis R. Huff
James J. Husnik
Capt. and Mrs. N. R. Hutchinson
Dr. and Mrs. O. C. Irion
Mr. and Mrs. Ronald Jacobs


A. E. Jaketic
Phillips James
Mrs. Ralph James
Mr. and Mrs. Jaquez
Rex Jarsen
Mr. and Mrs. Paul J. Jeffries
N. Jensen
Jessick
Mrs. Barbara Johnson
H. N. Johnson
Irene A. Johnson
Joyce Johnson
Mrs. Rhett Johnson
Mr. and Mrs. Walter Johnston
E. A. Jones
Reverend James Jones
Mrs. G. E. Jordan
Mrs. M. Jove
Charles R. Kalb
Karen Kandrin
Mr. and Mrs. K. P. Karpinski
Hinayuki Katsumato
Mr. and Mrs. Ted Kaufer
Mr. and Mrs. William L. Keller
Mrs. Bill Kendall
Trifonia Kendall
Mrs. J. R. Kerwin
Mrs. Sylvia Kestler
Anne Kienzle
Dorothy King
Mr. and Mrs. John M. Klasovsky
Mr. and Mrs. John Knight
Mr. and Mrs. Koziol
Mrs. Kroft
Jane La Roche
Mr. and Mrs. Jorgen Lauritzen
Mr. and Mrs. R. D. Lawrence
Mr. and Mrs. L. E. Layman
Mr. and Mrs. Warren E. LeDoux
Mr. and Mrs. Lentz
Dr. and Mrs. B. K. Levin
Mrs. Linanes
G. A. Link
Ben Linschoten
Mr. and Mrs. Lloyd
Mr. Trivett Lloyd
Janna Loizeaux
Laura Loizeaux
Marc Loizeaux
Marcia Loizeaux
Dr. P. H. Loizeaux
Mrs. P. H. Loizeaux
Spooky Loizeaux
Turpi Loizeaux
Mr. and Mrs. Andrew I..nig'.rk
Mr. and Mrs. G. W. Lopp
Mr. and Mrs. Jack B. Love
Jerry Love
Patricia Loyld
Michael Lubrano
Rey D. Lucas


Mr. and Mrs. Howard Lund
Mr. and Mrs. \'s rrtn W. Lyman
Fabio Mabilia
Mr. and Mrs. D. MacElrevey
Mrs. Rita MacMeeker
Frank Madigar
M. L. Malo
R. Manns
Mr. and Mrs. W. E. Marek
Mr. and Mrs. Alfred G. Mare
Mr. and Mrs. Tom Marsh
Mr. and Mrs. Louis E. Martin
Mrs. S. F. Mason III
Juan Mata
Capt. and Mrs. Robert S. Mata
Mr. and Mrs. McCorrick
Mr. and Mrs. Maurice McCullough
R. E. McCullough
Capt. and Mrs. G. A. McDonald
Capt. and Mrs. Pat McDonald
Mrs. Tashiko McDonald
Pat and Patti McDonald
Lt. Col. and Mrs. James McKenny
Karen McKown
Capt. and Mrs. Arthur McLean
Mrs. James McMade
Capt. and Mrs. Drummond McNaughton
A. McZeno
Jaime Medina
Capt. and Mrs. J. Finley Meehan
Mr. and Mrs. Dabney B. Meeker
Capt. and Mrs. John W. Meeker
M. W. Menger
Mr. and Mrs. Paul M. Menges
Harvey Michael
Mr. and Mrs. Charles R. Miller
R. E. Miller
Mr. and Mrs. Jack Milligan
Mr. and Mrs. Thomas E. Minehart
Mr. and Mrs. Dave Minskew
George Mitchelle
Thomas Mizener
Mr. and Mrs. Mizrachi
Frank Modizar
Mrs. N. G. Moncevais
Aleida M, nr.n .r,.
Mrs. V. N. M. rg In
Mrs. Joseph Morrisen
Mr. and Mrs. Robert L. Myers
Mrs. Luida Nelson
Donnie Nettles Jr.
Wilbert L. Ney and Family
Mr. and Mrs. Andreas Nicolaiscn
Mr. Nicolette
Mrs. Maria I. Nieves
Maj. and Mrs. G. P. Noble III
Mr. Norman
Mrs. M.lr. trit.i N. rm n., I
Mr. and Mrs. R. E. Oberholtzer
Mrs. Ochoa
Robert O'Connor









I (i t(.i
Nhi .ld Ns John T O'DI)nncl Jr
r and NMr Richa.rd ()l)'innll
IIMC R T Oldl)iha
SF': Abel l ) li\are
cuiha S (O'Neill
l.1lAnes )rrego

Mr and iMrs Luin R. Orti
SO)rnti/
P' Osbo(rne
R W \Owen
Mr. and MrNs Harland )OxIc
Miss Sandra Pacte
Mr. I'nrirquc Pagan
MNrs. E. T, Painm
Mr ind Mrs Inuke C Palumbo Jr.
Mr and Mrs. Luke C. Palumbo Sr.
Mr. and Mrs. Luke T. Palumbo
Mr. and Mrs. C F. Pantova
Sarah Parks
C T.R, and Mrs. Roger R Peaskc
Mr. and Mrs. Ronald L. Pennock
Col. anid Mrs. Robrto Peralta
Hectcr Perez
Mr and Mrs James Pfau
Mr. and Mrs. Carl A. Pinto
Sonia Podial
Charlie and Mike Poer
Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Polite
Mr and Mrs. Darwin E Pope
Poticr Fanmil
Maj. and Mrs. Frank M. Potete
Mr. and Mrs. Poulin
K. S. Prichard
Maj. and Mrs. R P. Prothers
Dr. and Mrs Jaime Pujals
Frene Rabaghat
Capt and Mrs. A E. Rainey
Darci Riam.lho
Capt. E. B. Ramier
Mariend Riamirez
A A. Rankin
Mr and Mrs Robert Raukin
Donald 1Rahill
Edwa aid Read
Jose Rec io
Mr .md Mrs J. Redugoi
Carmenit Reedt
Mr. aind Mrs J Reid
Di and \IMrs Paul Revello>
Mr and Mrs Rtlxs'
Iis Ri miilund
NiMr and lMrs. r1 F Ridge
Mr and \Mrs. Viintnt Ridge
Mr and Mrs. (arl () Riggs Jr
I.'I'C ami MrN Theooreo Ric s ih
SI 1 Donald ki\cra
j]o e RI\eIaI

.h and Mrs, Roberts
l]i k and 1.l Rbson
Rots RodnIl


Tohn lRublcl
Mir and iMrs. Wallv F. Russon
ShiMev Salt/
Vilmna Eihsa Sampson
Charles A. Sanche/
John IH. San che
iMr and Mrs. John Sanders
Al Sandrock
Carlos Santiago-Gonzales
SFC and Mrs. William Santiago
oce and Sonia Schack
Mr. and Mrs. G. C. Scheibh
Mrs. E. G. Shell
Mrs. Schwinn
Mrs. Scott
Ine/ Scott
Gracicla R. de Severance
Capt. and Mrs. Harold W. Shad III
John Sherwood
Clover Shobe
Mr. Fred Sholtes
SFC and Mrs. William P. Sieben
Edward Silva
Ellis H. Simpkins
Mrs. E Singh
CTRCS and Mrs. Horace P. Sirmons
Capt. and Mrs. P. L. Skrable
Van Stamper
David Stanley
Capt. and Mrs. R. K. Stanley
Gatun Fire Station
Mr. and Mrs. J. E. Stearns
Shirley Stccle
Cothrew B. Sterling
Mr. and Mrs. R. R. Stoluy
S. R. Stough
Mr. and Mrs. J. C. Smith
Mrs. Lucille Smith
Mr. and Mrs. M. Smith
Mr. and Mrs. Rodolto T. Smith
Lowere Snyder
Dr. and Mrs. W. M. Snyder
Karsten Sorensen
Dorothy Spagna
Mr. and Mrs. Neal F. Sparrow
Mrs. John P. Spear
Amelia Sperling
Mr. and Mrs. John B. Spivey
Dr. and Mrs. R. Antonio Suescum
(Capt. and Mrs. Roger H. Swain
Wallace R. Swank
Mr. and Mrs. F Tahev
SFC TaundrN
Mrs. Marion Tavlor
Capt. and Mrs Thor B. Tcllctsen
Aline Tcllman
MrN and Mrs A G. T., .11...
Fhukai iTeves
Mrs. Paula Theall
Thiomps on
Ncndcll Thompsi on
Angel I. l)ial Torres
Mrs Robert Toucrdv


Mr and Mrs HarrI E Townsend
Jose L. Truvillo
Shirley TIv
Mrs. Tyler
Mujoja Tyler
Cectilia Ubbcn
Joe Valencia
Capt. and Mrs. Jose B. Vasquez
Mr. and Mrs. Pete B. Vasquez
Mr. and Mrs. Clinton W. Vaught
Delia Vedio
Juan R. Velez
Juan Ventura
Ria E. Voight
Sylvia Voight
Mr. and Mrs. Joseph A. Vowell Jr
Mr. and Mrs. R. E Waggoner
Mr. and Mrs. F . Wainio
Barbara Walcott
Lawrence E. Walker
Walline
Dr. and Mrs. V. W. Walters
Mr. and Mrs. R. L. Ward
Cindy Watson
Mrs. C. C. Weigart
Mr. and Mrs. W. E. Weigle
Capt. and Mrs. A. T. Welden
Mr. and Mrs. Dayton Wells
Mr. and Mrs. Richard Werder
Bill Wesley
Zorro Wesley
Karen Westeberg and Family
Mr. and Mrs. V. Westerburg
Mr. and Mrs Weston
Mr. and Mrs. John M. N\ Il.
R. L. Whulu
Albert and Maria Wiber
Dr. and Mrs. Wiggins
Gloriela X\ ii ,
David A. Wild
Mrs. Wilfred
Mr. and Mrs. Wilkinson
Mr. and Mrs. Howard Will
Mr. and Mrs. Raymond R. Will
Robert R. Will
Mr. and Mrs. J. R. Williams
SFC Wilson
Mrs. Winder
Mr. and Mrs. H. L. Wirthams
Jenny Wirtz
Mrs. Hallv Witcher
Mr. and Mrs. 1. D. Wood
Mrs. Gladys Wudgin
Mrs. and Mrs. Merlin B. Yocum
Harold Young
Karen Young
Mr. and Mrs. Yrey
Carmen T. Ysdimer
Paul Zuleta











Congratulations to the
Class of 1971
From
UNITED FRUIT COMPANY
Box 5016
Cristobal, Canal Zone


Compliments of
MOTTA INTERNATIONAL, S.A.
Box 417
Colon, Panama







Compliments of the
CRISTOBAL Y.M.C.A.
BARBER SHOP
"Service is our business."
Hours: Mon. Thru Sat.
8:00 A.M.-8:00 P.M.
RUPERT AND JOE BLACK
Your Favorite Barbers!
For Appointments Call 3-2797
-AIR CONDITIONED-


I


Compliments of the
MARGARITA FLORIST
"We Watch-Match-Dispatch."
Phone 3-1916
7997 First St., Margarita, C. Z.
Box 1355
Cristobal, Canal Zone


Established in 1909

BOYD BROTHERS
STEAMSHIP AGENCIES, LTD.
Box 5077
Cristobal, Canal Zone


Compliments of
E. J. BERGER
ATTORNEY AT LAW

Box 5081
Cristobal, Canal Zone







Congratulations to the Class of 1971
PANAMA CANAL YACHT CLUB


Box 5041
Cristobal, Canal Zone








AVEC LES COMPLIMENTS
DE
CIE. GLE.
TRANSATLANTIQUE
FRENCH LINE


/


N


Cristobal, Canal Zone


Compliments of
NORTON LILLY
&
COMPANY, INC.
STEAMSHIP AGENTS
AND OPERATORS
United Fruit Company Building


CRISTOBAL
1837
Tel. 3-1801
1756
Balboa Port Captain Building
Tel. 2-1841
1746


Compliments of
CRISTOBAL SHOESHOP
14th Street
Cristobal, Canal Zone
Tel. 3-1260


Compliments of
DR. MELCHOR SAYOC
Dentist
Box 5006
Margarita, Canal Zone


i












Congratulations
to the
Class of 1971
From

UNITED FRUIT COMPANY
Box 5016
Cristobal, Canal Zone


YAMAHA
"It's A
Better Machine"
Compliments
of
TEXAS
ANTILLES
LIMITED

Compliments of
The Vincentian Fathers
HOLY FAMILY CHURCH
Margarita
Canal Zone















Compliments
of


GIL MORLAND
From


C. B. FENTON AND CO., INC.
Box 5015
Cristobal, Canal Zone













Compliments
of
DELCARGO, INC.
Cristobal
Canal, Zone


Congratulations
to the

Class of 1971
From

C. FERNIE AND CO. INC.
Box 5042
Cristobal, Canal Zone







Compliments
of


Italian Line
"ITALIA" -Societa per Azionc di Navlgazione-Genoova



Telephone
Cristobal 3-2464
Panama 25-5001


With the Compliments
of
W. ANDREWS & CO. LTD.


Compliments of
J. J. PALOMERAS
FRENCH BAZAR
Colon


Compliments
of the


COCO SOLO
LIONS CLUB


4


Courtesy
of the
CRISTOBAL
Y.M.C.A.
RESTAURANT


I


ALMACEN SURANY, S. A.
P.O. Box 503


Telex: PA 226
Tel. 7-5070
Cable: Shagwan

CASA BEE'S,
B. T. MAYANI, S. A.
Colon, Free Zone


Apartado 336
Colon, Rep. De Panama










Congratulations
to the
Class of 1971
From



B.P.O. ELKS
LODGE #1542


( A ai


Box 1542
Cristobal
Canal Zone


lii









Compliments
of

CANAL ZONE
CUSTOMS ASSOCIATION
Box 1295
Cristobal, Canal Zone


AUTHORIZED DEALER
MEYERS MANX


NORDSTROM e HIJOS S.A.
Box 1566
Colon, Panama




























Congratulations
to the
Class of 1971
From


TROPICAL RADIO TELEGRAPH CO.
Cristobal, Canal Zone


PRUDENTIAL-GRACE LINES, INC.
PANAMA AGENCIES CO.
General Agencies
Cristobal, Canal Zone


-p-
I


Compliments
From the


CANAL ZONE
POLICE ASSOCIATION
Cristobal


j














































INTER-AMERICAN LINES
BI-Weekly-lndependent Service to From

New Orleans and Miami
and
Central America
Phone
Panama 25-4933
Cristobal 3-2528







KNEM


ROYAL NETHERLANDS STEAMSHIP CO.


C.:


M CY T: 6 0 B A T 2-


'C)
U~.l~~,


Compliments of



LT. G. H. MOUMBLOW
MEMORIAL POST #3876
VFW INC.

Cristobal
Canal Zone



































Compliments
From the
MAVIS
BEAUTY SHOP
Colon, Panama


Congratulations
to the
Class of 1971
From
MADURITO'S S.A.
Colon, Panama


P 0. BOX 800
COLON. R. OF P


TELEPHONE 7.0311
TEL. RES. 7-8236


Tw=


litr" A[lofoer l4op
9th and Front Street Colon, Rep. of Panama
WE MAKE ARRANGEMENTS FOR ALL OCCASIONS


SUPPORT

YOUR

LOCAL

YEARBOOK!


Congratulations


to the
Class of 1971
From



HOSPITAL SAMARITANO
Colon, Panama


i








Compliments


ELBERT


S. WAID POST NO.


THE AMERICAN LEGION
FRANCE FIELD, C. Z.
Air-Conditioned Bar


Open 24-Hours a


Day


Bingo Thursday and Sunday
Meetings
2nd Wednesday of Each Month


LESLIE R. THOMAS
Post Commander








CARIBBEAN SPORTS

PARACHUTE

CLUB

















Hangar 1147 Behind
The High School


CIA MARITIMA ITURRALDE
Apartado 1737
Colon, Rep. de Panama

KERLEY NAUTICAL SUPPLY
P.O. Box 4192
Miami, Florida
33101


Cables:
COFER-Balboa, C. Z.


P. O. Box 192
Balboa C. Z.


L. K. COFER, INC.
Steamship Agents
Captain of the Port Building, Balboa, C. Z.
Post Office Building, Cristobal, C. Z.
Balboa 2-2572 and 2-2998
Cristobal 3-3206 and 3-1743


PUT A LITTLE

LOVE

IN YOUR
HEART


Courtesy
of
PAN AMERICAN
MAIL LINE









Compliments
of the
GATUN YACHT
CLUB










faculty, Staff and Curriculum Jndev


Administration 30, 31
Alford, Rotc 55
Allen, Joanne 32
Art 36
Berger, Robert 118, 52
Blanchette (Mrs.) 32
Bock, Richard W. 44
Bright, Adamary A. 45, 33
Campbell, Barbara L. 48
Carwithen, Edward R. 46
Cheshire, Jr., Herbit D. 38
Clinic 32
Commerce 37
Condon, Mary L. 52
Cowley, Lawrence A. 44
Dedeaux, Louis F. 124, 168, 154, 48
Dobbins, Joel B. 38
Elfers, Jane K. 126, 38, 132
English 38, 39
Fattorosi, Louis J. 165, 65, 38, 39,
134


Fattorosi, M. June 48, 153
Fite, Ronald S. 60, 43, 91
Fite, Barbara D. 37
Foreign Languages 40, 41
Gansen, William J. 53, 52
Gegg, Anne D. 128, 129, 40
Gregg, Eugene T. 53
Griffiths, Jacinta E. 32
Grubbs, Randall H. 44
Guidance 33
Harris, Joan F. 145, 48
Hieronymus, Paul J. 50
Holloway, Jesse C. 43
Home Economics 42
Howard, Telma I. 130, 131, 40, 41
Howell, Roy E. 45
Hoffman (Coach) 155, 147
Industrial Arts 43
Jacobs, Ronald D. 53
Jeffries, Paul J. 31
Johnson, Clare W. 60, 139, 37


Knight, Carol J. 45
Koziol, Edwin M. 36
Lassila, Ronald L. 60, 43
Levin (Dr.) 32
Library 34
Litton, Douglas B. 168, 48, 156
Mason, Emma L. 50
Mata, Juan M. 55
Mathematics 44, 45
Mazzoni, Bernard 45
McCullough, Robert E. 127, 53
McNaughton, Elizabeth 42
Mowery, Robert L. 33
Murphy, Alejandro D. 55
Music 46, 47
Norman, James D. 99, 151
Office Staff 32
Palumbo, Luke C. 33
Palumbo, Luke T. 51
Pfau, Grace S. 35


Pfau, James H. 60, 117, 30
Physical Education -- 48. 49
Picoli, Frank L. 55
Reeves, Charles T. 127, 51, 79
Riefkohl, Stella C. 40
ROTC 54, 55, 56, 57
Science 50, 51
Sharick, Earl C 35
Smith, Dorothy H. 39, 38, 80
Social Studies 52, 53
Special Education 35
Stearns, James E. 41
Stronach, Glenda S. 60, 39
Tanner, Martha I. 39
Taylor, Marion B. 32
Weaver, Fiorella
'W'cll. Dayton N. 34
Wilferd, Ugolena 39
Will, William 41, 39
'& illhim. Rebecca D. 60, 39


Student AdeC


Abeyta, Raymond
Abresch, Ernest 124, 140, 95
Adams, Clyde 151, 156, 116
Adams, Emilio
Adams, Nickilda 96
Alberga, Charles 104
Alberga, Deborah 104, 135, 132
Alberga, Sandra 135, 164, 62, 80,
132
Alberga, Sheila 128, 129, 88, 135,
134, 139, 91, 132
Alexaitis, Sheri Lynn 120
Alexaitis, Jr., John 104
Alger, David 116, 120
Alger, Pattie 88
Alger, Vickie 118
Allen, Brian 88, 123, 140
Allen, Lonnie 119
Allen, William 116, 120
Alonis, Jay 62, 23
Amason, James 120
Ambum, Buddy
Andersen, Carl 115, 118, 127
Anderson, Shawn 114
Andree, Michael
Andree, Willian 104
Anton, Martha 128, 129, 88, 132
Apodaca, Cynthia 114
Apodaca, Gil 96, 128, 122
Apodaca, Michael 88, 124, 140
Aponte, Julio 161
Aponte, Stephen 96, 129, 47, 55, 56
Arbaugh, Susan 104
Austin, Almanubia 6, 62, 80
Austin, Donald 104
Austin, John 116, 120
Austin, Patricia 62, 85
Austin, Paul 119
Austin, Robert 113, 116
Austin, Robert 112, 116
Austin, Susan 119
Austin Jr., Donald


Austin, Elaine 128
Autry, Debie 111
Baitel, Barbara 117, 120
Baitel, Paul 88, 155, 140, 156, 132
Baker, Carol 104, 148, 107
Baker, Donna 96
Baker, Debbie 120
Baker, Diane 113
Baker, Glen 88
Baker, Paul 119, 116
Baker, Terri 62, 152
Balmer, Kathy 115
Banks, Barbara 88
Barger, Michael 88, 140
Barger, Steven 116
Barnett, Marilyn 113
Baronne, Joanne 116
Barr, James 96
Barr, Peter 115
Barr, Robert 62
Barraza, Jaime 88, 161, 26
Barraza, Evelyn 104
Barriteau Jr., John 112, 116
Bassett, Jean 63, 80, 132
Baxter, Marihn 96
Beale, Mary 112
Beale, Michael 155, 63
Beale, Roger 104
Beebe, William 88
Behre, Thomas 33, 111
Beltran, Jaime
Bensen, Christopher 104
Berry, Frank 129, 88, 140
Betancourt, Margaret
Betancourt, Rosemary 96, 130, 102
Betcher, Barbara 88
Bird Jr., James 119, 116
Bisot, Donna 96
Blorneb. Jan 58, 164, 125, 63
Bjomeby, Michael 96
Blair, Marjorie 114
Blanchard. Stanr'y


Blanchard, Timothy 96
Blanchette, Gerianne 88
Blanchette, Paula 104, 111
Bleicher, Beth -118, 120, 139
Bleicher, David 104, 148
Bleicher, Paul 96, 138, 100, 147,
148
Blevins, Elizabeth 58, 63, 80
Blevins, Jeffrey 96
Bliznik, Barbara 118
Bloemer, Barbara 96. 128, 58, 125,
152, 145
Bloemer Jr., Robert 88, 124, 155,
140, 148, 119
Blout, Edward 118
Blount, Lucy
Bocanegra, Tina 120, 42
Bock, Robin 96
Boman, James
Bonilla, Arnaldo 104
Boone, Lana 128, 135, 34, 136, 133,
80, 71, 82, 139, 23, 63, 86, 134
Boone, Maria 128, 88, 127, 148,
139, 134
Booth, Richard 88, 148
Borsellino, Henry 88, 33
Boseman, Vivian 6, 63, 80
Boswell, Debra 88
Boswell, Michael 120
Boswell, Steven 113
Bowers, Carl 104
Boyland, Charlotte 104, 122. 11l
Boyland, Rita 128, 129, 88, 122,
123, 10, 127, 139
Bradby, Robert 113
Bradbury, Margaret 112
Bradbury III, William
Bramlett Jr., Robert 120
Bradenburg, Janet 89, 58
Brannan, George 104, 120


Brannan, Sheila 112, 118
Brannen, George
Brannen III, William
Bridwell III, Arthur
Bridwell, John 113
Bridwell, Pamela 96
Brien, JcltriN 96, 163, 103
Bringas, Carmen 113
Bringas Jr., Edward 96, 129, 12'
Brock, Laura 104
Brock, Linda 89, 58, 95
Brock, Steven 114, 116
Brockman, Robert 104
Brown, Amber 104
Brown, Billie 112
Brown, Carlos 89, 124, 10, 155, 140
Brown, Debra 104
Brown, Donald 104
Brown, Elisa 115, 42
Brown, Janet 120
Brown, Jonathan 120
Brown, Kathleen 96, 135. 103
Brown, Melinda 96, 129, 130, 103
Brown, Patrice 96, 12
Brown, Terri 114, 34
Budd, Debra 104
Budd, Desiree 113
BulIr.~erl Denise 103
Bullinger, Kurt 113
Bundy Jr., Earl 96
Burac, Francisco 118
Burbine, Anthony 114
Burge, Susan 96, 128, 129, 10
Burgess, Elizabeth 104
Burgess, Kathryn 64
Bush, Kathryn 96
Butcher. Leo 104
Butler. Carmen 6, 164, 1(. ,5 M,
64, 71, 83
Butler, Ines 112
Bynoe, Carlos 119







P rd, Dl)onild 12o, 1(2, 1(,, 1(,.
S5 (4, 1 .1
Bird, M.iar -- l
Cabrera, Arinndo soi
Cain, Mihacl -- 110
Calkmns. Itcne 1l,. i4
Campbell, James 11
Carev. Deborah ltl, 148. III
Carlisle. ( atherin -- 1 2. 89, 126,
1 1l. 21, 1 ,. 91
Caroll, Diane 96, 162. 16o. 1,
Caroll, Richard 111
Carter, Eli7abeth 1226,8, M4, 49,
'1, so
Carw~ithen, Jeffrev 112, 116
Cash. Mary 89
Cash Jr., Jimmy 114
Castro, Helen 89
Castro. Raul 135, F4, 86, 64, 71,
132
Castro, Rita 120
Catlett, Anstey 95
Caudill, Cheryl 89
Caudill. Jay 89
Chavis, Valdez 119
Chavez, Barbara 118
Cheshire, Alan 104
Cheshire. Deborah 89
Childress, James -96
Childress, Randy 89
Christian II. Joe 104
Christian, Mona -112
Christian, Patty 34, 66
Christian, Rosemary 161, 160, 66,
26
Ciccheto, Frank 89, 124. 140, 156
Ciccolo, William 105
Cimino, Elizabeth 96
Cimino, Leopold 118
Cirulli, Ann 96
Claramunt, Juan 112
Clement, Caleb 159, 155, 140, 143,
160, 66, 151
Cliette, Michael 114
Cliette. Renee 105, 130
Coad, Faith 162, 34, 66
Coad, Pamela 89
Cobb, Aminta 89, 130. 59
Coe, Debra 105
Coe, Lisbet 115
Coffin. Gerald 96, 148, 107
Coffin, Marcia 114
Cole, Fred 66
Cole, Roberta 89. 58, 157, 125, 145,
153, 91
Coleman, Alexis 105, 130
Coleman, Cheryl 89, 58, 52
Collins. Gary 155, 6,
Collins III, James 105, 102
Collins, John 120
Collins, Mark 89
Collins, Michael 114
Collins Jr, Walter 120, 35
Colpe, Kathleen 96
Colpe, Pamricia 113
Colon, Lourdes 90, s5, 155
Colon, Sonia 89
Cooke. Lavera 9'
Cooper, Greg 115
Cooper, Paul
Coronado, (arlos 11i,
Coronado, Gustavo 120
Couts, Carl 119
Couts, Clihford
Couts. Susan 78


Couts. W'a ICne '
Cox, Christopher -- 123
Cox, Jeainntte 128, 129. 130, 13,
156, 139, 6 1-,1
Cronan, William 112
Crouch. Anne 105
Crouch, Marian 102
Cruz, George 103, 156
Cruz Jr, John 116, 120
Cummings, Ivette 129, 89, 130, 10,
132
Cummings, Leland 97
Cummings, Walter 115
Cummings, Wanda 97
Currier, Karen 89, 159, 15, 91, 144,
34, 125
Currier, Robert 115, 116
Dailey, Wayne 115
Diaz, David 161
Daly, Darlene 158. 159
Damiani, Guy 97
Dancer. Laveda 105. 122, 130
Dancer, Sheila 90
Dancer Jr., Doyle 113
Dandridge, Devony 114
Daniel, Emilie 90, 145, 146
Daniel, Patrick 113, 116
Danielsen, Cheri 117, 119, 118
Danielsen, Kathie 97, 122, 5, 33
Darcy, Joan
Darcy, Michelle 105
Davila, Mark 105
Davison, John 120
Day, John 90, 40, 143
Day, Robert 114, 116
Deaton, Donna 114
Deaton Jr., William 90, 124, 140,
151
Deaton, Ted 105
Deboor, Karen 120
Deboor, Theodore 113
De Jesus, George 119, 116
De Jesus, Ruperto 35
De Jesus Jr., Ruperto
Del Busto, Iracema 105
Denis, Marc 97
DeRaps, Brian 97, 129
DeRaps, Kathleen 128, 58, 65, 139,
67, 134, 71
DeVault, Patricia 120, 42
DeVault, Michael 114
DeVault II, Raymond 105
Dexter, Kathleen 115, 117
Dexter, James 112, 116
Dexter, Michael 122, 138, 7, 133,
164, 168, 136, 71, 156, 134, 147, 82,
23. 81, 86, 67
Diaz, David 160
Diaz, Richard 119
Diaz, Ramon 105
Diaz Jr., Pedro 67
Dillin, James 115
Dingman, Henry 103
Dockery, Michael 116
Dohle, Craig 116, 120
Dohle, Jane 97, 125, 153
Dohle, John 97, 125, 107
Dohle Judy 97, 125. 99, 152
Dominguez, Rosita 97, 58
Dowell, Harry 97
Dowell, Richard 115
Dustin, Elaine 103
Edmondson, Nancy 128, 129, 90,
122, 125, 45, 91, 76, 58
Edwards, Tilda 114


Egger, Brenda 90, 130, 6, 111, 94
Evangelas, Sue -- 10
Endara, Roberto 95
Ender, Joseph 97, 132
Ender, Ralph 135, 78, 132
Escobido, Lawrence 116
Estes, Robert
Evans, Cheryl 113
Evans, David 119
Evans, Michael 122
Farnsworth, Allen 78
Farnsworth, David 114
Farrington, Kathryn 97. 122, 138
Fauber, Albert 119
Fauber, James 116
Fauber, Karen 105
Fauber, Kathleen 97
Feeley, James 119
Ferguson, Cindy 112
Ferguson, Daniel
Ferguson, Edna 97, 130
Ferguson, Trina 105, 130
Fernandez, Robert 114
Ferns, Alice 120
Ferns, Gary 120
Ferrel, Clifford 90
Ferris, Estelita 97, 145
Finneman, Thomas 105
Flores, Lori 119, 118
Flores, Wendy 159, 164, 142, 86,
67, 71, 83, 80
Fluharty, Carol 112
Fluharry, Mary 119
Fryer, George 115
Fryer, Richmond
Fontanez, Maria 90, 130, 132
Fontanez, Pedro 97
Ford, Robert 97, 163
Forsgren, Lester 113
Forsyth, Steven 105
Forsyth Jr., Ronald 97, 163
Foshee, Andrew 90, 124, 162, 144,
155, 140
Foshee, Denise 123, 159, 15, 11, 80,
71, 22, 164, 10, 11, 82, 55, 84, 78,
134
Fugleberg, Stephan 90, 140
Funderburk, John 68, 83, 164
Furr, Lisa 97
Gabriel, Clifford 105
Gabriel, Thomas 113, 116
Garcia, Linda 112
Garner, Mardette 90, 103, 130
Garner, Paul 120
Gercich, Catherine 58, 68, 80, 160,
161
Gercich, Nina 58, 97
Gewin, Jimmy 90, 127
Gewin, Rebecca 105
Gibson, Brenda 36, 68
Gibson, Leslie 112
Gibson, Mark 97
Gilbert, Susan 115, 117, 118
Gillespie, Russell 116, 118
Gillespie, William 90, 129
Godinez, Violanda 115
Goeberrus, Cornelius 97, 128, 129,
132
Goguen, Gregory 90, 122, 132
Goguen, Lynne 95
Golden, Edward 97
Golden, Sharon 68
Goldman, Henry 97
Goldman, Peter 97
Gonier, David 116, 120


Gonier, Patrice 97, 103, 129
Gonzalez, Ann 90, 58, 95, 22, 128
Gonzalez, Esther 97
Gonzalez, Francisco 155
Gonzalez, Josefa 116, 118, 42
Gonzalez, Juan 95
Gonzalez, Maria 105, 130
Gonzalez, Olga 97, 130, 131
Good, Gloria 119
Goodwin, Barbara 105, 148, 111
Goodwin, Brenda 114
Gosney, Debra 123, 130, 98, 131,
95
Gosney, Diane 130
Gosney, Jeffery 144
Goss, Randy 120
Gott, Roy 98
Goulet, Karen 105
Goulet, Stephen 23, 68
Graham, Donna 58, 49
Green, Daniel 105
Green, Matthew
Green, Zan 90
Gregg, Gail 112
Gregg, Laura 114
Gregg, Lynn 91
Gregg, Marian 58, 91
Gregg, Nancy 98, 145
Gregory, Clarissa 105
Gregory, Kelvin 120
Grier, Barbara 91
Grist, Gregory 105
Grist, Ronald 120
Gsell, Raymond 98, 91
Guerrero, Carlos 119
Grerrero, Maria 111, 130
Guilfoyle, Lorraine
Guilfoyle, Walter 113
Gutierrez, Patricia 68
Hames, Melanie 118
Hamilton, Francisco 105
Hammond, Edwin 91
Hammond, Hubert 116
Hanly, Mark 123, 91, 132
Hannah, John 68
Harden, Debra 116
Harden, Karen 105, 130
Harmon, Allen 126, 138, 139, 86,
69, 134
Harris, Jose
Hartshorn, Kimberly 105
Hartshorn, Robin 130
Hauke, Diane 122, 126, 135, 134,
127, 81, 69, 71, 80, 132
Hauke, Patricia 128, 129, 130, 135,
58, 134, 91, 7, 132
Hayden, Michael 98, 13
Heady, Brian 105
Heady, Paul 69
Heath, Cynthia 105
Helmerichs, Susan 98
Hernandez, Evelyn 115
Hernandez, Iris 106
Hemandez, Melinda 120
Hernandez, Nestor 115, 116
Heres, Isaac 10, 69, 156, 57, 80, 132
Herring, Anne 106
Herring, Joseph 155, 91
Herring, Mark 164, 69
Herring, Stephen 116
Hess, Glen 114, 116
Hess, Kathleen 129, 145, 91
Hess, Linda 120, 129, 98, 145, 153
Hieronymus, Cheryl 122, 106, 148,
111, 107







Higgins, Barbra 115
Highley, Frederick 70
Hill II, Kenneth 127, 50, 91
Hill, Patricia 59, 95
Hill, Sherry 116
Hoagland, Richard 113
Hoffman, Jeffry 119, 106
Hoffman, Melody 106
Hogaboam, Doris 114
Holloway, Kip 113
Holt, Harry 106
Honerbaum, Mark
Hopkins, Paul 112
Horn, Nancy 129, 130, 98
Housley, Kay 113
Hudgins, Ruth 114
Huff, Linda 98, 103, 153
Huffman, James 106
Huffman, William 124, 154, 140,
143, 156, 91
Hughes, Charles 119
Hughes, Deborah 115, 118
Hughes Jr., Bobby
Humphreys, Marcia 130, 106
Hunnicut, Yolanda 113
Hunter, Bruce 118
Hurlbut, Dennis 98
Hurlbut, Ronald
Husband, Pamela 106
Husband, Priscilla 112
Huson, Nancy 70
Huster, Harold 98
Illies, Stephanie 6, 135, 22, 70, 79,
132
Ilund, Garry 119
Ilund, June 129, 130, 92
Irion, Eric 123
Irion, Leif 147, 70
Irizarry, Angel 106
Jackson, Bruce 112
Jackson, Deborah 106
Jackson, Debra
Jackson, Donna 98
Jackson, Raymond 111
Jackson Jr., James 124, 92, 140, 156
Jaketic, Debrah 98
Jaketic, Margaret 114, 118
Janosik, Jan
Janosik, Joyce 106
Jansen, Rex 112
Jeffries, Douglas 122, 6, 92, 147, 95
Jeffries, Michael 106, 154, 155, 147
Jeffries Jr., Donald 113
Jimenez, Jenny 130, 106
Jimenez, William 106
Johnson, Jacqueline 119
Johnson, Jose 98, 147
Johnson, Robert 70, 43
Johnston, Roger 95
Jones, James 106
Jones, Karen 106
Jordi, Paulette 128, 129, 130, 92,
132
Kardonski, Steven 114
Katsumoto, Janet 113
Kaufer, Norine 112
Kaufer, Sandra 106
Kelly III, Daniel 120
Kern, Sherry 122, 70, 79, 152
Kern III, William 119
Kessler, Michele 98, 102, 103
Kienzle, Margaret 115, 117
Kilmer, Paul 98
Kinsey Jr., Forest 120
Kiyonaga, John 120


Kiyonaga, Vicky 115
Klasovsky, Antonia 71
Knauss, Daniel 92
Knauss, Frederick 148, 71
Kononen, Clifford
Kononen, Michael
Kraus, Katherine 128, 122, 159,
144, 92, 64
Kraus, Katie 98
Kredell, Marian 58, 125, 145, 49,
91,92
Kredell, Thomas
Kresge, Cheryl 106
Kresge, Richard
Laboy, Juan 120
La Porta, Jr., D. 113
LaRoche, Angeline
LaRoche, David
LaRoche, Mary 112
LaRoche, Maxine 95
LaRoche, Neal 71
Lasher, Christian 98, 148
Lauritzen, Ann 128, 71
LeDoux, William 140, 148, 95
Lee, David 106
Lee, Joel 95
Lee, John 98
Lee, Robert 116
Lee, Victor 106, 133, 107
Lindo, Rodrigo 122, 164, 147, 86,
72, 83, 80, 132
Loibl, Paul 119
Loizeaux, Christina 128, 92, 10,
148, 27
Loizeaux, Janna 117, 134, 118, 120
Loizeaux, Linda 112
Loizeaux, Scot 98, 148
Love, Brian 98
Loyd, Ann 106
Loyd, Patricia 113
Lucas, Laura 106
Lucas, Paul 120
Luger, Rockwell 115
Luna, Armando 119
Luna Jr., Louis
Lund, Shelley 128, 34, 125, 86, 160,
161, 72, 49, 80
Lyman, Hila 164, 84, 160, 72, 27,
56
Lyman, Mounyen 98, 58
Lyons, Ricky 112
Lyons, Tony 106, 56
Maestas, Lawrence 98
Mans, Donald 92, 156
Marohl, Kim 106
Marsh, Edythe 98, 135, 149, 148,
103
Marsh, Esther 130, 111
Martin, John 122, 72, 79, 56
Martinez, Jaime 72
Mason, Deshea 106
Maxwell, Dennis 164, 84, 72, 79,
80, 71
Maxwell, Elena 6, 100
May, Sandra.- 106, 107
May, Vicki 115
Mayoni, Pusha 114
Mayani, Sheila 130, 100
McCann, Brian 115, 117
McCann, Michael 122, 123, 138,
20, 52, 127, 95, 92, 50
McCann, Sharon 114
McCarrick, James 120
McCullough, Susan 106
McDonnell, Michael 116


McGilberry, Kathleen 123, 58, 92
McKenney, Mark 100
McKown, Karen 113, 32
McIlwain, Paris 114
McLain, Judy 126, 162, 163, 164,
71, 134, 65, 85, 72
McLean, Sarah 72
McNaughton, Robert 122, 148, 108
Medina, George 115, 116
Medina, Jose 138, 159, 157, 20, 133,
73, 140, 143, 22, 86, 160, 156
Meeker, D. 130, 100, 101, 99
Meeker III, John 92
Mendenhall, Linda 10, 100
Mendenhall, Susan 157, 125, 145,
23, 152, 148, 86, 73
Mendoza, Susan 112
Menges, Judith 100
Merrick, Karen 108
Merrick, Linda 100, 27
Metivier, John 108
Metivier, Susan
Meyer, Katherine 112
Mika, Glenda 114
Miller, Peggy 100
Miller, Phillip 108
Miller, Shyla 92, 5
Milligan, Kathryn 58, 73, 80
Mills, Anne 115
Mills, Mary 112
Minehart, Daniel
Minehart, Michael 92, 108, 132
Mitte, David 113
Mitte, Karon 112
Mitte, Dale 92
Mize, Janet 118
Moats, Robert 113
Moebus, Julie 113
Moebus, Patricia 108
Mohlman, J. 100
Mon, Nayra 113
Moncivais, Maria
Moncivais, Maricela 112, 116
Moncivais Jr., John 114
Monclova, Irma 138, 130, 92, 95
Monclova, Pedro 108
Montenegro, Aleida 73, 80
Moody, Barbara 100
Moody, Patrick 115
Moochler, Lawrence 112
Moore, Gary 120
Moore, Glynn 116, 120
Moore, Jane 108
Moore, Maurie 119
Morrell, Edward 110
Morrell II, Glen
Morrell, Kimberly 112
Moses, Patricia 114
Mowery, Stephanie 114
Munoz, Cristobal 108
Munoz, Manuel 100
Munoz, Rosa 108, 130
Munoz, Susie 115
Murphey, Charles 113
Murphy, Kathleen 115
Murphy, William 73, 80, 86
Musser, James 112
Musser II, John 92, 140
Nairn, Laurie 33
Newbury, Patricia 115
Ney, Renee 112
Nicholson, Robert 113
Nicolaisen, Leslie 115
Nieves, Alexis 114, 116
Nordstrom, Robert 129, 100


Normandia, Ada 120
Normandia, Alexis 78
Normandia, Ivan 108
Norton III, Barney 120
Norval, Andrew 113
Norval, Anne 108
Norval, Mary 128, 129, 58, 132, 10,
92, 91, 11, 95
Novak, Mark
O'Donnell, Ann 115
O'Donnell, Thomas 108
Olivarez, Gloria 112
Olivera, Myrta 130, 100
Olivera Jr., Angel 120
Olsen, Beverly 123, 130, 131, 92,
127, 148, 153
Olsen, Cheryl 148, 108
Olsen, Don 14, 140
O'Neal, Samuel 108
Orrego, Michael 105
Orrego, William 108
Ortiz, Ada 130, 131, 100
Ortiz Alvarez, Noelia 130, 131, 100
Ortiz Alvarez, Wanda 130, 108
Osborn, Michael 119, 127
Oster, Robert 116, 118
Oster, Stanley 92
Ostrea, Viana 58, 100
Overstreet, Terri 129, 130, 135, 58,
100
Owen, Valerie 118, 120
Pacheco, Andrea 120
Pacheco, Peter 109, 127
Padro, Jorge 108
Paine, Patricia 128, 130, 92, 127, 91
Palmer, Louise 92
Palmer, Maryann 108
Palser, Elizabeth 92, 100
Palser, Ronald 47
Parker, Jacqueline 128, 129, 123,
130, 91, 96, 131, 132
Parker, Mark 92, 95
Parker, Scott 114, 116
Parker, Anthony 116, 120
Parsons, William 108
Pate, Deborah 128, 129, 126, 135,
92, 139, 134, 132
Patton, Neil 159, 140, 142, 73, 26,
143, 85, 161, 160, 156
Paulson, Jane 161, 160, 73, 49, 80
Paulson, Jill 119
Peralta, Paul 100
Perez, Rosa 100
Perret, Andre 118
Perret, Catherine 115, 117
Perrett, Charles
Perusse, Mark 112
Phares, Richard 120
Phallips. Robert 128, 159, 157, 133,
27, 136, 71, 140, 143, 74, 134, 160.
156, 65, 82, 86
Phillips, Toby 140, 74
Phillips, Warren 128, 100, 140
Phillips Jr., Joseph 120
Pierpoint, Surse 118
Pino, Mario- 115, 116, 117
Polite, Sarah 119
Porbes, Josephine "74
Porbes Jr., Charles 108
Portier, Ingrid 74, 80
Price, Caroline 116
Pritham, Robin 93
Pruse, Mark 116
Pujals, Madeleine 112
Pursley, Mary 58, 132








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Rcdiga. Ria oI s
Reed, ('iric. n 9
Reed. Danm
Reed. lHelcna
Reid, loannc 101
Reitsnvder. Daniel lis
Resitnvder, l)onna -- 113. 1
Reves, I.ourdes 93
Reves, Orlando 108. 160
Rhoads, Paul 95
Riue. Marlene 122, 125. 145. 93
Richardson. Allan 101
Rihardson, Anne 11
Ri hardson. Chris -5
Richmond. Marn 11
Richmond, Ralph 140, 14', 95. 156
Ridge. Michael 115. 110
Ridge, Nancy 128. 130, 131, 101.
99, 133
Ridge. Susan 93
Riggs, Susan 119
Risch. Catherine 108
Rivera. Checene 115, 116
Rivera, Elizabeth 120
Rivera. Jasmin '5
Rivera Jorge 122. 101. 56
Rivera, Jose 108
Roach, Carolann 101
Robertson. Julia 119
Robertson, Raymond 14, 101
Robinson, Alfonso 109
Robinson. Danny -- 5. '9
Robinson, Deborah 130. 109
Robinson, Rand\ 93
Robinson, Reginald 115. 116
Robinson, Tony 109
Robles. Edna 109
Robles. Eilecn 112
Robles, Nadia 90, 93
Rodriguez. Aida 120
Rodriguez. Allan 113
Rodriguez, Ivette 120
Rodriguez. Jose 119
Rodriguez, Maria 101
Rodriguez. Nestor 5-
Rodriguez, Patty 10
Romero. MNichal 114, 1 1
Rork., Francis 115
Rosado, Sarah 116
Ross, Carol 5, ')s. 41. 91
Rowley, Deborah 9k. 152
Rozmeski, Joseph I- 1,, 128, 157, 9.3
Ruiz Diana - II
Ruiz, Isaaic 9
Rui7, Lisandr.i I 3
Ruiz, Luis
Runion, Cynthia -- 11
Ruitt. I)ana 11
Ruoft, Regma 101l
Rutt, Shcrrl 10 9
Ruo .n Jr, Wallace -- 19, 151, 140,
I 5', 2(., 14 1. .(0 -1
R u'lcdge. Arnn 120
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Sanihc/ Ne lson I 1i
S., hr./, P.IU -a 1o12
Sainhc/, Pcicr 1093
San lhe, Siandra.i 10-i
San, hez, Terri 101
Sanchez, r, Paulo 101
Sandrotk Jr. Altred IF', 116. 11,
120
Santiago, Dolores 12s, 129, 10, 95
Santiago. Janet 119
Santiago. Juan 10)
Santiago Jr.. William 33, 109
Sasoc, Gaspar 101
Schaub, Richard 114
Schaub, Vickie 101
Scheibe, Gary 93
Scheibe, George 155, 78, 156. 80
Schill, Karen 138, 75
Schloredt, Diane- 101
Schwindt, Cherri 115
Scott, Antonio 112
Scott, Dino 118
Scott, Frank 93
Scott, Kevin
Scott, Michael 93
Scott, Theodore 101. 47
Scott Jr, Johnny 115
Senrg, Arthur 93, 140
Shaffer, Higinia 93
Shaffer, James 93
Shannon, Jerry 109
Shobe, Clover 34, 118, 120
Shobe, John 114
Shobe, Stephan 93, 127
Short, Jody 113
Shum, Nai-Yuen 51, 75, 80
Sills, Leslie 118
Sills, Ronnie 93
Simmons, Elizabeth 109
Simmons, Judith 93, 149, 148
Simmons, Pedro 101, 155, 156
Simms, Karl 110
Simms, Michael 109
Simms, Valerie 93
Simms Jr. Altonso 101
Simpkins, Barry 120
Simpkins. Brian 114
Skrable, Luke 120
Smith, Amelia 113
Smith, Cheryl 113
Smith. Cynthia- 130, 120
Smith, Elizabeth 114
Smith, Jean 157, 125, 93, 145, 95,
22
Smith, Joseph 101, 148
Smith, Kathyrn 100, 109
Smith, Michael 119
Smith, Sharon 148, 95
Smith, Sheryl 117, 119
Smith, Yvonne 112
Snider, Elizabeth 116, 13
Snider, James 118
Snider, Michael 124, 95, 127, 140,
147, 156
Snider, Patricia 102. 153
Snider, Thomas 120
Sollas, Edward 115
Souder. Janie 158, 159
Southerland, Reggie 94
Spagna, MaMtta 94. 110
Spagna, Mihdael 124, 15. 94, 1I40
Spangler, Mark 109, 148
Spangler Jr. James -- '


Spivey, Mars -- 102
Spooner. Anthony 113, 116
Springer, Ja kie 128, 75
Stamper, Linda 112
Stephens. Tennis 11
Stephens, John 120
Stephens. Kathrnn 110. 94, 152
Stern. Robert 10)
Stevens, Douglas 13 5, (6, 156, 80.
132
Stiebritz, Alice 109
Stone. Clara 120
Stone Jr., Ralph 119
Stroop Ill. Edward 114
Strube, Rhonda 130, 109
Styles, Susan 119. 118
Suarez, Lourdes
Summerlin, Anna 116, 42
Swain, Nola 119
Swain. Peter 124, 94, 140, 143
Swank, Clarence
Swank, Joe 109
Swanstrom, Susan 109
Swisher, Luanne 112
Tellefsen, Sonia 116, 118
Terwilliger, Catherine 94
Terwilliger, Dorothy 58, 94, 10
Teves, David 78
Teves, Ehukai 94
Teves, Kamalei 109
Teves, Puuloa 95
Thomas, Eligio 155, 76, 56
Thomas, Loisa 128, 129. 138, 130,
98, 135, 94
Thomas, Sonia 119
Thomas, Yvonne 122, 138, 130,
102, 41
Thompson. David 114
Tipton. Vicki 109. 111
Tom, Vielka
Tomlin. Donald 118
Tomlin. Doris 112
Tomlinson, Jidith 128, 122, 130.
102, 132
Toro, Angel 119, 116
Toro, Jose 102
Toro. Maria 130, 102
Torres, Angel
Torres, Damans 130
Torres, Toni 103
Townsend, Harry 128, 124, 94, 91,
140, 161
Tschumy, Robert 94
Tschumy, William 118
Tweedy, Danny
Ubben Ana 109)
Ubben. Mario 112
Ubben, Ramon
Urey, Michele
Valdez, Lewis 162, 1, 1 136, 76
Valencia, Jose 7o6
Valentine, Daniel -- 7, 79
Valentine, lames
Valentine, Patricia 115, 127
Vamprine, Elizabeth
Vamprine, Sylvia 130, 159, 15. 144,
76
Vamprine, William
Van Woudenberg, Frits
Vasquez, Rafael 120
Vaught, Paula
Vega, Carmen
Vega Soto, Jose 115
Verruno, Marianne 58, 102, 99
Vest. Linda 77


Vest, Bill 116
Vest, Martha 102
Vest Jr,, William 115
Vidro, Ramonta 130
Vielka, Tom 114
Viera Jr, Juan 120
Villar, Maria
Voight. Sylvia 118
Vrey, Mike 119
Wainio, Elizabeth 128. 102, 145,
99, 153
Wainio Jr., Frederick
Wallenius, Thomas 77
Walline, Terry 77
Ware, Anthony 112
Ware, Luann 102, 148, 27
Watson, Cynthia 118
Webb, Murray 112
Weigart, Joseph 113
Weigart, Katherine
Weigart, Margaret 114
Welch, David
Welch, Roger 112
Welch Jr., Clifford
Welty, Kimberly 119
Wertz, Carol 58, 75, 94
Wesley, Walter
West, Guy 119
West, Wayne 168
Westerberg, Karen 138, 77
Wheeler Jr, Ray 114
Whipple, Margaret
Whipple, Peggy 119
Whipple, Vickie 130
White, Nancy 114
Wick, Andrew 113
Wiechert, Joseph
Wilder. Thomas 113
Wilkins, Philip 115, 11118
Will, Noreen 113
Will, Robert 158
Williams, Aurelia 128, 129, 130,
125, 145. 94, 49, 152
Williams, Cheryl 112
Williams, Michael 119
Williford, Nancy 114
Willis, Bonnie 120
Willis, Susan 130, 102
Wilmont, Alberto 113, 116
Wilmont, Margarita 130
Wilmont, Robert 114, 116
Wilson, Janie
Wilson, Ricky 114
Wirtz, Jenny 6, 135, 77. 152, 13
80
Withrow, Evelyn 112
Wood, Dennis
Wood, Michael 94
Woodcock, Kimberly 113
Woods, David 114
Woods, Linda 102
Worthern, Ann 94
Yerxa, Barbara 115, 34
Young, Margarita 112
Young, Roberto 115
Zachry, Eunice 114
Zachry, Susann 129, 145, 94, 10
132
Zachry Jr., Ralph 103
Zamarripa. Margarita 112
Zavinsky, Priscilla 77
Zayas, Maria
Zayas, Maribel 94
Zayas, Marisol 94
Zebede, Alegre










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Digitized by the Internet Archive

in 2010 with funding from

University of Florida, George A. Smathers Libraries



http://www.archive.org/details/caribbean1971cris



Caribbean 1971



Cristobal Migh School

Coco Solo

Canal Zone



9



Volume 54







T)e(lication 4

Infernal 6

formal 28

faculty and Curriculum 30

Classes 60

Organizations 122



Zable

of
Contents




Sports j 40

Special Activities 15S

Editor's Page J69

Ziger Boosters no

Advertisements 173

Index j$7



Jn keeping With Zke Modern Zrend Zoward Qreater
flexibility Jn yearbook Organization. Zhe CHS Annual
Staff Js Jntroducing Jn Entirely New And 'different for-
mat J n Zke 1971 Caribbean. Departing from Zke Zradi-
tional Concept Of Separate Sections. Eack Introduced By J
Division Page, On Eack focet Of Zke Sckool jCife, Zke
yearbook Js Divided J n to Only Z wo Main Sections, for-
mal Jnd Jnformal Appearing Jn Zke formal Half Are-.
Administration And Jaculty, Class Pictures. Organization
Pictures. Zeam Pkotos. Queens And Cheerleaders, Adver-
tising. Andjndex. Zkis Section Contains All Zke formali-
ty Required Of A food yearbook. Jn Zke Exciting Jnfor-
mal Section. We Have Attempted Zo Present An Uninter-
rupted Candid Story Of School Ofe. Just As you Expe-
rienced Jt.



Dedication





1/





V





\



Mrs* Adamary bright



guidance
Counselor

Retires

After
36 years

Mens

The CHS annual staff wishes to
dedicate the 1971 Caribbean to Mrs.
Adamary Anderson Bright, in recog-
nition and appreciation of her many
years of devoted service to the stu-
dents of Cristobal High School.

Mrs. Bright was born in Jackson-
ville, Florida. She attended school in
Houston, Texas, during her early
years, but returned to Jacksonville to
complete her secondary education at
Duzal High School. She received her
A.B. in Education at Florida State
College for Women in Tallahassee,
and completed her graduate work for
a degree in history at the University
of Ann Arbor in Michigan.

After teaching at Jacksonville Jun-




Kathie Danielsen smilingly receives assistance from Mrs. Bright in planning her college ca-



ior High School for a short time, she
came to the Canal Zone in 1935.
Since that time she has served capably
and well in many positions at Cristo-
bal High School. Among these are: a
teacher of seventh and eighth grade
English, social science, vocational
guidance, social studies, girls' advisor,
and the position as a Guidance Coun-
selor which she has held from 1951 to
the present. During her many years at
CHS, Mrs. Bright received a number
of Outstanding Service Awards for
her distinguished service to the Canal
Zone Schools Division.




In addition to teaching and coun-
seling, Mrs. Bright also sponsored a
number of school activities and orga-
nizations such as the National Honor
Society. It was Mrs. Bright who orig-
inated the Zephyr, and the Caribe
Club. She is truly an outstanding or-
ganizer; efficient, and hard-working.

Mrs. Bright has done a great deal
of traveling during her years at CHS,
visiting many countries in both Cen-
tral and South America, as well as in
Europe. Both faculty and students are
saddened by the journey Mrs. Bright
is about to make as she retires from
the faculty of CHS. Her guidance will
be long remembered by the countless
students whose educations and careers
she helped plan.



Mrs. Bright advises Shyla Miller on her
schedule tor next vear.



A

New

year

Ueg'ms .




Elena Maxwell and Brenda Egger




Stephanie lilies, Almanubia Austin, Vivian Boseman, Jenny Wirtz, and Carmen Butler.




Douglas Jeffries, Mr. Johnson, and Nancy
Edmonson.




Mr. Hieronymus (S.A. sponsor) and Mi-
chael Dexter (S.A. president).




Michael Dexter and Nana' Edmonson (S.A. secret.m )




The halls of CHS were a mass of con-
fusion on September 1, 1970, as hun-
dreds of students congregated around
the bulletin boards on which homeroom
numbers were posted. Others lingered to
chat with old friends or to make new ac-
quaintances; summertime experiences
were shared and compared. The perenni-
al excitement of the "first day of school"
was in the air. This enthusiasm persisted
throughout the orientation assembly, in
which students were welcomed to CHS,
new teachers introduced, and the new
Student Association officers installed.
However, with the ringing of that first
bell, order began to emerge as students
fell back into the familiar routine of
school life. Another school year had
begun.



Debbie Meeker



The deserted halls are quiet, a soft
breeze whispers through the empty
corridors there is no indication now
of the activities and incidents which
the coming day may bring.







Suddenly, the stillness is shattered
by the slamming of a locker door, the
sounds of shuffling footsteps, shouted
conversations, and noisy greetings are
heard once more. A new day has
begun, the magic of the morning is
no more.




Zhe

Ml Kings,
Seats J re
Assumed




Ann Terwilliger, Dolores Santiago, Ivette
Cummings, Carlos Brown, Susann Zach-



ery, Susan Burge, Christina Loizeaux, Rita
Boyland.



Issac Heres



10



Morning

Routine

Resumes




n



Upon entering the classroom, a student assumes more than a seat, he assumes all
the privileges and responsibilities which accompany his position in this place of
learning the school. Having brought together the teachers and the taught, the
school has fullfilled its function what follows is determined by these individu-
als.

Often, it seems, minds are more eager and alert as the day begins, and the op-
portunities afforded by the morning hours should not be missed. To bring to
each student success at last this is the goal of every morning class.





Beth Snider. Mrs. McNaughton. Cheryl Smith





Diane Carroll




"Patches" Brown



More complaints were heard con-
cerning the lunch hour than perhaps
any other facet of school life. Lunch
was served in four shifts; those on the
early shift complained that it was too
early to eat, and those on the late
shift complained that it was too late.
Once in the cafeteria, however, no
one seemed to have any real trouble
eating.

The lunch hour provided a brief
respite from classes which was wel-
comed by all. Juniors and seniors took
advantage of their open-lunch privi-
lege to "eat out" on alternate days. In




After a satisfying lunch, students head to
the student's lounge.



spite of this, and the many meetings
scheduled during the lunch hour, the
cafeteria was always filled with hun-
gry, noisy students; eating, chatting
with friends or doing a little last min-
ute studying. Those wishing to leave
the cafeteria early, spent their lunch
hour in the pleasant surroundings of
the student lounge located directly be-
neath the cafeteria.

In spite of the frequent complaints,
most students found the lunch hour
one of the most relaxing and enjoya-
ble periods of the school day.




Senior + Open lunch + Car = Happy
Heart.




Raymond Robertson. "I'll have a chili dog and please include the hot dog!'



14





Carol Wertz. Karen Currier. "Reservation made. Fork over!



Denise Foshee. "It's the real thing ap-
petite!"





Lunchtime is a good time to make friends.



Sylvia Vamprine. "I can't help it! I'm hun-
gry'"



is



Students
Enjoy Comforts
Of Remodeled

Cafeteria





The installation of blue and gold draperies



i \



. . and a lowered, insulated ceiling gave the cafeteria a new look of elegance. Included
among the comments of students were such remarks as .




"It's like eating in a fancy restaurar
Ft




V

'Very Quiet and



'Man it's got class!"



16






Q^ffi






> r.



e?*u




It almost makes eating here a pleasant
xperience."




Then there were those who just laughed, and




of course, those who couldn't wait to get away and .





enjoy the beauties of the "great outdoors".



17



Refreshed from a relaxing lunch
hour, students returned at 11:30 to re-
sume their regular routine. Each after-
noon included three hours of classes
with the exception of seniors with
sixth-period study hall, who were per-
mitted to leave early. For some, the
enthusiasm characteristic of the
morning hours appeared to wave;
while others seemed to have awak-
ened at least. All, however evidenced
an increased restlessness as the hour
approached 2:15 and the ringing of
the final bell.




18








19




^1



asp"* ; ^ *%








-%







Zigers 'Display Eager
Enthusiasm J or Afternoon

Activities




553 si'ss: = ssT5'






ss^ESsS



P



1 VfJtMff




36 Qtjj




Jose Medina and Mike McCann.



20




^. t A\\



Cathy Carlisle




^K' : <-




21




With the ringing of the final bell at 2:15, many students rush eagerly to the
waiting buses thinking only "Free! at last!" Others also hurry anxious to
begin the extra-curricular activities which play such an important role in the life
of a student. Enjoying the company of those who share similar interests; whether
it be an advanced math or foreign language class, sports, drill team, journalism,
or dramatics, it is a pleasant and profitable way to spend an afternoon.




jTOBL ,




Stephanie lilies and Denise Foshee.



Jean Smith and Jose Medina.



22







Susan Mendenhall



23




The setting of the sun brought a change in the appearance of both the school
and the students. With the' coming of darkness, another of the many facets of
CHS was revealed. The evening activities. This was the time for bonfires and
football games; swim meets and track meets; hours of practice and reviews for
ROTC cadets .



24




25




TEEN CLUB DANCES




Neil Patton, Rosemary Christian, Wally Russon.



. AND FORMALS



Jimmy Barraza




26



. . CONCERTS: Practice for the
cast and crew of various plays: Dra-
matic Productions .




. . all those activities without which
school life would be quite incom-
plete.



27




A Place Of JC earning
Js Zo Ceam.
And ]/et from
Day Zo Day
Jt Also becomes
J Place Zo Cive.
A bridge Zhat
Spans Zhe Qap
Of Age And brings
Zogether Zhe Zeachers
And Zhe Zaught.



Zhe Human Mind
Must Keach Jn
Jts Own Direction

Zoward Jts Own Qoal.
Along Zhe Path Of
Cife One May
Meet A Hundred
Joes Or A Zhousand
Jriends



Administration




JAMES H. PFAU Cristobal High School Principal



To the Yearbook Staff:

"Thanks for the Memories" is the
title of a song that was popular some
years ago. As we record in this book
the events of the 1970-71 school year
at Cristobal High School we can sure-
ly say with gratitude and even a bit of
pride, "thanks for the memories."

You who have studied hard and
have given of yourselves to school ac-
tivities have shown by your Tiger
spirit that the busiest people are also
the happiest people.

Best wishes to all of you as you
continue your education here or else-
where. Although your highest com-
mitment may well be to academic ex-
cellence, you would not be wise to
pursue scholarship at the expense of
the development of an honorable
character, physical well-being, or a
pleasant personality. It is hoped that
the discipline of commitment to these
qualities will earn you a happy free-
dom of spirit and a sense of accom-



plishment. May you continue to mark
each milestone with satisfaction and



happy memories.



James H. Pfau
Principal




I'm a firm believer in the 'Tigers'!



30



PAUL J. JEFFRIES - B.A., Colorado
State College; M.A., Colorado State Col-
lege; Graduate Work, Univ. Southern Cali-
fornia, Calif. Western University. "Seek a
profession or occupation that is challeng-
ing and enjoyable. Smile and be happy."





SUPERINTENDENTS STAFF, U.S. SCHOOLS: Mr. Ross Anderson, Supervisor, Physical Education and Athletics, U.S. Schools; Dr. Ken-
neth Lake, Director of Curriculum; Mr. Stewart Brown, Supervisor, swimming pools and safety; Dr. Charles Latimer, Deputy Superintendent
of Schools; Mr. James Cook, Supervisor of Instruction, U.S. Secondary Schools; Mr. George Willingham, Supervisor of Instruction, U.S. Sec-
ondary Schools; Mr. F.A. Castles, Superintendent of Schools (seated); Mr. Vernon Caturia, Supervisor of Instruction, U.S. Elementary Schools;
Dr. Victor Herr, Supervisor of Music, U.S. Schools; Dr. James Wolf, Coordinator, Special Education; Mr. David Speir, Assistant Superintend-
ent, U.S. Secondary School; Mrs. Shirley Makibbin, Supervisor of Instruction, U.S. Schools; Mrs. Frances Sampsell, Assistant Superintendent
U.S. Elementary Schools; Mr. Zander Krowitz, Administrative Assistant; Mr. Robert Dahlstom, Supervisor, Education Data Processing.



31



Office Staff



The competent members of the
CHS office staff handled all general
clerical work for the administration
and faculty. Included among their
duties were official correspondence
and paper work. They were also in
charge of operating office machines
and the intercom system, and an-
swering the telephone. They main-
tained the record and files of each stu-
dent, mailed report cards, and sent
and received transcripts.



Clinic






D3**~



_**-*




MRS. ALLEN, MRS. TAYLOR, MISS GRIFFITHS.



The clinic was an important provi-
sion for the health and safety of Cris-
tobal High School students. The clin-
ic was staffed with trained nurses who
provided emergency first aid; and per-
formed certain routine checks on each
student. The clinic was also a place
for students to rest when unwell, and
for the storage of each students' per-
manent health records. The clinic also
sponsored tuberculosis and chest X-
rays for students in certain grades. Dr.
Levin, the Public Health Officer for
the Atlantic Side, visited the school
almost every morning. Dr. Chevelle,
the school physician for the Canal
Zone Schools, was available every
Wednesday.




DR. LEVIN, KAREN MtKOWN, MRS BLANCHETTE "Maybe this will cool your fever a bit."



32




Mrs. Bright, Laurie Nairn. "Your appointment is at 11:00 on Friday/'




Mr. Mowery, Thomas Behre, William San-
tiago, Henry Borselliono. "You both want
to go to Kings' Point?"




A final decision brings satisfaction to Ka-
thie Danielsen and Mrs. Bright.



Guidance is the process of helping
persons make the best possible de-
cisions concerning their lives, and aid-
ing them in solving their problems. It
includes helping students choose the
proper courses to take in school, and
aiding them in deciding what careers
to follow after their education is com-
pleted. Such decisions require that a
person have full and correct knowl-
edge about himself and his world.
The guidance counselors at Cristobal
High School aim to provide students
with information so that they may
make the best possible decisions in
life. The two principal methods used
for this are counseling, and testing.
Counseling consists chiefly of discus-
sions between a student and his coun-
selor concerning his interests, apti-
tudes, and special problems. Testing
is an important guidance tool. Apti-
tude, personality, and intelligence
tests provide counselors with much



Quittance




ADAMARY BRIGHT Counselor;
B.A., Florida State Univ., MA, Univ.
of Michigan. "Life will never be dull
if you will continue to learn ..."




ROBERT MOWERY Counselor;
B.S and M.S., Indiana State Univ.
"Take advantage of the opportunities
in high school."




LUKE C PALUMBO Attendance
Counselor; B.S. Ed., N.W. Missouri
State. "There is no substitute for work
to be happy and successful."



useful information. Other important
guidance tools are books, pamphlets,
and films used to help students decide
on courses of study and future careers.



33



Cibrary



The library, with its vast collection
of books, was a familiar stopping
place for CHS students. Throughout
the year, they used the library and its
many resources. The quiet, academic
atmosphere made it the perfect place
for studying and peaceful solitude
found there provided an excellent



background for the reading of books.
Students made good use of the library
during homeroom and study halls;
checking out books for reports, using
reference books, or simply browsing
through the library's collection of pa-
perbacks and magazines.

Mr. Wells, the school librarian,




'Peace at last!"



was always available for students who
needed help in locating a certain book
or in making a special report. There
were also at least two girls serving as
library assistants each period. They
helped students use the card catalog
and check out books.




DAYTON N. WELLS Librarian; B.S., University
of Idaho, M. Ed., University of Oregon. "Read to
help you become what you want to be."




Faith Coad, Patricia Christian, Janna Loizeaux, Terra Brown, Lana Boone, Clover Shobe, Barbara Yerxa, Jeanne Calkins. Library Assistants.



34




GRACE S. PFAU Reading; B.S.,
Valley City State College; M.A., Uni-
versity of Minnesota. "11 talented, ca-
pable people can match their dissatis-
faction and concern with positive,
concerted action, they should be able
to correct the ills they so rightly de-
plore."




Special
Education




Duke Collins and De Jesus Ruperto help Mrs. Pfau correct papers.



EARL C SHARICK Special Educa-
tion; B.A., M.S., Illinois State. "Work
hard and stay in school."



The Special Education department
was added to the CHS curriculum in
I960. In Special Education, students
received extra help in their academic
studies, learned crafts, and learned the
perspectives of human relationships
and civic responsibilities.

The remedial reading program pro-



vided special instruction to improve
reading skills and helped assure a stu-
dent of success in keeping with his
ability-. Seemingly average students
improved the quality of their reading
skills with the help of the Special
Education Department.




f




^



Reading holds the interest of the Remedial Reading class.



Mr. Sharick helps his class drill in math
with flash cards.



35



Jrt




EDWIN M. KOZIOL Art; B.A.,
Michigan State Univ. "Find out what
your responsibilities are and prepare
to meet them in order to gain control
of your life as rapidly and completely
as possible."





Class Portrait



Artists waiting for an ins



spiration!




fr




fl



In creative arts, a student learns to
express himself through different
media. With this in mind, the fol-
lowing courses were taught at CHS
this year. Art 7, an introduction to
drawing, painting, lettering, ceramics,
crafts, covering techniques, and the
use of tools with emphasis placed
on developing skills, imagination, and
art judgement. Art 8, a reinforcement
of knowledge gained in Art 7, with
greater emphasis placed on the basic
elements of design. Art I, a basic be-
ginning art course for all student
grades 9-12 which emphasized the de-
velopment of drawing skill and the
study of design concepts. It involved
drawing, painting, lettering, poster-
making and a variety of crafts. Art II,
an advanced art course for all students
grades 10-12. It involved art apprecia-
tion and a deeper investigation of de-
sign and color theory with emphasis
placed on individual organization and
the carrying out of art projects. The
student had an opportunity to devel-
op skills in the area of his choice, Art
III, which included appreciation and
advanced creative work.



Brenda Gibson. With a sweep of the brush, a masterpiece is created.



36



business Education




Would you believe the class average is 85 wpm

The Business Education depart-
ment offered an excellent selection of
courses for the student planning a ca-
reer in business, as well as for the col-
lege-bound students. The skills and
knowledge taught by this department
will be useful regardless of the stu-
dent's future occupation.

General Business gave the students
a basic understanding of business
practices useful in daily living. Typ-
ing I gave students an opportunity to
develop speed and accuracy on a type-
writer. They were taught to type let-
ters, tabulated reports, manuscripts,
and business forms. Typing II was a
continuation of Typing I with em-
phasis on constant practice for in-
creased speed and accuracy. Seniors
taking Shorthand learned to read,
write, and take dictation. Another
course offered only to seniors was
Bookkeeping. In this course, students
learned the fundamentals of single
and double-entry bookkeeping and
were given practical problems for the
application of these skills.



? Would you believe 35 wpm with 3 errors?




George and John find girls more inter-
esting than bookkeeping.




DIANE FITE Typing I, II, Soc.
Studies 7; B.S., East Texas State U.

Mrs. Fite likes her new home in
Panama, especially the tropical weath-
er. She is originally from Texas,
where she previously taught at Bowie
Jr. High in Irving.

Her favorite hobbies are water
skiing, boating, and fishing. Her ad-
vice to students? "Be individuals."




CLARE W JOHNSON Short-
hand, Bookkeeping, General Busi-
ness; B.S., Bemidji State College;
M.Ed., Central Washington State Col-
lege

During his first year at CHS, Mr
Johnson was yearbook sponsor and
head of the Business Education De-
partment aside from his regular duties
as teacher.

He was born in Minnesota and
taught for seven years including being
principal at Adna High School in
Washington.

He enjoys fishing, bowling, and
scuba diving.

His advice is, "Spend more time
enjoying the good things about the
establishment and less time trying to
change it."




"This is almost as bad as Latin.



37



English





HERBIT D CHESHIRE English;
B.S., University- of Tampa.




J.B DOBBINS English II, Jour-
nalism, B.S., University of Virginia;
M.Ed., Univ. of Virginia. "HAM-
LET: Act I, Sc. iii Polonius to
Laertes."



English, an extensively wide field,
was one of the largest departments at
CHS. It was a required subject for all
students, since the ability to under-
stand and to use well his native lan-
guage deemed necessary for a stu-
dent's success in any endeavor.

Regular English classes included
the study of grammar, composition,
and literature. In addition to these
regular courses; the English depart-
ment also included journalism, speech
and drama, and remedial reading. In
journalism the student learned to
write in newspaper form and received
much practical experience. Speech
and drama was a course which taught
the students the art of oral expres-
sion. Besides this, the course required
a great deal of research work. Reme-
dial reading provided students who
required extra help an opportunity to
improve their reading ability.



Books read in the various classes
include; Johnny T remain, Great Expec-
tations, A Tale of Two Cities, The
House of Seven Gables, The Red Badge of
Courage, Wuthering Heights, Lord Jim,
and The Moonstone.





[

JANE ELFERS English III, Speech
and Drama, B.S., University of Wis-
consin. "Choose those goals most im-
portant to you and be perseverant in
achieving them. Don't be reluctant to
serve others and the community.
Don't be afraid to give of yourself.
Aim high, prepare painstakingly,
serve; and work."



Mrs. Smith. "My goodness! What are the
Seniors coming to!"



38




LOUIS J. FATTOROSI English III;
B.S., M.Ed., Rutgers University. "No
tyranny is more intolerable than that of
the self-righteous reformer or the over-
zealous philanthropist. The world can be
destroyed by too much hatred or too
much love, but the latter is more danger-
ous because it is more insidious."



DOROTHY H SMITH English 12;
B.S., Ohio Northern U.; M.A., Denver

University.



GLENDA STRONACH English and
Music; B.Mus.Ed., B.A.. Trinity U.

Mrs. Stronach is from Texas and
taught in Curundu before coming to
CHS. She enjoys ecology, and sports. "To
thy own self be true."



MARTHA TANNER English; A.B..
U.N.C "Live everyday to the very fullest
enjoy!"




Mrs. Elfcrs. "That was some class




Mr. Dobbins. "... I deserve this rest."





TONI WILFERD English; B.S.. Flor-
ida State. ". . 'these times' will be anoth-
er period that I will add as one I've lived
through."




"I hope I don't forget the idea of that play before class is out ."



REBECCA WILLIAMS Geography 7,
English 8 and 9, B.A., Anderson College
Mrs. Williams' home state is West
Virginia. She has traveled through many
states and enjoys reading and swimming.
"Use your head think! listen! read!"



39



foreign £anguages




ANNE D. GEGG French, Latin;
B.A., Cornell University, M.S. in Edu-
cation, Cornell Univ. "Learn to do
things on time Make positive contri-
butions to school and your communi-
ty"



STELLA RIEFKOHL Spanish,
French; B.A., New York Univ., M.A.,
Columbia Univ., N. Y. "Never to
look back into the past always to
face each day as it comes without a
thought of the future




When will they ever learn?




TELMA 1 HOWARD Spanish,
Business Education, B.A., Hunter
College, M.A., Hunter College. "Be
obedient and respectful citizens in
your communities and set good exam-
ples of morals to your younger peers."




0i




Is it third declension, accusative, masculine, plural, or comparative? I'm mixed up!



40





JAMES E. STEARNS Spanish II.
Ill, IV, Russian II; B.S. Ed., MA.
University of Florida. "Spend more
time on the subjects that are hard for
you than on your favorites."



WILLIAM L. WILL Spanish 7 and
8, English 9; B.S. Econ., Xavier
Univ.; M. Ed., Univ. of Florida.

Mr. Will is a native Isthmian. He
taught in Florida betore coming to
CHS. His hobbies are golfing, swim-
ming, team sports and reading. Life is
short, so be satisfied in what you are
doing."




Toni Thomas. "It's right, isn't it?




The foreign language department
at CHS was a wide and interesting
one. Its aim was to increase a stu-
dent's understanding of the history
and culture, as well as the language of
countries other than his own. In order
to fulfill this aim, CHS offered cour-
ses in three modern languages;
French, Spanish, and Russian. Three
years of each language were offered,
students being placed in the level ap-
propriate to their development. In ad-
dition, a second year course in Latin
was offered.

In all language courses, speaking,
writing, reading, and understanding
of the language were stressed. The
Audio-Lingual Method, ALM, was a
new system used to teach Spanish and
Russian. This system involved inten-
sive oral practice in the language lab-
oratory.




Mrs. Howard. "I'm no model!"



"How can I concentrate on "Hablar" when I'm thinking of HIM.-"



41



Home Economics




ELIZABETH McNAUGHTON Home Econom-
ics; B.S., Slate Teachers' College. "What you do (or
don't do) today affects your future."




The homemaking program placed
emphasis on three areas: foods and
nutrition, clothing selection and con-
struction, and family living. It was
the aim of the department to provide
girls with knowledge helpful for their
futures as homemakers.

Junior high home economics stu-
dents learned the basics of sewing by
making simple household articles and
garments. They were also taught the
basics of cooking which included the
preparation and serving of formal and



informal meals.

Senior high students were offered
one semester of sewing which in-
cluded personal grooming, the plan-
ning and construction of clothing,
and a study of personal and family
relationships. In the second semes-
ter's cooking classes, students were
taught the fundamentals of nutrition,
the use of recipes, meal planning,
marketing, and various methods of
preserving food.




Tina Bocanegra, Pat De Vault, Elisa Brown. "Do we have to stand in line to help?"



Josefa Gonzalez and Anna Summerlin.
"You're off an inch!"




'Cookies". "It's messy but it's fun!"



42




RONALD FITE Mechanical
Drawing; B.S., East Texas State
Univ.; M.S., East Texas State Univ.

Mr. Fite's home state is Texas. He
is the Junior Class sponsor. He enjoys
the Canal Zone and his hobbies are
water skiing and hunting.



A


^


H


TJ^7'


\


fl^



Jndustrial Arts



JESSE C. HOLLOWAY Shop;
M.S., Oklahoma State College. "Get
the best education you can."




RONALD LASSILA Shop; B.S.,
Los Angeles, Calif.; Lie, Sorbonne.

Mr. Lassila is a native Californian
and has taught in San Francisco, Eng-
land, Turkey, Phillipines, and France.
His hobby is boating. His advice to
students? "Work."



The Industrial Arts department at
CHS attempted to provide pupils
with insight into their own interests;
to develop their abilities to work with
their hands and with tools, and to
sharpen their interest in creative
crafts. The Industrial Arts department
offered four groups of courses; Me-
chanical Drawing; Wood Working,
Metal Shop, and Plastics.

Mechanical Drawing I taught stu-
dents to visualize how an object is put
together. Neatness, correct lines, mea-
surement, and following instructions
were stressed. Mechanical Drawing II
was a continuation of this course for
students planning to continue their
education in this field. Woodworking
students learned about tools, joints,
shop safety, and the operation of
power tools. They used their knowl-
edge to carry out projects. Metal Shop
I taught the basic skills of bench-
work, forging, welding, sheetmetal,
and machine operation. Plastics stu-
dents learned the properties of plas-
tics and how to shape them into use-
ful objects.




Students display varied attitudes toward mechanical drawing.




"They didn't tel! me about this when I tilled out my class selection sheet." grumbles Robert
Johnson.



43



Mathematics




RICHARD W, BOCK Algebra II,
Analysis, Calculus; B.A., Univ. of N.
Dakota; MA, Univ. of Houston.
"Don't be trivial."




I I,



LAWRENCE A. COWLEY Alge-
bra I, Geometry; B.A., Trinity Univ.;
M.A., Southeastern State. "Live life
yourself"




RANDALL GRUBBS Math; B.A.,
William Jewell College. "Do not get
behind in life because it is hard to
catch up."



In this modern age, as well as in
the past, mathematics remains a basic
part of everyone's life. The CHS
math department offered all the math
courses required for success in college
as well as in the students' daily lives.

Five math courses offered were to
be taken in order as each was a pre-
requisite of the subsequent one.
These courses were Algebra I, Geom-
etry, Algebra II, Introduction to Anal-
ysis, and Calculus. General Math, and
Introduction to Algebra were also of-
fered for students not majoring in
math.

General Math captured the ele-
mentary forms of mathematics. It
pushed the students to have a mathe-
matical background.

Algebra I, the first step up the lad-
der to higher mathematics, caught the
principles of mathematics. Word
mastery of the language of mathemat-
ics was attained in this course.

Geometry dealt with the art of
drawing. Proving theorems was a
major part of geometry. The students
learned how to deal with space fig-
ures. Algebra I was also reviewed for
the students.

Algebra II taught the principles of
factoring, polynomials, logarithms,
and basic trigonometry. The pattern
of reasoning was also learned in this
course.



Introduction to Analysis went Calculus, the last step up a steep
deeper into trigonometry. Linear and ladder of mathematics in high school
quadratic equations were studied in was a college preparatory course in-
great depth. Functions and relations traducing the fundamentals of differ-
were the beginning notion of this ential calculus,
course.




Math class is a time for many things, from studying to reading comic books.



44




ROY HOWELL Algebra IB, Gen-
eral Math A; B.S., Shippensburg St,
College; M.S., Florida State Univ.
"Accept people on the basis of their
actions, not their appearances."




CAROL J. KNIGHT Life Science
7, Math 7 and 8; B.S., Auburn Univ.
"Read as much and as varied material
as you possibly can."




BERNARD R MAZZONI Math
8, Algebra I; B.S., Lebanon Valley
College; M.A., Penn State Univ. "Ev-
eryday should be a good day, and to-
morrow is a better day."




Nancy Edmondson. "I give up, I've had




Calculus proves to be a challenging class.




'Hey, class isn't dismissed vet."



45



JHhm




EDWARD R CARWITHEN
Music; B. Fine- Arts, Univ. Florida,
M Arts, F.astman School of Music.



The following courses were offered
this year in Music. Music 7 and 8; the
exploration of all kinds of music and
music skills with emphasis placed on
music fundamentals as a step to the
enjoyment of music. Beginning In-
strumental Class; a specialized class
for students desiring to learn the basic
techniques of a band or an orchestral
instrument. It is open to all grades
but it is recommended that a student
wishing to participate in advanced
music classes begin the study of in-
struments in seventh grade Educa-
tional values stressed are: reading of
musical notation, development of
good tone and the ability to express
oneself with confidence on a musical
instrument. Also stressed are pride in
personal achievement, concern tor
group results, and the discipline of
concentrating on details to build con-
fidence and ability. Intermediate In-
strumental Class; a specialized class
for students having had one or rwo
semesters of work in beginning in-
strumental class. This class is open to
all grades. It provides a chance for
students to work with symphonic
music of easy to medium difficulty.
The educational values stressed are:
continuing exploration of musical ex-
pression, building of confidence in
personal abilities, and striving to do
one's best. Senior Band is a special-
ized class for students with at least
one year or the equivalent of begin-
ning or intermediate instrumental




The Band relaxing before class begins.




The Girls' Chorus performing at the Christmas Concert



class. This is an activity group. It
serves the school by providing music
for assemblies, football games, pep
assemblies, and other occasions. Con-
certs are planned to expose the stu-
dent to the classical and modern mu-
sical world. Students are encouraged
to participate in musical groups of all
kinds. These include college, commu-



nity, and jazz groups. Values stressed
are; self discipline, appreciation and
toleration of new sounds and musical
experience, and exploration of the
student's abilities in music. The
music program also provides courses
in 7th and 8th grade chorus and sen-
ior chorus where students learn how
to sing and read music.




Ted Scott and Steve Aponte perform at the elementary school.






MEMBERS OF THE BAND


Flute


Trumpet


Ann Launtzen


Sieve Aponte


Kaihy Dexter


Cheryl Olsen


Linda Mendenhall


Ron Palser


Deshea Mason


Ed Golden


Ann Loyd


Jim Valentine


Chns Benson


Pedro Simmons


Sue McCullough


Drummond McNaughton


Obct


Craig Robertson


Gerry Blanchett


Allen Richardson


Cathy Terwilliger


Cheycnn Rivera


Bauoon


Tim Blanchard


Susan Willis


Ray Jackson


Chern Hieronymus


Trombone


El'Sop. a.


Paul Bleicher


Ed Bnngas


Billy Gilespie


Ann Cinilli


Beverly Olsen


Clarinets


Nancy Gregg


Lmcb Merrick


Wayne West


Ann Terwilliger


George Rivera


Barbara Blocmer


Fritz Van Woondenberg


LuAnn Ware


Bobby Hughes


Debbie Jacket*


Tuba


Emily Daniel


Don Olsen


Colleen Johnson


Guy Damiani


Debbie Meeker


Bass


Linda Hess


Gregg Grist


Debbie Pate


Drums


Patry Rodriguez


Dan Valentine


Thomas Wesley


Gaspar Sayoc


Alice Stiebritz


Mike Williams


Kathy Balmer


Robert Fernandez


Jim Collins


John Alexams


Thomas Behre




Alexis Coleman




Jeancttc Hernandez




Alio Clarinet




Susan Ridge




Sylvia Vamprine




Bass Clarinets




Tony Barr




Mardettc Garner




Sop. Sax




Libby Palser




Alio Sax




Jim Childress




Karen Merrick




Roy Gott




Edythe Marsh




Joanne Reid




Tenor Sax




Robin Pntham




Ted Scott




Peter Sanchez




French Horn




Bonnie W.lln




Rita Boyland




Willie Santiago




Baritone




James Bleicher




Mike B|orncbv




James Jones




Brian Love




Jimmy Huffman





"The important thing is to act nonchalant abc t



hotographer in our midst.'



Ronald Palsei



more measures to



Physical Education




BARBARA L. CAMPBELL Physi-
cal Education; B.S. Ed., Black Hills
State College; Graduate Credit, Wash.
State Univ., Central Wash. State Col-
lege and BHST. "Be quick to criticize
but if you do have a solution to
go with the criticism!"




LOUIS DEDEAUX Physical Edu-
cation; B.S., Oklahoma A&M Col-
lege; M.S., Oklahoma State Univ.
"Find out what you can do best as
early as possible, then take pride in
yourself that your doing it as well as
you can."




JUNE FATTOROSI Physical
Education; B.S., Southeastern La.
Univ.; M.A., Univ. Southern Miss.
"Mature enough in developing inter-
nal discipline to gradually replace the
external disciplines required during
childhood."




JOAN F. HARRIS Physical Edu-
cation; A.B., Canal Zone Jr. College;
B.S., Barry College; M.A., New York
University. "Don't seek an escape
from the pressures accompanying
your youth through cheap thrills that
could ruin your whole life. . You
can't afford to throw away your young
years. The clock can't be stopped or
turned back."




DOUG LITTON Phy Ed.; Mas-
ter's, Miss. State University. "Keep
training rules and always beat Bal-
boa and College!"




h







Gym can be relaxing!




Gym can be hard work!'



48





Ill




Marian Kredell, Carol Ross, Donna Graham, Shelley Lund, Jane Paulson, Beth Carter. The
PURPLE PASSION presenting their famous act.



Aurelia Williams. Supergirl Willie is at it
again!



The importance of physical, as
well as mental development in
achieving success in a highly complex
society was stressed by the physical
education department. Its aims were
to teach good sportsmanship and a
sense of fair play, to discipline the
mind, and to educate students in lei-
sure time activities which can be car-
ried into adulthood. The department
strove to give each student, regardless
of his stage of development a chance
to develop his skills, his attitude, and
his physique.

During the year 1970-71, Cristobal
High School's girls' physical educa-
tion classes participated in basketball,
volleyball, tumbling, track, tennis,
and various other sports. The boys'
physical education classes participated
in football, baseball, basketball, swim-
ming, weightlifting, and track.
Through these activities as well as in-
tramural and varsity sports, the de-
partment succeeded in achieving its
goals.



.



M



* i '4 >



4P



l*M8SB




'iiim-fi



i



3- A



U



'I thought speedball was bad, but hockey beats them al





I




'Keep your hands on vour hips so your pants won't fall down.'



49



Science









PAUL H1ERONYMUS Chemis-
try, Math; B.S., East Centra] State
College, M.N.S., University of Okla-
homa. "Have an open mind and
then use it."




Michael McCann, Kenneth Hill. "Now this will make me healthy, wealthy, and wise.'



CHS boasted a wide-ranging
science curriculum. The student who
followed this program can be assured
of a solid foundation in scientific
knowledge. The courses offered were
Life Science, Earth Science, Introduc-
tory Physical Science, Biology, Chem-
istry, and Physics.

The seventh-grade Life Science
course taught the basis of life and the
student's role in the realm of living
things. Earth Science, offered to



eighth-graders, was an interesting
study of the structure and function of
the world and its surrounding envi-
ronment. Introductory Physical
Science was a preliminary laboratory
course. Students were taught the pro-
cedures of scientific research and dis-
covery. Biology offered a change from
the world of physical actions and
reactions. This course was highlight-
ed by three dissections during the
year. A basic course in Chemistry ac-.



quainted students with methods of
scientific thinking and problem solv-
ing. Emphasis was placed on perform-
ing laboratory experiments and reach-
ing logical conclusions. Physics, the
science of measurement, dealt primar
ily with practical applications of
science in daily life. Vector analysis
and other physical aspects of science
were the major concepts studied in
this course.





Mad scientists at work!





WvM

EMMA LOUISE MASON Life
Science 7; A.B Randolph-Macon
Woman's College, M.A., Colgate
University. "In order for students to
learn they must be an active partici-
pant which requires much more than
mere physical presence."



50





JAMES D. NORMAN Biology;
B.S., Michigan State Univ.; MA,
Oregon State Univ. "Live, love and be
happy for tomorrow we die." "Smile
and have a full life."



"Beware of this plant!





LUKE T. PALUMBO Introducto-
ry Physical Science; B.S., Northwest
Missouri State College; M. Ed., Univ.
of Florida. "Things could be better."



CHARLES T REEVES Physics,
Earth Science, Mathematics, Driver
Education; B.S., B.A., M.A., Arizona
State University. "To thyself be hon-
est and think before you act."





Nai-Yuen Shum. "I think the one I just
cut up is the one I needed."



The formula for problem No. 2 is not on the clock!



si



Social Sciences




ROBERT BERGER Soc. Studies,
B.A., Michigan State U.; A.C., Gtand
Rapids J.C "Get the most education
you can and try to make this world ol
ours a better place in which to live.



The purpose of the social science
courses offered at CHS was to help
students learn about their world; its
past, its present, and its relation to
them both now and in the future.

The aim of the social studies in-
structor was to aid the student in
learning to view history in a objective
and unbiased manner, and to give
him a broader approach to such prob-
lems as national and international
relations. Social Science courses of-
fered at CHS included Geography,
World History, U.S. History, and




Cheryl Coleman, Mrs. Condon, Michael
MtCann. "Now who is on the pro side and
who is on the con side?"




*s



* k



MARY CONDON World Hist.,
U.S. Hist.; B.S., Northern Michigan
College. "Be sincere about everything
you do, particularly about getting an
education."



American Institutions.

Geography dealt with the study of
maps, climates, and the physical fea-
tures of various countries. World His-
tory was the study of the different na-
tions' pasts and their relationships to
one another. U.S. History provided
the student with knowledge of our
nation's past and its accomplishments
and led him to a better understanding
of our nation. American Institutions
taught the student about the work-
ings of government and the basic



k



WILLIAM J. GANSEN American
Institutions Social Studies 8; MA.,
University ot Michigan; MATE.,
Purdue Univ. "Treat others as you
would like to be treated."



principles of economics.

The objective of all social science
courses was to lessen misunderstand-
ing of the people of other nations and
to help the students learn to respect
cultures other than their own.

This year, CHS social science
teachers attended a special workshop
conducted by Dr. Edwin Tenton of
Carnegie Mellon University, Pitts-
burgh, Pennsylvania. He was an advo-
cate of the use of original source ma-
terial in the teaching of social studies.




Dr. Fenton gives a lecture to a U.S. History class.








EUGENE T. GREGG U.S. Histo-
ry; A. A., CZ. College; B.A., Colorado
State; M.A., Univ. of Colorado.
"Strive to become rich."




ROANALD JACOBS World Ge-
ography; Bachelors, Southeastern
State College; Masters, Northeastern
State College. "Make the best of what
ever situation you are faced with."




ROBERT McCULLOUGH Social
Studies; B.S., St. Cloud State College;
M.A., Univ. of Northern Colorado.
"Be kind to animals."




Now this is a real classroom with real students!





Mr. Gansen. "This is an example of a good



Long live democracy!



53



KOZC guilds Men Melps Students




'E" Company







The Reserve Officers Training
Corps at CHS was established to help
prepare high school students for fu-
ture careers in the Armed Forces, and
for ROTC in college, should they de-
cide to take it. It's chief aim was to
help students achieve the maturity
necessary to become officers and lead-
ers of men.

This year the ROTC was headed
by CPT. Juan F. Mata, who was as-
sisted by SFS Murphy, SFC Picoli,
and SSG Alford. The ROTC unit at
Cristobal consisted of "E" Company,
"F" Company, Color Guard, Drill
Team, Rifle Team, and the Battalion
Staff. The staff this year included Bat-
talion Commander Major John Mar-
tin; Battalions sponsor, lLt. Hila
Lyman; Si, 2Lt. Donald Byrd; S2,
2Lt. Daniel Valentine; S3, 2Lt. Jaime
Darraza; and S4, 2Lt. Lewis Valdez.
The Drill Team was commanded by
lLt. Eligio Thomas, and sponsored by
lLt. Jean Smith. "E" Company was
commanded by lLt. Dennis Maxwell
and sponsored by lLt. Jackie Spring-
er. "F" Company was commanded by
lLt. Isaac Heres and sponsored by
lLt. Denise Foshee.

Reviews were presented by the
ROTC each nine-weeks during the
school year. A large and important re-
view was Field Night, held on March
27th. Among the types of competi-
tion included were: personal, squad,
platoon, company, and most exciting
of all. Drill Team competition. An-
other exciting competition of the
school year was the Brigade Review.
In order to make competition fair, the
Brigade Review and Field Night are
held on the Atlantic and Pacific sides
on alternate years.



"F" Company



54



become Officers Md Ceaders




CAPTAIN MATA ROTC; B.A,
Pan American College. "Accomplish
what you set out to do at all cost,
with whatever resources available."



SFC MURPHY ROTC. "Don't
make the same mistake twice. Do it
right the first time and you won't
have to do it again."



SFC PICOL1 ROTC



SSG ALFORD ROTC




'There's really nothing to it," claims Denise Foshee with a confident grin."

:... a





ROTC cadets and sponsors attend Jungle Operations Training Center.




Steve Aponte. "Gee, it doesn't look like a
very long drop to me are you sure I need
a parachute?"



55





ROTC Drill Team




ROTC Color Guard



Major John Martin, lLt. Hila Lyman, lLt. Eligio Thomas





Steve Aponte, George Rivera, Tony Lyons.



ROTC Girls' Drill Team



Zhe tighter Side Of KOZC Cife




Cadets steal a moment of relaxation during ten grueling days at leadership school.





"Hear no evil, speak no evil, see no evil.'



"So this is what they teach you at leader-
ship school."




"F" Company Commander Isaac Heres "drops for ten" with a smile.



57



girls' 'Drill Zeam Wins
Veteran's Day Parade





The 1971 Girls' Drill Team at
CHS consisted of twenty-nine girls.
They were under the expert leader-
ship of Commander Jan Bjorneby.
The girls performed during halftime
at all home football games in the
Tiger Stadium. They also marched in
the quarterly ROTC Reviews. As an
additional activity, they participated
in the annual Veteran's Day Parade.
At this time, they were selected as the
outstanding girls' drill team on the
Isthmus. The girls considered this an
honor which made the long hours of
after-school practice well-worth the
time and effort it required.

The Drill Team also helped with
Orientation Day for the new students
of CHS. They provided guidance and
assistance when necessary.



Roberta Cole

(squad leader)
Lynn Gregg

co-commander)
Nance Edmondson

(squad leader)
Linda Brock
Pattie Hauke
Kathy Deraps
Viana Ostrea
Ann Terwilliger
Ann Gonzales



10. Kathy Milligan


19.


Terry Overstreet


11. Kathy Pursley


20.


Gigi Colon


12. Marian Kredell


21,


Katie McGilberry


(squad leader)


22.


Mary Norval


13. Carol Ross


23.


Cathy Gercich


14. Barbara Bloemer


24.


Nina Gercich


15. Janet Brandenburg


25.


Regina Dominguez


(squad leader)


26.


El lie Blevins


16. Donna Graham


27.


Carol Wertz


17. Sherry Coleman


28.


Marrianne Verruno


18. Mounyen Lyman


29.


Jan Bjorneby



(co-comdr.)




mmJmE



G r r



f Pi < .< ( <



.


Majorettes Perform "During

basketball
Qames





Despite overwhelming odds
against them, the majorettes Patty
Hill and Tita Cobb, presented a fine
performance on the last Junior Varsi-
ty game. They carried on their tradi-
tion by performing at the basketball
games. To be a majorette, one must
be willing to devote intensive hours
of practice over the summer, and al-
most regular practice after school
when school begins.

Tryouts were held during the
month of April.



Patty Hill and Tita Cobb



59




CHS

Commences

year With

Jive New

Zeachers



NEW TEACHERS: Mr. Lassila, Mr. Johnson, Mrs. Williams, Mr. Fite, Mrs. Stronach

MMitiypuiiwi

Cristobal High School teachers
began the 1970-71 school year on Au-
gust 31. On this date, the faculty at-
tended a special meeting at which
school policy and plans for the com-
ing year were discussed. Mr. Speir, as-
sistant Supervisor of U.S. Secondary
Schools and Mr. Cook, Supervisor of
Instruction, U.S. Secondary Schools
attended and were introduced to the
faculty. Following speeches by Mr.
Pfau, Mr. Jeffries, and Mr. Speir; cof-
fee was served to the new teachers in
the home economics room.







We must be prepared, tor a new school year begins.





Varying expressions reflect the faculty's concern for the new school year.



Mr. Pfau (principal of CHS) gives last
minute advice and information to the rest
of the faculty.



Car We Club Sponsors Cultural Exchange
Program With Colon Migh Schools




"I knew I should have brought my lunch!"







'Mrs. Fattorosi won't let us on the gym floor in our oxfords."



In order to provide students from
a Panamanian school with an oppor-
tunity to observe the workings of the
U.S. school system, the members of
the Caribe Club invited the students
of St. Mary's and St. Joseph's acade-
mies in Colon to visit CHS. On the
morning of December 9th, the entire
senior class of St. Mary's Academy
and a number of students from St. Jo-
seph arrived by bus. Each girl was as-
signed to a member of the Caribe
Club and whom they accompanied to
class. They had originally planned to
leave at noon, but refreshed by a
lunch provided by the Caribe Club,
they attended afternoon classes as
well. Both Panamanian and American
students agree that they had profited
from this cultural exchange.




"You're kidding! I'm glad I came so I can
catch up on the news."



61



Seniors




Sandra Alberga




Jay Alonis




Almanubia C. Austin



SANDRA ALBERGA

June 26, 1951

Colon, Republic of Panama

Entering CHS in the second semester of her junior year
Sandra quickly became an active member ot her class. She
served as treasurer of the Language Lab Club and secretary of
the Spanish Club. Sandra graduated in January 1971, and left
for Riverside City College where she plans to major in busi-
ness.

JAY ALONIS
January 25, 1953
Ancon, Canal Zone

Jay has attended Canal Zone schools for twelve years, six of
these were at CHS. In his senior year, Jay was a member of
the Caribe Club and the varsity track team. He plans to study
engineering and computer science at Louisiana Polytechnic
Institute after graduation.

ALMANUBIA CARMEN AUSTIN

October 13, 1952

Colon, Republic of Panama

Alma came to CHS in her junior year, having previously
attended St. Joseph's in Colon. She was a member of the
Spanish Club, and participated in volleyball intramurals.
Alma plans to attend Canal Zone College and major in medi-
cal technology.

PATRICIA YAMILET AUSTIN

December 13, 1952

Colon, Republic of Panama

Athletics have occupied much of Patsy's time in high
school. She was a member of the basketball and volleyball
teams in her freshman year and captain of both in her sopho-
more year when she also participated in tennis. In her junior
year, she lettered in three sports and also served as president
of the GAA and co-captain of the Powder Puff speedball
team. Patsy plans to attend CZC and major in physical educa-
tion.

TERRI LYNN BAKER
November 6, 1952
Anchorage, Alaska

This was Terri's first year at CHS. She participated in varsi-
ty volleyball, Het future plans include studies at the Universi-
ty of Arkansas.

ROBERT EARL BARR

March 18, 1952
Charleston, South Carolina

Robert has attended Canal Zone schools all his life, six
years at CHS. He plans to become a policeman.




Terry L. Baker




Robert E. Barr



62




Michael Francis Bcale




Elizabeth Blevi



JEAN LYNN BASSETT
June 9, 1933

Jeannie has attended C.Z. schools for ten years, five of
these at CHS. During her high school years, she was a
member of the Spanish Club, the swimming team, and the
Girls' Chorus. Her future plans include attending the Col-
lege of Bible in California, hopefully on a music scholar-
ship.

MICHAEL FRANCIS BEALE
July 16, 1953
St. Petersburg, Florida

Mike came to Cristobal High School in the second se-
mester of his sophomore year. He was a member of the
varsity basketball team. In his senior year he was elected
Homecoming "king". Mike plans to attend college in the
United States.

JAN TERI BJORNEBY
April 26, 1953
Bremerton, Washington

Jan has been an active member of the class of '71. She
was a member of the Girls' Drill team for three years, and
served as commander in her senior year. She was an S.A.
alternate in her freshman year. As a junior, she was a mem-
ber of the French Club and class treasurer. In her senior
year, she served as secretary of the GAA and as a member
of the Senior Privilege Committee. Sports have occupied
much of Jan's time. She participated in speedball, volley-
ball, tennis, band, -basketball intramurals, and was a mem-
ber of the varsity volleyball and tennis teams. Jan plans to
attend college in the U.S.

ELIZABETH BLEVINS
January 2, 1952
Colon, Republic of Panama

Ellie has attended Cristobal High School throughout
her high school career. She participated in intramural
speedball during her freshman and sophomore years, and
in basketball and volleyball during all four years. As a sen-
ior, she was a member of the Girls' Drill Team. Her future
plans include studv to become either an airline stewardess
or a veterinarian.

LANA GAVE BOONE
July 10, 1953
Abingdon, Virginia

Lana has been an active member of the senior class at
CHS. She was a member of the Caribe Club, and served as
treasurer of the Language Lab Club in her senior vear. She
was a member of the yearbook staff for three years, and as
a senior, served as copy editor. In her junior year, she be-
came a member of the National Honor Society, and was
elected president. As a freshman, she received an Outstand-
ing Student Award, and in her junior vear, an award for ex-
cellence in the Russian language. As a junior, she partici-
pated in the NSF SST Program at Lovola University. In
her senior year, she was a member of the Senior Class Ad-
visory Council and Board of Directors, and served as secre-
tary of the Student Advisory Committee. Lana's future
plans include majoring in computer science at Loyola Uni-
versity in New Orleans where she received a four-year
scholarship.

VIVIAN VICTORIA BOSEMAN

February 25, 1948

Colon, Republic of Panama

Vivian has attended CHS for each of her four years in
high school. Her future plans include the possibility of a
modeling career.




Senior Homecoming "King" Mike Beale is
escorted on royal walk around the gym.




Vivian Victoria Boseman



63




Kathryn Rachel Burgess




Carmen Luisa Butler



Donald Patrick Byrd






"tr"




tlizabeth Paulette Carter



KATHRYN RACHEL BURGESS
March 10, 1953

Yokohama, Japan

Kathy has attended CHS throughout her high school
career, and has been a member of the Girls' Glee Club for
four years, and the Girls' Drill Team for two. After gradu-
ation, Kathy plans to attend a College of Arts and Music,
in preparation for a musical career.

CARMEN LUISA BUTLER

November 12, 1952

Colon, Republic of Panama

Carmen has been a participant in many organizations
and clubs during her years at CHS. She served as secretary-
treasurer of the Caribe and Nurses's Aide Clubs, Historian
of the French Club, Vice-President of the Language Lab |
Club, and treasurer of the senior class. She also served on
various committees and the Senior Class Board of Direc-
tors. In her senior year, she was elected to the National
Honor Society. Carmen plans to enter Barry College in
Miami and study computer science.

DONALD PATRICK BYRD
June 6, 1952
Balboa, Canal Zone

Donald has attended Canal Zone schools all his life.
Throughout his high school years, he has been interested
in dramatics, playing leading roles in several Thespian pro-
ductions, and serving as treasurer of the Thespian Society
in his senior year. In the summer of 1970, he attended a
summer institute in drama. Donald plans to attend Canal
Zone College for a year, and then transfer to the U.S.










Armando Cabrera




/



Raul Eduardo Castro



64



"Cubby" Clement, Kathy Kraus.

just naturally have beautiful legs."
ARMANDO CABRERA
April 26, 1953
Santurce, Peurto Rico

This was Armando's first year at CHS. He previously at-
tended Antilees High School In Puerto Rico where he par-
ticipated in varsity track. His future plans include. the
study of accounting and business administration at the
University of Puerto Rico.

ELIZABETH PAULETTE CARTER
March 3, 1953
Gartersville, Georgia

Beth came to CHS from Georgia where she was active
in athletics and other school activities. She participated in
soccer, softball, badminton, and archery intramurals, and
was co-captain of the varsity soccer and softball teams. She
was also a cheerleader, a member of the FHA, vice-presi-
dent of the FTA, secretary of the Debate Club, and a mem-
ber of the yearbook and newspaper staffs. She was vice-
president of her freshman class, and secretary of her sopho-
more class. This year she was a member of the Senior Class
Advisory Council and Board of Directors. Beth plans to
study psychology, planning a career in social work or per-
haps teaching.

RAUL EDUARDO CASTRO

July 20, 1953

Colon, Republic of Panama

Raul has participated in many clubs during his five
years at CHS. He was a member of the Caribe Club, the
French Club, the yearbook staff, and served as president of
the Art and Spanish Clubs and vice-president of the Lan-
guage Lab Club. Raul served on the committee for the Jr.-
Sr. Prom, and as a member of the Senior Class Advisory
Council and Board of Directors. Raul plans to attend Am-
herst College in Massachusetts and take a liberal arts
course.



Class

Officers

Simplify

"Senior

Spirit"




CLASS SPONSOR
Mr. Louis Fattorosi




SENIOR CLASS OFFICERS: Kathy DcRaps, Vice President; Robert Phillips, President;
Judy McLain, Secretary; and Carmen Butler, Treasurer.



The 1970-71 school year was one
of innovation for CHS seniors. Under
the leadership of capable class offi-
cers, and with the expert guidance of
their sponsor, Mr. Fattorosi, the sen-
ior class set out to do great things.
The first project was to secure an
open lunch. A committee was estab-
lished to prepare and submit for ap-
proval a list of regulations, and the
privilege was granted. In order to pro-
vide a sounding board for the com-
plaints and suggestions of seniors, the
Advisor)' Council, consisting of
twenty representative seniors was es-
tablished. Another new group was
the Senior Board of Directors, made
up of representatives elected by stu-
dents in the senior class. Both groups
worked hard to make the year a suc-
cessful one.



Among the special activities of the
year were a trip to the other side to
visit Canal Zone College, the Senior
Banquet, and the Junior- Senior Prom.
School events of special significance
to seniors were the Jamboree where
Wendy Flores reigned as queen, the
homecoming game victory and the
dance which followed with Rosemary
Christian as queen, and the Christmas
formal at which the Hall of Fame
winners were announced.

It was a year which included those
once in a lifetime events which are so
much a part of being a senior; se-
lecting invitations and cards, senior
skip day, baccalaureate, and of course,
graduation. Altogether, it was a great
year one which the Class of '71
will never forget.



65




Patty Ann Christian




Rosemary Christian




Caleb Clement Jr.



PATTY ANN CHRISTIAN
June 26, 1942
Bluefield, West Virginia

Patty was a member of the Pep Club at her school in Vir-
ginia before coming to CHS. She was a member of the year-
book staff here, and in her senior year, served as publicity
chairman of the Thespian plays. Patty plans to return to Vir-
ginia after graduation, and enroll in a beautician school.

ROSEMARY CHRISTIAN
October 5, 1953
Coronado, California

Rosemary has attended Cristobal High School for three
years. She participated in "B" League basketball in her sopho-
more year, and the Girls' Drill Team in her senior year. As a
senior, she was selected queen of the Homecoming Dance.
Rosemary plans to attend Texas A&I University where she
will pursue the study of medicine.

CALEB CLEMENT
October 17, 1953
Gatun, Canal Zone

"Cubby" is one of the outstanding athletes in the class of
'71. He has participated in football, baseball, basketball, and
track intramurals, and was a member of the varsity football,
baseball, basketball, and track teams. He was a member of the
"21" Club in his freshman year, and of the "C" Club for the
other three years. "Cubby" plans to attend Canal Zone Col-
lege.

FAITH EMILY COAD

February 26, 1953
Flint, Michigan

Faith entered CHS in the second semester of her junior
year. She was a junior varsity cheerleader at her former school
in Michigan. After graduation. Faith plans to become a travel
agent.

FREDERICK COLE
April 13, 1953
Balboa, Canal Zone

ROTC has occupied much of Fred's time in high school.
He was a member of the Boys' Drill Team, and as a senior, a
member of Batallion Staff. He was also a member of the Na-
tional Honor Society and the Senior Class Board of Directors.
Fred's future plans include attending college.

GARY LEE COLLINS

November 13, 1952
Hampton, Virginia

Gary was president of his freshman class at CHS. He was
a member of the "21" Club in his freshman and sophomore
years. Gary participated in intramural and varsity basketball
during all four years in high school. He was a member of the
Student Advisory Committee and the Inter-school Dress Code
Committee. In his senior year, he was initiated into the Na-
tional Honor Society. Gary plans to attend Case Institute of
Technology in Cleveland, Ohio.



Class
Visits
Zone




Faith Emily Coad





Frederick Cole




Gary Lee Collins



66



Of '71

Canal
College




Jeannette Ramona Cox




Michael Edward Dexter



JEANNETTE RAMONA COX
August 31, 1952
Managua, Nicaragua

Jeannette was a member of the French Club for four years.
She was a member of the Nurses' Aides Club, and served as
secretary for two years. She was also active in Pink Girls.
Jeannette worked on the year book during each of her four
years in high school, and in her senior year, served as editor.
Jeannette was a member of the National Honor Society, and
served as secretary. She was also a member of the Student Ad-
visory Committee and the Philosophian Society. Jeannette
plans to attend Canal Zone College and later the University
of Florida, studying for a career in medicine. She also plans to
study Spanish during the summer, before attending CZC, in
Mexico or Spain.

KATHLEEN ANNE DERAPS
June 25, 1953
Ancon, Canal Zone

Kathy was a member of the Caribe Club for three years,
and was a mamber of the advertising staff for the yearbook in
her senior year. Kathy participated in volleyball and speedball
intramurals and was a member of the junior Powder Puff
team. She worked on many committees, and was vice-presi-
dent of the senior class. Kathy plans to attend college in San
Antonio, Texas where she will obtain her Bachelor of Science
degree for her career as a registered nurse.

MICHAEL EDWARD DEXTER
July I, 1953
Fort Benning, Georgia

Mike came to CHS in his junior year, and rapidly became
an active member of the class of '71. In his senior year, he was
president of the CHS Student Association. Mike continued his
participation in athletics at CHS, playing on the varsity tennis
and baseball teams. Mike was a member of the Caribe Club,
the "C" Club, and the National Honor Society. Mike plans to
study engineering at William and Mary or the University of
New Mexico.

PEDRO JUAN DIAZ
February 26, 1952
San Juan, Puerto Rico

Pedro attended CHS for three years. He was a ROTC pla-
toon leader, and a member of the Boys' Drill team. Pedro
plans to enlist in the Army's Special Forces, and Ranger train-
ing, and to attend Officer Candidate School.

WENDY MARIE FLORES
November 1 1 953
Leesville, Louisiana

Wendy was the 1SF0 Jamboree Queen. She was a member
of the Girls' Drill team in her sophomore year. Wendy was a
member of the Senior Advisory and Jr.-Sr. Prom Committees.
She plans to attend CZ.C for two years, and then transfer to
the United States.

DENISE ANNETTE FOSHEE

February 24, 1953

New Orleans, Louisiana

Denise was a cheerleader and an ROTC sponsor in her sen-
ior year. She lettered in tehnis in eleventh grade. Denise was
vice-president of the Caribe Club, and a member of the
French Club and the National Honor Society. Denise plans to
attend college and earn a teaching degree.




Pedro Juan Diaz




Wendv Marie Flores




Denise Annette Foshee



67




Brenda Lee Gibson



Sharon Louise Golden




\



Stephen Armand Goulet

V


Patricia Gutierrez


1*


£



John Michael Hannah



Allen Scott Harmon



JOHN B. FUNDERBURK
January 3, 1953
Tucson, Arizona

John participated in varsity track and football during his four years
at CHS. He served on the Jamboree Parry Committee. John plans to
become either a machinist or a diesel mechanic after graudation.

CATHERINE ANN GERCICH
January 1. 1953
Lynnwood, California

Cathy has attended CHS for four years. She participated in volleyball
intramurals during her freshman and sophomore years. As a senior, she
was a Member of the Girls' Drill Team. Cathy also served on theJr.-Sr.
Prom Committee. Her future plans include study at a college in Cali-
fornia or Florida.

BRENDA LEE GIBSON

December 6, 1953

Fort Bragg, North Carolina

Brenda entered CHS at the beginning of her sophomore year. Sh
participated in swimming, tennis, basketball, and volleyball intrami
rals, and was a member of the varsity tennis team. After graduatioi
Brenda would like to attend a junior college, travel extensively, an
pursue a career in hairdressing and art.

SHARON LOUISE GOLDEN

April 15, 1953
Anniston, Alabama

Sharon was a member of the CHS senior band for five years, playing
the flute. She officiated at varsity basketball games in her freshman
year. After graduation, she plans to attend a a nursing school in Miami,
Florida.

STEPHEN ARMAND GOULET

September 22, 1952
Somerville, Massachusetts

Stephen entered CHS at the beginning of his senior year. At his for-
mer high school he was a member of the A.F.S., the Chess Club, the
Math League, and the Science Club, and received an award for being
the best chemistry student in the junior class. He also participated in
varsity track and football. Stephen plans a career as a math teacher.

PATRICIA GUTIERREZ
July 20, 1952
Fayetteville, North Carolina

Pat has attended CHS for each of her four years in high school. She
was a member of the Drama Club and assisted with various Thespian
productions. Pat plans to become a woman jockey.

JOHN MICHAEL HANNAH

June 26, 1953

Waynesville, North Carolina

John enjoys motorcycling. He was active in ROTC during his fresh-
man and sophomore years. He served as a cheerleader in the Powder
Puff game, and as a member of the Jamboree Parry Committee. John
plans a career in aeronautical engineering.

ALLEN SCOTT HARMON
September 23, 1952
Annapolis, Maryland

Art is one of Allen's major interests. He was a member of the Art i
Club for two years, serving as president in his junior year. He was also
art editor of the newspaper and the yearbook in his senior year. Allen
was also active in the French Club and Drama Club. He participated in
several plays, and became a Thespian in his senior year. Allen won the
"Voice of Democracy" contest at CHS in his junior year. He plans to
attend the U.S. Merchant Marine Academy, or Chapman Floating Cam-
pus in California. He would like to become an architect or a commer-j
cial artist.



68



Caribbean College Club
Mosts "Senior flight"




DIANE FRANCES HAUKE

August 21. 1951

Colon, Republic of Panama

Diane has been an active member of many clubs and organizations
at CHS. She was a member of the French Club, the Spanish Club, the
Philosophian Society, the Nurses Aides, the Yearbook staff, and the
Senior Board of Directors; serving as an officer in several of the clubs.
She also served on the Cafeteria, Senior Advisory, and various dance
committees. Diane plans to pursue a course in business administration,
with plans for a career as an executive secretary.

PAUL HERBERT HEADY
March 6, 1953
Olney, Illinois

Paul attended CHS for only two years. At his former high school in
Salem, Illinois, he was a member of the Spanish and Pep Clubs, and
the varsity track team. He participated in the ROTC program at CHS.
Paul plans to major in Public Arts in college with a job in a radio or
television studio in mind.

ISAAC HERES
January- 4, 1953
Puerto Armuelles, Chiriqui

Isaac was active in ROTC throughout his high school years, partici-
pating on the Boys' Drill team, and in his senior year, serving as com-
mander of "F" Company. He participated in basketball intramurals, and
as a freshman and sophomore was a member of the varsitv football
team. After graduation, Isaac plans to attend Florida State University.

MARK STEPHEN HERRING
June 15, 1953
Ancon, Canal Zone

Mark has attended Canal Zone schools all his life. Six of these years
were at Cristobal High School. After graduation, Mark plans to learn a
trade.

On Tuesday, January- 19th, at 7:30
p.m., at the Women's Club Building
in Margarita, the members of the
class of '71, their parents, and friends
attended "Senior Night." This activi-
ty is sponsored annually by the Schol-
arship Committee of the Caribbean
College Club.

The program included a panel of
speakers from various vocational
fields and was stimulating and inter-
esting for all.

Following the meeting, refresh-
ments were served. At this time, the
seniors were given an opportunity to
question each of the speakers individ-
ually concerning his or her special in-
terests.




LCdr. C. W. Murphy, Mrs. Linda Nelson, Capt. A. L. Gallin, Miss Leslie Berger, Mr. Mer-
rick E. Banks, and Dr. Levin.



69




Stephanie Bridiga lilies



Eric Thomas Irion



Senior Class Sleets



FREDERICK JOHN HIGHLEY

October 19, 1953

Colon, Republic of Panama

Fred has attended Canal Zone schools all his life, including six years
at CHS. He participated in football intramurals.

NANCY HUSON

May 1, 1953

Colon, Republic of Panama

Nancy was in Nurses Aides for three years, and was a Pink Girl for
two years. She was homeroom representative in her sophomore year.
She participated in volleyball intramurals and in the Powder Puff
Speedball Game. Nancy plans to attend Brigham Young University.



STEPHANIE BRIGIDA ILLIES

October 2, 1953

Colon, Republic of Panama

Stephie was in the Spanish Club, Language Lab Club, and the Girls'
Glee Club. She took part in volleyball and speedball intramurals. Ste-
phie plans to go to college and become an occupational therapist.

ERIC THOMAS IRION

July 21, 1953
Oceanside, California

Eric attended CHS for five years. He participated in basketball intra-
murals in his sophomore year. Eric plans to go to college.



ROBERT RUDOLPH JOHNSON

January 8, 1953
Minneapolis, Minnesota

Robert has been at CHS for three years,
graduation.



He plans to travel after



SHERRY ANN KERN
July 19, 1953
Mobile, Alabama

Sherry was in the Caribe Club and was an S.A. representative. She
participated in Volleyball and was on the Drill Team. Sherry plans to
attend C.Z.C., then go to the States to earn a degree in data processing.




Robert Rudolph Johnson



Sherry Ann Kern



70



ftoard Of 'Directors




ANTONIA KLASOVSKY
March 12, 1953
Cristobal, Canal Zone

Toni was on the Student Advisory Committee and the Board of Di-
rectors. She plans to attend a junior college in Florida and major in
humanities.

FREDERICK EUGENE KNAUSS
October 15, 1952
Nashville, Tennessee

Fred was on the Swim Team and earned his letter. He plans to join
the Army and become a helicopter pilot. He wants to go to Vietnam.



Antonia Klasovsky



Frederick Eugene Knauss



NEAL A. LaROCHE
August 28, 1952
England

Neal attended CHS for only one year. He plans to become an art
teacher.

ANN MARIE LAURITZEN
May 24, 1955
Baltimore, Maryland

Ann Marie was in the Caribe Club and the Band. She plans to attend
college and major in Biology and Oceanography.




Neal A. LaRoche



Ann Marie Lauritzen




SENIOR BOARD OF DIRECTORS
Front Column: Diane Hauke, Carmen Butler, Mike Dexter, Judy McLain. Center Column: Robert Phillips, Wendy Flores, Raul Castro, Kathy
DeRaps. Back Column: Lana Boone, Beth Carter, Dennis Maxwell, Denise Foshee.



71







%



>



* I




Rodrigo Lindo



Shelley Madison Lunu




Hila P Lyman



John Hartley Martin






Jaime Martinez



M



Dennis Paul Maxwell




Judy Ann McLain



Sarah Louise McLean



RODRIGO LINDO

April 23, 195 3

Panama City, Republic of Panama

"Rod" was a member of the Spanish Club tor four years and was sec-
retary-treasurer in his sophomore year. He worked on several commit-
tees. Rod plans to attend college.

SHELLEY MADISON LUND
June 10, 1953
Buffalo, New York

Shelley was a cheerleader for two years and participated in basketball
and volleyball. She was a member of the G.A.A. and the Caribe Club.
Shelley plans to attend college in New York and become an English
teacher.



HILA P. LYMAN
October 14, 1933
Bremerton, Washington

Hila lettered in swimming in both her sophomore and freshman
years. She was secretary of the junior class. Hila was on the Girl's Drill
Team, and was Drill Team and Battalion sponsor. Hila plans to attend
Secretarial School.

JOHN HARTLEY MARTIN

March 14, 1953

Panama City, Republic of Panama

John was president of the junior class. He was ROTC Battalion and
Drill Team Commander. He played intramural basketball for four
years. John plans to attend a Military Academy or join the Armed
Forces.



JAIME MARTINEZ

August 5, 1952

Colon, Republic of Panama

Jaime was active in ROTC and was on the first Drill Team to com-
pete in the States. He plans to join the Army as an officer after college.

DENNIS PAUL MAXWELL

April 19, 1953

New York City, New York

Dennis was vice president of his sophomore class. He was in ROTC
four years and was "E" Company Commander. Dennis plans to study
architecture at the University of Florida.



JUDY ANN McLAIN

April 2], 1953

Colon, Republic of Panama

Judy was in Nurses' Aides and the Thespian Society, and was presi-
dent of both in her senior year. Judy won several acting awards and had
parts in several plays. She plans to attend college.

SARAH LOUISE McLEAN
December 9, 1952
Cristobal, Canal Zone-
Sally played basketball and volleyball. She worked on the Junior
Privilege Committee and the Senior Advisory Council. Sally plans to
travel in Europe after graduation.



72




Jane Man- Paulson



JOSE JAIME MEDINA
March 29, 1953
San Jose, California

This was Jose's first year at CHS. He was an S.A. representative, a
member of the Tradewind and Caribbean Staffs, and a ROTC platoon
leader. He was also a member of the varsity football, baseball, and bas-
ketball teams.

SUSAN WARD MENDENHALL
December 23, 1952
Springfield, Ohio

Susan has attended CHS for only rwo years. She was very active in
athletics and other school functions in the U.S. and continued her in-
terest at CHS. She participated in varsity and intramural swimming,
tennis, basketball, and volleyball, and was a member of the GAA.
Susan plans to attend Miami University in Oxford, Ohio, majoring in
physical education.

KATHRYN MARIE MILLIGAN
April 23, 1953
Bozeman, Montana

Kathy was a member of the Nurses' Aides Club, and of the Pink
Girls. She served as a student assistant. Kathy played volleyball in her
freshman year. She also served on various decorating and publicity
committees for plays and dances. In her senior year, she was elected
Carnival Queen. Kathy plans to attend Canal Zone College or Monta-
na State University, majoring in elementary education. After college,
she plans to attend airline stewardess school.

ALEIDA MONTENEGRO

February 14, 1953

Colon, Republic of Panama

"Monty" attended CHS for two years. She was a member of the
Spanish Club and participated in volleyball and basketball intramurals.
Monty plans to attend college and pursue a career as a computer pro-
grammer.

WILLIAM A. MURPHY
July 7, 1953
Fayetteville, North Carolina

"Murph" attended CHS for rwo years. He participated in basketball
intramurals and varsity basketball and football. He was active in
ROTC, and a member of the Boys' Drill Team. He was selected out-
standing MI for the fourth nine weeks. He was also a member of the
senior privilege committee. "Murph" plans to specialize in electronics
in college.

DON ALME OLSF.N
June 6, 1953
Whitefish, Montana

Don was active in the sports program at CHS, participating in varsi-
ty football and swimming and football intramurals. Don plans to at-
tend Canal Zone College, and perhaps transfer to an oceanographic
school.

NEIL CLIFFTON PATTON

February 7, 1952

Colon. Republic of Panama

Neil was one of CHS's most outstanding athletes. He participated in
varsity baseball, track, and football, and lettered every year. He was se-
lected most valuable player of the 1969-^0 school year, and also made
the All Zone Football Team. Neil plans to become an aviator or a den-
tist.

JANE MARY PAULSON
April 10. 1953
Ancon, Canal Zone

Jane participated in volleyball, basketball, and speedball intramurals.
She worked on committees for the Sadie Hawkins Day Dance and the
Jr.-Sr. Prom. Jane plans to attend secretarial school.



73





ROBERT RANDOLPH PHILLIPS
March 16, 1953
Montgomery, Alabama

Robert has been in CHS for three years, and in this time, had be-
come president of the Caribe Club, Vice-President of the NHS, a "C"
Club member, President of the Senior Class, and ROTC Battalion Ex-
ecutive Officer. He lettered in football twice, and twice in baseball. He
also attended the University of Florida for a NSF program, and attend-
ed the Naval Post-graduate School at Monterey, California. Robert
Plans to study pre-law and then go on to Law School.




TOBY RAY PHILLIPS
December 7, 1953
Burgaw, North Carolina

This has been Toby's first year in CHS and he has lettered twice in
track. His future plan is to become a marine biologist.



JOSEPHINE MARIE PORBES
June 11, 1953
New Orleans, Louisiana

Josie has attended Canal Zone Schools for two years. After gradua-
tion, she plans to get a job and plans on going ahead with her musical
education in piano and chorus.

INGRID PORTIER

September 28, 1953
Djakarta, Indonesia

Ingrid has attended CHS all through her high school years. She was as-
sistant stage manager in the play, "Bell, Book, and Candle" and "The
Black Flamingo." She plans to go to the States and get a job.



Josephine Marie Porbes



Ingrid Portier




"Actually, it was worth breaking my leg just to be able to put my feet up in Mr. Bock's class," comments senior, Wally Russon.



74




CHRIS BAILEY RICHARDSON
December 26, 1952
Seattle, Washington

Chris participated in varsity and intramural volleyball during her
three years at CHS. She received a "Driver of the year" award for the
year '69-' 7 0. In her senior year, she was sponsor of "E" company. Chris
was married and plans to continue her education.

JASMIN ANNA RIVERA
October 51. 1955
Cham, Germany

Jasmin was a member of the French Club at CHS. Following gradua-
tion, she plans to attend college, major in languages, and then travel.



DANNY RAY ROBINSON
April 20. 1953
Covington, Kentucky

Danny was a member of the Tradewind Staff, the Caribbean Sports
Parachute Club, the Civics Club, the Drama Club, and the choir. He
played basketball in his sophomore year. Danny plans to attend college
in Texas, Kentucky, or North Carolina.

NESTOR JOHN RODRIGUEZ

September 18. 1955
Sanrurce, Puerto Rico

Nestor has attended CHS for two and a half years. He plans to study
music and architecture after graduation.



Danny Ray Robinson



Nestor John Rodriguez




KAREN LYNN SCHILL
April 25, 1955
Gabon, Ohio

This was Karen's first year at CHS. She was a member of the Span-
ish Club, the G.A.A., and the newspaper staff. In her senior year she-
was editor of the second page (editorial page) of the Tradewind. She
also played tennis in her freshman and senior years. Karen plans to
major in medical technology at Canal Zone College.

NAI-YUEN SHUM

September n, 1955

Macau, China

Nai-Yuen has attended CHS tor two years. He hopes to become a

chemist.



JAMES H. SPANGLER

March 18. 1955

San Pedro, California

This was Jim's first year at Cristobal High School. He participated
in intramural and varsity track at his former school. After graduation.
Jim plans to become an automobile mechanic.

JACQUELINE FAITH SPRINGER
December 8. 1955
Ft. Eustis, Virginia

Jackie was a member of the Caribe Club. She marched with the
Girls' Drill Team, and in her Senior year, was the sponsor of "E" com-
pany. Jackie plans to become an x-ray technician.



Jacqueline Faith Springer



75




Douglas Robert Stevens






Eligio Fernando Thoi





DOUGLAS ROBERT STEVENS

April 11,1

Panama City, Republic of Panama

Doug was a member of the Spanish and Language Lab
Clubs. In his senior year, he served as historian of the first,
and vice-president of the latter. He lettered in baseball in
both his junior and senior years. Doug plans to attend col-
lege in Texas, majoring in languages and history with
plans for a career in the diplomatic corps.

ELIGIO FERNANDO THOMAS
January 7, 1951
Panama City, Republic of Panama

Eligio was active in ROTC at CHS, and in his senior
year, was commander of the boys' Drill Team. He also par-
ticipated in junior varsity basketball. Eligio plans to join
the army, and perhaps later attend college.

LEWIS EDWARD VALDEZ
November 19, I9i5
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

ROTC and dramatic have occupied much ot Lewis'
time in high school. He has attended Leadership School
and participated in several Thespian productions. He
played football in his junior year, and was also elected to
the National Honor Society. Lewis plans to attend college,
and perhaps later join the army.

JOSE F. VALENCIA

jum 8, 19S3

San Juan, Puerto Rico

Joe was ,i membei of the varsity baseball, track, and
swimming teams He was also active in ROTC, marching
on ilic Hoes' Drill Team, anil in his senior year, serving as
cm i uiiu ottic ei ol I ( ompam Joi pi ins to att< n.l

Brooklyn College in New York

DANIEL PAUL VALENTINE
October 13, 1953
I >etroit, Michigan

Danny was t lit- yearbook photographer tor four years.
Ik u.is a homeroom alternate in ninth and tenth gtades,
and in his junior year, served as treasurer ot the SA. He
was also active in ROTC Danny plans to attend college,
join the Air Force, and pursue a career In the field of avia-
tion.

SYLVIA ANN VAMPRINE

November i. )'> s ;

New Orleans, Louisiana

Sylvia was a member of the Nurses' Aides Club and
served as historian tor one year. She played in the CHS
band for tour years, and was a member of the Tradewind
Staff Slu served on various dance committees, and was a
varsitc cheerleader in her senior \e.ir Sylvia plans to major
In law at L.S.U.






Daniel Paul Valentine



Linda Alice Vest





Sylvia Ann Vampnne



Thomas Kenneth Wallenius





LINDA ALICE VEST

November 6, 1952

Ft. Clayton, Canal Zone

THOMAS KENNETH WALLENIUS
April 24, 1952
Helsinki, Finland

TERRY LEE WALLINE

November 22, 195 3

Fort McClellan, Alabama

Terry participated in swimming and water polo. He was
active in ROTC, a member of the Color Guard in his jun-
ior year, and of the Boys' Drill Team in his senior year.
Terry plans to attend college in California, majoring in ar-
chitectural engineering.

KAREN WESTERBERG
August 15, 1953
Flint, Michigan

During her high school years, all of them at CHS,
Karen was a member of the Caribe Club, the swim team,
the Girls' Chorus, and the Tradewind Staff. After gradua-
tion, she plans to study computer programming.

JENNY DEL MILAGRO WIRTZ
March 18, 1951
San Jose, Costa Rica

Jenny was a member of the Spanish Club, and served as
treasurer during her junior and senior years. She partici-
pated in varsity volleyball during her freshman and sopho-
more years. Jenny plans to become a nurse.

PRICILLA ANN ZAVINSKY
January 22, 1953
Terrell, Texas

This was "Penny's" first year at CHS. She was a mem-
ber of the Nurses' Aides Club. In her junior year, she re-
ceived a $25 savings bond for her bookkeeping. Penny
plans to attend Fayetteville Beauty College.




Jose F Valencia



Rosemary Christian. Michael Beale, Hila
Lvman. The attractive senior float was a



f -

ajor attraction at the Homecoming Pa-

de.




Karen Westcrbcrg






Jenny del Milagro Wirt*






u.- A&




ft




ft


I


1 ^g




V- *T




>



PriciUa Ann Zavinsky



1



daces Without J acts .





s



Susan Couts





*



Alexis Normandia



George Scheibe




Davie Teves



And Jacts Without daces



MICHAEL R. ANDREE
June 5, 1953
Annapolis, Maryland

i/DAVID RAYMOND DIAZ

September 9, 1955
Baltimore, Maryland

David played varsity football during his junior year at CHS, and
helped plan the Jamboree party. He plans to attend technical school
after graduation.

DANIEL WESLEY FERGUSON
June 26, 1951
Macon, Georgia

RICHARD ALLEN KRESGE
October 9, 1953
Ancon, Canal Zone

Ricky plans to attend trade school after graduation.



THOMAS ADDISON PURSLEY

July 9, 1952
Suffern, New York

Tom was active in sports during his high school years, participat-
ing in intramural football and wrestling, and playing on the varsity
football team. He was a member of the "C" Club, and in his senior
year, served as secretary. He was also a member of the Math Club
and the Rifle Team, and was active in ROTC. Tom plans to attend
the United States Military Academy at West Point, New York.

DANNY DALE TWEEDY
December 23, 1952
Victerville, California

Danny was a homeroom representative in his sophomore year.
He plans to enter an apprenticeship program in Tucson, Arizona,
planning a career as a carpenter.

MARIA DE LOS ANGELES ZAYAS

January 4, 1952
Mayaguez, Puerto Rico

Maria was a member of the Spanish and Pep Clubs. She plans to
become a psychologist.



78



Senior laces 'Display Many Moods




Stephanie lilies



John Martin, Dennis Maxwell

mm





Dannv Valentine, Sherrv Kern, Mr. Reeves



79



PARADES



Camera Captures Brief QUmpses Of Senior Cife .

ELECTIONS







Ellie Blevins, Jane Paulson, Rod Undo, Shelly Lund, Carnival Queen Kathy Milligan
Denise Foshee, Dennis Maxwell, Cathy Gercich, Wendy Flores and Beth Carter.

CLASSES .
CONVERSATIONS .




-



Diane Hauke and Sandra Alberga.




Aleida Montenegro, Jeannie Basset, and

Vivian Boseman.

AND MORE CLASSES .




Nai-Yuen Shum, Mrs. Smith, Doug Stevens, "Cubby" Clement, and Issac Heres.




Alma Austin, Lana Bonne, Ingrid Porticr. Jenny Wirt., Isaac Heres, Armando Cabrera, William Murphy, Jane Paulson, and George Scheibe



80



Introducing .

Zne Mall Of fame Class Of '71







Michael Dexter



Mr and Miss CMS



Diane Mauke



81




Most Jntellectual



Kobert Phillips



i



N>(












\



Most jCikely Zo Succeed



Cana Koom




Michael Doctcr



'Denise Joskee



82



7







ftest
Cooking

floliH Junderburk
Wendy 3 lores



Best
Dressed

Carmen Sutler
Kodrigo C'mdo




83



tfest

dancers

Carmen ttutler
Haul Castro





friendliest

Mi la CyttiaH

Demi's Maxwell

Devise Joskee



84



I



Most
M^letic

Patsy Austin
JO til Patten



^



Most
Zalented

Judy McCain
Donald Myrd




85



Also Presenting Kunners-Up




\ V- t WW

Zj/ R(W.' Robert Phillips Mr. CHS, Most Likely To Succeed; Shelly Lund Miss CHS. 2nd Row: Michael Dexter Most Intellectual; Lana
Boone Most Likely To Succeed. 3rd Row: Raul Castro Best Dressed; Wendy Flores Best Dressed. 4th Row: William Murphy Wit-
tiest, Best Dancer; Beth Carter Best Dancer. 5th Row: Jose Medina Best Personality; Susan Mendanhall Most Athletic. 6th Row: Allen
Harmon Most Talented; Rodrigo Lindo Best Looking.



Md Zkose ftot Pictured



Wittiest

Patricia Gutierrez
Mark Mcrring



West
Personality

(Jan Bjomeby
Tienms Maxwell



Kumers-up:



Sandra Alberga Most Intellectual

Rosemary Christian Best Looking

Toni Klasovsky Best Dressed, Most Talented

Sherry Kern Wittiest

"Cubby" Clement Most Athletic

Hila Lyman Best Personality



86





J time in the life of each girl

and boy
A time of sorrow, and yet of

graduation realization

brings,
Of the end of many things
Classes, dances, football

games will be no more,
Zhe magic of the high

school year is o 'er
though some may consider

all things done,
Zhey soon will learn
Cife's just begun



cmt*



87



{Juniors





AJ&\







Sheila


i/Pattie


Brian


Alberga


Alger


Allen


Paul


Glen


Barbara


B.utel


Baker


Banks


William


Frank


Barbara


Bebe


Berry


Betcher


Maria


Richard


Henry


Boone


Booth


Borsellino



Martha


Michael


Anton
Michael


Apodaca
Jaime


Barger
Gerianne


Barraza
Robert


Blanchette
Debra


Bloemer Jr.
Rita


Boswell


Boy land




Janet


Linda


Carlos


Catherine


Brandenburg


Brock


Brown


Carlisle


Helen


Cheryl


Jay


Deborah


Castro


Caudill


Caudill


Cheshire


Frank


Pamela


wAminta
Cobb


Roberta


Cicchetto


Coad


Cole


Mark


Sonia


Wayne


Ivette


Collins


Colon


Couts


Cummings



Man-
Cash

Rand)

Childress
^/Cheryl

Coleman

Karen
Currier



89




Shelia


Emilie


John


Dancer


Daniel


Day


Brenda


^/Clifford


Maria


Egg"


Ferrell


Fontanez



William

Deaton Jr.
Andrew

Foshee



/ /.-If




*



!



Nancy

Edmonson
Stephan

Fugleberg




Mardette

Garner


Jimmy
Gewin


William
Gillespie


Gregory
Goguen


Ann

Gonzalez


Zan
Green




Nadia Robles, "The feminine mystique
at work!"



90





CLASS OFFICERS: Harry Townsend (Vice-President), Cathy Carlisle (president), Patricia
Paine (Treasurer), Jackie Parker (Secretary).



The class of '72 was the largest and
one of the most active and spirited
classes of Cristobal High School.
Through the efforts of class officers
the Juniors obtained an open lunch
on Tuesdays and Thursdays of each
week. Another highlight of the year
was the selection of the class ring
which was round with a gold stone.
The Juniors will long remember
PSAT and NMSQT which are among
the many tests they took in prepara-
tion for college. The girls in the Jun-
ior Class organized and presented a
fashion show which demonstrated the
do's and don'ts of pants wear. Juniors
also planned and presented a Junior



Class Assembly. They were also re-
sponsible for the annual Junior-Senior



CLASS SPONSOR
MR. FITE

Prom honoring the graduating Sen-
iors.




Carol Ross, Marian Kredell, Jackie Parker, Lynn Gregg, Sheila Alberga, Cathy Carlisle, Mary
Norval, Titi Cole, Karen Currier, Nancy Edmondson. The do's and don'ts of dress wear.




Marian Gregg
Pacricia Haukc



Barbara Grier
Joseph Herring



Raymond Gsell
Kathleen Hess



Edwin Hammond
Kenneth Hill II



Mark Hanly
William Huffman



91




June Ilund
Katherine Kraus
Kathleen McGilberrv



James Jackson
Marian Kredel!
John Meeker



Douglass Jeffries
Christina Loizeaux
Shyla Miller



Paulette Jordi
Donald Mans
Michael Minehart



Daniel Knauss
Michael McCann
Dale Mitte



juniors Q ranted Open Cuneh Zwice J Week



92



Irma Monclova
Patricia Paine



John Musser II
Louise Palmer



Mary Norval
Ronald Palser



Beverly Olsen
Marc Parker



Stanley Oster
Deborah Pate




*




Robin Pritham
Marlene Rice



Raymond Ramos
Susan Ridge



Jose Recio
Randy Robinson



Carmen Reed
Nadia Robles



Lourdes Reyes
Carol Ross



Class Of '72 Picks yellow Stone ?or King



Deborah Rowley
Michael Scott
Ronnie Sills



Joseph Romeski
Arthur Serig
Judith Simmons



Juan Sanchez
Higinia Shaffer
Valarie Simms



Gary Sheibe
(..-'James Shaffer
Jean Smith



Frank Scott
Stephen Shobe
Michael Snider




93



^Juniors 'Display Zheir Zaletits
At {Junior Class Assembly




Reggie Southerland
Catherine Terwilliger
Robert Tschumy



Michael Wood



Mattia Spagna
Dorothy Terwilliger
Carol Wertz



Ann Worthen



Michael Spagna
Ehukai Teves
Aurelia Williams



Susann Zachry



The one and only, Brenda Egger!



Maribel Zayas Marisol Zayas




94



Catecoiners




4 M %M*




Ernest Abresh
Michael McCann
Sharon Smith



Anstey Catlett
Irma Monclova
Puuloa Teves





Gregg Goguen



Donna Graham



Roberto Endara
Marc Parker



Not Pictured: Lynne Goguen,
Juan Gonzalez, Debra Gosney,
Patricia Hill, Roger Johnston,
Maxine LaRoche, William Le-
Doux, Joel Lee, Paul Rhoads,
Ralph Richmond, Dolores
Santiago.




Douglas Jeffries. "I'm standing like this be-
cause there's no ball."




Jean Smith. "Who's on a diet?"



Linda Brock, Ann Gonzalez, Mary Norval. THREE FOR THE ROAD.



95



Sophomores




Nickilda

Adams
Rosemar)

Betancourt
Barbara

Bloemer
Melinda

Brown
James

Childress



Gil

Apodaca
Donna


Stephen

Aponte
Michael


Bisot
^/Robin


Bjorneby
vTam


Bock


Bridwell


i Patrice


Karl


Brown

Lulu


Bundy
v/Ann


Cimino


Cirulli



Donna

Baker
(/Timothy

Blanchard
Jeffrey

Briem
Susan

Burge
^/Gerald

Coffin



^/James

Barr
Paul

Bleicher
Edward

Bringas J
Kathryn

Bush
Lourdes

Colon



Marilyn

Baxter
Vjeffry

Blevins
Kathleen

Brown
\/Diane

Carol 1
VKathleen

Colpe



96




v/tavera


1/ Leland


v Wanda


i/Guy


Kathie


Cooke


Cummings


Cummings


Damiani


Danielsen


Brian


Jane


John


,/Judy


Rosita


Deraps


Dohle


Dohle


Dohle


Dominguez


v

Kathryn


^Kathleen


Edna


Estelita


Ender


Farrington


Fauber


Ferguson


Ferris


Robert


Ronald


Lisa


V Nina


Mark


Ford


Forsyth Jr.


Furr


Gercich


Gibson


Edward


^/Henrv


,/Peter


S Patrice


Esther


Golden


Goldmann


Goldmann


Gonier


Gonzalez



Marc

Denis
Harry

Dowel 1
Pedro

Fontanez
Cornelius

Goebertus
Olga

Gonzalez



97




y/Debra

Gosney

Linda

Hess

Deborah
Jaketic
V Katie

Kraus
/Brian
Love



V Roy


v/ Nancy


/Roy


Toni the TIGER!


Gott


Gregg


Gsell




(/Nancy


l/Linda


Dennis




Horn


Huff


Hurlbut




/Jose


Michele


/Paul




Johnson


Kessler


Kilmer




Christian


John


Scot




Lasher


Lee


Loizeaux




j Mi nun en


\/Lawrence


VEdythe




Lyman


Maestas


Marsh





98



Sophomore Jloat Jn Homecoming Parade

v





CLASS OFFICERS: Beth Wainio (vice-
president), Nancy Ridge (president), Deb-
bie Meeker (Sec. -Treasurer).



This year's sophomore class was
outstanding both as a group and as
individuals. Scott Loizeaux and Paul
Bleicher received High Honors dur-
ing the first semester.

The sophomore class was active
both in special class activities and
school events as a whole. They organ-
ized a float for the Homecoming
Game Parade, choosing Debbie
Meeker and Jan Janosik as their rep-
resentatives.

In cooperation with the Freshman
class, the sophomores sponsored the
Freshman-Sophomore dance on Feb-
ruary thirteenth. Ted Scott and Barba-
ra Bloemer became king and queen
for the evening.

Another sophomore worthy of
mention is Edythe Marsh winner
of the "Non-French Student" contest
sponsored by the French Club during
the French Week.

The enthusiastic sophomore offi-
cers planned several exciting events
for the spring.



CLASS SPONSOR
Mr. Norman




Marrianne Verruno. Proud Winner of "Nobel Art Award"








V*



#



Judy Dohle. Practicing for the future?




99





k/Elena Maxwell
Judith Menges

i/Barbara Moody
Viana Ostrea



I I



Sheila Mayani
Linda Merrick
Manuel Munoz
Terri Overstreet



Mark McKenney
vPeggy Miller

Robert Nordstom
Ureter Pacheco



i/Debra Meeker
Jack Mohlman
Myrta Olivera
Elizabeth Palser



'










\^'V




Ada Ortiz v/Noelia Ortiz

Paul Peralta Rosa Perez

Warren Phillips Betty Queen



Paul Bleicher tries his hand at typing.







George Rivera. Working up an appetite!




Ronny Ramos
..-Joann Reid

Nancy Ridge
/Carolann Roach



Bonnie Ramos
l/Allan Richardson
^Jorge Rivera

Ravmond Robertson



Maria Rodriguez
Terri Sanchez



i/Regina Ruoff
Gaspar Sayoc







'







.



Debra Meeker. "You can't say she wasn't warned



Elsa Sanchez
Vickie Schaub
Theodore Scott
Al Simms



Paul Sanchez Jr.
Diane Schloredt
Pedro Simmons
^Joseph Smith



101



Sophomore Class Consists Of 141 Students





James Collins. An example of utmost concentration.



Patricia Snider
Yvonne Thomas



Mary Spivey
Judith Tomlinson




/

U'-Jose Toro vMaria Toro

Elizabeth Wainio Luann Ware



i/Marianne Verruno v^^artha Vest
Susan Willis i/Linda Woods




Michele Kessler. "If I could only under-
stand this!"





Marian Crouch. "Who says I'm uncomfort-
able?"



osemary Betancourt. "I dare you!"



102



Catecomers




Edythc Marsh, Kathy Brown, Michele Kessler. "Come now, it can't be that boring.



Mardette Garner, Patrice Gonier. "Are you
two tip-toeing through the tulips again?"



103



dreshmen




Charles


Deborah


John


William


Susan


t-^Donald


Alberga


Alberga


Alexaitis


Andree


Arbaugh


Austin


Carol


Evelvn


Rodger


Christopher


Paula


David


Baker


Barraza


Beale


Ben sen


Blanchette


Bleicher


Arnaldo


Carl


Charlotte


George


^/P'amela


l/Laura


Bonilla


Bowers


Boyland


Brannen


Bridwell


Brock


Robert


Amber


j/Debra


Donald


Debra


^/Elizabeth


Brockman


Brown


Brown


Brown


Budd


Burgess


Ul


Mar)


Jeanne


Deborah


Alan


We


Butcher


Byrd


Calkins


Cares-


Cheshire


Christian



104




William


Renee


Debra


Alexis


James


Anne


Ciccolo


Cliette


Coe


Coleman


Collins


Crouch


Laveda


Michelle


f/Klark


Ted


l/Tracema


Raymond


Dancer


Darcy


Davila


Deaton


Del Busto


De Vault


Ramon


Karen


(/Trina


Thomas


Steven


Clifford


Diaz


Fauber


Ferguson


Finneman


Fors\th


Gabriel


Rebecca


Maria


Barbara


k/Karen


Daniel


Clarissa


Gewin


Gonzalez


Goodwin


Goulet


Green


Gregorj


Oregon


Francisco


Karan


Kimberlv


Brian


Cynthia


Grist


Hamilton


Harden


Hartshorn


Head)


Heath



105





Melody Hoffman iHarry Holt James Huffman

Bruce Jackson ^Jdyce Janosik j^Michael Jeffries




Ik



Iris Hernandez Anne Herring Cheryl Hieronymus

Marcia Humphrey ^Pimela Husband Leif Irion
fenny Jimenez William Jimenez vjames Jones

Karen Jones Sandra Kaufer Cheryl Kresge

David Lee Victor Lee Ann Loyd




Eager Freshmen impossible to hold still.




Laura Lucas Tony Lyons



141

Kim Marohl Deshea Mason




Sandra May ^Susan Mccullough



106



March 25 Speedball Qame Qives
freshmen Chance Zo Show Class Spirit




Cherri Hieronymus (secretary-treasurer), Victor Lee (president), Carol Baker (\
dent).



The freshman class this year partic-
ipated in the Homecoming parade,
the Freshman-Sophomore Brawl, the
Fresh-Soph Speedball Game, and the
Fresh-Soph Dance.

The Freshman Queen, Laura
Brock. Her escort was Phil Miller.
Reigning at the dance was Princess
Carol Baker and Prince Fred Wanio.
The Speedball game was held on
March 25. The Freshman girls played
the Sophomore girls, and half time
entertainment was provided by the
Cheerleaders.



presi-



'Be sure you get all the crumbs off."




"If you ask me, I think you two have it all wrong!"





John Dohle, Gerald Coffin. "Will you stop goofing off and get to work?"



Sandv May. "This is reallv grc



107




Robert McNaughton
i-^tinda Mendenhall
Karen Mcrhclc
John Meuviei
Phillip Miller



Daniel Minehart
Patricia Moebus
Pedro Monclova
Jane Moore
\ < ^




i^lvan Normandia
Thomas O'Donnell
Samuel O'Neal



Wayne West
'Straight down the hall, it's the last room on the right.'




U^illiam Orrego
L^-Wanda Onii
Jorge Padro

Marvann Palmer
William Parsons



V--" Charles Porbcs
Rita Reduga
Orlando Reyes
Catherine Risch
Jose Riveta



108



Alfonso Robinson
Deborah Robinson
Tony Robinson
' Edna Roblcs
Isaac Ruiz







"I thought all Indians were on reservations these days!'



William Santiago
i^-Etitabeth Simmons
Kathvm Smith



1^'Mark Spanglcr
Robcn Stem
Alice Stiebritz
Rhonda Strube
Joe Swank



Susan Swanstrom

\ David Tate

Kamalci Teves
Viclu Tipton

l^-Ani Ubben




109



m





Frits Woudenberg
Fredrick Waino



iXPaula Vaught
V /Kachcnne Wcigart




"I really hope it works.'





Debbie Carey, Cherrie Hieronymus. Cin-
derella never had it so good.




Debbie Carey. "It better evaporate in



Walter Wesley
(^fanie Wilson



Wayne West
^Dennis Wood



Paula Vaught, Renee Cliette. "Let's see, a
few boiling chips, or was it salt crystals?"




no



Catecomers




Ray Jackion



NOT PICTURED: Raymond Abete,
Randy Amburn, Carl Bowers, Earl Bundy,
Elizabeth Cimino, Michael Evans, Ester
Gonzalez, Lorraine Guilfoyle, Mark Honer-
baum, Bobby Hughes, Ronald Hurlburt.













$&,





Debbie Carey, Cherrie Hieronymus. "We are 15 going on 21?"







J




Charlotte Boyland. "I just hope that balloon can take it!'



Vicky Tipton. "How did I ever get stuck in
this vm'"



ill



Seventh And Eighth Qraders Jre




Front Row: Robert Austin, Lawrence Moochler, Roger Welch, William Cronan, Jeffrey Carwithen, Ricky Lyons, Mario LJbben. Center Row:
Marcela Moncivais, Margarita Zamarripa, Noreen Kaufer, Linda Loizeaux, Karon Mitte, Doris Tomlin, Eileen Robles, Mary Mills, Susan
Mendoza. Back Row: Cheryl Williams, James Dexter, Patricia Sanchez, John Barriteau Jr., Margaret Bradbury. Leslie Gibson, Anthony Ware,
Juan Claramunt, Margarita Young.




Front Row: Murray Webb, James Musser, Mark Perusse, Rexjansen, Paul Hopkins, Antonio Scott, Angel Irizarry. Center Row: Gail Gregg, Bil-
lie Brown, Kimberly Morrell, Mona Christian. Renee Nay, Mary Jo Beale, {Catherine Meyer. Back Row: Carol Fluharty, Gloria Olivarez, Linda
Garcia, Ines Butler, Yvonne Smith, Madeline Pujals, Cindy Ferguson, Linda Stamper, Man LaRoche, Priscilla Husband, Evelyn Withrow,
Sheila Brannon, Luanne Swisher.






Overwhelmed With Ziger Spirit




Front Row: Doyle Dancer Jr., Andrew Wick, Patrick Daniel, Jody Short, John Bridwell, Andrew Norval, Allan Rodriguez. Center Row: Yolanda
Hunnicut, Noreen Will, Desiree Budd, Janet Katsumoto, Donna Reifsnyder, Julie Moebus. Back Row: Robert Ramirez, Steven Boswell, Lester
Forsgren, D. LaPorta Jr., Robert Austin, David Mitte, Joseph Weichert, Anthony Spooner, Kurt Bullinger.




Front Row: Donald Jeffries Jr., Thomas Gabriel, Richard Hoagland, Robert Nicholson, Alberto Wilmont, Walter Guilfoyle, Thomas Wilder,
Robert Moats, James Campbell. Center Row: Chervl Evans, Patricia Colpe, Marilyn Barnett, Carmen Bringas, Nayra Mon, Kay Houslev. Kim-
berlv Woodcock, Patricia Lovd, Kip Holloway. Back Row: Robert Bradbv. Charles Murphey. Diane Ruoff, Maria Ramirez, Anne Richardson,
Karen McKown, Amelia Smith, Lisandra Ruiz, Diane Baker, Dennis Stephens, Theodore De Boor.



113









First Row: Steven Brock, Robert Day, Mi-
chael DeVault, Bryan Simpkins, Edward
Stroop, Michael Collins, Rickv Wilson.
Second Row: Donna Deaton, Shawn Ander-
son, Elizabeth Smith, Pushpa Mayani,
Ruth Hudgins, Brenda Goodwin, Margaret
Weigart, Margaret Jaketic, Marcia Coffin.
Third Row: Paris Mcllwain, Nancy White,
Stephanie Mowery, Devony Dandridge,
Tilda Edwards, Vielka Tom, Sharon
McCann, Glenda Mika.



'For-r-r-r-e!



l.fc < %




First Row: Scott Parker, Richard Schaub, Anthony Burbine, Glen Hess, Jimmy Cash, Leslie Recio, Jeff Gosney, Mike Romero. Second Row:
Nancy Wiliford, Laura Gregg, Pat Moses, Doris Hogaboam, Terri Brown, Marjorie Blair, Diana Ruiz. Third Row: Mike Cliette, Robert Wil-
mont, Ray Wheeler, John Shobe, Steve Kardonski, David Thompson, Robert Fernandez, David Woods, John Moncivais, Alex Nieves, Dave
Farnsworth, Eunice Zachry, Cindy Apodaca.







First Row: Peter Barr, Mike Ridge, Greg Cooper, Cheyenne Rivera, Robbie Currier, George Fryer, Richard Dowell. Second Row: Kathy Balmer,
Violanda Godinez, Kathy Murphy, Patty Valentine, Mary Richmond, Lisbet Coe, Kathy Dexter. Third Roiv: Barbara Yerxa, Ann O'Donnei,
Elisa Brown, Philip Wilkins, Sue Gilbert, Vicki May, Mario Pino, Pat Newbury, Leslie Nicolaison, Cathy Perret, Evelyn Hernandez, Ann
Mills, Cherri Schwindt.




Firsl Row: Rene Ramirez, Roberto Young, Nestor Hernandez, Brian McCann, George Medina, Dee Dillin. Johnny Scott, Reggie Robinson.
Second Row: Mike Orrego, Vicki Kivonaga. Debra Hughes. Margaret Kienzle, Susie Munoz, Barbara Higgins, Walter Cummings. Third Row:
Wayne Dailey, Patrick Moody, Dan Reirsnvder, Rocky Luger. Eddie Solas, Jose Vega, Frank Rorke, Bill Vest, Carl Anderson.



115




t




fra/ Row: Anthony Parker, Angel Toro, Robert Day, Robert Oster, Scott Parker, Ri
Gillespie. Center Row: John Austin, Robert Austin, Reggie Robinson, Karl Simms, Thomas
Gabriel, Mike Romero, George Dejesus. Back Row: Cheyenne Rivera, Carlos Coronado,
George Medina, Steve Brock, Alfred Sandrock, Eward Morrell, Mario Pino, Paul Baker,
Glvnn Moore.



Front Row: Billy Scott, Karl Simms, Carlos Coronado, Luke Green, Steve Barger, Mike McDonnell. Center Row: Anna Summerlin, Josefa Gon-
zales, Mary Moncivais, Caroline Price, Sherry Hill, Joanne Baronne, Sonia Tellefsen, Elizabeth Snider. Back Row: Sarah Rosado, Lawrence Es-
cobido, Hubert Hammond, Michael Dockery, Clyde Adams, Steve Herring, Robert Lee, Deborah Harden.

ftlue Scores

Victory Over

Qold

Football has always been an ex-
tremely popular sport with the junior
high school boys at CHS. This year,
for the first time, they played regula-
tion 11 -man football. In September,
over eighty seventh and eighth grade
boys tried out for the team. Of these,
fifty-six were chosen and divided into
two teams, the Blue and the Gold.
The two teams practiced on alternate
days and competed against one anoth-
er in three games. The first game
ended in a tie, with a score of 6-6.
The Blue Team won the remaining
games, with scores of 22-0 and 14-6
respectively.

Outstanding players for the Blue
Team were: George Medina (quarter-
back), Glenn Moore (fullback),
Mario Pino (end), and linemen Paul
Baker, Alfred Sandrock, Reggie Rob-
inson, Michael Romero, Carlos Coro-
nado, and Edward Morrell. Outstand-
ing players for the Gold Team were:
Alexis Nieves (quarterback), Philip
Wilkins (fullback), Craig Dohle
(flanker), and linemen James Bird,
Michael Ridge, Robbie Currier,
David Alger, and Bill Vest.




O <*> fU- £









Front Row: Mark Pruse, Pat Daniel, Anthony Spooner, Alberto Wilmont, Robert Currier,
Glen Hess. Center Row: Nestor Hernandez, Jeffrey Carwithen, John Cruz, James Dexter,
James Fauber, Craig Dohle, William Allen, Steve Barger, Alexis Nieves. Back Row: James
Bird, Clyde Adams, Robert Wilmont, Bill Vest, John Barriteau, David Alger, David Gonier,
Philip Wilkins, Michael Ridge.



116



Skit Opens Rational {Junior
Mo nor Society Initiation



On December 17, five new mem-
bers were initiated in the National
Junior Honor Society. The old mem-
bers presented an amusing skit, ex-
plaining the qualities of scholarship,
leadership, character, citizenship, and
service required for membership in
this organization. Following the skit,
a "tapping" ceremony was held. The
selected students were escorted to the
stage for the traditional candlelight-
ing ceremony. Mr. Pfau congratulated



the newly initiated eighth-graders and
presented them with pins and certifi-
cates of membership. A reception,
honoring the new members and their
proud parents was held in the home
economics room following the cere-
mony.

The National Junior Honor Socie-
ty held its spring initiation in March.
At that time, seventh-graders were el-
igible for membership.




Mario Pino, Margaret Kienzk. Cathy Perret, Barbara Baitel, and Shervl Smith. HAPPY M( )
MENT.




Mr. Pfau hands out certificates of member-
ship to the initiates.




Parents of the initiates relax at the recep-
tion.





Alfred Sandrock, Cherri Danielsen, Susan
Gilbert, and Brian McCann. "They call us
the BRAINS!"



Brian McCann, Cherri Danielsen, Susan Gilbert. Janna Loizeaux. Alfred Sandrock. and Kath-
leen Dexter. Old members wait patiently to begin the tapping ceremony.



117



{Junior Migh Debate Club Presents Assembly



The Junior High Debate Club was
organized in an effort to provide stu-
dents with an opportunity to express
their thoughts and feelings on various
issues. Many of the topics discussed
were based on events currently in the
news. The sponsor of the club was
Mr. Berger.

This year the Debate Club debated
for the different Junior High home-
rooms. The students served as judges
of these debates. The club also pres-
ented an assembly for the entire Jun-
ior High student body. The judgment
of this debate was left to the audi-
ence.





?\\o M s




-i



Sitting: Lori Flores (vice-president), Cheri
Danielsen (president), Susan Gilbert (sec-
retary). Center Row: Susan Styles, Sheila
Brannan, Margaret Jaketic, Beth Bleicher,
Donna Reifsnyder, Josefa Gonzalez, Mr.
Berger (sponsor). Back Row: Valerie
Owen, Clover Shobe, Sonja Tellefsen,
Janna Loizeaux, Deborah Hughes, Carl
Andersen, Philip Wilkins, Alfred
Sandrock.



Susan Gilbert, Lori Flores, Margaret Jaketic, Donna Reifsnyder, Beth Bleicher, Sheila Baran-
nan. "Now what was I saying?"




Front Row: James Snider, Leslie Sills, Nelson Sanchez, Russell Gillespie, Edward Blount, Francisco Burac, Surse Pierpoint. Center Row: Melanie
Hames, Vickie Alger, Janet Mize, Barbara Chavez, Barbara Bliznik, Sylvia Voight, Cindy Watson. Back Row: Andre Perret, Leo Cimino, Dino
Scott, William Tschumy, Donald Tomlin, Bruce Hunter. Robert Oster.



118




Front Row: Michael Cain, Paul Austin, Lonnie Allen, Paul Loibl, Angel Toro. Armando Luna, Ricky Diaz. Second Row: Kim Welty. Jackie
Johnson, Gloria Good, Susie Riggs, Lucy Blount, Sherlv Smith, Julia Robertson, Nola Swian, Sonia Thomas. Back Row: Michael Smith. Paul
Baker, Mike Osborn, Jimmy Bird, Carlos Gierrero, Carlos Bvmoe, Eddie Morrell.




Front Row: Garry Ilund. Michael Williams, George Dejesus. Jeff Hoffman, Dean Couts, Lori Flores, Maurie Moore, Susan Styles. Center Row:
Charles Hughes, Michele Vrev. Jimmv Feelev, Buddy Fauber. Janet Santiago. Man Fluhartv. Jill Paulson. Back Row: Billy Kern, Jose Rodri-
guez, Valdez Chavis. Susan Austin, Sarah Polite. Pegg) Whipple, Cheri Danielsen. Cindy Runion, Ralph Stone. David Evans, Guy West.



119




Front Row: John Collins, Ricky Phares, Jim
McCarrick, Barney Norton, Duke Collins,
Jonathan Brown, Randy Goss, Luke Skra-
ble. Center Row: Gary Ferns, Thomas Sni-
der, Yvette Rodriguez, Clara Stone, Beth
Bleicher, Angel Olivera. Ralph Vasquez.
Back Row: John Austin, Richard Ramos,
Dan Kelly, Kelvin Gregory, Juan Viera,
Jack Tate, James Amason, Forest Kinsey,
Gus Coronado, John Davison.



Front Row: Michael Boswell, Anthony
Parks, John Cruz, John Kiyonaga, Barry
Simpkins, Craig Dohle, Robert Bramlett.
Center Row: Deborah Baker, Ada Norman-
dia, Janna Loizeaux, Clover Shobe, Cynthia
Smith, Sheri Alexaitis, Janet Brown. Back
Row: David Gonier, John Stephens, Gary
Moore, Juan Laboy, Glynn Moore, Alfred
Sandrock, George Brannan, Paul Garner.





Front Row: Paul Lucas, David Alger, Joe
Phillips, Ronald Grist, William Allen. Cen-
ter Row: Valerie Owen, Patricia DeVault,
Andrea Pacheco, Elizabeth Rivera, Alice
Ferns, Barbara Baitel, Ann Rutledge. Back
Row: Rita Castro, Karen Tahey, Tina Bo-
canegra, Bonnie Willis, Linda Hernandez,
Karen DeBoor, Aida Rodriguez.



120



{Junior High Student Association Serves
As Unifying Jorce dor Students



fV*^




Front Row: Kathleen Dexter, James Dexter, Sherry Schwindt. Back Row: Mr. Cheshire (spon-
sor), Brian McCann, Surse Pierpoint, Linda Garcia, Patty Valentine, Patty Colpe. Janet Kat-
sumoto, Karen Mitte, Barbara Yerxa, Debbie Harden, Susan Austin, Eunice Zachry, Patricia
Sanchez, Carmen Bringas, Nancy White.



The Student Association is the
backbone of any school. This is true
of the junior as well as the senior
high school. The Cristobal Junior
High School Student association
served as a unifying force for the stu-
dents and afforded them an opportu-
nity to voice their thoughts and opin-
ions on various issues. Through the
S.A., students were able to participate
actively in the government of their
school and thus aid in making it a
more pleasant place in which to learn.

The year 1970-71 was a highly suc-
cessful one for Cristobal's Junior
High Student Association. Continu-
ing from the point it stopped last
year, it went on to make this an active
and exciting year. Among the activi-
ties planned and carried out by the
S.A. were the Blue and Gold Intra-
mural Football games, and various
drives and dances held throughout
the school year.




Front Row: Charles Hughes, Dee Dillian, Mark Perusse. Allen Rodriguez, Mark Novak,
Kathy Murphy. Back Row: Donna Reitsnider. Sheila Brannon, Mrs. Tanner. Glenda Mika,
Kathy Meyer, Margaret Jaketic, Surse Pierpoint. Anne Richardson, Margaret Whipple. Ruth
Hudgins, Kathy Balmer. Debbie Hughes. Barbara Yerxa, Sherry Hill, Sherry Schwindt.



The Zephyr was the Junior High
counterpart of the CHS Tradewind.

The staff was composed of seventh
and eighth grade students interested
in learning the fundamentals of jour-
nalism while providing a valuable ser-
vice to their fellow students. Under
the guidance of their sponsor, Mrs.
Tanner, these students published a
paper once each month. Each issue
contained articles concerning events
and topics of interest to junior high
students as well as an advice column,
cartoons, and letters to the editor.



121



S.J. Encourages Student Partici




The Student Association has been
an important part of the school life at
Cristobal High School for many
years. It was organized in 1932 to en-
courage the exchange of ideas among
students, to create friendlier relation-
ships among students, and to increase
student participation in school activi-
ties. Its primary purpose is to func-
tion as an organization in which stu-
dents may practice realistically the
basic principals of democracy and
learn to handle the responsibilities
which accompany the privileges of
self-government.



Nancy Edmonson (Secretary), Michael Dexter (President), Douglas Jeffries (Vice-Presi-
dent), Michael McCann (Treasurer).




Sitting: Drummond McNaughton, Judy Tomlinson, Sherry Kern. Toni Thomas, Kathy Kraus, Mike Evans. Center Row: Diane Dancer, Kathy
Farrington, Kathy Danielson, Cherri Hieronymus, Ann Gonzalez, Rita Boyland, Marlene Rice. Beth Carter, Diane Hauke. Back Row: Edward
Bringas, Charlotte Boyland, George Rivera, Rod Lindo, Greg Goguen, John Martin, Gary Scheibe, Gil Apodaca.



122



patio ft After Kioto us Campaign





Michael McCann, "Good things come in
little packages!"




Rita Boyland, Jackie Parker, Heidi Sweeney, Beverly Olsen. Brian Allen, and Debra Gosney.
"George, George, George of the Jungle."



Buddy Short, James Kunkel, Brandt Irion, and Denise Foshee. "Are you sure George Wash-
ington started out this way?"

Each year a nominating committee
considers long and carefully the quali-
fications of various students and then
selects those best suited for the job as
S.A. officer candidates. These candi-
dates then enter the exciting competi-
tion known as "Campaign Week."
Each candidate strives to obtain the
students' votes by hanging posters,
coining slogans, and passing out but-
tons and tags. The highlight of the
week is the campaign assembly, dur-
ing which candidates and their man-
agers speak and various amusing or
informative skits are presented. On
election day, students vote for the stu-
dent they feel is best qualified for the
job, realizing that the election be re-
sponsible for running CHS the fol-
lowing year is much more than a
mere popularity contest.




Chris Cox, "I'm only doing it for a friend!




Katie McGilberrv and Mark Hanlev. "This doesn't compare with a mini-bike tr.nl'"



123



Kace Jrom Qatun Zo Pirn Mighlights "C" Club
JmtiatioH




Sitting: Andrew Foshee, Mike Spagna, Car-
los Brown. Harry Townsend, Ernest
Abresch, Frank Cicchetto. Standing: Coach
Dedaux (sponsor) Bill Deaton, Jim Jack-
son, Will Huffman. Peter Swain. Robert
Bloemer, Mike Apodaca. Mike Snider.



Outstanding male athletes at CHS
were eligible for membership in the
"C" Club. This organization gave rec-
ognition to those who excelled in
football, swimming, track, basketball,
or tennis. All lettermen were invited
to join during one of the two initia-
tions held during the year. Aspiring
members were required to perform
humorous and often embarrassing
feats. On the final day of the initia-
tion period, the future members ran
from Gatun to Pina where they com-
pleted their "ordeal."

The "C" Club collaborated with
the GAA in presenting the highly
successful Homecoming Dance for
the victorious CHS Tigers.





"That's it, Apodaca, up and down." orders Billy Deaton.



124



0.A-A- Composed Of Zop (jirl Athletes




The Girls' Athletic Association
was the female equivalent of the "C"
Club. The members were girls who
demonstrated outstanding athletic
ability through their participation in
the CHS athletic program. Aspiring
members were required to participate
in all intramural sports and letter in
at least two varsity sports. In addi-
tion, these girls had to pass a grueling
initiation, similar to that of the "C"
Club. Members of this club, under
the direction of their sponsor, Mrs.
Harris, served as officials at all intra-
mural games.

The G.A.A. cooperated with the
"C" Club in sponsoring the annual
Homecoming Dance. This year for
the first time they also competed
against Cristobal's male athletes in
the "Olympics."



Front Raw: Jean Smith (treasurer). Shelly Lund (vice-president), Aurelia Williams (presi-
dent), Jan Bjorneby (secretary), Marlene Rice. Back Raw: Nancy Edmonson, Jane Dohle,
Roberta Cole, Barbara Bloemer, Sue Mendenhall, Judy Dohle. Karen Currier, and Marian
Kredell.




Up, up and away!'



125



Znespians Present Zwo Outstanding Plays




Sitting: Debbie Pate, Cathy Carlisle, Judy McLain, Diane Hauke, Mrs. Elfers (sponsor). Standing: Donald Byrd, Allen Harmon.



The purpose and aim of the Inter-
national Thespian Society was the ad-
vancement and improvement of thea-
ter arts in secondary schools. The
CHS chapter attempted to arouse in-
terest in the dramatic arts and gave
students interested in drama a chance
to work with its many facets; make-
up, direction, and acting. Any high



school student who earned ten points
was eligible to become a thespian.
Mrs. Elfers was the sponsor.

This year the International Thespi-
an Society at CHS produced two plays
presented to the public in the CHS
auditorium, one in November, and
one in March. The fall dramatic pro-



duction was the romantic comedy
Bell, Book, And Candle. The cast in-
cluded veteran actors, Judy McLain
and Donald Byrd and newcomers,
Diane Carroll, Lewis Valdez, and An-
drew Foshee. The play was well re-
ceived by both CHS students and the
general public.



126



"Debate Club broadens Minds




The Debate Club was organized
with the aim of providing students
with an opportunity to express their
views on controversial issues of the
day. Over-population, the dress code,
euthanasia, and other topics provided
subjects for weekly debates.

For each debate, the club members
were divided into two groups, pro and
con. Either the sponsor, Mr. Gregg,
or one of the students served as a
judge. Each team member was given
one minute in which to present his
arguments, then the opposing team
offered its rebuttal.

The highlight of the year for this
club was the Speech Festival, in
which they competed with a debating
team from Balboa.



Steve Shobe, Mike McCann, Patricia Paine, Mr. Gregg (sponsor), Beverly Olsen, Michael
Snider, Jimmy Gewin, Rita Boyland, Kenneth Hill. Maria Boone.



Safety Club Encourages Safety Practices



The Safety Club was formed in
order to encourage safety practices
among the students of CHS. Mr.
Reeves and his assistant, Mr. McCul-
lough, aided the student members in
carrying out their aims. Among these
aims were the organization of month-
ly fire drills and demonstrations of
correct methods for putting out small
fires. These fire drills and demonstra-
tions played an important part in
keeping CHS students prepared for
emergencies, not only at school, but
also at home and elsewhere.




Sitting: Mr. Reeves, (safety advisor). Mr. McCullough. (safety assistant advisor). Standing:
Carl Anderson, Mike Osborn. Diane Hauke. Peter Pacheco. Pattv Valentine.



127



Caribe Club Members Zeach
Jor Entire School T)ay

I 1




Front Row: Martha Anton, Nancy Edmond
son. Mar)' Norval, Patti Hauke (historian
Robert Phillips (president), Lana Boone,
Deborah Pate, Susan Burge, Jeannette Cox.
Center Row: Ann Gonzalez, Ann Lauritzen,
Jackie Parker, Paulette Jordi, Sheila Alber-
ga, Aurelia Williams, Maritza Thomas,
Christy Loizeaux, Cathy Carlisle, Barbara
Bloemer, Patti Paine, Rita Boyland, Do-
lores Santiago, Mrs. Gegg (sponsor). Back
Row: Gil Apodaca, Elaine Austin, Elizabeth
Wainio, Cornelius Goebertus, Joseph
Rozmeski, Warren Phillips, Harry Town-
send, Shelly Lund, Judy Tomlinson, Jackie
Springer, Linda Hess, Maria Boone, Nancy
Ridge.




#

*



K.uhy Kraus and Kathy Deraps welcome parents on Visitors' Day, on October 27.




The Caribe Club (Future Teachers
of America) was formed for the pur-
pose of promoting a better under-
standing of the teaching profession.
All students with a "B" average were
invited to join following the second
semester of their freshman year. On
November 18, 1970, the new mem-
bers were initiated at the Initiation
Banquet held at the Brazos Heights
Golf Club.



In February, the Caribe Club spon-
sored Teacher Appreciation Day in
honor of the faculty of CHS. This
was the sixth year for the club to
sponsor this activity. The members
also sponsored the successful Student
Teacher's Day on April 22. This year
was the first time that the students
taught classes for the entire day. All
agreed that this was a challenging and
rewarding experience. The club also



visited Coco Solo Elementary School,
and a Latin American school in
Colon, Republic of Panama.

Another activity of the Caribe
Club was their tutoring program.
Members aided weaker students who
needed help in their studies. Fre-
quently, members took over entire
class periods for teachers when substi-
tutes were not available.



128



'Xe Circle Jrtwcais"
Promotes
Merest

France




Dolores Santiago, Susann Zachrv, Susan Burge, and Rita Boyland. "French is not that hard!
Je l'aime!"



"Le Circle Francais" met twice a
month in order to stimulate student
interest in the language, history, and
culture of France. To achieve this
aim, special guest speakers or selected
members presented reports on various
subjects.

The club was sponsored by Mrs.
Gegg. Only those students who ob-
tained a "B" average in French were
eligible for membership. These stu-
dents were initiated at a banquet held
at the Brazos Heights Golf Club.
Each initiate was required to recite a
poem, sing a song, or perform a skit.

The French Club members were
involved in a number of interesting
activities during the year. They spon-
sored French Week and elected the
annual "Miss France." They also vis-
ited the famous passenger liner, "The
France."




Front Row: Ivette Cummings, Susann Zachrv, Martha Anton, Cornelius. Goebetfus, Paulette Jordi, Jackie Parker, Linda Hess, Susan Burge,
Jeannette Cox. Center Row: Nancy Edmondson, Patricia Hauke, Man- Norval. Debbie Pate, Aurelia Williams, Maritza Thomas, Sheila Alberga,
June Ilund, Nancy Horn, Rita Boyland, Terri Overstreet, Dolores Santiago, Mrs. Gegg. Back Row: Stephen Aponte. Brian DeRaps, Frank
Bern-, Edward Bringas, Robert Nordstrom, Bill Gillespie. Melinda Brown. Patrice Gonier, Cathy Hess.



129



Nurses Jirfes Impart Christmas Spirit
Zo People Of Cagarterita




First Row: W. Ortiz, R. Strube, B. Olsen, A. Ortiz, M. Olivera, R. Vidro, D. Robinson, R. Betancourt, E. Ferguson, K. Harden. Second Row: T.
Ferguson, M. Garner, R. Hartshorn, T. Overstreet, P. Hauke, A. Williams, N. Ridge, M. Thomas, J. Parker, P. Jordi. Third Row: Mrs. How-
ard (Sponsor), J. Jimenez, M. Gonzalez, T. Torres, O. Gonzalez, M. Toro, S. Vamprine, J. Cox, A. Coleman, M. Wilmont, S. Willis, D. Gos-
ney, D. Gosney, J. Ilund, J. Tomlinson, M. Fontanez. Fourth Row: I. Cummings, D. Dancer, T. Cobb, N. Ortiz, V. Whipple, R. Cliete, M.
Humphreys, N. Horn, P. Paine, K. Stevens, T. Thomas, B. Egger, M. Brown, D. Meeker, C. Smith, R. Munoz, E. Marsh, I. Monclova, S. May-
ani.



The Nurses' Aides Club was a very
popular organization at Cristobal
High. Its members were girls inter-
ested in nursing or another medical
profession. The club encouraged and
stimulated this interest by inviting
guest speakers, showing films, and
planning field trips to hospitals.

The most important field trip this
year was the annual visit to La Gar-
terita in Gatun Lake, on December
12. The purpose of this trip was to
give Christmas gifts to the people on
the island, especially the children



The Student Association assisted the
Nurses' Aides club this year in col-
lecting food and used clothing for
this purpose. The police division pro-
vided the club with a launch as trans-
portation.



In order to become a member of
the Nurses' Aides Club, one must be
a freshman girl, wear a cardboard
nurse' cap on the day of the initiation,
and say the pledge with the other ini-
tiates during a special meeting.




NEW INITIATES



130




Mrs. Howard, Brenda Egger, Beverly
Olsen, Debra Gosney, Jacqueline Parker,
Nancy Ridge, Olga Gonzalez, Noelia
Ortiz.

The Pink Girls helped their com-
munity greatly during the summer
months. They voluntarily offered
their services at Coco Solo Hospital.

In order to be eligible for this pro-
gram, each girl was required to take a
two-week first aid course. In addition,
a one-week training period, during
which the basics of hospital work
were taught, was required. The girls
learned how a hospital functions and
how to care for patients with various
needs.

In order to become a full-fledged
Pink Girl, each girl had to work a
total of 125 hours. In the hospital, the
Pink Girls were casually referred to as
"Pinkies." They were expected to ad-
here to the commands and advice of
their superiors who were registered
nurses. The fun-filled summer of
hard, but rewarding work was cli-
maxed by a private graduation cere-
mony attended by the group's spon-
sor, Mrs. Howard, and various civic-
minded citizens.



Pink Qirls Work
125 Hours






Ada Ortiz resuscitates "Annie."




Mr. Byrd instructs the Pink Girls on First Aid.



131



Spanish Club Participates Jn Carnival Parade




Seated, 1st Row: Cornelius Goebertus, Judy Tomlinson, Jackie Parker, Jenny Wirtz, Pauletre Jordi, Jeannie Basset, Mike Minehart. 2nd Row:
Marta Anton, Susan Zachery, Doug Stevens, Diane Hauke, Raul Castro, Sandra Alberga, Patty Hauke. Maria Fontanez, Ivette Cummings.
Standing: Kathy Pursley, Rod Lindo, Isaac Heres, Paul Baitel, Ralph Ender, Mary Norval, Mark Hanley, Joseph Ender, Greg Goguen, Stepha-
nie lilies, Sheila Alberga, Debbie Pate, Debbie Alberga, and Spanish Club sponsor, Mrs. Elfers.



The Spanish Club at CHS was or-
ganized for the purpose of encourag-
ing Spanish-speaking students to be-
come active in various activities, and
to increase their understanding of the
Latin American countries. Meetings
were held twice each month, and mat-
ters of interest to members were dis-
cussed. All discussions were conduct-
ed in Spanish.

The officers of the Spanish Club
this year were: Raul Castro, Presi-
dent; Diane Hauke, Vice-President;
Sandra Alberga, Secretary, and fenny
Wirtz, Treasurer.

The club was sponsored by Mrs.
Elfers who helped with the organiza-
tion of various activities and attended
all meetings.




Who said that Spanish had to be spoken only at Spanish Club meetings?



132



Student Advisory Committee Provides
Sounding Hoard ?or Student Opinion




Karen Currier, Cathy Carlisle, Michael Dexter, Lana Boone (recording secretary), Wally
Russon, Jeannette Cox, Robert Phillips, Nancy Ridge, and Victor Lee.




The Student Advisory Committee
was organized at the suggestion of
Mr. Pfau, with the cooperation of
Michael Dexter, President, and other
members of the Cristobal High
School Student Association. The pur-
pose of this group was to serve in an
advisory capacity to the principal of
CHS. Members were carefully select-
ed in order that each club and organi-
zation in the school, and each class,
might be represented. Members
served as a sounding board, bringing
to the attention of Mr. Pfau the com-
plaints, comments, and suggestions of
their fellow students. Jose Medina
served as chairman of the group, and
Lana Boone acted as recording secre-
tary.

Meetings were held on the first
Monday of each month. Among the
topics discussed were the reasons be-
hind school regulations and the possi-
bility of changing them, modifica-
tions in the dress code, and possible
changes in the athletic schedule.
Members cooperated with other orga-
nizations in planning and carrying
out activities and projects of interest
to the majority of the student body.
Among these were: a special assembly
in cooperation with the Canal Zone
Youth Council, the "Olympics" in
which the GAA and "C" Club partic-
ipated, and the Powderpuff Speedball
Game in which the Junior and Senior
girls participated.



"Why didn't somebody tell me there was a meeting todav?" queries Chairman Jose Medina as
he and Robert Phillips hurry to a meeting.



133



Philosophian Society Js domed



A new club at CHS this year, the
Philosophian Society was formed by
a group of students interested in intel-
lectual and literary pursuits. The
club's aim was to provide students
with an opportunity for discussion
and exploration of the various aspects
of philosophy and literature. It en-
couraged students to develop and im-



prove their ability to express them-
selves; either through group discus-
sion, or individually through reading,
creative writing, or poetry.

Membership was open to all high
school students, but was limited to
fifteen at any one time. Interested stu-
dents applied through Mr. Fattorosi,
the club's sponsor, or through any



two members. Regular meetings were
held twice each month, with various
extra meetings scheduled for after
school and on weekends. These extra
meetings were planned for places
such as the beach, which offered an
atmosphere of informal association
that helped the club members to dis-
cuss freely and honestly.




IM



Debbie Pate, Diane Hauke, Denise Foshee, Mike Dexter, Judy McLain, Shelia Alberga, Lana Boone, Allen Harmon (vice chairman), Jeannette
Cox, Donald Byrd, Robert Phillips (chairman), Maria Boone, Thomas Pursley, Kathy DeRaps (secretary), Mr. Fattorosi, Patti Hauke.

CMS Offers 3

Drivers Sd.

Sessions

Drivers' Training was an extreme-
ly popular course among CHS stu-
dents. It was offered three times dur-
ing the school year. Each session last-
ed six weeks. Meetings were held
after school in room 341 for one hour
and forty-five minutes, Monday
through Friday. The instructor, Mr.
Reeves, presented lectures and films
in order to give students the back-
ground in traffic laws, safety, and
automobile mechanics necessary to
enable them to become good drivers.
In addition to classroom instruction,
ten hours of behind-the-wheel driving
were required before students were el-
igible to take the road test and obtain
a license. Driver education students brace themselves for another "horror movie.'




134




Douglas Stevens (vice-president). Sitting: Raul Castro, Diane Hauke, Ralph Ender, Sheila Alberga (president), Lana Boone,
Sandra Alberga (treasurer). Standing: Jenny Wirtz, Kathy Brown, Maritza Thomas, Stephanie lilies, Deborah Pate, Deborah



Sitting on Floor:
Patricia Hauke,
Alberga, Edithe Marsh, Terri Overstreet



language Cab Club

Promotes J n teres t

Jn foreign Nations




The LANGUAGE LAB CLUB is

an organization for tri-lingual stu-
dents who are skilled in the operation
of the language lab equipment. These
students assist the teachers of the var-
ious foreign languages by setting the
equipment in the lab and taking con-
trol of the console.

Members attend bi-monthly meet-
ings held in the language laboratory.
Matters of interst are presented to the
members by the officers, and lively
discussions often result. The sponsor,
Mr. Stearns is always present to make
certain that order is maintained.

Several interesting field trips are
scheduled during the year. Members
visit passenger liners of the countries
whose languages the members have
studied. These excursions provide the
members with an opportunity to con-
verse with native speakers and to
learn something about their culture.



Language Lab members operate the lab for the benefit of other students.



135



Reverend Payne Quest Speaker At Ml





Uli



wmm



Jeannette Cox, Michael Dexter, Robert Phillips, Lana Boone. Moments before the assembly
begins, old members of the NHS relax on stage.





Robert Phillips speaks on Character, one oi
the four cardinal virtues of the NHS.



Jnitiation Of National Mo nor Society





like Dexter lights the green candle of
adership, symbolizing growth.



rui &



Mrs. Valdez, Jeannette Cox, Lewis Valdez, and Rev. Clarence Payne, admit the approving
smiles of interested onlookers as the initiate lights his candle.




Mrs. Valdez, Carmen Butler, Mrs. B ;
Mike Dexter. Rev. Payne. The candlel




NATIONAL HONOR SOCIETY MEMBERS: First Row: Jeannette Cox (secretary-treasur-
er), Lana Boone (president), Robert Phillips (vice-president). Second Row: Carmen Butler,
Denise Foshee, Michael Dexter. Third Row: Lewis Valdez, Fred Cole.



Membership in the National
Honor Society has become nationally
recognized as one of the highest hon-
ors which may be bestowed upon a
high school student. The Canal Zone
Caribbean Chapter was formed for
the purpose of providing recognition
to those students who have excelled
in all aspects of Cristobal High
School life.

Students who have a minimum
grade point average of 3.00, and have
demonstrated outstanding leadership,
character, and service are eligible for
membership in this society.

Two initiation assemblies are pre-
sented to the student body each year,



one each semester. At the fall initia-
tion, only seniors may be inducted.
This year, the assembly was held on
November 19th. The theme for the
program was, "Where do we go from
here?" and Reverend Clarence Payne
from the Canal Zone Youth Council
spoke on the subject of young rebels.
New members announced at this time
were: Sandra Alberga, Carmen Butler,
Fred Cole. Gary Collins, Denise
Foshee, and Lewis Valdez. At the
spring initiation, not more than 159r
of the senior class, and not more than
5% of the junior class may be consid-
ered for election.




Silting: Karen Schill, Kathy Farrington, Irma Monclova, Maritza Thomas (managing editor), Karen Westerberg. Standing: Michael McCann,
Jose Medina, Michael Dexter, Toni Thomas, Allen Harmon, Paul Bleicher.



Pink Uok Qives Zradcwind
J might Zo CMS



This year's TRADEWIND staff
worked toward faster publication and
a more entertaining newspaper. Work
sessions were held after school three



days a week. The editors, reporters,
typists, and photographers devoted
many hours of their own time to the
paper.




'The answer to CHS problems?"



In order to get the entire student
body involved in making the
TRADEWIND a vital and inter-
esting part of our school, new ideas
were necessary. One such idea was
THE PINK BOX. This box served
as a "catch all" for school happen-
ings. Students were encouraged to
drop in letters to HELP (the new ad-
vice column), letters to the editor,
poems, bits of gossip, and anything
they felt might be interesting and
amusing for their schoolmates.

Mr. Dobbins was TRADEWIND
advisor this year; it was his second
year in this position. He devoted
much of his time and energy to pub-
lishing an interesting, informative
newspaper.

The staff consisted of many mem-
bers, each with varied and vital tasks
to perform. The hours of hard work
required for the publication of a good
paper all seemed worthwhile when
the TRADEWIND returned from
the press.



131



Zhe Clock Qave Jn ; Kut

Zhe yearbook Staff

Worked On



The yearbook staff had the chal-
lenging responsibility of producing
and editing the CHS yearbook, the
Caribbean. The staff consisted of a
group of efficient students who
worked tirelessly after school in order
to meet the deadlines established by
the publishing company. With the
guidance of their sponsor, Mr. John-
son, and the help of an ambitious
group of photographers, the staff ac-
complished their duty without unnec-
essary delay.

The staff introduced many innova-
tions this year. One was a new system
of editing, whereby the staff mem-
bers, excluding the editor and the



copy editor, were unassigned. Each
staff member did the work which had
to be done, regardless of the subject
matter. This new system proved to be
very practical. Another innovation
was an entirely new arrangement of
the Caribbean itself. Also in order to
compensate for shortage of funds, the
staff sponsored a number of contests
to stimulate yearbook sales. As a re-
sult, staff membership enlarged to in-
clude junior as well as senior high
school students. This was done in ap-
preciation of their generous donations
and enthusiastic sales of Tiger Boost-
ers.






Allen Harmon. "The subject is marvelous, Maritza Thomas, Jeannette Cox. "Put it Sheila Alberga. "Stop grinning and get to

but the photography is lousy!" here." "No, here." work!"



I *4*}



I; i : 'lfi 'i




Mr. Johnson (sponsor), Rita Boyland, Maritza Thomas, Maria Boone, Allen Harmon, Jeannette Cox (editor). Sheila Alberga, Lana Boone
(copy editor), Beth Bleicher, Thomas Purslev, Kathv Deraps, Debra Pate.



139



Cristobal Migh School Produces








~j*Jk-?.C^



Front Row: Paul Baitel, Bill Deaton, Mike Snider, Stephan Fugleberg, Toby Phillips, Ralph Richmond, Frank Cicchetto, Carlos Brown, Juan
Sanchez. Second Row: Caleb Clement, Jim Jackson, Joe Rozmeski, Andrew Foshee, Harry Townsend, Frank Berry, Warren Phillips, Mike Bar-
ger, Bill LeDoux, Arthur Serig, John Musser, Mike Spagna. Third Row: Neil Patton (co-captain), Jose Medina, Robert Phillips, Don Olsen,
John Day, Brian Allen, Mike Apodaca, Mattia Spagna, Robert Bloemer, William Huffman, Peter Swain, Ernest Abresch, Wally Russon (co-
captain).



This year's interscholastic Champi-
on Tigers will long be remembered as
the best team ever to play in the
Canal Zone. They achieved what no
other team has an undefeated sea-
son all the way from the Jamboree to
the Palm Bowl.

Cristobal's first taste of victory
came in the Jamboree. In the first
quarter the Tigers defeated the Bull-
dogs when quarterback, Neil Patton,
threw for 41 yards for the only touch-
down. The College Devils were una-
ble to stop the mighty Tigers in the
second quarter and once again Cristo-
bal came out on top 7-0.

The first game of the regular sea-
son once again brought victory to the
Tigers when they overpowered Canal
Zone College by a score of 22 to 6.



The quality of the performance in
that first game was typical of that in
the games which followed.

Balboa's homecoming was

smashed when Cristobal outplayed
and outscored them 33-8. This was
the high scoring game for the Tigers
this year. Touchdowns were made by
Neil Patton, Billy Deaton, Robert
Phillips, and Willie Huffman, who
scored twice.

The first home game for the Ti-
gers proved a thriller for all. The
game was undecided until the last few
seconds when "Cubby" Clement in-
tercepted a pass from College quarter-
back, Russ Bowen, thus continuing
the winning streak to three straight
wins.

The final season game, between



Balboa and Cristobal, again displayed
the Tiger superiority as they crushed
Balboa with four wins and no losses.
Cristobal became the Interscholastic
Champions for the year 1970-71.

The Annual United Fund Palm
Bowl Game brought the Tigers up
against a strong team consisting of
outstanding players from both Balboa
and College. The "Devil-Dogs" were
determined to obtain revenge for the
losses suffered at the claws of the Ti-
gers. Yet even their combined efforts
was not enough to stop the powerful
Cristobal machine. Determined to
keep their undefeated record, the Ti-
gers slipped by the All-Stars to win
7-0. It was a fitting climax to a foot-
ball season which Cristobal Tigers
will not soon forget.



140



Kccord-Ureak'mg Jootball Zeam



Long hours of diligent practice




J






.








$i£




^dl






ai




k \


^


i?


WF ^x


M?#


I-mJ %


\.iM


- w W ^ v


*


< <

2


^k ^M 'JB






Mr


-






^WfHv'^W








.










,





Enthusiastic support from fans at bonfires, students at pep assemblies, and fathers at football
games .





Able leadership




And expert coaching







combined to produce results visible from the moment the team



141



Zigcr Victory Jh Palm ftowl



Appeared on the field . throughout
the season, beginning with victor}' in
the Jamboree . and continuing





with victories in each of the regular
season games, the defeat of the All-
Stars in the annual Palm Bowl .



Co-captain, Neil Patton, Queen Wendy Flores, Co-captain Wally Russon.





142



Climaxes Undefeated Season




Jamboree:




SCORES




Sept.
Sept.
Oct.


18

25

9






Oct.


16






Oct.


30






Palm Bowl








Nov.


13






CHS 14




. czc


6


CHS 22




. . czc


6


CHS 33




.... BHS


8


CHS 13




...CZC


12


CHS 26




BHS


8


CHS 7




. All-Stars





BHSO









the presentation of trophies at a spe-
cial assembly honoring the victorious
Tiger football team .




And finally the selection of seven Tigers for the All-Zone team.




TIGERS SELECTED FOR ALL-ZONE TEAM: Willie Huffman, Jose Medina, Neil Patton, John Day, Peter Swain, Robert Phillips, and
"Cubby" Clement.



143



Cheerleaders:
Power ftehmd Zigers




'**>, .:



> v Mt)p£'



It has been said that behind every
successful man there is a woman
certainly this must also be true of a
successful team. The 1970-71 school
year included a history making foot-
ball season for the CHS Tigers. Their
victories certainly gave Cristobal's
five lovely young cheerleaders some-
thing to cheer about as they remained
undefeated in game after game. Be-
fore each game, however, these ener-
getic girls practiced for many long,
hard hours perfecting new cheers and
routines to cheer their team to victo-
ry. They painted posters, planned pep
assemblies, sponsored contests, and
distributed spirit ribbons in an effort
to increase student interest in athletic
events, and school spirit in general.
These girls, with their smiling faces
and attractive uniforms, were indeed
an asset to their team and to their
school.



Lying: Kathy Kraus and Sylvia Vamprine. Back Row: Cathy Carlisle, Karen Currier and Den-
ise Foshee. CHS Cheerleaders






"We've come to sing a praise, a hearty
cheer to raise . ."






~~~^



v * /



>



-\ : ~ x >



mm



"Do it, do it, ail right!!!"



144



A-£eague flasket ball Zeam Captures
Championship Qame With Score Of 28-21




Front Row: Barbara Bloemer, Roberta Cole, Aurelia Williams (captain), Marlene Rice, Linda
Hess, Nancy Gregg, Susan Zachry (manager). Back Row: Susan Mendenhall, Marian Kredell,
Jean Smith, Emilie Daniels, Beth Wanio, Kathy Hess, Estelita Ferris (manager).




At the close of the intramural bas-
ketball season, those girls who dem-
onstrated the greatest skill and ability
were selected to play on the Varsity
of A-League Team. Each team mem-
ber had to be a junior or senior and
maintain a "C" average.

This was a year of innovation for
the Cristobal High School Girls' Bas-
ketball team. It was the first year in
which a team was composed of only
five girls. Also, for the first time
numbers appeared on the front of the
uniforms.

The 1970-71 season commenced in
September and continued until the
end of October. The girls played
teams from Balboa High School and
Canal Zone College twice each and
remained undefeated throughout the
season. To climax their successful sea-
son, the girls went on to a 28-21 vic-
tory in the championship game.



"Whatsoever you ask for you shall receive."





SCORES






CHS 35 .




. .BHS


33


CHS 23 .




. czc


19


CHS 33 .




. czc


22


CHS 28 .




BHS


21







A.



A dripping but happy Mrs. Harris is pulled
from the pool following her "victory dunk-
ing."




145



"%" Ceague Places 2nd Jn basketball




The B-League Junior Varsity Girls'
Basketball team was composed of
freshmen, sophomores, and some
younger, less experienced juniors.
The procedure for selecting team
members was the same as that for A-
League. These girls wore the same
uniforms as their varsity counterparts,
and practiced many long, hard, hours
after school in an effort to improve
their skills and teamwork. They
played only two games, both against
Balboa. They lost both games, but
some of these girls will undoubtedly
prove an asset to next year's A-League
team because of the experience they
have gained.



CHS tigresses "jump for joy" as another basket is made.





Emily Daniel executes a free-throw.



"You girls get dried off and go take a shower.'



146



Zennis Zeam Composed Of Zoumatnent Winners




1st Raw: Rodrigo Lindo, Ralph Richmond, Douglas Jeffries, Michael Jeffries, Paul Bleicher, and Jese Johnson. 2nd Raw: Coach Hoffman, Mi-
chael Snider, Michael Dexter (captain), and Eric Irion.

Members of the Cristobal High
School varsity tennis team were se-
lected by means of a preliminary
elimination tournament. Those boys
winning a sufficient number of
matches, and meeting the minimum
scholastic requirements were eligible
for the team. Practice sessions were
held each afternoon after school from
2:45 until 4:30 at various tennis
courts throughout the community.

Tennis competition this year cons-
isted of two interscholastic matches
and a triangular meet in which Cris-
tobal, Canal Zone College, and Bal-
boa participated.




Coach Hoffman provides extra insurance by covering the backcourt as Paul Bleicher and
Mike Snider prepare to receive a serve.




_> A>



i r m 5 vs




*mmi



w

After a hard day ot practice, the members of the tennis team relax.





SCORES






CHS 6 .




. . CZC


1


CHS 1 .




. . BHS


6


CHS 2 .




\ BHS


5


CHS




CZC






147



Jh Medley Md freestyle Kelays




Seated: Cheryl Hieronymus, Debbie Carey, Cheryl Olsen, Christy Loizeaux, LuAnn Ware, Maria Boone, Edythe Marsh, and Carol Baker.
Standing: lit Row: Scott Loizeaux, Joe Smith, Gerald Coffin, Fred Knauss, Beverly Olsen, Barbara Goodwin, Robert Bloemer, Mike Spagna,
Drummond McNaughton, and David Bleicher. 2nd Row: Chris Lasher, Paul Bleicher, Ronnie Ramos, Sharon Smith, Judy Simmons, Susan
Mendenhall, Richard Booth, and Bill LeDoux.

The 1970 Swimming season began
in late October. Practices were held
each day after school for two hours.
The individual work-out totaled al-
most a mile, and the swimmers also
did sprints and relays.

CHS had looked forward to a very
promising season, but they only man-
aged to capture second place. Individ-
ual performances, however, were out-
standing on both the boys' and girls'
teams; and CHS captured a large
number of first places in medley and
freestyle relay competition through-
out the season.

Quite a number of swimmers
earned letters this year. In order to
earn a letter, a swimmer must earn an
average of approximately three points
per meet, and must attend practice
sessions regularly.

CHS had a number of good swim-
mers this year. With the help of these
veterans and a number of promising
young freshmen, next season may
well be a victorious one.




"Swimmers, take your marks, get set




GO!" They're off, swimming rapidly until .



148



Swimming team Captures Tirst Places




Edythe Marsh . one comes up for air.




Judith Simmons . prepares to execute a
reverse gainer.





Later, interested spectators watch from the stands as a graceful diver




And after the meet ... the triumphant, or perhaps only hopeful, swimmers, relax and enjoy
the long train ride home.



149



Scenes behind Sports Javorite
Zime Jor Many Students




Cathy Carlisle, Sylvia Vamprine, Katie
Kraus. "Don't be mad, Cathy."



A bench eye-view of the game.



Qirls' Zennis

Tryouts for girls tennis were held
in February and the season ran from
March 5 to March 26. Practice was
held everyday after school at various
courts in the community. This was
done to give the girls practice on dif-
ferent courts where the ball bounced
differently and the direction of the



wind varied. General qualifications
were dedication to this individual
sport, self-discipline, and endurance.

Many hours of hard practice were
necessary to make a good tennis
player. The girls' equipment was fur-
nished by the school except for the
rackets which the girls supplied
themselves.

A new scoring system was intro-
duced in which play continued until



one girl won six games. If there was
a 6-6 tie, one game called "sudden
death" was played, the winner of
which was declared the winner of the
match.

Four matches were played this
year. Two against Balboa, and two
against Canal Zone College.



ISO



CMS Co-Champion Jn Kalboa Kelays



Nr^.




"This is the part of track we like best," sign Ernest Abresch, Frank Ciccheto, and Billy
Deaton.



One week before the beginning of
the track season, a meeting was
called, and all interested persons
asked to attend. Those willing to at-
tend the two-hour daily practice ses-
sions became members of the varsity
or junior varsity teams, depending on
their ages. CHS participated in three
interscholastic meets this year. Track
events at each meet included: hurdles,
relays, sprints, and distance running,
Field events included: the shotput,
the pole vault, the discus throw, and
the long and high jumps. In addition
to the regular meets, CHS also partic-
ipated in the two-day Balboa Relays.
They were co-champions with Balboa
in this special event in which Rain-




"Eat your heart out, Nureyev!" exclaims
Cubby Clement.



SCORES

CHS 65 BHS. .72 CZC

CHS... 53.5 BHS... 91.5 CZC 3

CHS .65 BHS ... 78 CZC 3




Smiling Billy Deaton displays trophy he
won as outstanding participant in the Para-
iso Balboa Relays.



bow City, Panama City, and Colon
teams participated.

The 1970-71 track team was one of
the best ever from CHS. Willie Huff-
man broke the record in both the dis-
cus throw and the shot put. Members
of the record-breaking 880-yard relay
team were: Billy Deaton, Neil Pat-
ton, Ed Bringas, and Frank Cicchetto.
The outstanding runner of the season
was junior, Billy Deaton. His success
as due to natural ability, dedication,
hard work, and a willingness to be
coached. An excellent team combined
with the expert coaching of varsity
coach, Robert Agge, and jr. varsity
coach, Randy Grubbs, to produce a
very successful track season.



151



A And "ft" Ceague Players




"A" LEAGUE
Standing: Sherry Kern, Manager; Judy Dohle, Susan Mcndenhall; Debbie Rowley; Teri Baker; Barbara Bloemer; and Jenny Wirtz. Kneeling:
Aurelia Williams and Cathy Stevens, co-captains.



L








Debbie Rowley practices "set-ups".




Jenny Wirtz, Cathy Stevens, Judy Dohle, Barbara Bloemer, Aurelia Williams. "Judy, this is
no time to be doing jumping jacks!"



152



Attend Volleyball Clinic



At the conclusion of the intramural
volleyball season, the varsity volley-
ball teams, A and B League, were se-
lected. Older, more experienced girls
made up the A League team while
girls new to the sport were placed on
the B League team. The girls drilled
and practiced every day after school
from 2:15 until 4:30. Emphasis was
placed on bump and set drills. The
achievement of power with control in
all areas of play was stressed.

A new feature in volleyball play
this year was the selection of a "Most
Valuable Player" for each game. Win-
ners for this year were: Aurelia Wil-
liams, Susan Mendenhall, Barbara
Bloemer, and Gigi Colon. Another
"first" of the 1971 volleyball season
was a clinic presented by an AAU
rated official, Sgt. Escobido.

Managers of this year's team were
Stella Ferris and Sherry Kern. Mrs.
Fattorosi was the coach for both A
and B League teams.




A League players pause for a moment of prayer before the game begins.




"B" LEAGUE
Standing: Linda Hess, Beverly Olsen, Patty Snider, Linda Huff. Jane Dohle, and Gigi Colon. Kneeling: Beth Wainio and Titi Cole, co-captains.



153



1970 Varsity And {Junior Varsity Boys'




CHS 48
CHS 27
CHS 41
CHS 40
CHS 36
CHS 39


VARSITY
SCORES


. .BHS 51




CZC 55




. BHS 53




. CZC 55




. BHS 40




. CZC 50







Kneeling: Dee DeLapp, Wallace Russon, William Huffman, Mitchell Blanchette, Walter
Ilund, David Robertson. Standing: Mike Jeffries (asst. manager), Coach Dedeaux, James
Kunkel (manager).




'O.K., you guys, you have to get this right!"





William Huffman. Higher, Willy, higher



An awkward position does not prevent Dee DeLapp from shooting for the basket.



basketball Have Mtive Season




Members of the Cristobal High
School Varsity Basketball team were
selected by the athletic coaches from
those boys who demonstrated out-
standing performance in intramurals
or who demonstrated unusual ability
during special tryouts. Each team
member was required to meet certain
qualifications in regard to scholar-
ship, height, and speed. He also had
to be willing to attend afternoon or
evening practice sessions. All high
school boys were eligible for varsity,
but seniors could not play on the jun-
ior varsity team which was selected in
the same manner.

This year, the Tigers competed in
six interscholastic games three
each against BHS and CZC. In addi-
tion, they participated in numerous
practice games against Rainbow City
High School and the U.S. Navy. A
highlight of the year's competition
was the Canal Zone Invitational
Tournament.

The coaches this year were: Coach
DeDeaux (Varsity), and Coach Hoff-
man (Junior Varsity). Dee Delapp
was named Most Valuable Player.



Sitting: Mike Jeffries (manager). Kneeling:
Pedro Simmons, Caleb Clement, Carlos
Brown, Michael Beale, Paul Baitel, Gary
Collins. Standing: Coach Hoffman, Francis-
co Gonzalez, Andrew Foshee, Robert
Bloemer, Joseph Herring, George Scheibe,
Eligio Thomas.




Joe Herring, George Scheibe. "Give me the
ball!"




"Look, look at that ball go!



155



Zigcrs Play Close Uaseball Season




Sitting, 1st Row: Joe Rozmeski, Ralph Richmond, Isaac Heres, George Cruz, Pedro Simmons, Mike Snider. 2nd Row: Ernest Abresch, Frank



Ciccheto, Jose Medina, George Scheibe, Paul Baitel, Cubby Clement. Standing: Willie Huffman,
Mike Dexter, Donald Mans, Neil Patton, and Coach Litton.




CHS Tigers "warm the bench'



im Jackson, Doug Stevens, Robert Phillips,

The 1971 baseball season was from
January 10 to March 19- CHS played
four games against BHS and four
against CZC. Also, a practice game
against the alumni was held about
twice a month.

Tryouts were held the first week of
the baseball season. The qualifica-
tions for each position were different,
but in general the following qualities
were desired: a good eye, long, good,
arms, skill in throwing and catching,
and a quick reaction. Practice was
held after school or in the evening for
approximately two hours.

After the regular eight-game sea-
son, the All-Stars played the Inter-
scholastic League Champions.

This years baseball coaches were
Mr. Litton and Mr. Agee.




Frank Ciccheto prepares to hit a homerun.



156




(i/m



( C" Club Wins
Victory Jn 1st
Qamcs"



Smashing
'Olympic



Robert Phillips. "Determination pays!"





Another first in the 1970-71 school
year was the Olympics held in the
CHS gymnasium on December 23,
1970 at 7 pm. This competition be-
tween the outstanding male and fe-
male athletes at Cristobal was organ-
ized through the combined efforts of
the GAA and the "C" Club.

The boys were divided into two
teams, the "Globe Clappers" and the
"Gungarias." The girls were also di-
vided into two teams, the "All-Ameri-
cans," and the "Bunnies."

The evening included competition
in basketball, battleball, volleyball,
and various relays. Sophomore girls
under the direction of Mrs. Harris ref-
ereed the games. The girls succeeded
in capturing only eight points, and
the boys scored a smashing victory
with a total of twenty-two points.

A good time was had by all, partic-
ipants and spectators alike, and it is
hoped that this competition may be-
come an annual event.



Mike Spagna. "No wonder the girls won
this event!"



Titi Cole, Marlene Rice, Jean Smith, Sue
Mendenhall. "Ready girls?"





Mike Spagna sails into the air for two
points.



Jose Medina, Marlene Rice, Titi Cole, Joe Rosmeski. "The victors display their prize ribbons
while the defeated display good sportsmanship."



157



21st Mnual jamboree 'Dedi




Janie Souder, Robert Will, Wendy Flores, John Sanders, Darlene Daly. "Sometimes it all seems worthwhile!"



The twenty-first annual Jamboree
provided the kickoff for the most suc-
cessful football season in Tiger histo-
ry. In Tiger Stadium on September
18, 1970, the CHS football team had
its first taste of victory in this tradi-
tional pre-season game.

The first Jamboree was held
twenty years ago. It was first con-
ceived by former CHS coach, Luke
Palumbo, as an exhibition game for
the three participating teams: BHS,
CZC, and CHS. Over the years, it de-
veloped into its present form, in
which the team scoring the most
points is presented with a trophy.
Play is divided into three quarters



each team playing the other two once.

This year the Jamboree was dedi-
cated to two former CHS students,
John Sanders and Robert Will. These
two young men were both injured
while serving their country in Viet-
nam.

The cheerleaders, color guard, the
drill teams, the football teams, and
the spectators were all part of the ex-
citement which was highlighted by
the presentation of the Jamboree
queens: Janie Souder, BHS; Wendy
Flores, CHS; and Darlene Daly, CZC.
The pomp and splendor displayed
made the Jamboree a memorable
event as always, but it was the victory



of the Tigers over both their oppo-
nents that made it a perfect evening.

In the first quarter, Cristobal
downed Balboa when quarterback,
Neil Patton threw a pass to Willie
Huffman, who ran 41 yards for a
touchdown. Cubby Clement then
kicked the extra point, and the quar-
ter ended with a score of 7-0.

In the second quarter, Cristobal
again came out on top when Neil
Patton scored a touchdown on a pass
interception.

The third and final quarter played
by BHS and CZC ended in a scoreless
tie.



158



cated Zo Vietnam Veterans




Kathy Kraus. "Paper tigers can't compare
with the real thing, but they do boost
school spirit before the game!"





JAMBOREE QUEENS: Janie Souder of
Balboa, Wendy Flores of Cristobal, and
Darlene Daly of Canal Zone College; at
the pre-game pep assembly with their es-
corts: Caleb Clement, Jose Medina, Neil
Patton, Wallace Russon, Thomas Pursley,
and Robert Phillips.




Kathy Kraus, Karen Currier, Denise Foshee, Neil Patton, and Sylvia Vamprine. The game's
leading rusher, Neil Patton, who carried the ball 12 times for 61 vards, has his moments of
apprehension.





Wendy Flores. Queen of the 21st Annual
Jamboree.



159



Queen Rosemary Qreets Victorious I




Caleb Clement, Jane Paulson, Shelley Lund, Mike Dexter, Wally Russon, Queen Rosemary, Jose Medina, Cathy Gercich, Neil Patton, Robert
Phillips, and Hila Lyman. The queen and her court.




Each year, following the Home-
coming Football Game, a dance, hon-
oring the members of the team and
returning alumni, is held. This year,
the dance was an exceptionally joyous
occasion as it was celebrated the day
after Cristobal's third undefeated
game of the season, a 26 to 8 victory
over arch-rival, Balboa High School.

A completely transformed cafeteria
was the scene of this festive event on
Saturday, October 31, 1970. The
dance officially began at 8:30 with the
presentation of the court by Master of
Ceremonies, Wally Russon. This
year's queen was the lovely Rosemary
Christian. Accompanying her were
four other attractive girls from the
class of '71, especially selected by the
members of the football team to pre-
side at this special dance. They were:
Princess Cathy Gercich, Princess
Shelley Lund, Princess Hila Lyman,



and Princess Jane Paulson. Acting as
escorts for the queen and members of
her court were: Neil Patton and
Wally Russon, Jose Medina, Michael
Dexter, Robert Phillips, and Caleb
Clement.

Music for the evening was pro-
vided by "The Cheese," a rock and
roll band composed of Cristobal High
School students. A large number of
students attended the dance, spending
much of their time at the refreshment
counter where they consumed copious
quantities of soft drinks and other re-
freshments. A pleasant evening was
enjoyed by all who attended.

The girls' Athletic Association and
the Letterman's Club, co-sponsors of
this annual event, are to be commend-
ed by the many hours of hard work
necessary to make this dance an out-
standing success.



QUEEN ROSEMARY



tigers At Momeeoming Dance








Harry Townsend. "Where are the mem-
bers of the Pepsi Generation?"





Princesses, Jane Paulson, Hila Lvman,
Shelley Lund, and Cathy Gercich, and their
escorts join Queen Rosemary Christian and
her escort, Neil Patton in the traditional
"Queen's Dance."




"THE CHEESE." Jimmy Barraza, Rolie
Manns, David Diaz, and Julio Aponte.



A transformed cafeteria provides an ideal setting for the Homecoming Dance.



161



Witches And Warlocks Haunt CMS




CAST: Diane Carol], Donald Byrd, Andrew Foshee, Judy McLain, Lewis Valdez.



The annual fall dramatic produc-
tion of the CHS International Thespi-
an Society was John van Druten's ro-
mantic comedy, Bell, Book, and Can-
dle. Van Druten takes an apparently
simple love story, peoples it with
some delightful modern-day witches,
and creates an aura magic in a prosaic
New York apartment building. The
talented young actors and actresses
succeed in bringing some of this
magic into the CHS auditorium on
November 6 and 7. Audiences were
enchanted by the story of Gillian
Holroyd, a beautiful young woman
with the power to cast spells and per-
form supernatural feats. She used her
powers to win the love of Shepherd
Henderson, the unattached young
publisher living upstairs, but forgot



one important fact a witch in love
may lose her powers. This is exactly
what happens to Gillian and audience
sympathizes with her attempts to ad-
just to life as an ordinary mortal amid
the teasing of her Aunt Queenie and
her warlock brother. All are delighted
when Gillian finally wins her man
and the play closes on a happy note.
The outstanding performances in
the demanding roles of this play by
CHS actors, three of whom were new-
comers to the stage, received much
deserved applause. Credit for the suc-
cessful presentation of this play also
goes to the hardworking students
who designed and constructed the set,
handled publicity, make-up, lighting,
programs, and props, and to Mrs. El-
fers.



* ; inn

DELL Dull

4MB








Faith Coad, The Finishing Touch.



162



Auditorium fa ML ftook And Candle




Diane Caroll and Donald Bvrd, "No peek-
ing!"



CAST

Gillian Holroyd

Diane Caroll
Shepherd Henderson

Donald Byrd
Miss Holroyd (aunt Queenie).

Judy McLain

Nicky Holroyd

Andrew Foshee
Sidney Redlitch

Lewis Valdez

Pyewacket

"Sinbad"

Director

Mrs. Terence Elters

Stage Manager

Sue Mendenhall

Assistant Manager

Ingrid Portier




Diane Caroll and Donald Byrd, "Now, this is my Grandmummy's secret brew!'

r




Judy McLain and Donald Byrd. "Ooh! This chair feels lump




Robert Ford, Jeff Briam, and Ronnie Forsyth. THE LIGHT CREW.



163



Mall Of Jame flamed M Christmas formal





"Shake it, but don't break it!'



Lewis Valdez, Judy McLain, and Sandra Al-
berga. "Don't they ever stop talking?"



The Christmas Formal, held at the
Sky Room on December 19, 1970 was
the climax of many weeks of hard
work for the members of the Senior
Class Advisory Council and Board of
Directors who made up the commit-
tees which organized and planned this
successful dance. Students danced to
the music of the "What For" amid
decorations on the theme "Right
Down Santa Claus Lane." The pre-
sentation of the Senior Class Hall of
Fame made this event one of the
most memorable of the school year.





Mark Herring, John Funderburk, Rod Lindo, Carmen Butler, and Wendy Flores. Hall of
Fame Winners.




Michael Dexter, "Mr. CHS."



Denise Foshee, Hila Lyman, Dennis Maxwell, Jan Bjorneby, Donald Byrd, Judy McLain,
Mark Herring. Hall of Fame Winners.



164



J titer national Christmas-,
Zheme Of Christmas Concert




WL(V

mm\m






The Intermediate Band




The Girls' Chorus




The Senior High Band



_ m --wrrf




Mr. Fattorosi. "The Legend of Babushka.'



At 7:30 Tuesday evening, Decem-
ber 22nd, the Cristobal High School
auditorium was the scene of the annu-
al Christmas Concert. Participating in
this traditional event were the Inter-
mediate Band, the Senior High Band,
and the Girls' Chorus, all under the
direction of Mr. Edward Carwithen.

This year the concert had an inter-
national flavor; songs and musical se-
lections from such countries as
France, Germany, Russia, and Spain
were presented. Mr. Louis Fattorosi,
an English teacher at CHS, gave read-
ings from the literature of these
countries, which aided in setting the
mood.

The Intermediate Band, composed
of Junior High School students, pre-
sented a number of selections which
were well received by the audience.
Following their performance, the Sen-
ior High Band played a number of
unusual and difficult selections. A
highlight of the concert was the ap-
pearance of the Girls' Chorus, who
were dressed in formals, adding a fes-
tive note to the occasion. Among
those deserving mention for solo per-
formances are; Ronald Palser, Judy
McLain, and Jean Bassett.



KOZC Cadets Md Sponsors
Attendff.O.Ze.



^







Thomas Purslev



For seven days on several week-
ends in the month of February, the
jungle surrounding Ft. Sherman be-
came the temporary "home" of a
number of students. These students
were ROTC cadets and sponsors from
Balboa and Cristobal High Schools
who were participating in the ROTC
program. The purpose of this pro-
gram was to train students to move,
shoot, communicate, and sustain
themselves in a jungle environment.
The army provided equipment and



instructors; participants paid for their
own food. The training included sev-
eral hours of classroom instruction,
numerous excursions to nearby Fort
Sherman, target detection, airborne
training, boat training, river crossing,
and a trip to the mock Viet Cong vil-
lage located on the French Canal. Par-
ticipants who graduated from the
course were given the title, "Honor-
ary Jungle Expert". This year's out-
standing graduate from CHS was
cadet corporal Orlando Reyes.



166



wis 8




167



ttanquet Honors CHS
Ccttemm





Mike Dexter receives a letter in tennis
from Coach Dedeaux.



The final athletic event of the
1969-70 school year was the annual
Lettermen's Banquet. On this occa-
sion the outstanding athlete's in all
sports received recognition of their
ability and awards for their service to
CHS. The Banquet was held on May
9, 1970, at the France Field American
Legion. Dinner was served and a film
of the 1969 Palm Bowl was shown.
Cristobal High School's coaches, Lit-
ton and Dedeaux presented the boys
with letters in basketball, baseball,
football, tennis, and track. The most
valuable player in each sport received
a trophy. Among the honored guests
at the banquet were the cheerleaders,
and the guests which each boy
brought.



"It's not often that athletes
this!"



get a



like




Ann Hirons presents Coach Litton with a
token of the team's appreciation.




"Well, we can't all win a trophy!"



168



March 12, 1971

Dear Readers:

Today is the day I and the other members of the yearbook staff
have long dreamed of reaching. It marks the completion of the tre-
mendous task of compiling and editing the 1971 Caribbean. As I help
our sponsor, Mr. Johnson, with the packaging of our final shipment of
copy, I recall the events, people, and places which are recorded in
these pages. I also think of a number of individuals who assisted with
the many essential, but often unrecognized tasks involved in the suc-
cessful production of a yearbook. On behalf of the yearbook staff, I
wish to extend a special thank you to Mrs. Condon who supervised
the sale of advertisements, and to Mr. Gansen who dedicated much of
his time to the photography department. I also wish to thank the Tay-
lor Publishing Company, Compagnani Aleman and Quelquejeu, S.A.
for their collaboration, and the business firms for their patronage.

The yearbook staff had only a limited amount of time in which to
record an almost unlimited number of events, but every effort was
made to make our coverage of the school year as complete as possible.
I sincerely hope that you have received as much pleasure in reading
this book as we did in editing it.



Very truly yours



Qexx^^injZuy Ut)C



Jeannette Cox
Editor



Sponsor Mr. Johnson

Business Manager Mrs. Condon

Editor Jeannette Cox

Copy Editor Lana Boone

Assistant Editors Maritza Thomas

Rita Boyland

Maria Boone

Margaret Jacketic

Beth Bleicher



Typist Sheila Alberga

Photographers Danny Valentine

Debbie Pate

Artwork Allen Harmon

Advertisements Kathy DeRaps

Jeannie Bassett
Raul Castro



169



Zigcr



Mrs. W. B. Abresch
Ramon Acevedo
MSG C. H. Adams
Bob and fan Agee

Paul AIkk kU
Luis Alakn

Mr ami Mrs C. Alberga
Mr and Mrs. I.. Alberga
shci la Albcrga

Mr. and Mrs. Calvin Ray Aldridge
Mr. and Mrs. E. L. Alger
Mrs. Allen
Mrs. Joanne Allen
Mr. and Mrs. William Alonis
Georgia I.. Anderson
Fred R. Andree

Capt. and Mrs. R. M. Andrews
Capt. and Mrs. M. Annen
Mr. and Mrs. D. Austin
Mr. and Mrs. Nelson Austin
Robert L. Austin and Family
Apodaca Family
Gloria A. Aponte
John W. Askew
D. Bai lev-
Mr. and Mrs. Floyd Baker
Mrs. R. Balloy
Doris Ban
T. W. Bannes

Mr. and Mrs. I. Gonzalez Barbosa
Mr. and Mrs. Jack Barger
Mrs. Barr

Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth Bassett
Mr. and Mrs. Daina E. Beach
Mr. and Mrs. D. E. Bell and Daughter
L. E. Bell

Mr. and Mrs. Belland
R. W. Beninghoff
Mr. and Mrs. Ed Bensen
Mr. and Mrs. Bobby Bentley
Mr. and Mrs. E. J. Berger
Mr. and Mrs. A. J. Best
Mrs. J. R. Best
Mrs. A. Betancourt
Chris Betancourt

Mr. and Mrs. J. A. Bialkowski, Sr.
Mr. and Mrs. Alfonso Bisay
Dennis Bight
Fred Bingham
Mr. and Mrs. J. Bjorneb)
Dora Blanchard

Mr. and Mrs. Robert Blanchette
Mr. and Mrs. Harold E. Blake
Mary Blennerhasset
Mis. Stanley L. Bli/nik
Mr. and Mrs. Richard W. Bock
Mr. and Mrs. F. J. Boer
Maria Boone
Mrs. George Boone
Mrs. Boscman and FannK
Lourdes A. Boseman



Esther Boyd

W. Brand!

Venus Brannan

Mr. and Mrs. J. Bressel

Mrs. Bringas

Elvia P. Bringas

Allen S. and Celia S. Brown

Mrs. Calvin E. Brown

Mr. and Mrs. Fay M. Brown

Mr. and Mrs. William M. Brown

Mr. and Mrs. D. E. Bruce

Mr. D. F. Bullinger

Mr. and Mrs. Bunnel

Mrs. R. L. Bunnel

Mr. and Mrs. T. J. Burbine

Mr. and Mrs. I. N. Burgess

G. Burza

Mr. and Mrs. Michael Burza

Mr. and Mrs. Raymond G. Bush

Gloria Buswell

Mr. and Mrs. W. R. Byrd

Martin Caballero

Mrs. A. Cabieca

Mr. and Mrs. R. L. Calclasure

Mr. and Mrs. William C. Calkins

E. B. Callomn and Family

Mr. and Mrs. Camacho

Mr. and Mrs. C. R. Campbell

Jim Campbell

Mr. and Mrs. H. H. Carey

Capt. and Mrs. T. H. Carlisle

Mrs. Helen L. Carroll

Delia E. Carter

Mr. E. R. Carwithen

Mr. Roland Casanova

W T. Cash

Mr. and Mrs. Larry Celluci

Mr. G. F. Chaser

Mr. and Mrs. H. Cheshire

C. H. Childress

CSM and Mrs. W. H. Childress

SFC H. Childress

Mr. and Mrs. Joe Childress

Lou B. Childress, Jr.

Mr. and Mrs. E. Cirulli

Tony Cixbell

Mrs. Barbara L. Clark

H. Clark

Caleb C. Clement

Joyce Clevenger

SGT and Mrs. Jimmy D. Clowers

Mr. and Mrs. J. Coffin

M. J. Cole

Mr. and Mrs. George W. Coleman

Mrs. Joann Collier

Mr. and Mrs. Albert B. Collini

Mark Collins

Walter A. Collins

Mr. and Mrs. Colon

E. Comerford

Mr. and Mrs. E. J. Compter



Mary Condon

Mr. and Mrs. Conway

Mrs. Maria A. Coroke

Mr. and Mrs. J. S. Cossigan

Mr. and Mrs. William H. Cox

Jeanne Criess

Mr. and Mrs. John L. Croix

M. Currier

Alden Curtis

Damiani

R. J. Danielsen

R. Deaton

W. M. Deaton and Family

De Jesus

Mr. and Mrs. David Dempsey

Mr. and Mrs. D. C. Denis

Angelica S. Derickson

Mr. and Mrs. H. B. DeVolt

Mr. and Mrs. Aurelio DeWitt

Mr. and Mrs. F. Diaz

Mr. and Mrs. H. A. Dockery

L. Doke

H. R. Domenech

Mrs. Doney

Mrs. Zona V. Dowell

Debra Dunkins

Mr. and Mrs. William Eggeb

Mr. and Mrs. George Egger, Jr.

Mr. and Mrs. George R. Egolf

Mr. and Mrs. T. Elfers

Frank Ender

Eric Ernest

Leonora Escobido

M. Estes

Mr. and Mrs. D. R. Fall

Mr. and Mrs. Joe Fallen

Kathy Fauber

SFC and Mrs. Jose Fernandez

Mrs. Ferguson

Dorothy Ferro

Gilbert R. Ferro

D. Finley

Mr. and Mrs. Ronald Fite

Pat and Lanky Flores

Mr. and Mrs. Charles W. Flyn

Mr. and Mrs. Robert Forsythe

LTC and Mrs. G. Foshee

Mr. and Mrs. S. T. Frankel

John and Sue Frensley

Mr. and Mrs. K. O. Fugleberg

Mr. and Mrs. Richard Gadbois

Mrs. Galloglier

SGT. and Mrs. G. W. Ganter

Mrs. Maria Garcia

SSG and Mrs. Paul Garibay

Enrique Garza

Mr. and Mrs. Geer

Mr. and Mrs. Robert Gegg

Mrs. Helen J. Gercich

Capt. and Mrs. W. Gillespie

Gilbert Gilmore



170



boosters



Maritza Gitz

Mrs. Povidc Gitz

Cornelius Goebcrtus

Carol O. Goerra

Mr. and Mrs. Howard Golden

Jeanne J. Goldman

Mr. and Mrs. Henry- Goldmann

Gabrielle H. Gonzalez

Ed Gordon

Debra Gosney

Mr. and Mrs. Gott

Capt. and Mrs. Thomas W. Goves

Mr. and Mrs. Randall H. Grubbs

Mr. and Mrs. William R. Graham

Roger A. Graham

W. Grant

Robert Greer

Gene Gregg

Mr. and Mrs. Gregory

Mr. and Mrs. D. E. Grier

Miss Jacinta E. Griffiths

Mrs. Grist

Mr. and Mrs. Juan J. Guevara

Tirama Hall

Mr. and Mrs. Arnold F. Hames

Mr. and Mrs. Eugene E. Hamlin, Jr.

SGT and Mrs. D. H. Hammond

Mr. and Mrs. Robert J. Hancock

David R. Harburger

Ronald L. Hargis

Mr. and Mrs. P. B. Harwell. Jr.

Diane Hauke

Mrs. James Hauser

Thomas Head

R J. Helmericks

L Hess

Mr. and Mrs. Paul Hieronymus

Mr. and Mrs. T. H. Higgins

Mr. and Mrs. L. G. Highley

Mr. and Mrs. Roy Hill

Mr. and Mrs. William G. Hill

Richard Hines

Maj. and Mrs. Vernon W. Hinkel

Mr. and Mrs. R. M. Hirons

Capt. and Mrs. L. H. Hixon

Insula Hogaboam

Mr. and Mrs. M. Holcomb

Mr. and Mrs. Wilfred Hold Jr.

Judv and Bob Holden

Emilia Holgerson

James L. Homer

Mr. and Mrs. Hopkins

Mr M. C. Howard

Mr. and Mrs. Charles W. Howe

Mr. Roy Howell

R. F. Huldtcjuist Jr.

Mr. and Mrs. Dennis R. Hurt'

James J. Husnik

Capt. and Mrs. N. R. Hutchinson

Dr. and Mrs. O. C. Irion

Mr. and Mrs. Ronald Jacobs



A. E. Jaketic

Phillips James

Mrs. Ralph James

Mr. and Mrs. Jaquez

Rex Jarsen

Mr. and Mrs. Paul J. Jeffries

N. Jensen

Jessick

Mrs. Barbara Johnson

H. N. Johnson

Irene A. Johnson

Joyce Johnson

Mrs. Rhett Johnson

Mr. and Mrs. Walter Johnston

E. A. Jones

Reverend James Jones

Mrs. G. E. Jordan

Mrs. M. Jove

Charles R. Kalb

Karen Kandrin

Mr. and Mrs. K. P. Karpinski

Hinavuki Katsumato

Mr. and Mrs. Ted Kaufer

Mr. and Mrs. William L. Keller

Mrs. Bill Kendall

Trifonia Kendall

Mrs. J. R. Kerwin

Mrs. Sylvia Kestler

Anne Kienzle

Dorothy King

Mr. and Mrs. John M. Klasovsky

Mr. and Mrs. John Knight

Mr. and Mrs. Koziol

Mrs. Kroft

Jane La Roche

Mr. and Mrs. Jorgen Lauritzen

Mr. and Mrs. R. D. Lawrence

Mr. and Mrs. L. E. Layman

Mr. and Mrs. Warren E. LeDoux

Mr. and Mrs. Lentz

Dr. and Mrs. B. K. Levin

Mrs. Linanes

G. A. Link

Ben Linschoten

Mr. and Mrs. Lloyd

Mr. Trivett Lloyd

Janna Loizeaux

Laura Loizeaux

Marc Loizeaux

Marcia Loizeaux

Dr. P. H. Loizeaux

Mrs. P. H. Loizeaux

Spooky Loizeaux

Turpi Loizeaux

Mr. and Mrs. Andrew Longorie

Mr. and Mrs. G. W. Lopp

Mr. and Mrs. Jack B. Love

Jerry- Love

Patricia Lo\ Id

Michael Lubrano

Rev D. Lucas



Mr. and Mrs. Howard Lund
Mr. and Mrs. Warren W. Lyman
Fabio Mabilia

Mr. and Mrs. D. MacElrevev
Mrs. Rita MacMeeker
Frank Madigar
M. L. Malo
R. Manns

Mr. and Mrs. W. E. Marek
Mr. and Mrs. Alfred G. Mare
Mr. and Mrs. Tom Marsh
Mr. and Mrs. Louis E. Martin
Mrs. S. F. Mason 111
Juan Mata

Capt. and Mrs. Robert S. Mata
Mr. and Mrs. McCorrick
Mr. and Mrs. Maurice McCullough
R. E. McCullough
Capt. and Mrs. G. A. McDonald
Capt. and Mrs. Pat McDonald
Mrs. Tashiko McDonald
Pat and Patti McDonald
Lt. Col. and Mrs. James McKennv
Karen McKown
Capt. and Mrs. Arthur McLean
Mrs. James McMade

Capt. and Mrs. Drummond McNaughton
A. McZeno
Jaime Medina

Capt. and Mrs. J. Finley Meehan
Mr. and Mrs. Dabney B. Meeker
Capt. and Mrs. John W. Meeker
M. W. Menger
Mr. and Mrs. Paul M. Menges
Harvey Michael

Mr. and Mrs. Charles R. Miller
R. E. Miller

Mr. and Mrs. Jack Milligan
Mr. and Mrs. Thomas E. Minehart
Mr. and Mrs. Dave Minskew
George Mitchelle
Thomas Mizener
Mr. and Mrs. Mizrachi
Frank Modizar
Mrs. N. G Moncevais
Aleida Montenegro
Mrs. V. N. Morgan
Mrs. Joseph Morrisen
Mr. and Mrs. Robert L. M\ers
Mrs. Luida Nelson
Donnic Nettles Jr.
Wilbert L. Ney and Family-
Mr. and Mrs. Andreas Nicolaisen
Mr. Nicolette
Mrs. Maria I. Nieves
Maj and Mrs. G. P. Noble III
Mr. Norman

Mrv Margarita Normandia
Mr and Mrs R. E. Oberholtzer
Mrs. Ochoa
Robert O'Connor



171



J Octer

Mr and Mrs fohn T. O'Donnell Jr.
Mr .ind Mrs Richard O'Donnell
HMC R T Oldham
SIX: Abel Olivarez
( ecilia S. O'Neill
[ames < )rrego
Mr and Mrs. Ortiz
Mr. .mil Mrs. Luis R Ortiz
N. Ortiz
P. Osborne
R. W. Owen

Mr. and Mrs. Harland Oxley
Miss Sandra Pace
Mr. Enrique Pagan
Mrs. E. T. Paine

Mr. and Mrs. Luke C. Palumbo Jr.
Mr. and Mrs. Luke C. Palumbo Sr.
Mr. and Mrs. Luke T. Palumbo
Mr. and Mrs. C. F. Pantoya
Sarah Parks

C.T.R. and Mrs. Roger R. Peaske
Mr. and Mrs. Ronald L. Pennock
Col. and Mrs. Roberto Peralt.i
Hecter Perez
Mr. and Mrs. James Pfau
Mr. and Mrs. Carl A. Pinto
Sonia Podial
Charlie and Mike Poer
Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Polite
Mr. and Mrs. Darwin E. Pope
Potier Family

Maj. and Mrs. Frank M. Potete
Mr. and Mrs. Poulin
K. S. Prichard

Maj. and Mrs. R. P. Prothers
Dr. and Mrs. Jaime Pujals
Frene Rabaghat
Capt. and Mrs. A. E. Rainey
Darey Ramalho
Capt. E. B. Ramier
Mariend Ramirez
A. A. Rankin

Mr. and Mrs. Robert Raukin
Donald Rayhill
Edward Read
Jose Recio

Mr. and Mrs. J. Redugo
Carmen Reed
Mr. and Mrs. J. G. Reid
Dr. and Mrs. Paul Revello
Mr. and Mrs. Reyes
Iris Richmond
Mr. and Mrs E, F. Ridge
Mr. and Mrs. Vincent Ridge-
Mr. and Mrs. Carl O. Riggsjr.
LTC and Mrs. Theodore RisJi
SP/4 Donald Rivera
|ose Rivera
Mrs. Roach
Mr. and Mrs. Roberts
Jack and Lil Robson
Rosie Rodriguez



John Ruble-
Mr. and Mrs. Wally F. Russon
Shirley Salt/
Vilma Elisa Sampson
Charles A. Sanchez
John H. Sanchez
Mr. and Mrs. John Sanders
Al Sandrock

Carlos Santiago-Gonzales
SFC and Mrs. William Santiago
Joe and Sonia Schack
Mr. and Mrs. G. C. Scheibe
Mrs. E. G. Shell
Mrs. Schwinn
Mrs. Scott
Inez Scott

Graciela R. de Severance
Capt. and Mrs. Harold W. Shad III
John Sherwood
Clover Shobe
Mr. Fred Sholtes
SFC and Mrs. William P. Sieben
Edward Silva
Ellis H. Simpkins
Mrs. E. Singh

CTRCS and Mrs. Horace P. Sirmons
Capt. and Mrs. P. L. Skrable
Van Stamper
David Stanley

Capt. and Mrs. R. K. Stanley
Gatun Fire Station
Mr. and Mrs. J. E. Stearns
Shirley Steele
Cothrew B. Sterling
Mr. and Mrs. R. R. Stoluy
S. R. Stough

Mr. and Mrs. J. C. Smith
Mrs. Lucille Smith
Mr. and Mrs. M. Smith
Mr. and Mrs. Rodolfo T. Smith
Lowere Snyder
Dr. and Mrs. W. M. Snyder
Karsten Sorensen
Dorothy Spagna
Mr. and Mrs. Neal F. Sparrow
Mrs. John P. Spear
Amelia Sperling
Mr. and Mrs. John B. Spivey
Dr. and Mrs. R. Antonio Suescum
Capt. and Mrs. Roger H. Swain
Wallace R. Swank
Mr. and Mrs. F. P. Tahey
SFC Taundry
Mrs. Marion Taylor
Capt. and Mrs. Thor B. Tellefsen
Aline Tellman

Mr. and Mrs. A. G. Terwilleger
Ehukai Teves
Mrs. Paula Theall
Thompson
Nendell Thompson
Angel I. Diaz Torres
Mrs. Robert Touerdy



Mr. and Mrs. Harry E. Townsend

Jose L. Truvillo

Shirley Tye

Mrs. Tyler

Mujoja Tyler

Cecilia Ubben

Joe Valencia

Capt. and Mrs. Jose B. Vasquez

Mr. and Mrs. Pete B. Vasquez

Mr. and Mrs. Clinton W. Vaught

Delia Vedio

Juan R. Velez

Juan Ventura

Ria E. Voight

Sylvia Voight

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph A. Vowell Jr.

Mr. and Mrs. R. E. Waggoner

Mr. and Mrs. F. G. Wainio

Barbara Walcott

Lawrence E. Walker

Walline

Dr. and Mrs. V. W. Walters

Mr. and Mrs. R. L. Ward

Cindy Watson

Mrs. C. C. Weigart

Mr. and Mrs. W. E. Weigle

Capt. and Mrs. A. T. Welden

Mr. and Mrs. Dayton Wells

Mr. and Mrs. Richard Werder

Bill Wesley

Zorro Wesley

Karen Westeberg and Family

Mr. and Mrs. V. Westerburg

Mr. and Mrs. Weston

Mr. and Mrs. John M. White

R. L. Whulu

Albert and Maria Wiber

Dr. and Mrs. Wiggins

Gloriela Wikins

David A. Wild

Mrs. Wilfred

Mr. and Mrs. Wilkinson

Mr. and Mrs. Howard Will

Mr. and Mrs. Raymond R. Will

Robert R. Will

Mr. and Mrs. J. R. Williams

SFC Wilson

Mrs. Winder

Mr. and Mrs. H. L. Wirthams

Jenny Wirtz

Mrs. Hally Witcher

Mr. and Mrs. L. D. Wood

Mrs. Gladys Wudgin

Mrs. and Mrs. Merlin B. Yocum

Harold Young

Karen Young

Mr. and Mrs. Yrey

Carmen T. Ysdimez

Paul Zuleta



172



Congratulations to the

Class of 1971

From

UNITED FRUIT COMPANY

Box 5016
Cristobal, Canal Zone



Compliments of

MOTTA INTERNACIONAL, SA.

Box 417
Colon, Panama



173



Compliments of the




CRISTOBAL Y.M.C.A.


Compliments of the


BARBER SHOP


MARGARITA FLORIST


"Service is our business."


"We Watch Match Dispatch."


Hours: Mon. Thru Sat.


Phone 3-1916


8:00 A.M.-8:00 P.M.


7997 First St., Margarita, C. Z.


RUPERT AND JOE BLACK


Box 1355


Your Favorite Barbers!


Cristobal, Canal Zone


For Appointments Call 3-2797




AIR CONDITIONED





Established in 1909

BOYD BROTHERS
STEAMSHIP AGENCIES, LTD.



Box 5077
Cristobal, Canal Zone




Compliments of

E. J. BERGER
ATTORNEY AT LAW

Box 5081
Cristobal, Canal Zone



174



Congratulations to the Class of 1971

PANAMA CANAL YACHT CLUB




Box 5041
Cristobal, Canal Zone



175



AVEC LES COMPLIMENTS
DE

CIE. GLE.

TRANSATLANTIQUE

FRENCH LINE







Cristobal, Canal Zone





Compliments


of


DR.


MELCHOR

Dentist
Box 5006


SAYOC




Margarita, Canal


Zone



Compliments of

NORTON LILLY

&
COMPANY, INC.

STEAMSHIP AGENTS
AND OPERATORS

United Fruit Company Building



CRISTOBAL

1837
Tel. 3-1801

1756

Balboa Port Captain Building

Tel. 2-1841
1746



Compliments of

CRISTOBAL SHOESHOP

1 4th Street
Cristobal, Canal Zone

Tel. 3-1260



176



Congratulations

to the

Class of 1971

From

UNITED FRUIT COMPANY

Box 5016
Cristobal, Canal Zone





YAMAHA


Compliments
of


"It's A
Better Machine"


TEXAS




ANTILLES
LIMITED








Compliments of
The Vincentian Fathers




HOLY FAMILY CHURCH




Margarita
Canal Zone



177



Compliments
of

GIL MORLAND

From

C. B. FENTON AND CO., INC.

Box 5015
Cristobal, Canal Zone



178



Compliments
of

DELCARGO, INC.

Cristobal
Canal, Zone





Compliments




of the


TARPON CLUB








Box 1322




/ -%1 1

9 jflUI


Cristobal






Canal Zone




H 1



Congratulations
to the

Class of 1971
From

C. FERNIE AND CO. INC.

Box 5042
Cristobal, Canal Zone



179



Compliments
of

Italian Lino

"ITALIA Socleta per Azioni di Navkjazlone Genova




Telephone

Cristobal 3-2464
Panama 25-5001



With the Compliments
of

W. ANDREWS & CO. LTD.



Compliments of
J. J. PALOMERAS

FRENCH BAZAR

Colon



Compliments
of the

coco solo nffiS?f\

LIONS CLUB /^M |fcl2)


ALMACEN SURANY, S. A.
P.O. Box 503


Courtesy

of the

CRISTOBAL

Y.M.C.A.
RESTAURANT


Telex: PA 226

Tel. 7-5070
Cable: Shagwan

CASA BEE'S,
B. T. MAYANI, S. A.

Colon, Free Zone

Apariado 336
Colon, Rep. De Panama



180



Congratulations

to the

Class of 1971

From



B.P.O. ELKS
LODGE #1542




Box 1542

Cristobal

Canal Zone




181



Compliments
of

CANAL ZONE
CUSTOMS ASSOCIATION

Box 1295
Cristobal, Canal Zone



AUTHORIZED DEALER
MEYERS MANX




NORDSTROM e HIJOS SA



Box 1566
Colon, Panama



182



Compliments
From the



CANAL ZONE
POLICE ASSOCIATION

Cristobal



Congratulations
to the

Class of 1971
From

TROPICAL RADIO TELEGRAPH CO.

Cristobal, Canal Zone



P-

PRUDENTIAL-GRACE LINES, INC.
I PANAMA AGENCIES CO.

General Agencies
Cristobal, Canal Zone



183



V. F. W.




POST 100, MARGARITA, C.Z.



n t/n me loomAiimenfo

¥

h Viliwd dt t. (((hay, Jffi



Compliments
of

in ALL AMERICAN
CABLE & RADIO INC.

Box 5032
Cristobal, Canal Zone



Compliments of

BREAKERS CLUB




Compliments
of

BIR HAR'S BOUTIQUE

Colon, Panama



Compliments
of

INTERNACIONAL
DE LICORES S.A.

Colon, Panama



INTER-AMERICAN LINES

Bl-Weekly-lndependent Service to From

New Orleans and Miami
and
Central America

Phone
Panama 25-4933
Cristobal 3-2528



184




ROYAL NETHERLANDS STEAMSHIP CO.




CRISTOBAL Tel: 3-1218
3-1219
3-2115



PANAMA CITY Tel: 64-2806

64-3484



BALBOA Tel: 2-3719
2-2666



Compliments of

LT. G. H. MOUMBLOW

MEMORIAL POST #3876

VFW INC.



Cristobal
Canal Zone



Congratulations

to the

Class of 1971

From

HOSPITAL SAMARITANO

Colon, Panama



Compliments
From the

MAVIS
BEAUTY SHOP

Colon, Panama


H O. BOX 800 J( TELEPHONE 7.0311

COLON. R, OF P. ^^i^L^ TEL. RES. 78236

9th and Front Street Colon, Rep. of Panama
WE MAKE ARRANGEMENTS FOR ALL OCCASIONS


Congratulations

to the

Class of 1971

From

MADURITO'S S.A.

Colon, Panama


SUPPORT

YOUR

LOCAL

YEARBOOK!



186



Compliments
of

ELBERT S. WAID POST NO. 2

THE AMERICAN LEGION

FRANCE FIELD, C. Z.

Air-Conditioned Bar
Open 24-Hours a Day






Bingo Thursday and Sunday

Meetings

2nd Wednesday of Each Month




LESLIE R. THOMAS
Post Commander



187



CARIBBEAN SPORTS

PARACHUTE

CLUB




¥



Hangar I 147 Behind
The High School



CIA MARITIMA ITURRALDE

Apartado 1737

Colon, Rep. de Panama



KERLEY NAUTICAL SUPPLY

P.O. Box 4192

Miami, Florida

33101



Cables






P.


O.


Box


192


COFEF


Balboa, C


Z.


Balboa C


Z.




L K.


COFER, INC.










Steamship


Agents








Ca


ptain of the


Port Bu


Iding, Balboa


C.


Z.






Post Office


Building,


Cristobal, C


Z.








Balboa


2-2572


and 2-2998










Cristoba


1 3-3206


and 3-1743









Courtesy
of

PAN AMERICAN
MAIL LINE



Compliments
of the

GATUN YACHT
CLUB



PUT A LITTLE

LOVE

IN YOUR

HEART



188



faculty, Staff and Curriculum Judex



Administration 30, 31
Alford, Rote 55
Allen, Joanne 32
Art 36

Berger, Robert 118, 52
Blanchette (Mrs.) 32
Bock, Richard W. 44
Bright, Adamary A. 45, 33
Campbell, Barbara L. 48
Carwithen, Edward R. 46
Cheshire, Jr., Herbit D. 38
Clinic 32
Commerce 37
Condon, Mary L. 52
Cowley, Lawrence A. 44
Dedeaux, Louis F. 124, 168, 154, 48
Dobbins, Joel B. 38
Elfers,Jane K. 126, 38, 132
English 38, 39

Fattorosi, Louis J. 165, 65, 38, 39,
134



Fattorosi, M. June 48, 153

Fite, Ronald S. 60, 43, 91

Fite, Barbara D. 37

Foreign Languages 40, 41

Gansen, William J. 53, 52

Gegg, Anne D. 128, 129, 40

Gregg, Eugene T. 53

Griffiths, Jacinta E. 32

Grubbs, Randall H. 44

Guidance 33

Harris, Joan F. 145, 48

Hieronymus, Paul J. 50

Holloway, Jesse C. 43

Home Economics 42

Howard, Telma I 130, 131, 40, 41

Howell, Roy E. 45

Hoffman (Coach) 155, 147

Industrial Arts 43

Jacobs, Ronald D. 53

Jeffries, Paul J. 31

Johnson,~Clare W. 60, 139. 37



Knight, Carol J. 45

Koziol, Edwin M. 36

Lassila, Ronald L. 60, 43

Levin (Dr.) 32

Library 34

Litton, Douglas B. 168, 48, 156

Mason, Emma L. 50

Mata, Juan M. 55

Mathematics 44, 45

Mazzoni, Bernard 45

McCullough, Robert E. 127, 53

McNaughton, Elizabeth 42

Mowery, Robert L. 33

Murphy, Alejandro D. 55

Music 46, 47

Norman, James D. 99, 151

Office Staff 32

Palumbo, Luke C. 33

Palumbo, Luke T. 51

Pfau, Grace S. 35



Pfau, James H. 60, 117, 30
Physical Education -. 48, 49
Picoli, Frank L 55
Reeves, Charles T. 127, 51. ^9

Riefkohl, Stella C. 40

ROTC 54, 55, 56, 57

Science 50, 51

Sharick, Earl C. 35

Smith, Dorothy H. 39, 38, 80

Social Studies 52, 53
Special Education 35
Stearns, James E. 41
Stronach, Glenda S. 60, 39
Tanner, Martha I. 39
Taylor, Marion B. 32

Weaver, Fiorella
Wells, Dayton N. 34
Wilferd, Ugolena 39
Will, William 41, 39
Williams, Rebecca D. 60, 39



Student Jndex



Abevta, Raymond

Abresch, Ernest 124, 140. 95

Adams, Clyde 151, 156, 116

Adams, Emilio

Adams, Nickilda 96

Alberga, Charles 104

Alberga, Deborah 104, 135, 132

Alberga, Sandra 135, 164, 62, 80,

132
Alberga, Sheila 128, 129, 88, 135,

134, 139,91, 132
Alexaitis, Shcri Lynn 120
Alexaitis, Jr., John 104
Alger, David 116, 120
Alger, Pattie 88
Alger, Vickie 118
Allen, Brian 88, 123, 140
Allen, Lonnie 119
Allen, William 116, 120
Alonis, Jay 62, 23
Amason, James 120
Amburn, Buddy

Andersen, Carl 115, 118, 127
Anderson, Shawn 114
Andree, Michael
Andree, Willian 104
Anton, Martha 128, 129, 88, 132
Apodaca, Cynthia 114
Apodaca, Gil 96, 128, 122
Apodaca, Michael 88, 124, 140
Aponte. Julio 161
Aponte, Stephen 96, 129, 4^. 55. 56
Arbaugh, Susan 104
Austin, Almanubia 6, 62, 80
Austin, Donald 104
Austin, John 116, 120
Austin. Patricia 62, 85
Austin, Paul 119
Austin, Robert 113, 116
Austin, Robert 112, 116
Austin, Susan 119
Austin Jr., Donald



Austin, Elaine 128

Autry, Debie 111

Baitel, Barbara 117, 120

Baitel, Paul 88, 155. 140, 156, 132

Baker, Carol 104, 148, 107

Baker, Donna 96

Baker, Debbie 120

Baker, Diane 113

Baker, Glen 88

Baker, Paul 119. 116

Baker, Terri 62, 152

Balmer, Kathy 115

Banks, Barbara 88

Barger, Michael 88, 140

Barger, Steven 116

Barnett, Marilyn 113

Baronne, Joanne 116

Barr, James 96

Barr, Peter 115

Barr, Robert 62

Barraza, Jaime 88, 161, 26

Barraza, Evelyn 104

Barriteau Jr., John 112, 116

Bassett, Jean 63, 80, 132

Baxter, Marilyn 96

Beale, Mary 112

Beale, Michael 155, 63

Beale, Roger 104

Beebe, William 88

Behre, Thomas 33, 111

Beltran, Jaime

Bensen, Christopher 104

Berry, Frank 129, 88. 140

Betancourt, Margaret

Bctancourt, Rosemary 96, 130, 102

Betcher, Barbara 88

Bird Jr., James 119, 116

Bisot, Donna 96

Bjorneby, Jan 58, 164, 125. 63

Bjorneby, Michael 96

Blair, Marjorie 114

Blanchard. Stanly



Blanchard, Timothy 96
Blanchette, Gerianne 88
Blanchette, Paula 104. Ill
Bleicher, Beth "ll8, 120, 139
Bleicher, David 104, 148
Bleicher, Paul 96, 138, 100, 147,
148

Blevins, Elizabeth 58, 63, 80
Blevins, Jeffrey 96
Bliznik, Barbara 118
Bloemer, Barbara 96, 128, 58, 125,
152, 145

Bloemer Jr., Robert 88, 124, 155,
140, 148, 119

Blout, Edward 118

Blount, Lucy

Bocanegra, Tina 120, 42

Bock, Robin 96

Boman, James

Bonilla, Arnaldo 104

Boone, Lana 128, 135, 34, 136, 133,

80, 71, 82, 139, 23, 63, 86, 134
Boone, Maria 128, 88, 127. 148,

139, 134

Boorh, Richard 88, 148
Borsellino, Henry 88, 33
Boseman, Vivian 6, 63, 80
Boswell. Debra 88
Boswell, Michael 120
Boswell, Steven 113
Bowers, Carl 104
Boyland, Charlotte 104, 122, 111
Boyland, Rita 128, 129, 88, 122,
123, 10, 127, 139

Bradby, Robert 113
Bradbury, Margaret 112
Bradburv III. William
Bramlett Jr., Robert 120
Bradenburg. Janet 89, 58

Brannan, George 104, 120



Brannan, Sheila 112, 118

Brannen, George

Brannen III, William

Bridwell III, Arthur

Bridwell, John 113

Bridwell, Pamela 96

Brien, Jeffrey 96, 163, 103

Bringas, Carmen 113

Bringas Jr., Edward 96, 129, 12"

Brock, Laura 104

Brock, Linda 89, 58, 95

Brock, Steven 114, 116

Brockman. Robert 104

Brown, Amber 104

Brown, Billie 112

Brown. Carlos 89. 124. 10, 155, 1 K)

Brown, Debra 104

Brown, Donald 104

Brown, Elisa 115,42

Brown, Janet 120

Brown, Jonathan 120

Brown, Kathleen 96. 135, 103

Brown, Melinda 96, 129, 130, 103

Brown, Patrice 96, 12

Brown, Terri 114, 34

Budd, Debra 104

Budd, Dcsiree 113

Bullingcr, Denise 103
Bullinger, Kurt 113
Bundy Jr., Earl 96
Burac, Francisco 118
Burbine, Anthony 114
Burge, Susan 96, 128, 129, 10

Burgess, Elizabeth 104

Burgess, Kathryn 64

Bush, Kathryn 96

Butcher, Leo 104

Butler, Carmen 6. 164. 136. 65, 84,

64, 71, 83
Butler, Ines 112
Bynoe, Carlos 119



189



Byrd, Donald 126, 162, 165, 164,

85, 64, 134
Byrd, Man.' 164
Cabrera, Armando 80
Cain, Michael 1 19
Calkins, Jeanne 104, 54
Campbell, James 113
Carey, Deborah 104, 148, 1 1 1
Carlisle, Catherine 128, 89, 126,

144, 21, 133, 91
Caroll, Diane 96, 162, 163, 13
Caroll, Richard 1 1 1
Carter, Elizabeth 122, 86, 64, 49,

71, 80
Carwithen, Jeffrey 112, 116
Cash, Mary 89
Cash Jr., Jimmy 114
Castro, Helen 89
Castro, Raul 135, 84, 86, 64, 71,

132
Castro, Rita 120
Catlett, Anstey 95
Caudill, Cheryl 89
Caudill, Jay 89
Chavis, Valdez 119
Chavez, Barbara 118
Cheshire, Alan 104
Cheshire, Deborah 89
Childress, James 96
Childress, Randy 89
Christian II, Joe 104
Christian, Mona 112
Christian, Patty 34, 66
Christian, Rosemary 161, 160, 66,

26
Ciccheto, Frank 89, 124, 140, 156
Ciccolo, William 105
Cimino. Elizabeth 96
Cimino, Leopold 118
Cirulli, Ann 96
Claramunt, Juan 112
Clement, Caleb 159. 155, 140, 143,

160, 66, 151
Cliette, Michael 114
Cliette, Renee 105, 130
Coad, Faith 162, 34, 66
Coad, Pamela 89
Cobb, Aminta 89, 130, 59
Coe, Debra 105
Coe, Lisbet 115
Coffin, Gerald 96, 148, 107
Coffin, Marcia 114
Cole, Fred 66
Cole, Roberta 89, 58, 157, 125, 145,

153,91
Coleman, Alexis 105, 130
Coleman, Cheryl 89, 58, 52
Collins, Gary 155, 66
Collins III, James 105, 102
Collins, John 120
Collins, Mark 89
Collins, Michael 1 14
Collins Jr., Walter 120, 35
Colpe, Kathleen 96
Colpe, Patricia 113
Colon, Lourdes 96, 58, 153
Colon, Sonia 89
Cooke, Lavera 97
Cooper, Greg 115
Cooper, Paul
Coronado, Carlos 116
Coronado, Gustavo 120
Couts, Carl 119
Couts, Clifford
Couts, Susan 78



Couts, Wayne 89

Cox, Christopher 123

Cox, Jeannette 128, 129, 130, 133,

136, 139, 67, 134
Cronan, William ~- 112
Crouch, Anne 105
Crouch, Marian 102
Cruz, George 103, 156
Cruz Jr., John 116, 120
Cummings, Ivette 129, 89, 130, 10,

132
Cummings, Leland 97
Cummings, Walter 115
Cummings, Wanda 97
Currier, Karen 89, 159, 15, 91, 144,

34, 125
Currier, Robert 115, 116
Dailey, Wayne 115
Diaz, David 161
Daly, Darlene 158, 159
Damiani, Guy 97
Dancer, Laveda 105, 122, 130
Dancer, Sheila 90
Dancer Jr., Doyle 113
Dandridge, Devony 1 14
Daniel, Emilie 90, 145, 146
Daniel, Patrick 113. 116
Danielsen, Cheri 117, 119, 118
Danielsen, Kathie 97, 122, 5, 33
Darcy, Joan

Darcy, Michelle 105
Davila, Mark 105
Davison, John 120
Day, John 90, 40, 143
Day, Robert 114, 116
Deaton, Donna 114
Deaton Jr., William 90, 124, 140,

151
Deaton, Ted 105
Deboor, Karen 120
Deboor, Theodore 113
De Jesus, George 119, 116
De Jesus, Ruperto 35
De Jesus Jr., Ruperto
Del Busto, Iracema 105
Denis, Marc 97
DeRaps, Brian 97, 129
DeRaps, Kathleen 128, 58, 65, 139,

67, 134, 71
DeVault, Patricia 120, 42
DeVault, Michael 114
DeVault II, Raymond 105
Dexter, Kathleen 115, 117
Dexter, James 112, 116
Dexter, Michael 122, 138, 7, 133,

164, 168, 136, 71, 156, 134, 147, 82,

23, 81, 86, 67
Diaz, David 160
Diaz, Richard 119
Diaz, Ramon 105
Diaz Jr., Pedro 67
Dillin, James 115
Dingman, Henry 103
Dockery, Michael 116
Dohle, Craig 116, 120
Dohle.Jane 97, 125, 153
Dohle, John 97, 125, 107
Dohle, Judy 97, 125. 99, 152
Dominguez, Rosita 97, 58
Dowell, Harry 97
Dowell, Richard 115
Dustin, Elaine 103
Edmondson, Nancy 128, 129, 90,

122, 125, 45, 91, 76, 58
Edwards, Tilda 1 14



Egger, Brenda 90, 130, 6, 131, 94

Evangelas, Sue 103

Endara, Roberto 95

Ender, Joseph 97, 132

Ender, Ralph 135, 78, 132

Escobido, Lawrence 116

Estes, Robert

Evans, Cheryl 113

Evans, David 119

Evans, Michael 122

Farnsworth, Allen 78

Farnsworth, David 114

Farrington, Kathryn 97, 122, 138

Fauber, Albert 119

Fauber, James 1 16

Fauber, Karen 105

Fauber, Kathleen 97

Feeley, James 119

Ferguson, Cindy 112

Ferguson, Daniel

Ferguson, Edna 97, 130

Ferguson, Trina 105, 130

Fernandez, Robert 114

Ferns, Alice 120

Ferns, Gary 120

Ferrel, Clifford 90

Ferris, Estelita 97, 145

Finneman, Thomas 105

Flores, Lori 119, 118

Flores, Wendy 159, 164, 142, 86,

67, 71, 83, 80
Fluharty, Carol 112
Fluharry, Mary 119
Fryer, George 115
Fryer, Richmond
Fontanez, Maria 90, 130, 132
Fontanez, Pedro 97
Ford, Robert 97, 163
Forsgren, Lester 113
Forsyth, Steven 105
Forsyth Jr., Ronald 97, 163
Foshee, Andrew 90, 124, 162, 144,

155, 140
Foshee, Denise 123, 159, 15,11, 80,

71, 22, 164, 10, 11, 82, 55, 84, 78,

134
Fugleberg, Stephan 90, 140
Funderburk, John 68, 83, 164
Furr, Lisa 97
Gabriel, Clifford 105
Gabriel, Thomas 113, 116
Garcia, Linda 112
Garner, Mardette 90, 103, 130
Garner, Paul 120
Gercich, Catherine 58, 68, 80, 160,

161
Gercich, Nina 58, 97
Gewin, Jimmy 90, 127
Gewin, Rebecca 105
Gibson, Brenda 36, 68
Gibson, Leslie 112
Gibson, Mark 97
Gilbert, Susan 115, 117, 118
Gillespie, Russell 116, 118
Gillespie, William 90, 129
Godinez, Violanda 115
Goebertus, Cornelius 97, 128, 129,

132
Goguen, Gregory 90, 122, 132
Goguen, Lynne 95
Golden, Edward 97
Golden, Sharon 68
Goldman, Henry 97
Goldman, Peter 97
Gonier, David 116, 120



Gonier, Patrice 97, 103, 129

Gonzalez, Ann 90, 58, 95, 22, 128

Gonzalez, Esther 97

Gonzalez, Francisco 155

Gonzalez, Josefa 116, 118, 42

Gonzalez, Juan 95

Gonzalez, Maria 105, 130

Gonzalez, Olga 97, 130, 131

Good, Gloria 119

Goodwin, Barbara 105, 148, 111

Goodwin, Brenda 114

Gosney, Debra 123, 130, 98, 131,

95
Gosney, Diane 130
Gosney, Jeffery 144
Goss, Randy 120
Gott, Roy 98
Goulet, Karen 105
Goulet, Stephen 23, 68
Graham, Donna 58, 49
Green, Daniel 105
Green, Matthew
Green, Zan 90
Gregg, Gail 112
Gregg, Laura 114
Gregg, Lynn 91
Gregg, Marian 58, 91
Gregg, Nancy 98, 145
Gregory, Clarissa 105
Gregory, Kelvin 120
Grier, Barbara 91
Grist, Gregory 105
Grist, Ronald 120
Gsell, Raymond 98, 91
Guerrero, Carlos 119
Grerrero, Maria 111, 130
Guilfoyle, Lorraine
Guilfoyle, Walter 113
Gutierrez, Patricia 68
Hames, Melanie 118
Hamilton, Francisco 105
Hammond, Edwin 91
Hammond. Hubert 116
Hanly, Mark 123, 91, 132
Hannah, John 68
Harden, Debra 116
Harden, Karen 105, 130
Harmon, Allen 126, 138, 139, 86,

69, 134
Harris, Jose

Hartshorn. Kimberly 105
Hartshorn, Robin 130
Hauke, Diane 122, 126, 135, 134,

127, 81, 69, 71, 80, 132
Hauke, Patricia 128, 129, 130, 135,

58, 134, 91, 7, 132
Hayden, Michael 98, 13
Heady, Brian 105
Heady, Paul 69
Heath, Cynthia 105
Helmerichs, Susan 98
Hernandez, Evelyn 115
Hernandez, Iris 106
Hernandez, Mclinda 120
Hernandez, Nestor 115, 116
Heres, Isaac 10, 69, 156, 57, 80, 132
Herring, Anne 106
Herring. Joseph 155, 91
Herring, Mark 164, 69
Herring, Stephen 116
Hess, Glen 114, 116
Hess, Kathleen 129, 145, 91
Hess, Linda 120, 129, 98, 145, 153
Hieronymus, Cheryl 122, 106, 148,

111, 107



190



Higgins, Barbra 115

Highley, Frederick 70

Hill II, Kenneth 127, 50, 91

Hill, Patricia 59, 95

Hill, Sherry 116

Hoagland, Richard 113

Hoffman, Jeffry 119, 106

Hoffman, Melody 106

Hogaboam, Doris 1 14

Holloway, Kip 113

Holt, Harry 106

Honerbaum, Mark

Hopkins, Paul 112

Horn, Nancy 129, 130, 98

Housley, Kay 113

Hudgins, Ruth 114

Huff, Linda 98, 103. 153

Huffman, James 106

Huffman, William 124, 154, 140,
143, 156,91

Hughes, Charles 119

Hughes, Deborah 115, 118

Hughes Jr., Bobby

Humphreys, Marcia 130, 106

Hunnicut, Yolanda 113

Hunter, Bruce 118

Hurlbut, Dennis 98

Hurlbut, Ronald

Husband, Pamela 106

Husband, Priscilla 112

Huson, Nancy 70

Huster, Harold 98

lilies, Stephanie 6, 135, 22, 70, 79,
132

Ilund, Garry 119

Ilund, June 129, 130, 92

Irion, Eric 123
Irion, Leif 147, 70

Irizarry, Angel 106
Jackson, Bruce 112
Jackson, Deborah 106
Jackson, Debra
Jackson, Donna 98
Jackson, Raymond 111
Jackson Jr., James 124, 92, 140, 156
Jaketic, Debrah 98
Jaketic, Margaret 114, 118
Janosik, Jan
Janosik, Joyce 106
Jansen, Rex 112
Jeffries, Douglas 122, 6, 92, 147, 95
Jeffries, Michael 106, 154, 155, 147
Jeffries Jr., Donald 113
Jimenez, Jenny 130, 106
Jimenez, William 106
Johnson, Jacqueline 119
Johnson, Jose 98, 147
Johnson, Robert 70, 43
Johnston, Roger 95
Jones, James 106
Jones, Karen 106
Jordi, Paulette 128, 129, 130, 92,
132

Kardonski, Steven 114

Katsumoto, Janet 113

Kaufer, Norinc 112

Kaufcr, Sandra 106

Kelly III, Daniel 120

Kern, Sherry 122, 70, 79, 152

Kern III, William 119

Kessler, Michele 98, 102, 103

Kicnzlc, Margaret 115, 117

Kilmer, Paul 98

Kinsey Jr., Forest 120

Kiyonaga, John 120



Kiyonaga, Vicky 115

Klasovsky, Antonia 71

Knauss, Daniel 92

Knauss, Frederick 148, 71

Kononen, Clifford

Kononen, Michael

Kraus, Katherine 128, 122, 159,

144, 92, 64
Kraus, Katie 98
Kredell, Marian 58, 125, 145, 49,

91,92
Kredell, Thomas
Kresge, Cheryl 106
Kresge, Richard
Laboy, Juan 120
La Porta, Jr., D. 113
LaRoche, Angeline
LaRoche, David
LaRoche, Mary 112
LaRoche, Maxine 95
LaRoche, Neal 71
Lasher, Christian 98, 148
Lauritzen, Ann 128, 71
LeDoux, William 140, 148, 95
Lee, David 106
Lee, Joel 95
Lee, John 98
Lee, Robert 1 16
Lee, Victor 106, 133, 107
Lindo, Rodrigo 122, 164, 147, 86,

72, 83, 80, 132
Loibl, Paul 119
Loizeaux, Christina 128, 92, 10,

148, 27
Loizeaux, Janna 117, 134, 118, 120
Loizeaux, Linda 112
Loizeaux, Scot 98, 148
Love, Brian 98
Loyd, Ann 106
Loyd, Patricia 113
Lucas, Laura 106
Lucas, Paul 120
Luger, Rockwell 115
Luna, Armando 119
Luna Jr., Louis
Lund, Shelley 128, 34, 125, 86, 160,

161, 72, 49, 80
Lyman, Hila 164, 84, 160, 72, 27,

56
Lyman, Mounyen 98, 58
Lyons, Ricky 112
Lyons, Tony 106, 56
Maestas, Lawrence 98
Mans, Donald 92, 156
Marohl, Kim 106
Marsh, Edythe 98, 135, 149, 148,

103
Marsh, Esther 130, 111
Martin, John 122, 72, 79, 56
Martinez, Jaime 72
Mason, Deshea 106
Maxwell. Dennis 164, 84, 72, 79,

80, 7i
Maxwell, Elena 6, 100
May, Sandra 106, 107
May, Vicki 115
Mayoni, Pusha 114
Mavini, Sheila 130, 100
McCann, Brian 115, 117
McCann, Michael 122, 123, 138,

20, 52, 127, 95, 92, 50
McCann, Sharon 114
McCarrick, James 120
McCullough. Susan 106
McDonnell, Michael 116



McGilberry. Kathleen 123, 58, 92
McKenney, Mark 100
McKown, Karen 113, 32
Mcllwain, Paris 114
McLain, Judy 126, 162, 163, 164,

71, 134, 65, 85, 72
Mclean, Sarah 72
McNaughton, Robert 122, 148, 108
Medina, George 115, 116
Medina, Jose 138, 159, 157, 20, 133,

73, 140, 143, 22, 86, 160, 156
Meeker, D. 130, 100, 101, 99
Meeker III, John 92
Mendenhall, Linda 10, 100
Mendenhall, Susan 157, 125, 145,

23, 152, 148, 86, 73
Mendoza, Susan 112
Menges, Judith 100
Merrick, Karen 108
Merrick, Linda 100, 27
Metivier, John 108
Metivier, Susan
Meyer, Katherine 112
Mika, Glenda 114
Miller, Peggy 100
Miller, Phillip 108
Miller, Shyla 92, 5
Milligan, Kathryn 58, 73, 80
Mills, Anne 115
Mills, Mary 112
Minehart, Daniel

Minehart, Michael 92, 108, 132
Mitte, David 113
Mitte, Karon 112
Mitte, Dale 92
Mize, Janet 118
Moats, Robert 113
Moebus, Julie 113
Moebus, Patricia 108
Mohlman.J. 100
Mon, Nayra 113
Moncivais, Maria
Moncivais, Maricela 112, 116
Moncivais Jr., John 114
Monclova, Irma 138, 130, 92, 95
Monclova, Pedro 108
Montenegro, Aleida 73, 80
Moody, Barbara 100
Moody, Patrick 115
Moochler, Lawrence 112
Moore, Gary 120
Moore, Glynn 116, 120
Moore, Jane 108
Moore, Maurie 119
Morrell, Edward 110
Morrell II, Glen
Morrell, Kimberly 112
Moses, Patricia 114
Mowery, Stephanie 114
Munoz, Cristobal 108
Munoz, Manuel 100
Munoz, Rosa 108, 130
Munoz, Susie 115
Murphey, Charles 113
Murphy, Kathleen 115
Murphy, William 73, 80, 86
Musser, James 112
Musser II, John 92, 140
Nairn, Laurie 33
Newbury, Patricia 115
Ney, Renee 112
Nicholson, Robert 113
Nicolaisen, Leslie 115
Nieves, Alexis 114, 116
Nordstrom, Robert 129. 100



Normandia, Ada 120

Normandia, Alexis 78

Normandia, Ivan 108

Norton III, Barney 120

Norval, Andrew 113

Norval, Anne 108

Norval, Mary 128, 129, 58, 132, 10,

92,91, 11,95
Novak, Mark
O'Donnell, Ann 115
O'Donnell, Thomas 108
Olivarez, Gloria 112
Olivera, Myrta 130, 100
Olivera Jr., Angel 120
Olsen, Beverly 123, 130, 131, 92,

127, 148, 153
Olsen, Cheryl 148, 108
Olsen, Don 14, 140
O'Neal, Samuel 108
Orrego, Michael 105
Orrego, William 108
Ortiz, Ada 130, 131, 100
Ortiz Alvarez, Noelia 130, 131, 100
Ortiz Alvarez, Wanda 130, 108
Osborn, Michael 119, 127
Oster, Robert 116, 118
Oster, Stanley 92
Ostrea, Viana 58, 100
Overstreet, Terri 129, 130, 135, 58,

100
Owen, Valerie 118, 120
Pacheco, Andrea 120
Pacheco, Peter 109, 127
Padro, Jorge 108
Paine, Patricia 128, 130, 92, 127, 91
Palmer, Louise 92
Palmer, Maryann 108
Palser, Elizabeth 92. 100
Palser, Ronald 47
Parker, Jacqueline 128, 129, 123,

130,91,96, 131, 132
Parker, Mark 92, 95
Parker, Scott 114, 116
Parker, Anthony 116, 120
Parsons, William 108
Pate, Deborah 128, 129, 126, 135,

92, 139, 134, 132
Patron, Neil 159, 140, 142, 73, 26,

143, 85, 161, 160, 156
Paulson, Jane 161, 160, 73, 49, 80
Paulson, Jill 119
Peralta, Paul 100
Perez, Rosa 100
Perret, Andre 118
Perret, Catherine 115, 117
Perrett, Charles
Perusse, Mark 112
Phares, Richard 120
Phillips. Robert 128, 159, 157, 133,

27, 136, 71, 140, 143, 74, 134, 160,

156, 65, 82, 86
Phillips, Toby 140, 74
Phillips, Warren 128, 100, 140
Phillips Jr., Joseph 120
Pierpoint, Surse 118
Pino, Mario 115, 116, 117
Polite, Sarah 1 19
Porbes, Josephine 7 4
Porbes Jr., Charles 108
Portier. Ingrid 74, 80
Price, Caroline 116
Pritham, Robin 93
Pruse, Mark 116
Pujais, Madeleine 112
Pursley, Mary 58, 132



191



Pursley, Thomas 159, I ;,) I"". 134

Queen. Bett) 100

Ramirez, Maria 113

Ramirez, Rene 1 I s

Ramirez, Robert 113

Ramos. Bonnie 101

Ramos, Raimond 93

Ramos. Richard 120

Ramos. Ronny 101. 148

Redo, Jose 93

Rccio, Leslie 114

Rcduga, Rita 108

Reed, Carmen 93

Reed, Danny

Reed, Helena

Reid, Joanne 101

Rcifsnyder, Daniel 115

Ktit-nvder, Donna 113, 118

Reyes. Lourdes 93

Reyes, Orlando 108, 167

Rhoads, Paul 95

Rice, Marlcne 122, 125, 145. 93

Richardson, Allan 101

Richardson. Anne 113

Richardson. Chris t>

Richmond, Mary 115

Richmond, Ralph 140, 147, 95, 156

Ridge. Michael 115. 116

Ridge, Nancy 128, 130. 131, 101,

99, 133
Ridge, Susan 93
Riggs, Susan 119
Risch, Catherine 108
Rivera, Cheyenc 115, 116
Rivera, Elizabeth 120
Rivera, Jasmin 75
Rivera, Jorge 122, 101, 56
Rivera, Jose 108
Roach, Carolann 101
Robertson, Julia 119
Robertson, Raymond 14, 101
Robinson, Alfonso 109
Robinson, Danny 75, 79
Robinson, Deborah 130, 109
Robinson, Randv 93
Robinson, Reginald 115, 116
Robinson, Tony 109
Robles. Edna 109
Robles, Eileen 112
Robles, Nadia 90, 93
Rodriguez, Aida 120
Rodriguez, Allan 113
Rodriguez, Ivette 120
Rodriguez, Jose 1 19
Rodriguez, Maria 101
Rodriguez, Nestor 75
Rodriguez, Pattv 10
Romero, Michael 114, 116
Rorke, Francis 115
Rosado, Sarah 116
Ross, Carol 58, 93, 49, 91
Rowley, Deborah 93, 152
Rozmeski, Joseph 156, 128, 157, 93
Ruiz, Diana 114
Ruiz, Isaac 109
Ruiz, Lisandra 113
Ruiz, Luis

Runion, Cynthia 119
Ruoff, Diana 113
Ruoff, Regina 101
Ruoff, Sheryl 109
Russon Jr., Wallace 159. 151, no.

133, 26, 142, 160. 74
Rutledge, Ann 120
Rugledge, Arthur 109



Sanchez, Elsa 101

Sanchez, Juan 93, 140

Sanchez, Nelson 118

Sanchez, Patricia 112

Sanchez, Peter 109

Sanchez, Sandra 104

Sanchez. Terri 101

Sanchez. Jr., Paulo 101

Sandrock Jr., Alfred IP, 116, lis,

120
Santiago, Dolores 128, 129, 10, 95
Santiago, Janet 119
Santiago, Juan 109
Santiago Jr., William 33, 109
Sayoc, Gaspar 101
Schaub, Richard 114
Schaub, Vickie 101
Scheibe, Gary 93
Scheibe, George 155, 78, 156, 80
Schill, Karen 138, 75
Schloredt, Diane 101
Schwindt, Cherri 115
Scott, Antonio 112
Scott, Dino 1 18
Scott, Frank 93
Scott, Kevin
Scott, Michael 93
Scott, Theodore 101, 47
Scott Jr., Johnny 115
Serig, Arthur 93, 140
Shaffer, Higinia 93
Shaffer, James 93
Shannon, Jerry 109
Shobe, Clover 34, 118, 120
Shobe, John 114
Shobe, Stephan 93, 127
Short, Jody 113
Shum, Nai-Yuen 51, 75, 80
Sills, Leslie 118
Sills, Ronnie 93
Simmons. Elizabeth 109
Simmons, Judith 93, 149, 148
Simmons, Pedro 101. 155, 156
Simms, Karl 116
Simms, Michael 109
Simms, Valerie 93
Simms Jr., Alfonso 101
Simpkins, Barry 120
Simpkins. Brian 114
Skrable, Luke 120
Smith, Amelia 113
Smith, Cheryl 113
Smith, Cynthia 130, 120
Smith, Elizabeth 114
Smith, Jean 157, 125, 93. 145, 95,

22
Smith, Joseph 101, 148
Smith, Kathyrn 100, 109
Smith, Michael 119
Smith, Sharon 148, 95
Smith, Sheryl 117, 119
Smith, Yvonne 112
Snider, Elizabeth 116, 13
Snider, James 118
Snider, Michael 124, 95, 127, 140,

147, 156
Snider, Patricia 102, 153
Snider, Thomas 120
Sollas, Edward 115
Souder, Janie 158, 159
Southerland, Reggie 94
Spagna, Mattia 94, 140
Spagna, Michael 124, 157, 94, 140
Spangler, Mark 109, 148
Spangler Jr., James 75



Spivey, Mary 102

Spooner, Anthony 113, 116

Springer, Jackie 128, 75

Stamper, Linda 112

Stephens, Dennis 113

Stephens, John 120

Stephens, Kathryn 130, 94, 152

Stern, Robert 109

Stevens, Douglas 135, 76, 156, 80,

132
Stiebritz, Alice 109
Stone, Clara 120
Stone Jr., Ralph 1 19
Stroop III, Edward 114
Strube, Rhonda 130, 109
Styles, Susan 119, 118
Suarez, Lourdes
Summerlin, Anna 116, 42
Swain, Nola 119
Swain, Peter 124, 94, 140, 143
Swank, Clarence
Swank, Joe 109
Swanstrom, Susan 109
Swisher, Luanne 112
Tellefsen, Sonja 116, 118
Terwilliger, Catherine 94
Terwilliger, Dorothy 58. 94, 10
Tevcs, David 78
Teves, Ehukai 94
Teves, Kamalei 109
Teves, Puuloa 95
Thomas, Eligio 155, 76, 56
Thomas, Loisa 128, 129, 138, 130,

98, 135, 94
Thomas, Sonia 119
Thomas, Yvonne 122. 138, 130.

102, 41
Thompson, David 114
Tipton, Vicki 109, 111
Tom, Vielka
Tomlin, Donald 118
Tomlin, Doris 112
Tomlinson, Jidith 128, 122, 130,

102, 132
Toro, Angel 119, 116
Toro, Jose 102
Toro, Maria 130, 102
Torres, Angel
Torres, Damaris 130
Torres, Toni 103
Townsend, Harry 128, 124, 94, 91,

140, 161
Tschumy, Robert 94
Tschumy, William 118
Tweedy, Danny
Ubben Ana 109
Ubben, Mario 112
Ubben, Ramon
Urey, Michele

Valdez, Lewis 162, 164, 136, 76
Valencia, Jose 76
Valentine, Daniel 76, 79
Valentine, James
Valentine, Patricia 115, 127
Vamprine, Elizabeth
Vamprine, Sylvia 130. 159, 15, 144.

76
Vamprine. William
Van Woudenberg, Frits
Vasquez, Rafael 120
Vaught, Paula
Vega, Carmen
Vega Soto, Jose 115
Verruno, Marianne 58. 102. 99
Vest. Linda 77



Vest, Bill 116

Vest, Martha 102

Vest Jr., William 115

Vidro, Ramonita 130

Vielka, Tom 1 14

Viera Jr., Juan 120

Villar, Maria

Voight, Sylvia 118

Vrey, Mike 1 19

Wainio, Elizabeth 128, 102, 145,

99, 153
Wainio Jr., Frederick
Wallenius, Thomas 77
Walline, Terry 77
Ware. Anthony 112
Ware, Luann 102, 148, 27
Watson, Cynthia 118
Webb, Murray 112
Weigarr, Joseph 113
Weigart, Katherine
Weigart, Margaret 114
Welch, David
Welch, Roger 112
Welch Jr., Clifford
Welty, Kimberly 119
Wertz, Carol 58, 75, 94
Wesley. Walter
West, Guy 119
West, Wayne 168
Westerberg, Karen 138, 77
Wheeler Jr., Ray 114
Whipple, Margaret
Whipple, Peggy 119
Whipple, Vickie 130
White, Nancy 114
Wick. Andrew 113
Wiechert, Joseph
Wilder, Thomas 113
Wilkins, Philip 115, 116, 118
Will, Noreen 113
Will, Robert 158
Williams. Aurelia 128, 129, 130,

125, 145. 94, 49, 152
Williams, Cheryl 112
Williams, Michael 119
Williford, Nancy 1 14
Willis, Bonnie 120
Willis, Susan 130, 102
Wilmont, Alberto 113, 116
Wilmont, Margarita 130
Wilmont, Robert 114, 116
Wilson, Janie
Wilson, Ricky 114
Wirtz, Jenny 6, 135, 77, 152, 13

80
Withrow, Evelyn 112
Wood, Dennis
Wood, Michael 94
Woodcock, Kimberly 113
Woods, David 114
Woods, Linda 102
Worthern, Ann 94
Yerxa, Barbara 115, 34
Young, Margarita 112
Young, Roberto 115
Zachry, Eunice 114
Zachry, Susann 129, 145, 94, 10

132
Zachry Jr., Ralph 103
Zamarripa, Margarita 112
Zavinsky, Priscilla 77
Zayas, Maria
Zayas, Maribel 94
Zayas, Marisol 94
Zebede, Alegre



192





'4'*V*V>W



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Id t









K M



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STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00093680/00053
 Material Information
Title: Caribbean
Physical Description: Serial
Language: English
Creator: Cristobal High School
Publisher: Yearbook House
Place of Publication: Kansas City, Missouri
Publication Date: 1971
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Canal Zone
Yearbook
Genre: serial   ( sobekcm )
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID: UF00093680:00053

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Front Matter
        Front Matter 1
        Front Matter 2
    Title Page
        Page 1
        Page 2
    Table of Contents
        Page 3
    Dedication
        Page 4
        Page 5
    Opening
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
    Faculty
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
    Activities
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 61
    Seniors
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
        Page 65
        Page 66
        Page 67
        Page 68
        Page 69
        Page 70
        Page 71
        Page 72
        Page 73
        Page 74
        Page 75
        Page 76
        Page 77
        Page 78
        Page 79
        Page 80
        Page 81
        Page 82
        Page 83
        Page 84
        Page 85
        Page 86
        Page 87
    Juniors
        Page 88
        Page 89
        Page 90
        Page 91
        Page 92
        Page 93
        Page 94
        Page 95
    Sophomores
        Page 96
        Page 97
        Page 98
        Page 99
        Page 100
        Page 101
        Page 102
        Page 103
    Freshmen
        Page 104
        Page 105
        Page 106
        Page 107
        Page 108
        Page 109
        Page 110
        Page 111
    Junior high
        Page 112
        Page 113
        Page 114
        Page 115
        Page 116
        Page 117
        Page 118
        Page 119
        Page 120
        Page 121
        Page 122
        Page 123
    Clubs
        Page 124
        Page 125
        Page 126
        Page 127
        Page 128
        Page 129
        Page 130
        Page 131
        Page 132
        Page 133
        Page 134
        Page 135
        Page 136
        Page 137
        Page 138
        Page 139
    Sports
        Page 140
        Page 141
        Page 142
        Page 143
        Page 144
        Page 145
        Page 146
        Page 147
        Page 148
        Page 149
        Page 150
        Page 151
        Page 152
        Page 153
        Page 154
        Page 155
        Page 156
        Page 157
        Page 158
        Page 159
        Page 160
        Page 161
        Page 162
        Page 163
        Page 164
        Page 165
        Page 166
        Page 167
        Page 168
        Page 169
    Advertising
        Page 170
        Page 171
        Page 172
        Page 173
        Page 174
        Page 175
        Page 176
        Page 177
        Page 178
        Page 179
        Page 180
        Page 181
        Page 182
        Page 183
        Page 184
        Page 185
        Page 186
        Page 187
        Page 188
    Index
        Page 189
        Page 190
        Page 191
        Page 192
    Back Matter
        Page 193
        Page 194
    Back Cover
        Page 195
        Page 196
Full Text




9


Caribbeal 1971


Cristobal High Sckool
Coco Solo


Canal Zone


Volume 54


4.


4-p







edication. ..........
infoar al ... ..........
oarmal .... .........
a=culty and Curriculum..
Classes ............
Organizations ..... ..


. . . . ..4
................ 6
............... 28
............... 30
............... 60
.............. 122


rCable

of

Contents


4


In Keeping With Che Modern 'rend Coward greater
~7leibility A yearbook Organization, (he CHS Annual
Staff Js introducing An entirely JVew And Different 7or-
mat jn Che 1971 Caribbean. Departing from Che 'radi-
tional Concept Of Separate Sections, ach Introduced byA
Division Page, On Each ?acet Of Che School ife; Che
yearbook Js Divided Into Only (wo Jlain Sections, 9or-
mal And Informal Appearing In Che Formal 1alf Are:
Administration And Faculty, Class Pictures, Organization
Pictures, (eam Photos, Queens And Cheerleaders, Adver-
tising, And Jder. Chis Section ContainsAll he bormaI-
ty Required Of A Good yearbook. Jn Che Eciting Infor-
mal Section, We Have Attempted Co PresentAn Uninter-
rupted Candid Story OfSchool Cife, fust As you Eepe-
rienced It.


Sports. ..................
Special Activities .............
Editor's Page .................
'iger Boosters ................
Advertisements ................
under ......................


..... 140
.....158
.....169
.....170
..... 173
..... 187


I,





Dedication


I
/

If'


7


Ir"


rX


St JPP,4,


Mrs. Adamary grikht


400or








GuiddaHce

Counselor

Retires


After

36 years


At 8HS

The CHS annual staff wishes to
dedicate the 19'1 Caribbean to Mrs
Adamary Anderson Bright, in recog-
Inition and appreciation of her man.
years of devoted service to the sru-
dents of Cristobal High School.
Mrs. Bright was born in Jackson-
ville, Florida She attended school in
Houston. Texas, during her earl)
years, but returned to Jacksonville to
complete her secondary education at
Duzal High School She received her
A.B. in Education at Florida State
College for Women in Tallahassee.
and completed her graduate work for
a degree in history at the Universitr
of Ann Arbor in Michigan
After teaching at Jacksonville Jun-


-v
m p7


Kathie Danielsen smilingly receives assistance from Mrs. Bright in planning her college ca-


reer.

ior High School for a short time, she
came to the Canal Zone in 1935.
Since that time she has served capably
and well in many positions at Cristo-
bal High School. Among these are: a
teacher of seventh and eighth grade
English, social science, vocational
guidance, social studies, girls' advisor,
and the position as a Guidance Coun-
selor which she has held from 1951 to
the present. During her many years at
CHS. Mrs. Bright received a number
of Outstanding Service Awards for
her distinguished service to the Canal
Zone Schools Division.


In addition to teaching and coun-
seling, Mrs. Bright also sponsored a
number of school activities and orga-
nizations such as the National Honor
Society. It was Mrs. Bright who orig-
inated the Zephyr, and the Caribe
Club. She is truly an outstanding or-
ganizer; efficient, and hard-working.
Mrs. Bright has done a great deal
of traveling during her years at CHS,
visiting many countries in both Cen-
tral and South America, as well as in
Europe. Both faculty and students are
saddened by the journey Mrs. Bright
is about to make as she retires from
the faculty of CHS. Her guidance will
be long remembered by the countless
students whose educations and careers
she helped plan.









Mrs. Bright advises Shyla Miller on her
schedule for next year.


K'


T-





















Elena Maxwell and Brenda FL',r r


-I


Stephanic Illics. Almanubia Austin, Vivian Boseman, Jenny .\ n r and Carmen Butler.


Douglas Jeffries, Mr. Johnson, and Nancy
Edmonson.


A
jYew
year
/egits .


. .


IO\









































Mr Hieronymus (S.A. sponsor) and Mi-
chael Dexter (S.A. president).


icy Edmonson (S.A. secretary).

The halls of CHS were a mass of con-
fusion on September 1, 1970, as hun-
dreds of students congregated around
the bulletin boards on which homeroom
numbers were posted. Others lingered to
chat with old friends or to make new ac-
quaintances; summertime experiences
were shared and compared. The perenni-
al excitement of the "tirst day of school"
was in the air. This enthusiasm persisted
throughout the orientation assembly, in
which students were welcomed to CHS,
new teachers introduced, and the new
Student Association officers installed.
However, with the ringing of that first
bell, order began to emerge as students
fell back into the familiar routine of
school life. Another school year had
begun.


Debbie Meeker

















The deserted halls are quiet, a soft
breeze whispers through the empty
corridors there is no indication now
of the activities and incidents which
the coming day may bring.


~F~-r





















Suddenly, the stillness is shattered
by the slamming of a locker door, the
sounds of shuffling footsteps, shouted
conversations, and noisy greetings are
heard once more. A new day has
begun, the magic of the morning is
no more.








yIIl KRilgs,

Seats Are

Assumed. .


I.? tI


/
/, .-
I--


Patty Rodriguez, Linda Mendenhall
Z


Ann Terwilliger, Dolores Santiago. Ivettc
( urninigs Carlo. Brown. Susann Zach-


ery, Susan
Bovland.


Burge, Christina Loizaux Rita
Burge, Christina Loizeaux, Rita


Li


K'r


J


Ckhe


Issac Heres


7w






osnoing
Routine
esumes . .


II


Mary Norval and Denise Foshee.


Senior High Band
Senior High Band











Upon entering the classroom, a student assumes more than a seat, he assumes all
the privileges and responsibilities which accompany his position in this place of
learning the school. Having brought together the teachers and the taught, the
school has fullfilled its function what follows is determined by these individu-
als.
Often, it seems, minds are more eager and alert as the day begins, and the op-
portunities afforded by the morning hours should not be missed. To bring to
each student success at last this is the goal of every morning class.


1I-1


L


Diane Carroll


Mike Hayden


r




























is A I
After a satisfying lunch, students head to
the student's lounge.


More complaints were heard con-
cerning the lunch hour than perhaps
any other facet of school life. Lunch
was served in four shifts; those on the
early shift complained that it was too
early to eat, and those on the late
shift complained that it was too late.
Once in the cafeteria, however, no
one seemed to have any real trouble
eating.
The lunch hour provided a brief
respite from classes which was wel-
comed by all. Juniors and seniors took
advantage of their open-lunch privi-
lege to "eat out" on alternate days. In


spite of this, and the many meetings
scheduled during the lunch hour, the
cafeteria was always filled with hun-
gry, noisy students; eating, chatting
with friends or doing a little last min-
ute studying. Those wishing to leave
the cafeteria early, spent their lunch
hour in the pleasant surroundings of
the student lounge located directly be-
neath the cafeteria.
In spite of the frequent complaints,
most students found the lunch hour
one of the most relaxing and enjoya-
ble periods of the school day.


Senior + Open lunch + Car
Heart.


= Happy


'-:'ii PQ





Ry nRbro hav a c









Raymond Robertson. "I'll have a chili dog and please include the hot dog!"


_ _Y


_---------p -

Lr,


J


I
I
~F4~S~Pllil
















































Carol Wertz. Karen Currier. "Reservation made. Fork over!"


I


Denise Foshee. "It's the real thing ap-
oetite!"


Lunchtime is a good time to make friends.


Sylvia Vamprine. "I can't help it! I'm hun-
grv'"







Students


Njaoy


Comforts


Of Remodeed

Cafeteria


.. and a lowered, insulated ceiling gave the cafeteria a new look of elegance. Included
among the comments of students were such remarks as ...


..s t class
M.%i', it's got class!" .


"It's like eating in fancy r ur
"It's like eating in a fancy rr 4raurriar






























"It almost makes eating here a pleasant
experience "


Then there were those who lust laughed, and .


... of course, those who couldn't wait to get away and ...


S. enio% the beauties of the "great outdoor'r"














I ________________________________________


Refreshed from a relaxing lunch
hour, students returned at 11:30 to re-
sume their regular routine. Each after-
noon included three hours of classes
- with the exception of seniors with
sixth-period study hall, who were per-
mitted to leave early. For some, the
enthusiasm characteristic of the
morning hours appeared to wave;
while others seemed to have awak-
ened at least. All, however evidenced
an increased restlessness as the hour
approached 2:15 and the ringing of
the final bell.


R r. ..


~ZA


1 IT4'


'^ ^


Ii,


I )

m


PP~,


I



iPIB!












! C.
S'V
\ Vr'
TIr' -


Cigers
OEthusiasmI


Display


Sager


Aftermaoo
Activities
IA -
I MIrP
Im "



- E~uk: *m


Jose Medina and Mike McCann.


7or


I~~p(


c I
'4


Irrr,
- ~da,


































With the ringing of the final bell at 2:15, many students rush eagerly to the
waiting buses thinking only "Free! at last!" Others also hurry anxious to
begin the extra-curricular activities which play such an important role in the life
of a student. Enj. i r.n'. the company of those who share similar interests; whether
it be an advanced math or foreign language class, sports, drill team, journalism,
or dramatics, it is a pleasant and profitable way to spend an afternoon.


Stephanie Illies and Denise Foshee.


jean Smith and Jose Medina.








'-?
w ~


'U

k


Lana Boone, Jay Alonis, Michael Dexter, Stephen Goulet.


Susan Mendenhall


















- I.


*. d.:nxoi ;
. ,.,j g*.* *.*~!+';~j: I.I l* *; ''*1 i a;~
I .L *


'~91~i
A


The setting of the sun brought a change in the appearance of both the school
and the students. With the coming of darkness, another of the many facets ot
CHS was revealed. The evening activities. This was the time for bonfires and
football games; swim meets and track meets; hours of practice and reviews for
ROTC cadets ..


ii'_










TEEN CLUB DANCES ...


Neil Patton, Rosemary Christian, Wally Russon.



. AND FORMALS...


Jimmy Barraza













.. CONCERTS: Practice for the
cast and crew of various plays: Dra-
matic Productions ...


Luann Ware, Chrisina Loitaux. Linda Mtrrick


... all those activities without which
school life would be quite incom-
plete.


Hila Lsman. Robtrt Ph11iPS




/~X~'~*X~ /
'4
)


~
:i i
i I"C

"-i


/


A Place Of learunig
is to Cearm.
Aid Vet from
Day 'Co Day
Jt Also becomes
A Place 'o Cive,
A Bridge (hat
Spans (he #ap
Of Age And 4 rings
aCothekr (he Ceackers
And Che Caught.


rke Huiman M iNd
Must Reach kI
Its Own ZDirection
towardd its Own 4oal
Alon# 'Mhe Path Of
ICife One "May
Aeet A hundred
boes Or A thousand
riends


I


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4l


('-c~7~ r

-2:


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v~
~L~ \












i. .

....


JAMES H. PFAU Cristobal High School Principal
JAMES H. PFAU Cristobal High School Principal


To the Yearbook Staff:
"Thanks for the Memories" is the
title of a song that was popular some
years ago. As we record in this book
the events of the 1970-71 school year
at Cristobal High School we can sure-
ly say with gratitude and even a bit of
pride, "thanks for the memories."
You who have studied hard and
have given of yourselves to school ac-
tivities have shown by your Tiger
spirit that the busiest people are also
the happiest people.
Best wishes to all of you as you
continue your education here or else-
where. Although your highest com-
mitment may well be to academic ex-
cellence, you would not be wise to
pursue scholarship at the expense of
the development of an honorable
character, physical well-bunin.', or a
pleasant personality. It is hoped that
the discipline of commitment to these
qualities will earn you a happy free-
dom of spirit and a sense of accom-


plishment. May you continue to mark happy memories.
each milestone with satisfaction and
James H. Pfau
Principal


"I'm a firm believer in the 'Tigers'!"


.Adminuistration


I


Oc~-` Ir















PAUL JEFFRIES BA C)lor.idi
State College. M A Colur.ido St.ic Col.
lege; Graduate \\ork. Unix Siothern (.-aI
forma, Calit \X'esttrn Unincrs-ir "Sclk a
profession or oicup.atnn that i! ihallcng.
ing and enjo\ ble Smile and be hjpp "


L-
I SUPERINTENDENTS STAFF, U.S. SCHOOLS: Mr. Ross Anderson, Supervisor, Phrsikal Education and Athletics, U.S. Schools; Dr. Ken-
neth Lake. Director of Curriculum; Mr. Stewart Brown, Supervisor, inim in;n pools and a.ifi\. Dr. Charles Latimer, Deputy Superintendent
i of Schools; Mr. James Cook, Supervisor of Instruction, U.S. Secondary Schools; Mr. GC ire\c Willinghl.iin, Supervisor of Instruction, U.S. Sec-
I ondar Schools; Mr. F.A. Castles, Superintendent of Schools (..,./) Mr. Vernon Caturia, Supervisor of Instruction, U.S. Elementary Schools;
SDr. Victor Herr, Supervisor of Music, U.S. Schools; Dr. James Wolf, Coordinator, Special Edu ajinon. Mr. David Speir, Assistant Superintend-
ent, U S. Secondary School; Mrs. Shirley Makibbin, Supervisor of Instruction, U.S. Schools; Mrs. Frances Sampsell, Assistant Superintendent
U.S. Elementary Schools; Mr. Zander Krowitz, Administrative Assistant; Mr. Robert Dahlstom, Supervisor, Education Data Processing.








Office Staff


The competent members of the
CHS office staff handled all general
clerical work for the administration
and faculty. Included among their
duties were official correspondence
and paper work. They were also in
charge of operating office machines
and the intercom system, and an-
swering the telephone. They main-
tained the record and files of each stu-
dent, mailed report cards, and sent
and received transcripts.












CI~C



The clinic was an important provi-
sion for the health and safety of Cris-
tobal High School students. The clin-
ic was staffed with trained nurses who
provided emergency first aid; and per-
formed certain routine checks on each
student. The clinic was also a place
for students to rest when unwell, and
for the storage of each students' per-
manent health records. The clinic also
sponsored tuberculosis and chest X-
rays for students in certain grades. Dr.
Levin, the Public Health Officer for
the Atlantic Side, visited the school
almost every morning. Dr. Chevelle,
the school physician for the Canal
Zone Schools, was available every
Wednesday.


. ....
Ir-r
MSA= 8"


I1


MRS ALLEN, MRS TAYLOR, MISS GRFFITHS
MRS. ALLEN, MRS. TAYLOR, MISS GRIFFITHS.


,4D\


DR LEIN, KAREN MRS BLANCHETT. Maybe this will oo your fever a b






DR. LEVIN, KAREN McKOWN, MRS. BLANCHETTE "Maybe this will cool your fever a bit."


I

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,4


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4idmdalcC


VIA


.-......_ -_
Mrs. Bright, Laurie Nairn "Your appointment i :lr I1 ..rI n Frndj


hJI


Mr lower,. I homas iehre. William .in.
tiago. Henry Boritlliono "You bt-.i "anr
to go to Kings' Poin '"

I.
w~m


A final drcsion brings satisfaction to Ka-
rhie Danielsen and Mrs Brichr


Guidance is the process of helping
persons make the best possible de-
cisions concerning their lives, and aid-
ing them in solving their problems. It
includes helping students choose the
proper courses to take in school, and
aiding them in deciding what careers
to follow after their education is com-
pleted. Such decisions require that a
person have full and correct knowl-
edge about himself and his world.
The guidance counselors at Cristobal
High School aim to provide students
with information so that they may
make the best possible decisions in
life. The two principal methods used
for this are c_,unsulin. and testing.
Counseling consists chiefly of discus-
sions between a student and his coun-
selor concerning his interests, apti-
tudes, and special problems. Testing
is an important guidance tool. Apti-
tude, personality, and intclligcnce
tests provide counselors with much


ADAMARY BRIGHT Counselor;
B.A., Florida State Univ., M.A., Univ.
of Michigan. "Life will never be dull
if you will continue to learn . "


-A



V:.
ROBERT MOWERY Counselor;
B.S. and MS., Indiana State Univ.
"Take advantage of the opportunities
in high school."


LUKE C. PALUMBO Attendance
Counselor; B.S. Ed., NW. Missouri
State. "There is no substitute for work
to be happy and successful."




useful information. Other important
guidance tools are books, p.imphlllrs.
and films used to help students decide
on courses of study and future careers.







Library
The library, with its vast collection
of books, was a familiar stopping
place for CHS students. Throughout
the year, they used the library and its
many resources. The quiet, academic
atmosphere made it the perfect place
for studying and peaceful solitude
found there provided an excellent


background for the reading of books.
Students made good use of the library
during homeroom and studyhalls;
checking out books for reports, using
reference books, or simply browsing
through the library's collection of pa-
perbacks and magazines.
Mr. Wells, the school librarian,


was always available for students who
needed help in locating a certain book
or in making a special report. There
were also at least two girls serving as
library assistants each period. They
helped students use the card catalog
and check out books.



I

^"1


DAYTON N. WELLS Librarian; B.S., University
of Idaho, M. Ed., University of Oregon. "Read to
help you become what you want to be."


"Peace at last!"


Faith Coad, Patricia Christian, Janna Loizeaux, Terra Brown, Lana Boone, Clover Shobe, Barbara Yerxa, Jeanne Calkins. Library Assistants.


AL--. , -








Special

Education


GRACE S. PFAU Reading; B.S.,
Valley City State College; M.A., Uni-
versity of Minnesota. "If talented, ca-
pable people can match their dissatis-
faction and concern with positive,
concerted action, they should be able
to correct the ills they so rightly de-
plore."


Duke Collins and De Jesus Ruperto help Mrs. Pfau correct papers.


EARL C. SHARICK- Special Educa-
tion; B.A., M.S., Illinois State. "Work
hard and stay in school."


The Special Education department
was added to the CHS curriculum in
1960. In Special Education, students
received extra help in their academic
studies, learned crafts, and learned the
perspectives of human relationships
and civic responsibilities.
The remedial reading program pro-


vided special instruction to improve
reading skills and helped assure a stu-
dent of success in krc-pini with his
ability. Sccmingl% average students
improved the quality of their reading
skills with the help of the Special
Education Department.


Reading holds the interest t o the Remedial Rc.lin.c tl.in s


Mr. Sharick helps his class drill in math
with -1.lh cards.





















EDWIN M. KOZIOL Art; B.A.,
Michigan State Univ. "Find out what
your responsibilities are and prepare
to meet them in order to gain control
of your life as rapidly and completely
as possible."


.s. ii at




Class Portrait


*f~.


Artists waiting for an inspiration!



: is i, ..... "A


In creative arts, a student learns to
express himself through different
media. With this in mind, the tiI-
lowing courses were taught -it (CHS
this year. Art 7, an intrnduct.ion to
drawing, painting, lettering. ccr.i nics,
crafts, covering techniques, ind the
use of tools with emph.isi police
on developing skills, ima .in.mtrn. .ind
art judgement. Art 8, a rcinturcmei-nt
of knowledge gained in Art ', vith
greater emphasis placed on the la-ri
elements of design. Art I. a bal.i be-
ginning art course for ill ,tud-nt
grades 9-12 which empha.iizcd rthc de-
velopment of drawing skill and the
study of design concepts It intlIetd
drawing, painting, lettering. po.-str-
making and a variety of cr.itr, Art 11,
an advanced art course for all students
grades 10-12. It involved art apprecia-
tion and a deeper investigation of de-
sign and color theory with emphasis
placed on individual organization and
the carrying out of art projects. The
student had an opportunity to devel-
op skills in the area of his choice, Art
III, which included appreciation and
advanced creative work.


With a sweep of the brush, a masterpiece is created.


Art


Brenda Gibson.


Ak. ot







RIusiess Education


j'-


Would you believe the class average is 85 wpm? Would you believe 35 wpm with 3 errors?


DIANE FITE Typing I, 11, Soc.
Studies 7; B.S., East Texas State U.
Mrs. Fite likes her new home in
Panama, especially the tropical weath-
er. She is originally from Texas,
where she previously taught at Bowie
Jr. High in Irving.
Her favorite hobbies are water
skiing, boating, and fishing. Her ad-
vice to students? "Be individuals."

.. ". .... ..




;;:s* 1
,


The Business Education depart-
ment offered an excellent selection of
courses for the student planning a ca-
reer in business, as well as for the col-
lege-bound students. The skills and
knowledge taught by this department
will be useful regardless of the stu-
dent's future occupation.
General Business gave the students
a basic understanding of business
practices useful in daily living. Typ-
ing I gave students an opportunity to
develop speed and accuracy on a type-
writer. They were taught to type let-
ters, tabulated reports, manuscripts,
and business forms. Typing II was a
continuation of Typing I with em-
phasis on constant practice for in-
creased speed and accuracy. Seniors
taking Shorthand learned to read,
write, and take dictation. Another
course offered only to seniors was
Bookkeeping. In this course, students
learned the fundamentals of single
and double-entry bookkeeping and
were given practical problems for the
application of these skills.


i I



1991


George and John find girls more inter-
esting than bookkeeping.

















a usS


CLARE W. JOHNSON Short-
hand, Bo<.kkeeping. General Busi-
ness; BS, Bemnid) State College;
M.Ed., Central Washington State Col-
lege.
During his first year at CHS, Mr.
Johnson was yearbook sponsor and
head of the Business Education De-
partment aside from his regular duties
as teacher.
He was born in Minnesota and
taught for seven year, ;r,,lu lrl: being
principal at Adna High School in
Washington.
He enjoys fishing, bowling, and
scuba diving.
His advice is, "Spend more time
enjoying the good things about the
establishment and less time trying to
change it."


"This is almost as bad as Latin."


"A


- t








8Nglish


IK*


J.B. DOBBINS English II, Jour-
nalism; B S., University of Virginia;
M.Ed., Univ. of Virginia. "HAM-
LET: Act I, Sc. iii Polonius to
Laertes."


English, an extensively wide field,
was one of the largest departments at
CHS. It was a required subject for all
students, since the ability to under-
stand and to use well his native lan-
guage deemed necessary for a stu-
dent's success in any endeavor.
Regular English classes included
the study of grammar, composition,
and literature. In addition to these
regular courses; the English depart-
ment also included journalism, speech
and drama, and remedial reading. In
journalism the student learned to
write in newspaper form and received
much practical experience. Speech
and drama was a course which taught
the students the art of oral expres-
sion. Besides this, the course required
a great deal of research work. Remc-
dial reading provided students who
required extra help an opportunity to
improve their reading ability.


Books read in the various classes
include; johnny Tremain, Great Expec-
tations, A Tale of Two Cities, The
House of Seven Gables, The Red Badge of
Courage, Wuthering Heights, Lord Jim,
and The Moonstone.


Mrs. Smith. "My goodness' What are the
Seniors coming to'"


JANE ELFERS English III, Speech
and Drama, B.S., University of Wis-
consin. "Choose those goals most im-
portant to you and be perseverant in
achieving them. Don't be reluctant to
serve others and the community.
Don't be afraid to give of yourself
Aim high; prepare painstakingly;
serve; and work "













(


LOUIS J FATTOROSI Engllh Ill. DOROTHY H SMITH Enghlh i
B.S, M Ed. Ruiger LUrnio tr N, B S. Ohl(. Northern i' M l, lr'.rr
tyrann) is morre inoltrabkl ihrn IhJit .I LUns.etlirn
the seli-righteou retormer .'r the .,*cir
zealous philanthrc.pist The o,:rlid nr, he
destroyed by too muh hatrcJ or t~i
much love, but the later is mote danger
ous because ii more nsidlouu "


d J
GLENDA STRONACH English and
Musir B Nu Ed B A., Trinity U.
Mris Srr._na,h i' from Texas and
raught in ;urundu before coming to
CHS She cno., ei lrhgy, and sports. "To
th% oan :elt be tru'


MARTHA TANNER English; A.B.,
U.N.C. "Live everyday to the very fullest
- enjoy!"


r,4


TONI WILFERD English; B S., Flor-
ida State. ". 'these times' will be anoth-
er period that I will add as one I've lived
through."


Mr Dobbin4 I de crve thi, rest


-/


REBECCA WILLIAMS Geography 7,
English 8 and 9; B.A., Anderson C. :lr',
Mrs. Williams' home state is West
Virginia. She has traveled thr u l many
states and enjoys reading and im'-;i.-.
"Use your head think! listen rcl,


"I hope I don't lrget the id ot th, pl., re t i '
"I hope I don't forget the id ea ot thii plui bxefort ii .,i1..ur


Mrs. Elfers


om
"That was some Llais


WTI


L
tia


a









Foreifg alguages


"Welcome to the camp."


ANNE D. GEGG French, Latin,
B.A., Cornell University, M.S. in Edu-
cation, Cornell Univ "Learn to do
things on time Make positive contri-
butions to school and your Lommunm-
ty


STELLA RIEFKOHL Spanish,
French. B.A, New York Univ., M.A.,
Columbia Univ, N Y. "Never to
look back into the past always to
face each day as it comes without a
thought of the future "


-Whe

When will they ever learn?


c- ~--


t^


-V


', ... J


TELMA 1 HOWARD Spanish.
Business Educauton. BA, Hunter
College, M A., Hunter College. "Be
obedient and respectful Iitiens in
your communities and set good exam-
ples of morals to vour younger peers


* t


Is it third declension, accusative, masculine, plural, or comparative? I'm mixed up!












i


JAMES E. STEARNS Spanish II,
III, IV, Russian II; B.S. Ed., M.A.,
University of Florida. "Spend more
time on the subjects that are hard for
you than on your favorites."


WILLIAM L. WILL Spanish 7 and
8, English 9; B.S. Econ., Xavier
Univ.; M. Ed., Univ. of Florida.
Mr. Will is a native Isthmian. He
taught in Florida before coming to
CHS. His hobbies are golfing, swim-
ming, team sports and reading. Life is
short, so be satisfied in what you are
doing."

".. .. . ,, ;.',..
T~'
iL.1..24C.;


The foreign language department
at CHS was a wide and interesting
one. Its aim was to increase a stu-
dent's understanding of the history
and culture, as well as the language of
countries other than his own. In order
to fulfill this aim, CHS offered cour-
ses in three modern languages;
French, Spanish, and Russian. Three
years of each language were offered,
students being placed in the level ap-
propriate to their development. In ad-
dition, a second year course in Latin
was offered.
In all language courses, speaking,
writing, reading, and understanding
of the language were stressed. The
Audio-Lingual Method, ALM, was a
new system used to teach Spanish and
Russian. This system involved inten-
sive oral practice in the language lab-
oratory.


.5'.


Toni Thomas. "It's right, isn't it?"


Mrs. Howard. "I'm no model!"


"How can I concentrate on "Hablar" when I'm thinking of HIM?"







rome S coomiocs


The homemaking program placed
emphasis on three areas: foods and
nutrition, clothing selection and con-
struction, and family living. It was
the aim of the department to provide
girls with knowledge helpful for their
futures as homemakers.
Junior high home economics stu-
dents learned the basics of sewing by
making simple household articles and
garments. They were also taught the
basics of cooking which included the
preparation and serving of formal and


informal meals.
Senior high students were offered
one semester of sewing which in-
cluded personal r'r.. miniri the plan-
ning and construction of t.k.thin'.
and a study of personal and family
relationships. In the second semes-
ter's cooking classes, students were
taught the fundamentals of nutrition,
the use of recipes, meal planning,
m.Ark.irin, and various methods of
preserving food.


r


)j I'


.4



ELIZABETH McNAUGHTON Home Econom-
ics; B.S., Slate Teachers' College. "What you do (or
don't do) today affects your future."


I


i


I p


Tina Bocanegra, Pat De Vault, Elisa Brown. "Do we have to stand in line to help
Tina Bocanegra, Pat De Vault, Elisa Brown. "Do we have to stand in line to help?"


I



I


\N


- 3J


Josefa Gonzalez and Anna Summerlin.
"You'rc off an inch!"


"Cookies". "It's messy but it's fun!"


+rS


17""








/tdustrial Arts


RONALD FITE Mechanical
Drawing; B.S., East Texas State
Univ.; M.S., East Texas State Univ.
Mr. Fite's home state is Texas. He
is the Junior Class sponsor. He enjoys
the Canal Zone and his hobbies are
water skiing and hunting.



The Industrial Arts department at
CHS attempted to provide pupils
with insight into their own interests;
Ito develop their abilities to work with
'their hands and with tools, and to
,sharpen their interest in creative
crafts The Industrial Arts department
offered four groups of courses; Me-
Ichanical Drawing; Wood Working,
|Metal Shop, and Plastics.
Mechanical Drawing I taught stu-
dents to visualize how an object is put
together Neatness, correct lines, mea-
surement, and following instructions
were stressed. Mechanical Drawing II
;was a continuation of this course for
:students planning to continue their
education in this field. Woodworking
students learned about tools, joints,
.shop safety, and the operation of
:power tools. They used their knowl-
edge to carry out projects. Metal Shop
I taught the basic skills of bench-
iwork, forging, welding, sheetmetal,
and machine operation. Plastics stu-
|dents learned the properties of plas-
tics and how to shape them into use-
ful objects.


JESSE C. HOLLOWAY Shop;
M.S., Oklahoma State College. "Get
the best education you can."


RONALD LASSILA Shop; B.S.,
Los Angeles, Calif.; Lie. Sorbonne.
Mr. Lassila is a native Californian
and has taught in San Francisco, Eng-
land, Turkey, Phillipines, and France.
His hobby is boating. His advice to
students? "Work."


Students display varied attitudes toward mechanical drawing.
If -I AP


"They didn't tell me about this when I filled out my class selection sheet," grumbles Robert
Johnson.








lMathemIatics


21


RICHARD W. BOCK Algebra II,
Analysis, Calculus. B.A, Univ of N
Dakota, M A, Univ of Houston
"Don't be trivial."




In this modern age, as well as in
the past, mathematics remains a basic
part of everyone's life. The CHS
math department offered all the math
courses required for success in college
as well as in the students' daily lives.
Five math courses offered were to
be taken in order as each was a pre-
requisite of the subsequent one.
These courses were Algebra I, Geom-
etry, Algebra II, Introduction to Anal-
ysis, and Calculus. General Math, and
Introduction to Algebra were also of-
fered for students not majoring in
math.
General Math captured the ele-
mentary forms of mathematics. It
pushed the students to have a mathe-
matical background.
Algebra I, the first step up the lad-
der to higher mathematics, caught the
principles of mathematics. Word
mastery of the language of mathemat-
ics was attained in this course.
Geometry dealt with the art of
drawing. Proving theorems was a
major part of geometry. The students
learned how to deal with space fig-
ures. Algebra I was also reviewed for
the students.
Algebra II taught the principles of
factoring, polynomials, logarithms,
and basic trigonometry. The pattern
of reasoning was also learned in this
course.


LAWRENCE A COWLEY Alge-
bra I, Geometry. BA., Trinity Univ.,
M.A., Southeastern State "Live life
yourself"


Introduction to Analysis went
deeper into trigonometry. Linear and
quadratic equations were studied in
great depth. Functions and relations
were the beginning notion of this
course.


RANDALL GRUBBS Math; B.A.,
William Jewell College, "Do not get
behind in life because it is hard to
catch up."


Calculus, the last step up a steep
ladder of mathematics in high school
was a college preparatory course in-
troducing the fundamentals of differ-
ential calculus.







1 -~F~~j~j~


> c


Math class is a time for many things, from studying to reading comic books.


aggMIS
































ROY HOWELL Alprbra IB. Gen
eral Math A, BS, Shippen'barg S
College. N S. Florld) Stirre lU'n
"Accept people on the bajsr c.l heir
aiilons. nor their appearane "


CAROL J KNIGHT Li.e Sence
". Mith ". nd n. B Auburn L'ru,
' Rcad a. much jand A. ariJ natE .. l
1s ,ou p,.,.,ibl\ .An


BERNARD R MAZZONI Maih
6. Algebra I. b S. L-bani..n \'lley
Cullege M . Penn Srre L'Urn 'Ev-
endas hdul d be i guctd da\ And J-
m .rro i. a b lerer JdI "


Nancy Edmondson. "I g\,e up, I've had


Calculus proves ,t- be a ch.llengngp |lass










MEMBERS OF THE BAND


Aukwsic


EDWARD R, CARWITHEN -
Music; B. Fine Arts, Univ. Florida,
M Arts, Eastman School of Music.


The following courses were .tlier.l
this year in Music. Music 7 and 8; the
exploration of all kinds of music and
music skills with emphasis placed on
music fundamentals as a step to the
enjoyment of music. Beginning In-
strumental Class; a specialized class
for students desiring to learn the basic
techniques of a band or an orchestral
instrument. It is open to all ru ld-l
but it is recommended that a student
wishing to participate in advanced
music classes begin the study of in-
struments in seventh grade. Educa-
tional values stressed are: :.. iling of
musical notation, development of
good tone and the ability to express
oneself with confidence on a musical
instrument. Also stressed are pride in
personal achievement, concern for
group results, and the discipline of
concentrating on details to build con-
fidence and ability. Intermediate In-
strumental Class; a specialized class
for students having had one or two
semesters of work in !'. tnningih in-
strumental class. This class is open to
all grades. It provides a chance for
students to work with symphonic
music of easy to medium hIllt 'ilr.
The educational values stressed are:
continuing exploration of musical ex-
pression, b.uildlir., of confidence in
personal abilities, and striving to do
one's best. Senior Band is a special-
ized class for students with at least
one year or the equivalent of begin-
ning or intermediate instrumental


The Band relaxing before class begins.


class. This is an activity group. It
serves the school by providing music
for assemblies, football games, pep
assemblies, and other occasions. Con-
certs are planned to expose the stu-
dent to the classical and modern mu-
sical world. Students are encouraged
to participate in musical groups of all
kinds. These include ..lltet, commu-


nity, and jazz groups. Values stressed
are; self discipline, appreciation and
toleration of new sounds and musical
experience, and exploration of the
student's abilities in music. The
music program also provides courses
in 7th and 8th grade chorus and sen-
ior chorus where students learn how
to sing and read music.


Ted ,il,:r nd istld e Ap.:irac perform at the elementary school.


"The important thing is to act nonchalant alx
55The important thing is ro act nonchalant abc


'i..r,,i.r.lpher n .,ur mt nil


My..* J 411 I 12
Ronald Palser. "Just six more measures to
go."


ii.


Plus
Ann Lauriten
Kathy Dexter
Linda Mendenhall
Dcshea Mason
Ann Loyd
Chris Benson
Sue McCullough
06&
Grry Blanchett
Cathy Terwilliger
Banss
Susan Willis
Chermi Hieronymus
EbSqf G
F1i Br-pii
A r,.. .' ,
ClaUnnrt
Linda Merrik
Ann Terwilligcr
Barbara Blomer
LuAnn Ware
Debbie Jacketic
Emily Daniel
Colleen Johnson
Debbie Mhlker
Linda Hess
Debbie Pate
Patny Rodrigue
Thomas Wcslcy
Alike Sticbrint
Kathy Baimer
Jim Collins
Thomas Bchre
Alexis Coleman
Jeanetie Hernandez
Alo Canna
Susan Ridge
Sylvia Vamprinr
Bao Clarmete
Tony Barr
Manette Carner
Sop. sax
Libby Palser
Alto Sax
Jim Chldress
Karen Mcrriik
Roy Gots
Edythe Marsh
Joanne Reid
Tmor Sax
Robin Prstham
Ted Scott
Peter Sanchcz
Fesnh Honr
Bonnie Willi
Rin Boyland
Willie Sanrtigo
Buartlnt
James Bljcicher
Mike Bjorncby
James Jones
Brian Love
Jimmy Huffman


46


Traumsl
Sevce Aponte
Cheryl Olsen
Ron Palser
Ed Golden
Jim Valentine
Pedro Simmons
Drummond McNaughton
Craig Robenrson
Allen Richardson
Cheyenn Rivera
Tim Blanchard
Ray Jackson
Trmawoue
Paul Bleicher
Billy Gilespie
Beverly Olsen
Nancy Gregg
Wayne West
GC..gr ..
Fritz Van Woondenberg
Bobby Hughes
Tuba
Don Olsen
Guy Damiani
Bass
Gregg Grist
Drum
Dan Valentine
Gspar Sayoc
Mike Williams
Robert Fernandez
John Alexaitis








Physical Education


f7w


BARBARA L. CAMPBELL Physi-
cal Education; B.S Ed., Black Hills
State C II Graduate Credit, Wash.
State Univ., Central Wash State Col-
lege and BHST "Be quick to criticize
- but if you do have a solution to
go with the criticism'"


LOUIS DEDEAUX Physical Edu-
cation, B.S., Oklahoma A&M Col-
lege; M.S., Oklahoma State Univ.
"Find out what you can do best as
early as possible, then take pride in
yourself that your doing it as well as
you can


W"







JUNE FATTOROSI Physical
Education; B.S., Southeastern La.
Univ.; M.A., Univ. Southern Miss.
"Mature enough in developing inter-
nal discipline to gradually replace the
external disciplines required during
childhood."


;., r . - _. -

rT -A-!
j I 11


JOAN F. HARRIS Physical Edu-
cation, A B, Canal Zone Jr College,
B.S., Barry College, M.A., New York
University. "Don't seek an escape
from the pressures accompanying
your youth through cheap thrills that
could ruin your whole life.. You
can't afford to throw away your young
years. The clock can't be stopped or
turned back."


IDOUG LITTON Phy Ed; Mas-
ter's, Miss State University "Keep
training rule and always beat Bal-
ho.i and (. i ,


Gym can be relaxing! .


S. Gym can be hard work!"


7-
i_~~.'. ~
.-: I~r~









a

-i-


*1 q


i,


Marian Kredell, Carol Ross. Donna Graham. Shelle l.und
PURPLE PASSION prtesnting thcir t.mnc-u. at


The importance of physical. as
well as mental development in
achieving success in a high\ complexx
society was stressed b\ the physical
education department Its aims were
to teach good sportsmanship and a
sense of fair plaN. to discipline the
mind, and to educate students in lei
sure time activities which can be car-
ried into adulthood The department
strove to give each student, regardless
of his stage of development a chance
to develop his skills, his actirude. and
his physique.
During the year 19'o-'I. Crstobal
High School's girls' physical educa-
tion classes participated in basketball.
volleyball, rumbling, track. tennis,
and various other sports. The boxs'
physical education classes participated
in football, baseball, basketball, swim-
ming. weightlifting. and track
Through these activities as well as in-
tramural and varsir sports. the de-
partment succeeded in achieving its
goals.


lane P.ulI,n.


A


"U


' -f t Aurelia Williams. Supergirl Willie is at it
Beth .irtr The again!


40i-Q. A ,
dl
IA Ir-




c bad, but hockey beas them all
"I hiloughi peedhall wa bad, but hockey beats them all."


m


"Keep '-\ur hand' in iour hips so your pants won't fall down."


g








Science


PAUL HIERONYMUS Chemis-
try, Math; B.S., East Central State
College, M N.S., University of Okla-
homa. "Have an open mind and
then use it."


Michael McCann, Kenneth Hill. "Now this will make me healthy, wealthy, and a r,


CHS boasted a wide-ranging
science curriculum. The student who
followed this program can be assured
of a solid foundation in scientific
knowledge. The courses offered were
Life Science, Earth Science, Introduc-
tory Physical Science, Bil .1c,, Chem-
istry, and Physics.
The seventh-grade Life Science
course taught the basis of life and the
student's role in the realm of living
things. Earth Science, offered to


eighth-graders, was an interesting
study of the structure and function of
the world and its surrounding envi-
ronment. Introductory Physical
Science was a preliminary laboratory
course. Students were taught the pro-
cedures of scientific research and dis-
covery. Biology offered a change from
the world of physical actions and
reactions. This course was highlight-
ed by three dissections during the
year. A basic course in Chemistry ac-.


quainted students with meth,,d, 't
scientific thinking and problem _,.,b-
ing. Emphasis was placed on pcrti.,rm-
ing laboratory experiments and r.il h-
ing logical conclusions. Physis. the
science of measurement, dealt prim.r-
ily with practical applications r
science in daily life. Vector :in.il\ls
and other physical aspects of ,lence
were the major concepts studied in
this course.


EMMA LOUISE MASON -- l.
Science 7; A.B., Randolph-Mat...
Woman's College, M.A, Colglr.:
University. "In order for students .-
learn they must be an active parti,
pant which requires much more tl..n
mere physical presence."


Mad scientists at work!


r

iG-
1~L










...


JAMES D. NORMAN Biology;
B.S., Michigan State Univ.; M.A.,
Oregon State Univ. "Live, love and be
happy for tomorrow we die." "Smile
and have a full life."


latm
LUKE T. PALUMBO Introducto-
ry Physical Science; B.S., Northwest
Missouri State College; M. Ed., Univ.
of Florida. "Things could be better."


"Beware of this plant!"

















CHARLES T. REEVES Physics,
Earth Science, Mathematics, Driver
Education; B.S., B.A., M.A., Arizona
State University. "To thyself be hon-
est and think before you act."


The formula for problem No 2 is nor on the hlck'


Nai-Yuen Shum. "I think the one I just
cut up is the one I needed."


--








Social Sciieces



-O p


ROBERT BERGER Soc. Studies;
B.A., Michigan State U.; A.C., Grand
Rapids J.C. "Get the most education
you can and try to make this world of
ours a better place in which to live.


The purpose of the social science
courses offered at CHS was to help
students learn about their world; its
past, its present, and its relation to
them both now and in the future.
The aim of the social studies in-
structor was to aid the student in
learning to view history in a objective
and unbiased manner, and to give
him a broader approach to such prob-
lems as national and international
relations. Social Science courses of-
fered at CHS included Geography,
World History, U.S. History, and


MARY CONDON World Hist.,
U.S. Hist.; B.S., Northern Michigan
College. "Be sincere about everything
you do, particularly about getting an
education."


American Institutions.
Geography dealt with the study of
maps, climates, and the physical fea-
tures of various countries. World His-
tory was the study of the different na-
tions' pasts and their relationships to
one another. U.S. History provided
the student with knowledge of our
nation's past and its accomplishments
and led him to a better understanding
of our nation. American Institutions
taught the student about the work-
ings of government and the basic


WILLIAM J. GANSEN American
Institutions Social Studies 8; M.A
University of Michigan; M.A.T.E
Purdue Univ. "Treat others as yo'j
would like to be treated."


principles of economics.
The objective of all social science
courses was to lessen misundcrsit.nd
ing of the people of other nation s and
to help the students learn to rtsppct
cultures other than their own.
This year, CHS social science
teachers attended a special workshop
conducted by Dr. Edwin Tent,: n ut
Carnegie Mellon University. Pittrs-
burgh, Pennsylvania. He was an adi-.
cate of the use of original source ma.
trial in the teaching of social studiess


Cheryl C olcman, Mrs. (ondon, Michael
Nk(Cann "Now who is on the pro side and
wio 1i on the (on side?"


-1-
J-
F~..
si
"IIc


Dr. Fenton gives a lecture to a U.S. History class.


-<


rvC


"ik
Pffi~w
*** *^"Tii


4M























EUGENE T. GREGG U.S. Histo-
ry; A.A., C.Z. College; B.A., Colorado
State; M.A., Univ. of Colorado.
"Strive to become rich."


mtE
ROANALD JACOBS World Ge-
ography; Bachelors, Southeastern
State College; Masters, Northeastern
State College. "Make the best of what
ever situation you are faced with."


ROBERT McCULLOUGH Social
Studies; B.S., St. Cloud State College;
M.A., Univ. of Northern Colorado.
"Be kind to animals."


real classroom with real students!


Mr. Gansen. "This is an example of a good
screen."


Long live democracy!


Now this is a







KO Z'C uilds 4Men lelps Students


The Reserve Officers Training
Corps at CHS was established to help
prepare high school students for fu-
ture careers in the Armed Forces, and
for ROTC in college, should they de-
cide to take it. It's chief aim was to
help students achieve the maturity
necessary to become officers and lead-
ers of men.
This year the ROTC was headed
by CPT. Juan F. Mata, who was as-
sisted by SFS Murphy, SFC Picoli,
and SSG Alford. The ROTC unit at
Cristobal consisted of "E" Company,
"F" Company, Color Guard, Drill
Team, Rifle Team, and the Battalion
Staff. The staff this year included Bat-
talion Commander Major John Mar-
tin; Battalions sponsor, 1Lt. Hila
Lyman; S1, 2Lt. Donald Byrd; S2,
2Lt. Daniel Valentine; S3, 2Lt. Jaime
Darraza; and S4, 2Lt. Lewis Valdez.
The Drill Team was commanded by
1Lt. Eligio Thomas, and sponsored by
1Lt. Jean Smith. "E" Company was
commanded by 1Lt. Dennis Maxwell
and sponsored by 1Lt. Jackie Spring-
er. "F" Company was commanded by
1Lt. Isaac Heres and sponsored by
1Lt. Denise Foshee.
Reviews were presented by the
ROTC each nine-weeks during the
school year. A large and important re-
view was Field Night, held on March
27th. Among the types of competi-
tion included were: personal, squad,
platoon, company, and most exciting
of all, Drill Team competition. An-
other exciting competition of the
school year was the Brigade Review.
In order to make competition fair, the
Brigade Review and Field Night are
held on the Atlantic and Pacific sides
on alternate years.


"E" Company


"F" Company








become Officers And Ceaders


CAPTAIN MATA ROTC; B.A,
Pan American College. "Accomplish
what you set out to do at all cost,
with whatever resources available."
f I


-- --


SFC MURPHY ROTC. "Don't
make the same mistake twice. Do it
right the first time and you won't
have to do it again."


SFC PICOLI ROTC. SSG ALFORD ROTC.


"There's really nothing to it," claims Denise Foshee with a confident grin."


ROTC cadets and sponsors attend Jungle Operations Training Center.


Steve Aponte. "Gee, it doesn't look like a
very long drop to me are you sure I need
a parachute?"





























ROTC Drill Team


ROTC Color Guard


Major John Martin, 1Lt. Hila Lyman, ILt. Eligio Thomas.


Steve Aponte, George Rivera, Tony Lyons.


ROTC Girls' Drill Team








Z'ke Cighter Side Of R0 tC'Z ife


UI





)j


Cadets steal a moment of relaxation during ten grueling days at leadership school.


"Hear no evil, speak no evil, see no evil."
^ .
a E r r
*. I. i ,

I-.
f '- .*' .

*i .:
*"x:, '
'-,, *, . "- "- I 1' . ' l/ ; ; ''
,. ..., , ... 0 * e


.- . ,
: 't *
''r
Lit;
-= p


"So this is what they teach you at leader-
ship school."


I . .. *
,, ... ''
S .
I. "
' '. "l .'. '


. .
i -'" -

.. .wL *1 I..

"F" Company Commander Isaac Heres "drops for ten" with a smile.









,irs,' Drill ream Wins


Veteran


Day Parade


The 1971 Girls' Drill Team at
CHS consisted of twenty-nine girls.
They were under the expert leader-
ship of Commander Jan Bjorneby.
The girls performed during halftime
at all home football games in the
Tiger Stadium. They also marched in
the quarterly ROTC Reviews. As an
additional activity, they participated
in the annual Veteran's Day Parade.
At this time, they were selected as the
outstanding girls' drill team on the
1rshmus The girls considered this an
honor which made the long hours of
after-school practice well-worth the
time and effort it required.
The Drill Team also helped with
Orientation Day for the new students
of CHS. They provided guidance and
assistance when necessary.


1 Roberta Cole
(quad leader)
2 I.vnn Gregg
Wo-Lmmandcr)
A. Nance Edmnii on
(squad ieadcr)
4 Linda Brotk
s Pattic Haukt
i, Kaith D)erap,
Viana Ostrrca
s Ann T .
) Ann ionnalcs


10. Kathy Milligan
11. Kathy Pursley
12. Marian Kredell
(squad leader)
1,. Carol Ross
14 Barbara Bloemer
15. Janet Brandenburg
(squad leader)
16. Donna Graham
17 Sherry Coleman
18. Mounven Lyman


9. Terry Overstreet
. Gigi Colon
1. Katie McGilberry
. Mary Norval
. Cathy Gernich
. Nina Gercich
i. Regina Dominguez
i. Ellie Blevins
SCarol Wertz
. Marrianne Verruno
SJan Bjorneby
(co-comdr.)


3i 2




67



U3 yv



















Forward March . About Face!


AMajorettes Perform Durieg

B basketball


wames

Despite uverm helming odd,
against them, the majnrette- Partt
Hill and Tit.i Cobb, presented J tine
performance on the l.iat junir \'arsi
ry game. Thce carried on their rradi.
tion by performing at the bajketb.ll
games. To be a majorette. one mu t
be willing to devote intense hour-
of practice over the 'ummter, and .il
must regular practice .iter ~hlnil
when school begins.
Tryouts were held during tlh
month of April


Pairr Hill and Tita Cobb







CIS

Coimumces

Vear WU//t
r A re New


teachers

NEW TEACHERS: Mr. Lassila, Mr Johnson, Mrs. A i\ll. l, Mr. Fite, Mrs. Stronach.
m 11 l 11 '15 % loll \ 3rn'. w a
lit z
Cristobal High School teachers i- o wT71
began the 1970-71 school year on Au- |ii
gust 31. On this date, the faculty at- -
tended a special meeting at which .
school policy and plans for the com-r. I -
ing year were discussed. Mr. Speir, as-
sistant Supervisor of U.S. Secondary ..
Schools and Mr. Cook, Supervisor of ,
Instruction, U.S. Secondary Schools
attended and were introduced to the
faculty. Following speeches by Mr.
Pfau, Mr. Jeffries, and Mr. Speir; cof-
fee was served to the new teachers in
the home economics room.


We must be prepared, for a new school year begins.





f the f a l r o





S' Mr. Pfau (principal of CHS) gives last
1 minute advice and information to the rest
tryingng cxprcssions reflect the faculty's concern for the new school year. of the faculty.







Caribe Club Spoasors Cultural exchange

Program With Colon Jtigh Schools
7 In order to provide students from
- [ a Panamanian school with an oppor-
i M tunity to observe the workings of the
U.S. school system, the members of
S" the Caribe Club invited the students
of St. Mary's and St. Joseph's acade-
mies in Colon to visit CHS. On the
S.. morning of December 9th, the entire
senior class of St. Mary's Academy
and a number of students from St. Jo-
seph arrived by bus. Each girl was as-
SA signed to a member of the Caribe
Club and whom they accompanied to
class. They had originally planned to
1 I leave at noon, but refreshed by a
Lunch provided by the Caribe Club,
S'" they attended afternoon classes as
well. Both Panamanian and American
) students agree that they had profited
from this cultural exchange.

"I knew I should have brought my lunch'"






Cfi


















"Mrs Farrorosi won't let u; on the p.m tlinor in our ,\ttrd '"
"You're kidding' I'm laid I came so I can
catch up on the news."








Sailors


Sandra Alberga








9. ^
f: ^.


*r


Jay Alonis


SANDRA ALBEFRGA
June 2, 19 51
Colon, Republic of Panama
Entering CHS in the second semester of her junior )car
Sandra quickly became an active member of her class. She
served as treasurer of the Language Lab Club and secretary of
the Spanish Club. Sandra graduated in January 1971, and left
for Riverside City College where she plans to major in busi-
ness.

JAY ALONIS
January 25, 1953
Ancon, Canal Zone
Jay has attended Canal Zone schools for twelve years, six of
these were at CHS. In his senior year, Jay was a member of
the Caribe Club and the varsity track team. He plans to study
engineering and computer science at Louisiana Polytechnic
Institute after graduation.

ALMANUBIA ( AR Ml N AUSTIN
October 13. 1952
Colon, Republic of Panama
Alma came to CHS in her junior year, having previously
attended St. Joseph's in Colon. She was a member of the
Spanish Club, and participated in -. lI.. I.ll intramurals.
Alma plans to attend Canal Zone College and major in medi-
cal r., I, .. .

PATRICIA YAMILET AUSTIN
December 13, 1952
Colon, Republic of Panama
Athletics have occupied much of Patsy's time in high
school. She was a member of the basketball and ,'.I .L.ll
teams in her freshman year and captain of both in her sopho-
more year when she also participated in tennis. In her junior
year, she lettered in three sports and also served as president
of the GAA and co-captain of the Powder Puff speedball
team. Patsy plans to attend CZC and major in physical educa-
tion.

TERRI LYNN BAKER
November 6, 1952
Anchorage, Alaska
This was Terri's first year at CHS. She participated in varsi-
ty volleyball, Her future plans include studies at the Universi-
ty of Arkansas.

ROBERT EARL BARR
March 18, 1952
Charleston, South Carolina
Robert has attended Canal Zone schools all his life, six
years at CHS. He plans to become a policeman.


Fatricia Y. Austin


S/ *//


IA


\lf


Almanubia C Austin


Robert E. Barr







JEAN LYNN BASSETT
June 9, 1953
Jeannie has attended C.Z. schools for ten years, five of
these at CHS. During her high school years, she was a
member of the Spanish Club, the swimming team, and the
Girls' Chorus. Her future plans include attending the Col-
lege of Bible in California, hopefully on a music scholar-
ship.

MICHAEL FRANCIS BEALE
July 16, 1953
St. Petersburg, Florida
Mike came to Cristobal High School in the second se-
mester of his sophomore year. He was a member of the
varsity basketball team. In his senior year he was elected
Homecoming "king". Mike plans to attend college in the
United States.

JAN TERI BJORNEBY
April 26, 1953
Bremerton, Washington
Jan has been an active member of the class of '71. She
was a member of the Girls' Drill team for three years, and
served as commander in her senior year. She was an S.A.
alternate in her freshman year. As a junior, she was a mem-
ber of the French Club and class treasurer. In her senior
year, she served as secretary of the GAA and as a member
of the Senior Privilege Committee. Sports have occupied
much of Jan's time. She participated in speedball, volley-
ball, tennis, band, basketball intramurals, and was a mem-
ber of the varsity volleyball and tennis teams. Jan plans to
attend college in the U.S.

ELIZABETH BLEVINS
January 2, 1952
Colon, Republic of Panama
Ellie has attended Cristobal High School throughout
her high school career. She participated in intramural
speedball during her freshman and sophomore years, and
in basketball and volleyball during all four years. As a sen-
ior, she was a member of the Girls' Drill Team. Her future
plans include study to become either an airline stewardess
or a veterinarian.

LANA GAYE BOONE
July 10, 1953
Abingdon, Virginia
Lana has been an active member of the senior class at
CHS. She was a member of the Caribe Club, and served as
treasurer of the Language Lab Club in her senior year. She
was a member of the yearbook staff for three years, and as
a senior, served as copy editor. In her junior year, she be-
came a member of the National Honor Society, and was
elected president. As a freshman, she received an Outstand-
ing Student Award, and in her junior year, an award for ex-
cellence in the Russian language. As a junior, she partici-
pated in the NSF SST Program at Loyola University. In
her senior year, she was a member of the Senior Class Ad-
visory Council and Board of Directors, and served as secre-
tary of the Student Advisory Committee. Lana's future
plans include majoring in computer science at Loyola Uni-
versity in New Orleans where she received a four-year
scholarship.

VIVIAN VICTORIA BOSEMAN
February 25, 1948
Colon, Republic of Panama
Vivian has attended CHS for each of her four years in
high school. Her future plans include the possibility of a
modeling career.


Senior Homecoming "King" Mike Beale is
escorted on royal walk around the gym.


Jean Lynn Bassett


IJ


Michael Francis Beale


Jan Teni Bjorneby


Elizabeth Blevins






KATHRYN RACHIEIL BIUR(GSS
>koIha.m. Japan

Katlih hasl attend ( IIS throughout her high w(hool
cartccr, and has bccin a mcmher of the (irls' (;leC (lub for
four cars, and tlic (Girls' D)rill Team tor two. After gradu-
ation, Kathi plan, to attend a College of Arts and Music,
S in preparation for a muisial career.


Kathryn Rachel Buress
Kathryn Rachel Burgess


rc


CARMEN LUISA BUTLER
N1oanlbcr 12. 1952
Colon, Republic of Panama
(armcn has been a participant in many organizations
and clubs during lier years at CHS. She served as secretary-
treasurer of the Caribe and Nurses's Aide Clubs, Historian
of the French Club, Vice-President of the Language Lab
Club, and treasurer of the senior class. She also served on
various committees and the Senior Class Board of Direc-
tors. In her senior year, she was elected to the National
Honor Society. Carmen plans to enter Barry College in
Miami and study computer science.

DONALD PATRICK BYRD
June( 1952
Balboa, Canal Zone
Donald has attended Canal Zone schools all his life.
Throughout his high school years, he has been interested
in dramatics, playing leading roles in several Thespian pro-
ductions, and serving as treasurer of the Thespian Society
in his senior year. In the summer of 1970, he attended a
summer institute in drama. Donald plans to attend Canal
Zone College for a year, and then transfer to the U.S.


C-rmen lnei RHnurtr


"Cubby" Clement, Kathy Kraus. "Seniors
just naturally have beautiful legs."


a-


Armando Cabrera


hlitabeth P.ulettc Carter


Raul Eduardo Cistro


ARMANDO CABRERA
April 26, 1953
Santurce, Peurto Rico
This was Armando's first year at CHS. He previously at-
tended Antilees High School In Puerto Rico where he par-
ticipated in varsity track. His future plans include the
study of accounting and business administration at the
University of Puerto Rico.

ELIZABETH PAULETTE CARTER
March 3, 1953
Gartersville, Georgia
Beth came to CHS from Georgia where she was active
in athletics and other school activities. She participated in
soccer, softball, badminton, and archery intramurals, and
was co-captain of the varsity soccer and softball teams. She
was also a cheerleader, a member of the FHA, vice-presi-
dent of the FTA, secretary of the Debate Club, and a mem-
ber of the yearbook and newspaper staffs. She was vice-
president of her freshman class, and secretary of her sopho-
more class. This year she was a member of the Senior Class
Advisory Council and Board of Directors. Beth plans to
study psychology, planning a career in social work or per-
haps teaching.

RAUL EDUARDO CASTRO
July 20, 1953
Colon, Republic of Panama
Raul has participated in many clubs during his five
years at CHS. He was a member of the Caribe Club, the
French Club, the yearbook staff, and served as president of
the Art and Spanish Clubs and vice-president of the Lan-
guage Lab Club. Raul served on the committee for theJr.-
Sr. Prom, and as a member of the Senior Class Advisory
Council and Board of Directors. Raul plans to attend Am-
herst College in Massachusetts and take a liberal arts
course.


-s;


!


,,


IL/i









Class

Officers

4iemplify

"Senior


Spirit"


SENIOR CLASS OFFICERS: Kathy DeRaps, Vice President; Robert Phillips, President;
Judy McLain, Secretary; and Carmen Butler, Treasurer.


The 1970-71 school year was one
of innovation for CHS seniors. Under
the leadership of capable class offi-
cers, and with the expert guidance of
their sponsor, Mr. Fattorosi, the sen-
ior class set out to do great things.
The first project was to secure an
open lunch. A committee was estab-
lished to prepare and submit for ap-
proval a list of regulations, and the
privilege was granted. In order to pro-
vide a sounding board for the com-
plaints and suggestions of seniors, the
Advisory Council, consisting of
twenty representative seniors was es-
tablished. Another new group was
the Senior Board of Directors. made
up of representatives elected by stu-
dents in the senior class. Both groups
worked hard to make the year a suc-
cessful one.


Among the special activities of the
year were a trip to the other side to
visit Canal Zone College, the Senior
Banquet, and the Junior-Senior Prom.
School events of special significance
to seniors were the Jamboree where
Wendy Flores reigned as queen, the
homecoming game victory and the
dance which followed with Rosemary
Christian as queen, and the Christmas
formal at which the Hall of Fame
winners were announced.
It was a year which included those
once in a lifetime events which are so
much a part of being a senior; se-
lecting invitations and cards, senior
skip day, baccalaureate, and of course,
graduation. Altogether, it was a great
year one which the Class of '71
will never forget.


CLASS SPONSOR
Mr Loui, Farur.isi









PATTY ANN CHRISTIAN
June 26, 1942
Bluftield, West Virginia
Patty was a member of the Pep Club at her school in Vir-
ginia before coming to CHS. She was a member of the year-
book staff here, and in her senior year, served as publicity
chairman of the Thespian plays. Patty plans to return to Vir-
ginia after graduation, and enroll in a beautician school.

ROSEMARY CHRISTIAN
October 5, 1953
Coronado, California
Rosemary has attended Cristobal High School for three
years. She participated in "B" League basketball in her sopho-
more year, and the Girls' Drill Team in her senior year. As a
senior, she was selected queen of the Homecoming Dance.
Rosemary plans to attend Texas A&I University where she
will pursue the study of medicine.

CALEB CLEMENT
October 17, 1953
Gatun, Canal Zone
"Cubby" is one of the outstanding athletes in the class of
'71. He has participated in football, baseball, basketball, and
track intramurals, and was a member of the varsity football,
baseball, basketball, and track teams. He was a member of the
"21" Club in his freshman year, and of the "C" Club for the
other three years. "Cubby" plans to attend Canal Zone Col-
lege.

FAITH EMILY COAD
February 26, 1953
Flint, Michigan
Faith entered CHS in the second semester of her junior
.... year. She was a junior varsity cheerleader at her former school
in Michigan. After graduation, Faith plans to become a travel
agent.

FREDERICK COLE
April 13, 1953
Balboa, Canal Zone
ROTC has occupied much of Fred's time in high school.
He was a member of the Boys' Drill Team, and as a senior, a
member of Batallion Staff. He was also a member of the Na-
tional Honor Society and the Senior Class Board of Directors.
Fred's future plans include attending college.

GARY LEE COLLINS
November 13, 1952
Hampton, Virginia
Gary was president of his freshman class at CHS. He was
a member of the "21" Club in his freshman and sophomore
years. Gary participated in intramural and varsity basketball
during all four years in high school. He was a member of the
Student Advisory Committee and the Inter-school Dress Code
Committee. In his senior year, he was initiated into the Na-
tional Honor Society. Gary plans to attend Case Institute of
T I i, .1 .l, in Cleveland, Ohio.


Class


Visits


ZoIe


Frederick Cole














-Aoi
Gary Lee Collins


Pot,- Ann Chr-crsn


Kosemarv (.hnrrlan


\ i


Caleb Clement Jr.









Of '71


Canal


College


JEANNETTE RAMONA COX
August 31, 1952
Managua, Nicaragua
Jeannette was a member of the French Club for four years.
She was a member of the Nurses' Aides Club, and served as
secretary for two years. She was also active in Pink Girls.
Jeannette worked on the year book during each of her four
years in high school, and in her senior year, served as editor.
Jeannette was a member of the National Honor Society, and
served as secretary. She was also a member of the Student Ad-
visory Committee and the Philosophian Society. Jeannette
plans to attend Canal Zone College and later the University
of Florida, studying for a career in medicine. She also plans to
study Spanish during the summer, before attending CZC, in
Mexico or Spain.

KATHLEEN ANNE DERAPS
June 25, 1953
Ancon, Canal Zone
Kathy was a member of the Caribe Club for three years,
and was a member of the advertising staff for the yearbook in
her senior year. Kathy participated in volleyball and speedball
intramurals and was a member of the junior Powder Puff
team. She worked on many committees, and was vice-presi-
dent of the senior class. K.ith\ plans to attend college in San
Antonio, Texas where she will obtain her Bachelor of Science
degree for her career as a registered nurse.

MICHAEL EDWARD DEXTER
July 1, 1953
Fort Benning, Georgia
Mike came to CHS in his junior year, and rapidly became
an active member of the class of '71. In his senior year, he was
president of the CHS Student Association. Mike continued his
participation in athletics at CHS, playing on the varsity tennis
and baseball teams. Mike was a member of the Caribe Club,
the "C" Club, and the National Honor Society. Mike plans to
study engineering at William and Mary or the University of
New Mexico.

PEDRO JUAN DIAZ
February 26, 1952
San Juan, Puerto Rico
Pedro attended CHS for three years. He was a ROTC pla-
toon leader, and a member of the Boys' Drill team. Pedro
plans to enlist in the Army's Special Forces, and Ranger train-
ing, and to attend Officer Candidate School.

WENDY MARIE FLORES
November 1, 1953
Leesville, Louisiana
Wendy was the 1970 Jamboree Queen. She was a member
of the Girls' Drill team in her sophomore year. W\t nd was a
member of the Senior Advisory and Jr.-Sr. Prom Committees.
She plans to attend C.Z.C. for two years, and then transfer to
the United States.

DENISE ANNETTE FOSHEE
February 24, 1953
New Orleans, Louisiana
Denise was a cheerleader and an ROTC sponsor in her sen-
ior year. She lettered in tennis in eleventh grade. Denise was
vice-president of the Caribe Club, and a member of the
French Club and the National Honor S.x, icn Denise plans to
attend college and earn a teaching degree.


Pedro Juan Diaz


Wendy Marie Flores


Denise Annette Foshee












--9





^ ^ ""


'I
i




1 .


John B. Funderburk


T -







Brenda Lee Gibson















Stephen Armand Goulet


Catherine Ann Gercich


Sharon Louise Uoilen


John Michael Hannah


JOHN B. FUNI)ERBURK
January i, 1953
Tucson, Arizona
John participated in varsity track and ..I.l.Il during his fo n .. rs
at CHS. He served on the Jamborec Party Committee. John 1.1l Ii, 1
become either a machinist or a diesel mechanic after graudatio,

CATHERINE ANN GERCICH
January 1. 1953
Lynnwood, California
Cathy has attended CHS for tour years. She participated in N 1.Ik'b1il
intramurals during her freshman and sophomore years. As a senior, ,he
was a Member of the Girls' Drill Team. Cathy also served on the Jr.-Sr.
Prom Committee. Her future plans include study at a college in Cali-
fornia or Florida.

BRENDA LEE GIBSON
December 6, 1953
Fort Bragg, North Carolina
Brenda entered CHS at the beginning of her sophomore year. Sh
participated in swimming, tennis, basketball, and volleyball intramt
rals, and was a member of the varsity tennis team. After graduation
Brenda would like to attend a junior college, travel extensively, an
pursue a career in hairdressing and art.

SHARON LOUISE GOLDEN
April 15. 1953
Anniston, Alabama
Sharon was a member of the CHS senior band for five years, playing
the flute. She officiated at varsity basketball games in her ir. .-iln,
year. After graduation, she plans to attend a a nursing school i: M\i imi,
Florida.

STEPHEN ARMAND GOULET
September 22, 1952
Somerville, Massachusetts
Stephen entered CHS at the beginning of his senior year. At his for-
mer high school he was a member of the A.F.S., the Chess Club rhe
Math League, and the Science Club, and received an award f..r bimng
the best chemistry student in the junior class. He also particip.m.,r in
varsity track and football. Stephen plans a career as a math ten.h.r

PATRICIA GUTIERREZ
July 20, 1952
Fayetteville, North Carolina
Pat has attended CHS tor each of her four years in high scJ.. .I she'
was a member of the Drama Club and assisted with various Tli-hplan
productions. Pat plans to become a woman jockey.

JOHN MICHAEL HANNAH
June 26, 1953
Waynesville, North Carolina
John enjoys motorcycling. He was active in ROTC during hi, trech-
man and sophomore years. He served as a cheerleader in the P-.Vader
Puff game, and as a member of the Jamboree Party Committt. I .hn
plans a career in aeronautical engineering.

ALLEN SCOTT HARMON
September 23, 1952
Annapolis, Maryland
Art is one of Allen's major interests. He was a member of ric .Ai
Club for two years, serving as president in his junior year. He :. ilio
art editor of the newspaper and the yearbook in his senior year Allen
was also active in the French Club and Drama Club. He partic:Fp .cdl in
several plays, and became a Thespian in his senior year. Allen ,.. -n the
"Voice of Democracy" contest at CHS in his junior year. He I- I t
attend the U.S. Merchant Marine Academy, or Chapman FloatiriL ( im-
pus in California. He would like to become an architect or a i..nrier
cial artist.


'I~a~l~~ .


.0wr


Allen Scott Harmon







Caribbean College Club


-Hosts "Senior Vighlt"


D- -k
D ne Frcnesi Hake




_.U

1 :


Isaac Her Mk Sep Heng

Isaac Hcrts Mark Srephern Herrmng


DIANE FRANCES H A L K :
August 21, 1951
Colon, Republic of Panama
Diane has been an active member of many clubs and organizations
at CHS. She was a member of the French Club, the Spanish Club, the
Philosophian Society, the Nurses Aides, the Yearbook staff, and the
Senior Board of Directors; cr' inEr as an officer in several of the clubs.
She also served on the Cafeteria, Senior Advisory, and various dance
committees. Diane plans to pursue a course in business administration,
with plans for a career as an executive rtrc ir

PAUL HERBERT HEADY
March 6, 1953
Olney, Illinois
Paul attended CHS for only two years. At his former high school in
Salem, Illinois, he was a member of the Spanish and Pep Clubs, and
the varsity track team. He participated in the ROTC program at CHS.
Paul plans to major in Public Arts in college with a job in a radio or
television studio in mind.

ISAAC HERES
January 4, 1953
Puerto Armuelles, Chiriqui
Isaac was active in ROTC throughout his high school years, partici-
pating on the Boys' Drill team, and in his senior year, serving as com-
mander of"F" Company. He participated in basketball intramurals, and
as j tre-hrrijn .nd sophomore was a member of the varsity football
team Aticr gradua.nJn, Isaac plans to attend Florida State University.

MARK STEPHEN HERRING
)frr I , 19i
Ancon. Canal Z, ne
Mark has attended Canal Zone schools all his life. Six of these years
were at Cristobal High School. After graduation, Mark plans to learn a
trade


i6


-. I







LCdr C W Murphy, Mrs. Linda Nelson, Capt. A. L. Gallin, Miss Leslie Berger, Mr. Mer-
rick E Banks, and Dr. Levin.


On Tuesday, January 19th, at 7:30
p.m., at the Women's Club Building
in Margarita, the members of the
class of '71, their parents, and friends
attended "Senior Night." This activi-
ty is sponsored annually by the Schol-
arship Committee of the Caribbean
College Club.
The program included a panel of
speakers from various vocational
fields and was stimulating and inter-
esting for all.
Following the meeting, refresh-
ments were served. At this time, the
seniors were given an opportunity to
question each of the speakers individ-
ually concerning his or her special in-
terests.







Senior Class Elects


r "


V


Frederick John Highley















Stephanie Bridiga lies


FREDERICK JOHN HIGHLY
October 19, 1953
Colon, Republic of Panama
Fred has attended Canal Zone schools all his lite, including six years
at CHS. He participated in football intramurals.

NANCY HUSON
May I, 1953
Colon, Republic of Panama
Nancy was in Nurses Aides for three years, and was a Pink Girl for
two years. She was homeroom representative in her sophomore year.
She participated in volleyball intramurals and in the Powder Puff
Speedball Game. Nancy plans to attend Brigham Young University.




STEPHANIE BRIGIDA ILLIES
October 2, 1953
Colon, Republic of Panama
Stephie was in the Spanish Club, Language Lab Club, and the Girls'
Glee Club. She took part in volleyball and speedball intramurals. Ste-
phie plans to go to college and become an occupational therapist.

ERIC THOMAS IRION
July 27, 1953
Oceanside, California
Eric attended CHS for five years. He participated in basketball intra-
murals in his sophomore year. Eric plans to go to -.Il g.


Eric Thomas Irion


ROBERT RUDOLPH JOHNSON
January 8, 1953
Minneapolis, Minnesota
Robert has been at CHS for three years. He plans to travel after
graduation.

SHERRY ANN KERN
Ju/y 109, 195i
Mobile, Alabama
Sherry was in the Caribe Club and was an S.A. representative. She
participated in Volleyball and was on the Drill Team. Sherry plans to
attend C.Z.( then go to the States to earn a degree in data processing.


SIi


R ixbK Rd.ll'p, J..d,-,,...


Sherr) Ann Ir'ri


"t;;









koard Of Directors



ANTONIA KLASOVSKY
March 12, 1953
Cristobal, Canal Zone
Toni was on the Student Advisory Committee and the Board of Di-
rectors. She plans to attend a junior college in Florida and major in
humanities.

FREDERICK EUGENE KNAUSS
October 15, 1952
Nashville, Tennessee
Fred was on the Swim Team and earned his letter. He plans to join
the Army and become a helicopter pilot. He wants to go to Vietnam.


Antonia Klasovsky Frederick Eugene Knauss





NEAL A. LaROCHE
August 28, 1952
England
Neal attended CHS for only one year. He plans to become an art
teacher. i

ANN MARIE LAURITZEN
May 24, 1953
Baltimore, Maryland
Ann Marie was in the Caribe Club and the Band. She plans to attend
college and major in Biology and Oceanography.



Neal A. LaRoche Ann Marie Lauritzen















S-e






SENIOR BOARD OF DIRECTORS
Front Column: Diane Hauke, Carmen Butler, Mike Dexter, Judy McLain. Center Column: Robert Phillips, Wendy Flores, Raul Castro, Kathy
DeRaps. Back Column: Lana Boone, Beth Carter, Dennis Maxwell, Denise Foshee.








RODRIGO LINDO
ll V .*, April 25, 1953
Panama City, Republic of Panama
r "Rod" was a member of the Spanish Club tor four years and was sec-
retary-treasurer in his sophomore year. He worked on several commit-
^'Ma b tees. Rod plans to attend college.

SSHELLEY MADISON LUINI
Sr June 10, 19 3
k Buffalo, New York
Shelley was a cheerleader for two years and participated in .ik rliIll
and volleyball. She was a member of the G.A.A. and the Caribe Club.
Shelley plans to attend college in New York and become an English
Teacher.

Rodrigo Lindo Shelley Madison Lund
HILA P. LYMAN
October 14, 1953
Bremerton, Washington
( Hila lettered in swimming in both her sophomore and freshman
years. She was secretary of the junior class. Hila was on the Girl's Drill
Team, and was Drill Team and Battalion sponsor. Hila plans to attend
Secretarial School.

JOHN HARTLEY MARTIN
March 14, 1953
SPanama City, Republic of Panama
John was president of the junior class. He was ROTC Battalion and
l. iDrill Team Commander. He played intramural basketball for four
years. John plans to attend a Military Academy or join the Armed
Forces.

Hila P. Lyman John Hartley Martin


JAIME MARTINEZ
August 5, 1932
Colon, Republic of Panama
Ott Jaime was active in ROTC and was on the first Drill Team to com-
pete in the States. He plans to join the Army as an officer after college.

b DENNIS PAUL MAXWELL
April 19, 19-5.3
New York City, New York
Dennis was vice president of his sophomore class. He was in ROTC
four years and was "E" Company Commander. Dennis plans to study
Architecture at the University of Florida.


Jaime Martinez Dennis Paul Maxwell


S^ JUDY ANN McLAIN
April 27, 195.3
Colon, Republic of Panama
Judy was in Nurses' Aides and the Thespian Society, and was presi-
dent of both in her senior year. Judy won several acting awards and had
parts in several plays. She plans to attend college.

SARAH LOUISE McLEAN
December 9, 1952
Cristobal, Canal Zone
Sally played basketball and volleyball She worked on the Junior
Privilege Committee and the Senior Advisory Council. Sally plans to
travel in Europe after graduation.


Sarah Louise McLean


Judv Ann McLami



















-f. -


lose Jaime Ntedin3


Karhryn I'aric lillligin


Susr. Ward Miendernhll


Alcida Moinrtenerro


Don Alme Olen


Neil Clitfr.n Parnon


JOSE JAIME MEDINA
March 29, 1953
San Jose, California
This was Jose's first year at CHS. He was an S.A. representative, a
member of the Tradewind and Caribbean Staffs, and a ROTC platoon
leader. He was also a member of the varsity football, baseball, and bas-
ketball teams.

SUSAN WARD MENDENHALL
December 23, 1952
Springfield, Ohio
Susan has attended CHS for only two years. She was very active in
athletics and other school functions in the U.S. and continued her in-
terest at CHS. She participated in varsity and intramural %.rimmir-,'.
tennis, basketball, and volleyball, and was a member of the GAA.
Susan plans to attend Miami University in Oxford, Ohio, majoring in
physical education.

KATHRYN MARIE MILLIGAN
April 23, 1953
Bozeman, Montana
Kathy was a member of the Nurses' Aides Club, and of the Pink
Girls. She served as a student assistant. Kathy played volleyball in her
freshman year. She also served on various decorating and publicity
committees for plays and dances. In her senior year, she was elected
Carnival Queen. Kathy plans to attend Canal Zone College or Monta-
na State University, majoring in elementary education. After college,
she plans to attend airline stewardess school.

ALEIDA MONTENEGRO
February 14, 1953
Colon, Republic of Panama
"Monty" attended CHS for two years. She was a member of the
Spanish Club and participated in volleyball and basketball intramurals.
Monty plans to attend college and pursue a career as a computer pro-
grammer.

WILLIAM A. MURPHY
July 7, 1953
Fayetteville, North Carolina
"Murph" attended CHS for two years. He participated in basketball
intramurals and varsity basketball and football. He was active in
ROTC, and a member of the Boys' Drill Team. He was selected out-
standing MI for the fourth nine weeks. He was also a member of the
senior privilege committee. "Murph" plans to specialize in electronics
in college.

DON ALME OLSEN
June 6, 1953
Whitefish, Montana
Don was active in the sports program at CHS, partriip.iring in varsi-
ty football and swimming and football intramurals. Don plans to at-
tend Canal Zone College, and perhaps transfer to an oceanographic
school.

NEIL CLIFFTON PATTON
February 7, 1952
Colon, Republic of Panama
Neil was one of CHS's most our ,tandinr athletes. He participated in
varsity baseball, track, and football, and lettered every year. He was se-
lected most valuable player of the 1;ri.'.70 school year, and also made
the All Zone Football Team. Neil plans to become an aviator or a den-
tist.

JANE MARY PAULSON
April 10, 1953
Ancon, Canal Zone
Jane participated in volleyball, basketball, and speedball intramurals.
She worked on committees for the Sadie Hawkins Day Dance and the
Jr.-Sr. Prom. Jane plans to attend secretarial school.


Jane Mant Paulson







ROBERT RANDOLPH PHILLIPS
March/ 16, 1953
Montgomerv, Alabama
Robert has been in CHS for three scars, and in this time, had be-
come president of the Caribe Club, Vice-President of the NHS, a "C"
4cl >Club member, President of the Senior Class, and ROTC Battalion Ex-
T ecutive 0111... He lettered in football twice, and twice in baseball. He
S also attended the University of I. ..I for a NSF program, and attend-
ed the Naval Post-graduate School at Monterey, California. Robert
k Plans to study pre-law and then go on to Law School.


Robert Randolph Phillips


Josephine Marie Porbes


Toby Ray Phillips


Ingrid Portier


TOBY RAY PHILLIPS
December 1953
Burgaw, North Carolina
This has been Toby's first year in CHS and he has lettered twice in
track. His future plan is to become a marine biologist.



JOSEPHINE MARIE PORBES
June 11, 1953
New Orleans, Louisiana
Josie has attended Canal Zone Schools tor two years. After gradua-
tion, she plans to get a job and plans on going ahead with her musical
education in piano and chorus.

INGRID PORTIER
September 28. 1953
Djakarta, Indonesia
Ingrid has attended CHS all through her high school years. She was as-
sistant stage manager in the play, "Bell, Book, and Candle" and "The
Black Flamingo." She plans to go to the States and get a job.







-a x-


*4: :iB j i9I


"Actually, it was worth breaking my leg just to be able to put my feet up in Mr. Bock's class," comments senior, Wally Russon.


ro_























Chris Bailey Richardson
,k...:..4
A .


Dann% Ras Robinson


lasmin Anna Rivera


Nescor John Rodriguez


Picture


Not


Available


"aren Lnn Sihill


CHRIS BAILEY RICHARDSON
December 26, 1952
Seattle, 'Wahington
Chris participated in varsity and intramural volleyball during her
three years at CHS. She received a "Driver of the year" award for the
year '69-'70. In her senior year, she was sponsor of"E" company. Chris
was married and plans to continue her education.

JASMIN ANNA RIVERA
October 31, 1953
Cham, Germani
Jasmin was a member of the French Club at CHS. F .11. ,%l inig gradua-
tion, she plans to attend college, major in I nu.ii_'t. and then travel.





DANNY RAY ROHINo)N
April 20, 1953
Covington, Kentucky
Danny was a member of the Tradewind Staff, the Caribbean Sports
Parachute Club, the Civics Club, the Drama Club, and the choir. He
played basketball in his sophomore year. Danny plans to attend college
in Texas, Kcnruk'., or North Carolina.

NESTOR JOHN RODRIGUEZ
September 18, 1953
Santurce, Puerto Rico
Nestor has attended CHS for two and a half years. He plans to study
music and architecture after graduation.




KAREN LYNN SCHILL
April 25, 1953
Galion, Ohio
This was Karen's first year at CHS. She was a member of the Span-
ish Club, the G.A.A., and the newspaper staff. In her senior year she
was editor of the second page (editorial page) of the Tradewind. She
also played tennis in her freshman and senior years. Karen plans to
major in medical t,,hn-il, ,\ at Canal Zone College.

NAI-YUEN SHUM
September 17, 1953
Macau, China
Nai-Yuen has attended CHS for two years. He hopes to become a
chemist.


Nai-Yuen Shum


JAMES H. SPANGLER
March 18, 1953
San Pedro, California
This was Jim's first year at Cristobal High School. He participated
in intramural and varsity track at his former school. After ior Bl]u.li;n.
Jim plans to become an automobile mechanic.

JACQL'E .INE FAITH SPRINGER
December 8, 1953
Ft. Eustis, V'ireini:
Jackie was a member of the Caribe Club. She marched with the
Girls' Drill Team, and in her Senior year, was the sponsor of"E" com-
pany. Jackie plans to become an x-ray technician.


Jacqueline Fsiih Springer
















DOUGLAS ROBERT STEVENS
April 11, 1953
Panama City, Republic of Panama
Doug was a member of the Spanish and Language Lab
Clubs. In his senior year, he served as historian of the first,
and vice-president of the latter. He lettered in baseball in
both his junior and senior years. Doug plans to attend col-
lege in Texas, majoring in languages and history with
plans for a career in the diplomatic corps.

ELIGIO FERNANDO THOMAS
January 7, 1951
Panama City, Republic of Panama
Eligio was active in ROTC at CHS, and in his senior
year, was commander of the boys' Drill Team. He also par-
ticipated in junior varsity basketball. Eligio plans to join
the army, and perhaps later attend college.

LEWIS EDWARD VALDEZ
November 19, 1953
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
ROTC and dramatics have occupied much of Lewis'
time in high school. He has attended Leadership School
and participated in several Thespian productions. He
played football in his junior year, and was also elected to
the National Honor Society. Lewis plans to attend college,
and perhaps later join the army.

JOSE F. VALENCIA
June 8, 195i
San Juan, Puerto Rico
Joe was a member of the varsity baseball, track, and
swimming teams. He was also active in ROTC, marching
on the Boys' Drill Team, and in his senior year, serving as
executive officer of "F" Company. Joe plans to attend
Brooklyn College in New York.

DANIEL PAUL VALENTINE
October 1., 1953
Detroit, Michigan
Danny was the yearbook photographer for four years.
He was a homeroom alternate in ninth and tenth grades,
and in his junior year, served as treasurer of the SA. He
was also active in ROTC. Danny plans to attend college,
join the Air Force, and pursue a career in the field of avia-
tion.

SYLVIA ANN VAMPRINE
Novemtner 1, 191is
New Orleans. Louisiana
Sylvia was a member of the Nurses' Aides Club and
served as historian for one year. She played in the CHS
band for four years, and was a member of the Tradewind
Staff. She served on various dance committees, and was a
varsity cheerleader in her senior year. Sylvia plans to major
in law at L.S.U.


*0


LINDA ALICE VEST
November 6, 1952
Ft. Clayton, Canal Zone

THOMAS KENNETH WALLENIUS
April 24, 1952
Helsinki, Finland

TERRY LEE WALLINE
November 22, 1953
Fort McClellan, Alabama
Terry participated in swimming and water polo. He was
active in ROTC, a member of the Color Guard in his jun-
ior year, and of the Boys' Drill Team in his senior year.
Terry plans to attend college in California, majoring in ar-
chitectural engineering.

KAREN WESTERBERG
August 15, 1953
Flint, Michigan
During her high school years, all of them at CHS,
Karen was a member of the Caribe Club, the swim team,
the Girls' Chorus, and the Tradewind Staff After gradua-
tion, she plans to study computer programming.

JENNY DEL MILAGRO WIRTZ
March 18, 1951
San Jose, Costa Rica
Jenny was a member of the Spanish Club, and served as
treasurer during her junior and senior years. She partici-
pated in varsity ,. J 11, ..II during her freshman and sopho-
more years, Jenny plans to become a nurse.

PRICILLA ANN ZAVINSKY
January 22, 1953
Terrell, Texas
This was "Penny's" first year at CHS. She was a mem-
ber of the Nurses' Aides Club, In her junior year, she re-
ceived a $25 savings bond for her bookkeeping. Penny
plans to attend I ,tirrn.i Beauty College.


Jenny del Milagro Wirtz


SA i




Pricilla Ann Zavinsky


Jose F. Valencia


Douglas Robert ns
Douglam Robert Stvcns


Eligio Fernando Thomas


Lewis fdward Valdez









aces Without o acts


Sr"


Ralph Ender


George Scheibe
George Scheibe


Alexis Normandia


And Aacts Without aces.


MICHAEL R. ANDREE
June 5,. 1953
Annapolis, Maryland

/DAVID RAYMOND DIAZ
September 9, 195 i
Baltimore. Maryland
David played varsity football during his junior year at CHS, and
helped plan the Jamboree party. He plans to attend technical school
after graduation.

DANIEL ' 1 I Y FERGUSON
june 26. 1951
Macon, Georgia

RICHARD ALLEN KRESGE
October 9, 1 )s
Ancon, Canal /one
Rickv plans to attend trade school after graduation.


THOMAS ADDISON PURSLEY
July 9, 1952
Suffern, New York
Tom was active in sports during his high school years, participat-
ing in intramural football and wrestling, and playing on the varsity
football team. He was a member of the "C" Club, and in his senior
year, served as secretary. He was also a member of the Math Club
and the Rifle Team, and was active in ROTC. Tom plans to attend
the United States Military Academy at West Point, New York.

DANNY DALE TWEEDY
December 23, 1952
Victervillc, California
Danny was a homeroom representative in his sophomore year.
He plans to enter an apprenticeship program in Tucson, Arizona,
planning a career as a carpenter.

MARIA DE LOS ANGELES ZAYAS
January 4. 1952
Mayaguez, Puerto Rico
Maria was a member of the Spanish and Pep Clubs. She plans to
become a psychologist.


. .


Davie Teves


. .






Senior faces Display 1axy Moods ..


r
1W!:


-- -a


Danny Robinson


I










John Martin, Dennis Maxwell


- 'Stephanie I ..
Stephanie Illies


Danny Valentine, Sherry Kern, Mr. Reeves






Camera Captures grief (limpses Of Saeior /c. .

PARADES . ELECTIONS
I fml. .


Ellie Blevins, Jane Paulson, Rod Lindo, Shelly I un. ( irn.' il
Denise Foshcc, Dennis Maxwell, Cathy Gercich, '. .., I I .. -

CONVERSATIONS ..


0ii



Q ., n, K ,rl.. . lll, '
,n.1 l

Diine Hjukc jnd Snrdr Alhcrei


Aleida Montenegro, Jeannie Basset, and
Vivian Boseman.
AND MORE CLASSES ...


.-.. _. _' Js *11-- -< ...-._: ,,e-

4A -i- .r .I B

Alma Austin. Lana Bonne, Inerid Portier, Jenny -' i I i r e H .n l ri in It r I \'ilin .I n. PIU'I n. nl ( Ili hC
Alma Austin, Lana Bonne, Ingrid Portier Jenny \X r I F \i i Ii \\ iin, Nd~ph l ict P'j'-1 r d(1,--r. cL:(


N ii u t u rn hun.. NM r ,mirrli. 1)..,u *.L r -n ,.bt'.t ul.n, nt m d l,. tt rr-





JtroduciH . .
(he fall Of lame


'-El


f'


~~~~~~-- 4...~.r't.r*~(]III~~







I- t.


Mr.


and Miss C6HS


MAickael Veter


- Class


Of


'77


. 4 .


'4


I-- -


--4


DiaHe -Hauke

















AMost Jntellectual


Robert Phillips


ana foone


Most
Iichael Dexter


Likely


ro


Succeed


Denise 7oshee


~


494






_*,,, a
^^^a 4 l-- ?^ I\


i~arumrr,


Rest
Dressed
Carame Kutler
Rodrigo Cido


Rest
lookiiq
fokn if tnderburk
Wendy Alores


I:


c








Rest
Dancers
Carmen Hutler
Raul Castro


Friendliest

IHila Cyman
Dennis JIaell
Denise foshee








Most
talented
Judy aMcCdaif
ZDomald Ryrd


most
Athletic
Patsy A ustiH
NVeil Pattom


W'llEU






Also PreseHtiHg RuHers-Up . .


Vqm~


1st Row: Robert Phillips Mr. CHS, Most Likely To Succeed; Shelly Lund Miss CHS. 2nd Row: Michael Dexter Most Intellectual; Lana
Boone Most Likely To Succeed. 3rd Row: Raul Castro Best Dressed; Wendy Flores Best Dressed. 4th Row: William Murphy Wit-
tiest, Best Dancer; Beth Carter Best Dancer. 5th Row: Jose Medina Best Personality; Susan Mendanhall Most Athletic. 6th Row. Allen
Harmon Most Talented; Rodrigo Lindo Best Looking.

AMd Chose Jot Pictured ...


Wittiest
Patricia jutierrez
Mark J-erriln


Kunners-up.
Sandra Alberga Most Intellectual
Rosemary Christian Best Looking
Toni Klasovsky Best Dressed, Most Talented
Sherry Kern Wittiest
"Cubby" Clement Most Athletic
Hila Lyman Best Personality


h'est

Personality
jfam jorneby
Dennis JMawell
























A time in tke lie of each girl
and boy
A time o sorrow, and yet of

#radfuation realization
brings,
Of tke end of many things
Classes, dances, football
games will be no more,
the magic of the kigh
school year is o'er
though some may consider
all things done,
Chey soon will larn
(ife's just begun









Juniors


5-.k


4 /


Cr

<'4


sizzz- z~z


my
~f~

/


a3t -
^ _.


rI~


iN'


IW


Brian
Allen
Barbara
Banks
Barbara
Betcher
Henry
Borscllino


Martha
Anton
Michael
Barger
Gerianne
Blanchette
Debra
Boswell


Michael
Apodaca
Jai me
Barraza
Robert
Bloemer Jr
Rita
Boyland


At\


-w r


Sheila
Alberiga
Paul
B, wl

Marir
Boonn


vj)atie
Alger
Baker
Frank
Berry
Richaird
Boot h


1



























I


-I


4"


4'v1v


bd a


Janet
Brandtnbu.ir
Helen
Castro
Frank
Cicchetto
Mark
Collins


Linda
Brock
Cheryl
Caudill
Pamela
Coad
Sonia
Colon


Carlos
Brown
Jay
Caudill
i/Aminta
Cobb
Wayne
Couts


Catherine
Carlisle
Deborah
Cheshire
Roberta
Cole
Ivette
Cumin rlL''


Mary
Cash
Randy
( I ,i . .
./,Chcryl
Coleman
Karen
Currier


yr)
h


2


^


* r-












I--, -. r


ii-,

'it


k


Emilie
Daniel
v/Clifford
Ferrell


- A


John
Day
Maria
Fontanez


0-

kI
William
Deaton Jr.
Andrew
Foshee


I



1-


Nancy
Edmonson
Stephan
Fugleberg


ft
*q r














14,/


Jimmy
( ;i win
Ann
(ion/Ale/


William
Gillespie
Zan
Green


Nadia Robles, "The feminine mystique
at work!"


Shelia
Dancer
Brenda
Egger


Mardettr
( i.n Tcr
(nogucn


m




















CLASS OFFICERS: Harry Townsend (Vice-President), Cathy Carlisle (president), Patricia
Paine (Treasurer), Jackie Parker (Secretary).


The class of '72 was the largest and
one of the most active and spirited
classes of Cristobal High School.
Through the efforts of class officers
the Juniors obtained an open lunch
on Tuesday and Thursdays of each
week. Another highlight of the year
was the selection of the class ring
which was round with a gold stone.
The Juniors will long remember
PSAT and NMSQT which are among
the many tests they took in prepara-
tion for college. The girls in the Jun-
ior Class organized and presented a
fashion show which demonstrated the
do's and don't of pants wear. Juniors
also planned and presented a Junior


Class Assembly. They were also re-
sponsible for the annual Junior-Senior


Prom
iors.


honoring the graduating Sen-


Carol Ross, Marian Kredell, Jackie Parker, Lynn Gregg, Sheila Alberga, Cathy Carlisle, Mary
Norval, Titi Cole, Karen Currier, Nancy Edmondson. The do's and don't of dress wear.


Barbara Grier Raymond Gsell
Joseph Herring Kathleen Hess


Edwin Hammond
Kenneth Hill II


Mark Hanly
William Huffman


Marian Gregg
Patricia Hauke
















U't


C-~ 'V



K)





0r


AA }


'dl


June Ilund
Katherine Kraus
Kathleen MiGilbcrry


yuniors


Irma Mon clova
Patricia Paine


James Jackson
Marian Kredell
John Meeker


Douglass Jeffries
Christina Loizeaux
Shvla Miller


Paulette Jordi
Donald Mans
Michael Minchart


Daniel Knauss
Michael McCann
Dale Mitre


6aranted Open Cuch Z'wice A Week


John Musser 11
Louise Palmer


Mary Norval
Ronald Palser


Beverly Olsen
Marc Parker


Stanley Oster
Deborah Pate


'1


L'


4,


A


S

.- I 1
4


. : .P;>',:,. '... lr


cy--
r






















Robin Pritham
Marlene Rice


Raymond Ramos
Susan Ridge


Jose Recio
Randy Robinson


Carmen Reed
Nadia Robles


Lourdes Reyes
Carol Ross


Class


Of


'72 Picks Vellow Stone 7or Ring


Deborah Rowley Joseph Romeski Juan Sanchez Gary Sheibe Frank Scott
Michael Scott Arthur Serig Higinia Shaffer v-James Shafe r tStephen Shobe
Ronnie Sills Judith Simmons Valarie Simms Jean Smith Michael Snider






Juliors


Display


Cheir


zCalents


funior


Class


Assembly


I.


I

K'


Kathryn Stephens Peter Swain
Loisa Thomas Harry Townsend


Reggie Southerland
Catherine Tcrwilliger
Robert Tschuml


Mattia Spagna
Dorothy Terwilliger
Carol Wertz


Michael Spagna
Ehukai Teves
Aurelia Williams


The one and only, Brenda Egger!


Susann Zachry Maribel Zayas


At


Michael Wood Ann Worthen


Marisol Zayas






latecomers


Douglas Jeffries. "I'm standing like this be-
cause there's no ball."


Linda Brock, Ann Gonzalez, Mary Norval. THREE FOR THE ROAD.










Sophomores


I.



NiiAl
%%


\ .. '


4


\.l


0L


/I


Donna
Baker
,~ Timothy
Blanchard
Jcttrcv
Briem
Susan
Burge
(Gcerald
C otfin


lamrnes
Barr
Paul
Blechcr
Edward
Brings Jr.
Kathryvn
Bush
Lourdcs
Colon


Niuikl.i
Ad,111un1
Roscnr\

lurbari
Blocnimerr
B roh n

IJ, IIIrc


(,il
A podai a


B< k
L Ptriuot
Brown
.ulum
Cimino


Stephen
Aponte
Michael
Bjornebv
J IPam
Bridwcll
Karl
Bundv

Cirulli


Marilyn
Baxter
VeffTrv
Blevins
Kathleen
Brown
y/Diane
Caroll
Nv/Kathleen
Colpe


Ilr


B`ddl


"--


)


;F. I
"4
:_rrrr
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