Caribbean

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Caribbean
Physical Description:
Serial
Language:
English
Creator:
Cristobal High School
Publisher:
Yearbook House
Place of Publication:
Kansas City, Missouri
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Canal Zone
Yearbook
Genre:
serial   ( sobekcm )

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID:
UF00093680:00053


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text




9


Caribbeal 1971


Cristobal High Sckool
Coco Solo


Canal Zone


Volume 54


4.


4-p







edication. ..........
infoar al ... ..........
oarmal .... .........
a=culty and Curriculum..
Classes ............
Organizations ..... ..


. . . . ..4
................ 6
............... 28
............... 30
............... 60
.............. 122


rCable

of

Contents


4


In Keeping With Che Modern 'rend Coward greater
~7leibility A yearbook Organization, (he CHS Annual
Staff Js introducing An entirely JVew And Different 7or-
mat jn Che 1971 Caribbean. Departing from Che 'radi-
tional Concept Of Separate Sections, ach Introduced byA
Division Page, On Each ?acet Of Che School ife; Che
yearbook Js Divided Into Only (wo Jlain Sections, 9or-
mal And Informal Appearing In Che Formal 1alf Are:
Administration And Faculty, Class Pictures, Organization
Pictures, (eam Photos, Queens And Cheerleaders, Adver-
tising, And Jder. Chis Section ContainsAll he bormaI-
ty Required Of A Good yearbook. Jn Che Eciting Infor-
mal Section, We Have Attempted Co PresentAn Uninter-
rupted Candid Story OfSchool Cife, fust As you Eepe-
rienced It.


Sports. ..................
Special Activities .............
Editor's Page .................
'iger Boosters ................
Advertisements ................
under ......................


..... 140
.....158
.....169
.....170
..... 173
..... 187


I,





Dedication


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St JPP,4,


Mrs. Adamary grikht


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GuiddaHce

Counselor

Retires


After

36 years


At 8HS

The CHS annual staff wishes to
dedicate the 19'1 Caribbean to Mrs
Adamary Anderson Bright, in recog-
Inition and appreciation of her man.
years of devoted service to the sru-
dents of Cristobal High School.
Mrs. Bright was born in Jackson-
ville, Florida She attended school in
Houston. Texas, during her earl)
years, but returned to Jacksonville to
complete her secondary education at
Duzal High School She received her
A.B. in Education at Florida State
College for Women in Tallahassee.
and completed her graduate work for
a degree in history at the Universitr
of Ann Arbor in Michigan
After teaching at Jacksonville Jun-


-v
m p7


Kathie Danielsen smilingly receives assistance from Mrs. Bright in planning her college ca-


reer.

ior High School for a short time, she
came to the Canal Zone in 1935.
Since that time she has served capably
and well in many positions at Cristo-
bal High School. Among these are: a
teacher of seventh and eighth grade
English, social science, vocational
guidance, social studies, girls' advisor,
and the position as a Guidance Coun-
selor which she has held from 1951 to
the present. During her many years at
CHS. Mrs. Bright received a number
of Outstanding Service Awards for
her distinguished service to the Canal
Zone Schools Division.


In addition to teaching and coun-
seling, Mrs. Bright also sponsored a
number of school activities and orga-
nizations such as the National Honor
Society. It was Mrs. Bright who orig-
inated the Zephyr, and the Caribe
Club. She is truly an outstanding or-
ganizer; efficient, and hard-working.
Mrs. Bright has done a great deal
of traveling during her years at CHS,
visiting many countries in both Cen-
tral and South America, as well as in
Europe. Both faculty and students are
saddened by the journey Mrs. Bright
is about to make as she retires from
the faculty of CHS. Her guidance will
be long remembered by the countless
students whose educations and careers
she helped plan.









Mrs. Bright advises Shyla Miller on her
schedule for next year.


K'


T-





















Elena Maxwell and Brenda FL',r r


-I


Stephanic Illics. Almanubia Austin, Vivian Boseman, Jenny .\ n r and Carmen Butler.


Douglas Jeffries, Mr. Johnson, and Nancy
Edmonson.


A
jYew
year
/egits .


. .


IO\









































Mr Hieronymus (S.A. sponsor) and Mi-
chael Dexter (S.A. president).


icy Edmonson (S.A. secretary).

The halls of CHS were a mass of con-
fusion on September 1, 1970, as hun-
dreds of students congregated around
the bulletin boards on which homeroom
numbers were posted. Others lingered to
chat with old friends or to make new ac-
quaintances; summertime experiences
were shared and compared. The perenni-
al excitement of the "tirst day of school"
was in the air. This enthusiasm persisted
throughout the orientation assembly, in
which students were welcomed to CHS,
new teachers introduced, and the new
Student Association officers installed.
However, with the ringing of that first
bell, order began to emerge as students
fell back into the familiar routine of
school life. Another school year had
begun.


Debbie Meeker

















The deserted halls are quiet, a soft
breeze whispers through the empty
corridors there is no indication now
of the activities and incidents which
the coming day may bring.


~F~-r





















Suddenly, the stillness is shattered
by the slamming of a locker door, the
sounds of shuffling footsteps, shouted
conversations, and noisy greetings are
heard once more. A new day has
begun, the magic of the morning is
no more.








yIIl KRilgs,

Seats Are

Assumed. .


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/
/, .-
I--


Patty Rodriguez, Linda Mendenhall
Z


Ann Terwilliger, Dolores Santiago. Ivettc
( urninigs Carlo. Brown. Susann Zach-


ery, Susan
Bovland.


Burge, Christina Loizaux Rita
Burge, Christina Loizeaux, Rita


Li


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J


Ckhe


Issac Heres


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osnoing
Routine
esumes . .


II


Mary Norval and Denise Foshee.


Senior High Band
Senior High Band











Upon entering the classroom, a student assumes more than a seat, he assumes all
the privileges and responsibilities which accompany his position in this place of
learning the school. Having brought together the teachers and the taught, the
school has fullfilled its function what follows is determined by these individu-
als.
Often, it seems, minds are more eager and alert as the day begins, and the op-
portunities afforded by the morning hours should not be missed. To bring to
each student success at last this is the goal of every morning class.


1I-1


L


Diane Carroll


Mike Hayden


r




























is A I
After a satisfying lunch, students head to
the student's lounge.


More complaints were heard con-
cerning the lunch hour than perhaps
any other facet of school life. Lunch
was served in four shifts; those on the
early shift complained that it was too
early to eat, and those on the late
shift complained that it was too late.
Once in the cafeteria, however, no
one seemed to have any real trouble
eating.
The lunch hour provided a brief
respite from classes which was wel-
comed by all. Juniors and seniors took
advantage of their open-lunch privi-
lege to "eat out" on alternate days. In


spite of this, and the many meetings
scheduled during the lunch hour, the
cafeteria was always filled with hun-
gry, noisy students; eating, chatting
with friends or doing a little last min-
ute studying. Those wishing to leave
the cafeteria early, spent their lunch
hour in the pleasant surroundings of
the student lounge located directly be-
neath the cafeteria.
In spite of the frequent complaints,
most students found the lunch hour
one of the most relaxing and enjoya-
ble periods of the school day.


Senior + Open lunch + Car
Heart.


= Happy


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Ry nRbro hav a c









Raymond Robertson. "I'll have a chili dog and please include the hot dog!"


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Carol Wertz. Karen Currier. "Reservation made. Fork over!"


I


Denise Foshee. "It's the real thing ap-
oetite!"


Lunchtime is a good time to make friends.


Sylvia Vamprine. "I can't help it! I'm hun-
grv'"







Students


Njaoy


Comforts


Of Remodeed

Cafeteria


.. and a lowered, insulated ceiling gave the cafeteria a new look of elegance. Included
among the comments of students were such remarks as ...


..s t class
M.%i', it's got class!" .


"It's like eating in fancy r ur
"It's like eating in a fancy rr 4raurriar






























"It almost makes eating here a pleasant
experience "


Then there were those who lust laughed, and .


... of course, those who couldn't wait to get away and ...


S. enio% the beauties of the "great outdoor'r"














I ________________________________________


Refreshed from a relaxing lunch
hour, students returned at 11:30 to re-
sume their regular routine. Each after-
noon included three hours of classes
- with the exception of seniors with
sixth-period study hall, who were per-
mitted to leave early. For some, the
enthusiasm characteristic of the
morning hours appeared to wave;
while others seemed to have awak-
ened at least. All, however evidenced
an increased restlessness as the hour
approached 2:15 and the ringing of
the final bell.


R r. ..


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! C.
S'V
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TIr' -


Cigers
OEthusiasmI


Display


Sager


Aftermaoo
Activities
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Im "



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Jose Medina and Mike McCann.


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With the ringing of the final bell at 2:15, many students rush eagerly to the
waiting buses thinking only "Free! at last!" Others also hurry anxious to
begin the extra-curricular activities which play such an important role in the life
of a student. Enj. i r.n'. the company of those who share similar interests; whether
it be an advanced math or foreign language class, sports, drill team, journalism,
or dramatics, it is a pleasant and profitable way to spend an afternoon.


Stephanie Illies and Denise Foshee.


jean Smith and Jose Medina.








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Lana Boone, Jay Alonis, Michael Dexter, Stephen Goulet.


Susan Mendenhall


















- I.


*. d.:nxoi ;
. ,.,j g*.* *.*~!+';~j: I.I l* *; ''*1 i a;~
I .L *


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A


The setting of the sun brought a change in the appearance of both the school
and the students. With the coming of darkness, another of the many facets ot
CHS was revealed. The evening activities. This was the time for bonfires and
football games; swim meets and track meets; hours of practice and reviews for
ROTC cadets ..


ii'_










TEEN CLUB DANCES ...


Neil Patton, Rosemary Christian, Wally Russon.



. AND FORMALS...


Jimmy Barraza













.. CONCERTS: Practice for the
cast and crew of various plays: Dra-
matic Productions ...


Luann Ware, Chrisina Loitaux. Linda Mtrrick


... all those activities without which
school life would be quite incom-
plete.


Hila Lsman. Robtrt Ph11iPS




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A Place Of learunig
is to Cearm.
Aid Vet from
Day 'Co Day
Jt Also becomes
A Place 'o Cive,
A Bridge (hat
Spans (he #ap
Of Age And 4 rings
aCothekr (he Ceackers
And Che Caught.


rke Huiman M iNd
Must Reach kI
Its Own ZDirection
towardd its Own 4oal
Alon# 'Mhe Path Of
ICife One "May
Aeet A hundred
boes Or A thousand
riends


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i. .

....


JAMES H. PFAU Cristobal High School Principal
JAMES H. PFAU Cristobal High School Principal


To the Yearbook Staff:
"Thanks for the Memories" is the
title of a song that was popular some
years ago. As we record in this book
the events of the 1970-71 school year
at Cristobal High School we can sure-
ly say with gratitude and even a bit of
pride, "thanks for the memories."
You who have studied hard and
have given of yourselves to school ac-
tivities have shown by your Tiger
spirit that the busiest people are also
the happiest people.
Best wishes to all of you as you
continue your education here or else-
where. Although your highest com-
mitment may well be to academic ex-
cellence, you would not be wise to
pursue scholarship at the expense of
the development of an honorable
character, physical well-bunin.', or a
pleasant personality. It is hoped that
the discipline of commitment to these
qualities will earn you a happy free-
dom of spirit and a sense of accom-


plishment. May you continue to mark happy memories.
each milestone with satisfaction and
James H. Pfau
Principal


"I'm a firm believer in the 'Tigers'!"


.Adminuistration


I


Oc~-` Ir















PAUL JEFFRIES BA C)lor.idi
State College. M A Colur.ido St.ic Col.
lege; Graduate \\ork. Unix Siothern (.-aI
forma, Calit \X'esttrn Unincrs-ir "Sclk a
profession or oicup.atnn that i! ihallcng.
ing and enjo\ ble Smile and be hjpp "


L-
I SUPERINTENDENTS STAFF, U.S. SCHOOLS: Mr. Ross Anderson, Supervisor, Phrsikal Education and Athletics, U.S. Schools; Dr. Ken-
neth Lake. Director of Curriculum; Mr. Stewart Brown, Supervisor, inim in;n pools and a.ifi\. Dr. Charles Latimer, Deputy Superintendent
i of Schools; Mr. James Cook, Supervisor of Instruction, U.S. Secondary Schools; Mr. GC ire\c Willinghl.iin, Supervisor of Instruction, U.S. Sec-
I ondar Schools; Mr. F.A. Castles, Superintendent of Schools (..,./) Mr. Vernon Caturia, Supervisor of Instruction, U.S. Elementary Schools;
SDr. Victor Herr, Supervisor of Music, U.S. Schools; Dr. James Wolf, Coordinator, Special Edu ajinon. Mr. David Speir, Assistant Superintend-
ent, U S. Secondary School; Mrs. Shirley Makibbin, Supervisor of Instruction, U.S. Schools; Mrs. Frances Sampsell, Assistant Superintendent
U.S. Elementary Schools; Mr. Zander Krowitz, Administrative Assistant; Mr. Robert Dahlstom, Supervisor, Education Data Processing.








Office Staff


The competent members of the
CHS office staff handled all general
clerical work for the administration
and faculty. Included among their
duties were official correspondence
and paper work. They were also in
charge of operating office machines
and the intercom system, and an-
swering the telephone. They main-
tained the record and files of each stu-
dent, mailed report cards, and sent
and received transcripts.












CI~C



The clinic was an important provi-
sion for the health and safety of Cris-
tobal High School students. The clin-
ic was staffed with trained nurses who
provided emergency first aid; and per-
formed certain routine checks on each
student. The clinic was also a place
for students to rest when unwell, and
for the storage of each students' per-
manent health records. The clinic also
sponsored tuberculosis and chest X-
rays for students in certain grades. Dr.
Levin, the Public Health Officer for
the Atlantic Side, visited the school
almost every morning. Dr. Chevelle,
the school physician for the Canal
Zone Schools, was available every
Wednesday.


. ....
Ir-r
MSA= 8"


I1


MRS ALLEN, MRS TAYLOR, MISS GRFFITHS
MRS. ALLEN, MRS. TAYLOR, MISS GRIFFITHS.


,4D\


DR LEIN, KAREN MRS BLANCHETT. Maybe this will oo your fever a b






DR. LEVIN, KAREN McKOWN, MRS. BLANCHETTE "Maybe this will cool your fever a bit."


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.-......_ -_
Mrs. Bright, Laurie Nairn "Your appointment i :lr I1 ..rI n Frndj


hJI


Mr lower,. I homas iehre. William .in.
tiago. Henry Boritlliono "You bt-.i "anr
to go to Kings' Poin '"

I.
w~m


A final drcsion brings satisfaction to Ka-
rhie Danielsen and Mrs Brichr


Guidance is the process of helping
persons make the best possible de-
cisions concerning their lives, and aid-
ing them in solving their problems. It
includes helping students choose the
proper courses to take in school, and
aiding them in deciding what careers
to follow after their education is com-
pleted. Such decisions require that a
person have full and correct knowl-
edge about himself and his world.
The guidance counselors at Cristobal
High School aim to provide students
with information so that they may
make the best possible decisions in
life. The two principal methods used
for this are c_,unsulin. and testing.
Counseling consists chiefly of discus-
sions between a student and his coun-
selor concerning his interests, apti-
tudes, and special problems. Testing
is an important guidance tool. Apti-
tude, personality, and intclligcnce
tests provide counselors with much


ADAMARY BRIGHT Counselor;
B.A., Florida State Univ., M.A., Univ.
of Michigan. "Life will never be dull
if you will continue to learn . "


-A



V:.
ROBERT MOWERY Counselor;
B.S. and MS., Indiana State Univ.
"Take advantage of the opportunities
in high school."


LUKE C. PALUMBO Attendance
Counselor; B.S. Ed., NW. Missouri
State. "There is no substitute for work
to be happy and successful."




useful information. Other important
guidance tools are books, p.imphlllrs.
and films used to help students decide
on courses of study and future careers.







Library
The library, with its vast collection
of books, was a familiar stopping
place for CHS students. Throughout
the year, they used the library and its
many resources. The quiet, academic
atmosphere made it the perfect place
for studying and peaceful solitude
found there provided an excellent


background for the reading of books.
Students made good use of the library
during homeroom and studyhalls;
checking out books for reports, using
reference books, or simply browsing
through the library's collection of pa-
perbacks and magazines.
Mr. Wells, the school librarian,


was always available for students who
needed help in locating a certain book
or in making a special report. There
were also at least two girls serving as
library assistants each period. They
helped students use the card catalog
and check out books.



I

^"1


DAYTON N. WELLS Librarian; B.S., University
of Idaho, M. Ed., University of Oregon. "Read to
help you become what you want to be."


"Peace at last!"


Faith Coad, Patricia Christian, Janna Loizeaux, Terra Brown, Lana Boone, Clover Shobe, Barbara Yerxa, Jeanne Calkins. Library Assistants.


AL--. , -








Special

Education


GRACE S. PFAU Reading; B.S.,
Valley City State College; M.A., Uni-
versity of Minnesota. "If talented, ca-
pable people can match their dissatis-
faction and concern with positive,
concerted action, they should be able
to correct the ills they so rightly de-
plore."


Duke Collins and De Jesus Ruperto help Mrs. Pfau correct papers.


EARL C. SHARICK- Special Educa-
tion; B.A., M.S., Illinois State. "Work
hard and stay in school."


The Special Education department
was added to the CHS curriculum in
1960. In Special Education, students
received extra help in their academic
studies, learned crafts, and learned the
perspectives of human relationships
and civic responsibilities.
The remedial reading program pro-


vided special instruction to improve
reading skills and helped assure a stu-
dent of success in krc-pini with his
ability. Sccmingl% average students
improved the quality of their reading
skills with the help of the Special
Education Department.


Reading holds the interest t o the Remedial Rc.lin.c tl.in s


Mr. Sharick helps his class drill in math
with -1.lh cards.





















EDWIN M. KOZIOL Art; B.A.,
Michigan State Univ. "Find out what
your responsibilities are and prepare
to meet them in order to gain control
of your life as rapidly and completely
as possible."


.s. ii at




Class Portrait


*f~.


Artists waiting for an inspiration!



: is i, ..... "A


In creative arts, a student learns to
express himself through different
media. With this in mind, the tiI-
lowing courses were taught -it (CHS
this year. Art 7, an intrnduct.ion to
drawing, painting, lettering. ccr.i nics,
crafts, covering techniques, ind the
use of tools with emph.isi police
on developing skills, ima .in.mtrn. .ind
art judgement. Art 8, a rcinturcmei-nt
of knowledge gained in Art ', vith
greater emphasis placed on the la-ri
elements of design. Art I. a bal.i be-
ginning art course for ill ,tud-nt
grades 9-12 which empha.iizcd rthc de-
velopment of drawing skill and the
study of design concepts It intlIetd
drawing, painting, lettering. po.-str-
making and a variety of cr.itr, Art 11,
an advanced art course for all students
grades 10-12. It involved art apprecia-
tion and a deeper investigation of de-
sign and color theory with emphasis
placed on individual organization and
the carrying out of art projects. The
student had an opportunity to devel-
op skills in the area of his choice, Art
III, which included appreciation and
advanced creative work.


With a sweep of the brush, a masterpiece is created.


Art


Brenda Gibson.


Ak. ot







RIusiess Education


j'-


Would you believe the class average is 85 wpm? Would you believe 35 wpm with 3 errors?


DIANE FITE Typing I, 11, Soc.
Studies 7; B.S., East Texas State U.
Mrs. Fite likes her new home in
Panama, especially the tropical weath-
er. She is originally from Texas,
where she previously taught at Bowie
Jr. High in Irving.
Her favorite hobbies are water
skiing, boating, and fishing. Her ad-
vice to students? "Be individuals."

.. ". .... ..




;;:s* 1
,


The Business Education depart-
ment offered an excellent selection of
courses for the student planning a ca-
reer in business, as well as for the col-
lege-bound students. The skills and
knowledge taught by this department
will be useful regardless of the stu-
dent's future occupation.
General Business gave the students
a basic understanding of business
practices useful in daily living. Typ-
ing I gave students an opportunity to
develop speed and accuracy on a type-
writer. They were taught to type let-
ters, tabulated reports, manuscripts,
and business forms. Typing II was a
continuation of Typing I with em-
phasis on constant practice for in-
creased speed and accuracy. Seniors
taking Shorthand learned to read,
write, and take dictation. Another
course offered only to seniors was
Bookkeeping. In this course, students
learned the fundamentals of single
and double-entry bookkeeping and
were given practical problems for the
application of these skills.


i I



1991


George and John find girls more inter-
esting than bookkeeping.

















a usS


CLARE W. JOHNSON Short-
hand, Bo<.kkeeping. General Busi-
ness; BS, Bemnid) State College;
M.Ed., Central Washington State Col-
lege.
During his first year at CHS, Mr.
Johnson was yearbook sponsor and
head of the Business Education De-
partment aside from his regular duties
as teacher.
He was born in Minnesota and
taught for seven year, ;r,,lu lrl: being
principal at Adna High School in
Washington.
He enjoys fishing, bowling, and
scuba diving.
His advice is, "Spend more time
enjoying the good things about the
establishment and less time trying to
change it."


"This is almost as bad as Latin."


"A


- t








8Nglish


IK*


J.B. DOBBINS English II, Jour-
nalism; B S., University of Virginia;
M.Ed., Univ. of Virginia. "HAM-
LET: Act I, Sc. iii Polonius to
Laertes."


English, an extensively wide field,
was one of the largest departments at
CHS. It was a required subject for all
students, since the ability to under-
stand and to use well his native lan-
guage deemed necessary for a stu-
dent's success in any endeavor.
Regular English classes included
the study of grammar, composition,
and literature. In addition to these
regular courses; the English depart-
ment also included journalism, speech
and drama, and remedial reading. In
journalism the student learned to
write in newspaper form and received
much practical experience. Speech
and drama was a course which taught
the students the art of oral expres-
sion. Besides this, the course required
a great deal of research work. Remc-
dial reading provided students who
required extra help an opportunity to
improve their reading ability.


Books read in the various classes
include; johnny Tremain, Great Expec-
tations, A Tale of Two Cities, The
House of Seven Gables, The Red Badge of
Courage, Wuthering Heights, Lord Jim,
and The Moonstone.


Mrs. Smith. "My goodness' What are the
Seniors coming to'"


JANE ELFERS English III, Speech
and Drama, B.S., University of Wis-
consin. "Choose those goals most im-
portant to you and be perseverant in
achieving them. Don't be reluctant to
serve others and the community.
Don't be afraid to give of yourself
Aim high; prepare painstakingly;
serve; and work "













(


LOUIS J FATTOROSI Engllh Ill. DOROTHY H SMITH Enghlh i
B.S, M Ed. Ruiger LUrnio tr N, B S. Ohl(. Northern i' M l, lr'.rr
tyrann) is morre inoltrabkl ihrn IhJit .I LUns.etlirn
the seli-righteou retormer .'r the .,*cir
zealous philanthrc.pist The o,:rlid nr, he
destroyed by too muh hatrcJ or t~i
much love, but the later is mote danger
ous because ii more nsidlouu "


d J
GLENDA STRONACH English and
Musir B Nu Ed B A., Trinity U.
Mris Srr._na,h i' from Texas and
raught in ;urundu before coming to
CHS She cno., ei lrhgy, and sports. "To
th% oan :elt be tru'


MARTHA TANNER English; A.B.,
U.N.C. "Live everyday to the very fullest
- enjoy!"


r,4


TONI WILFERD English; B S., Flor-
ida State. ". 'these times' will be anoth-
er period that I will add as one I've lived
through."


Mr Dobbin4 I de crve thi, rest


-/


REBECCA WILLIAMS Geography 7,
English 8 and 9; B.A., Anderson C. :lr',
Mrs. Williams' home state is West
Virginia. She has traveled thr u l many
states and enjoys reading and im'-;i.-.
"Use your head think! listen rcl,


"I hope I don't lrget the id ot th, pl., re t i '
"I hope I don't forget the id ea ot thii plui bxefort ii .,i1..ur


Mrs. Elfers


om
"That was some Llais


WTI


L
tia


a









Foreifg alguages


"Welcome to the camp."


ANNE D. GEGG French, Latin,
B.A., Cornell University, M.S. in Edu-
cation, Cornell Univ "Learn to do
things on time Make positive contri-
butions to school and your Lommunm-
ty


STELLA RIEFKOHL Spanish,
French. B.A, New York Univ., M.A.,
Columbia Univ, N Y. "Never to
look back into the past always to
face each day as it comes without a
thought of the future "


-Whe

When will they ever learn?


c- ~--


t^


-V


', ... J


TELMA 1 HOWARD Spanish.
Business Educauton. BA, Hunter
College, M A., Hunter College. "Be
obedient and respectful Iitiens in
your communities and set good exam-
ples of morals to vour younger peers


* t


Is it third declension, accusative, masculine, plural, or comparative? I'm mixed up!












i


JAMES E. STEARNS Spanish II,
III, IV, Russian II; B.S. Ed., M.A.,
University of Florida. "Spend more
time on the subjects that are hard for
you than on your favorites."


WILLIAM L. WILL Spanish 7 and
8, English 9; B.S. Econ., Xavier
Univ.; M. Ed., Univ. of Florida.
Mr. Will is a native Isthmian. He
taught in Florida before coming to
CHS. His hobbies are golfing, swim-
ming, team sports and reading. Life is
short, so be satisfied in what you are
doing."

".. .. . ,, ;.',..
T~'
iL.1..24C.;


The foreign language department
at CHS was a wide and interesting
one. Its aim was to increase a stu-
dent's understanding of the history
and culture, as well as the language of
countries other than his own. In order
to fulfill this aim, CHS offered cour-
ses in three modern languages;
French, Spanish, and Russian. Three
years of each language were offered,
students being placed in the level ap-
propriate to their development. In ad-
dition, a second year course in Latin
was offered.
In all language courses, speaking,
writing, reading, and understanding
of the language were stressed. The
Audio-Lingual Method, ALM, was a
new system used to teach Spanish and
Russian. This system involved inten-
sive oral practice in the language lab-
oratory.


.5'.


Toni Thomas. "It's right, isn't it?"


Mrs. Howard. "I'm no model!"


"How can I concentrate on "Hablar" when I'm thinking of HIM?"







rome S coomiocs


The homemaking program placed
emphasis on three areas: foods and
nutrition, clothing selection and con-
struction, and family living. It was
the aim of the department to provide
girls with knowledge helpful for their
futures as homemakers.
Junior high home economics stu-
dents learned the basics of sewing by
making simple household articles and
garments. They were also taught the
basics of cooking which included the
preparation and serving of formal and


informal meals.
Senior high students were offered
one semester of sewing which in-
cluded personal r'r.. miniri the plan-
ning and construction of t.k.thin'.
and a study of personal and family
relationships. In the second semes-
ter's cooking classes, students were
taught the fundamentals of nutrition,
the use of recipes, meal planning,
m.Ark.irin, and various methods of
preserving food.


r


)j I'


.4



ELIZABETH McNAUGHTON Home Econom-
ics; B.S., Slate Teachers' College. "What you do (or
don't do) today affects your future."


I


i


I p


Tina Bocanegra, Pat De Vault, Elisa Brown. "Do we have to stand in line to help
Tina Bocanegra, Pat De Vault, Elisa Brown. "Do we have to stand in line to help?"


I



I


\N


- 3J


Josefa Gonzalez and Anna Summerlin.
"You'rc off an inch!"


"Cookies". "It's messy but it's fun!"


+rS


17""








/tdustrial Arts


RONALD FITE Mechanical
Drawing; B.S., East Texas State
Univ.; M.S., East Texas State Univ.
Mr. Fite's home state is Texas. He
is the Junior Class sponsor. He enjoys
the Canal Zone and his hobbies are
water skiing and hunting.



The Industrial Arts department at
CHS attempted to provide pupils
with insight into their own interests;
Ito develop their abilities to work with
'their hands and with tools, and to
,sharpen their interest in creative
crafts The Industrial Arts department
offered four groups of courses; Me-
Ichanical Drawing; Wood Working,
|Metal Shop, and Plastics.
Mechanical Drawing I taught stu-
dents to visualize how an object is put
together Neatness, correct lines, mea-
surement, and following instructions
were stressed. Mechanical Drawing II
;was a continuation of this course for
:students planning to continue their
education in this field. Woodworking
students learned about tools, joints,
.shop safety, and the operation of
:power tools. They used their knowl-
edge to carry out projects. Metal Shop
I taught the basic skills of bench-
iwork, forging, welding, sheetmetal,
and machine operation. Plastics stu-
|dents learned the properties of plas-
tics and how to shape them into use-
ful objects.


JESSE C. HOLLOWAY Shop;
M.S., Oklahoma State College. "Get
the best education you can."


RONALD LASSILA Shop; B.S.,
Los Angeles, Calif.; Lie. Sorbonne.
Mr. Lassila is a native Californian
and has taught in San Francisco, Eng-
land, Turkey, Phillipines, and France.
His hobby is boating. His advice to
students? "Work."


Students display varied attitudes toward mechanical drawing.
If -I AP


"They didn't tell me about this when I filled out my class selection sheet," grumbles Robert
Johnson.








lMathemIatics


21


RICHARD W. BOCK Algebra II,
Analysis, Calculus. B.A, Univ of N
Dakota, M A, Univ of Houston
"Don't be trivial."




In this modern age, as well as in
the past, mathematics remains a basic
part of everyone's life. The CHS
math department offered all the math
courses required for success in college
as well as in the students' daily lives.
Five math courses offered were to
be taken in order as each was a pre-
requisite of the subsequent one.
These courses were Algebra I, Geom-
etry, Algebra II, Introduction to Anal-
ysis, and Calculus. General Math, and
Introduction to Algebra were also of-
fered for students not majoring in
math.
General Math captured the ele-
mentary forms of mathematics. It
pushed the students to have a mathe-
matical background.
Algebra I, the first step up the lad-
der to higher mathematics, caught the
principles of mathematics. Word
mastery of the language of mathemat-
ics was attained in this course.
Geometry dealt with the art of
drawing. Proving theorems was a
major part of geometry. The students
learned how to deal with space fig-
ures. Algebra I was also reviewed for
the students.
Algebra II taught the principles of
factoring, polynomials, logarithms,
and basic trigonometry. The pattern
of reasoning was also learned in this
course.


LAWRENCE A COWLEY Alge-
bra I, Geometry. BA., Trinity Univ.,
M.A., Southeastern State "Live life
yourself"


Introduction to Analysis went
deeper into trigonometry. Linear and
quadratic equations were studied in
great depth. Functions and relations
were the beginning notion of this
course.


RANDALL GRUBBS Math; B.A.,
William Jewell College, "Do not get
behind in life because it is hard to
catch up."


Calculus, the last step up a steep
ladder of mathematics in high school
was a college preparatory course in-
troducing the fundamentals of differ-
ential calculus.







1 -~F~~j~j~


> c


Math class is a time for many things, from studying to reading comic books.


aggMIS
































ROY HOWELL Alprbra IB. Gen
eral Math A, BS, Shippen'barg S
College. N S. Florld) Stirre lU'n
"Accept people on the bajsr c.l heir
aiilons. nor their appearane "


CAROL J KNIGHT Li.e Sence
". Mith ". nd n. B Auburn L'ru,
' Rcad a. much jand A. ariJ natE .. l
1s ,ou p,.,.,ibl\ .An


BERNARD R MAZZONI Maih
6. Algebra I. b S. L-bani..n \'lley
Cullege M . Penn Srre L'Urn 'Ev-
endas hdul d be i guctd da\ And J-
m .rro i. a b lerer JdI "


Nancy Edmondson. "I g\,e up, I've had


Calculus proves ,t- be a ch.llengngp |lass










MEMBERS OF THE BAND


Aukwsic


EDWARD R, CARWITHEN -
Music; B. Fine Arts, Univ. Florida,
M Arts, Eastman School of Music.


The following courses were .tlier.l
this year in Music. Music 7 and 8; the
exploration of all kinds of music and
music skills with emphasis placed on
music fundamentals as a step to the
enjoyment of music. Beginning In-
strumental Class; a specialized class
for students desiring to learn the basic
techniques of a band or an orchestral
instrument. It is open to all ru ld-l
but it is recommended that a student
wishing to participate in advanced
music classes begin the study of in-
struments in seventh grade. Educa-
tional values stressed are: :.. iling of
musical notation, development of
good tone and the ability to express
oneself with confidence on a musical
instrument. Also stressed are pride in
personal achievement, concern for
group results, and the discipline of
concentrating on details to build con-
fidence and ability. Intermediate In-
strumental Class; a specialized class
for students having had one or two
semesters of work in !'. tnningih in-
strumental class. This class is open to
all grades. It provides a chance for
students to work with symphonic
music of easy to medium hIllt 'ilr.
The educational values stressed are:
continuing exploration of musical ex-
pression, b.uildlir., of confidence in
personal abilities, and striving to do
one's best. Senior Band is a special-
ized class for students with at least
one year or the equivalent of begin-
ning or intermediate instrumental


The Band relaxing before class begins.


class. This is an activity group. It
serves the school by providing music
for assemblies, football games, pep
assemblies, and other occasions. Con-
certs are planned to expose the stu-
dent to the classical and modern mu-
sical world. Students are encouraged
to participate in musical groups of all
kinds. These include ..lltet, commu-


nity, and jazz groups. Values stressed
are; self discipline, appreciation and
toleration of new sounds and musical
experience, and exploration of the
student's abilities in music. The
music program also provides courses
in 7th and 8th grade chorus and sen-
ior chorus where students learn how
to sing and read music.


Ted ,il,:r nd istld e Ap.:irac perform at the elementary school.


"The important thing is to act nonchalant alx
55The important thing is ro act nonchalant abc


'i..r,,i.r.lpher n .,ur mt nil


My..* J 411 I 12
Ronald Palser. "Just six more measures to
go."


ii.


Plus
Ann Lauriten
Kathy Dexter
Linda Mendenhall
Dcshea Mason
Ann Loyd
Chris Benson
Sue McCullough
06&
Grry Blanchett
Cathy Terwilliger
Banss
Susan Willis
Chermi Hieronymus
EbSqf G
F1i Br-pii
A r,.. .' ,
ClaUnnrt
Linda Merrik
Ann Terwilligcr
Barbara Blomer
LuAnn Ware
Debbie Jacketic
Emily Daniel
Colleen Johnson
Debbie Mhlker
Linda Hess
Debbie Pate
Patny Rodrigue
Thomas Wcslcy
Alike Sticbrint
Kathy Baimer
Jim Collins
Thomas Bchre
Alexis Coleman
Jeanetie Hernandez
Alo Canna
Susan Ridge
Sylvia Vamprinr
Bao Clarmete
Tony Barr
Manette Carner
Sop. sax
Libby Palser
Alto Sax
Jim Chldress
Karen Mcrriik
Roy Gots
Edythe Marsh
Joanne Reid
Tmor Sax
Robin Prstham
Ted Scott
Peter Sanchcz
Fesnh Honr
Bonnie Willi
Rin Boyland
Willie Sanrtigo
Buartlnt
James Bljcicher
Mike Bjorncby
James Jones
Brian Love
Jimmy Huffman


46


Traumsl
Sevce Aponte
Cheryl Olsen
Ron Palser
Ed Golden
Jim Valentine
Pedro Simmons
Drummond McNaughton
Craig Robenrson
Allen Richardson
Cheyenn Rivera
Tim Blanchard
Ray Jackson
Trmawoue
Paul Bleicher
Billy Gilespie
Beverly Olsen
Nancy Gregg
Wayne West
GC..gr ..
Fritz Van Woondenberg
Bobby Hughes
Tuba
Don Olsen
Guy Damiani
Bass
Gregg Grist
Drum
Dan Valentine
Gspar Sayoc
Mike Williams
Robert Fernandez
John Alexaitis








Physical Education


f7w


BARBARA L. CAMPBELL Physi-
cal Education; B.S Ed., Black Hills
State C II Graduate Credit, Wash.
State Univ., Central Wash State Col-
lege and BHST "Be quick to criticize
- but if you do have a solution to
go with the criticism'"


LOUIS DEDEAUX Physical Edu-
cation, B.S., Oklahoma A&M Col-
lege; M.S., Oklahoma State Univ.
"Find out what you can do best as
early as possible, then take pride in
yourself that your doing it as well as
you can


W"







JUNE FATTOROSI Physical
Education; B.S., Southeastern La.
Univ.; M.A., Univ. Southern Miss.
"Mature enough in developing inter-
nal discipline to gradually replace the
external disciplines required during
childhood."


;., r . - _. -

rT -A-!
j I 11


JOAN F. HARRIS Physical Edu-
cation, A B, Canal Zone Jr College,
B.S., Barry College, M.A., New York
University. "Don't seek an escape
from the pressures accompanying
your youth through cheap thrills that
could ruin your whole life.. You
can't afford to throw away your young
years. The clock can't be stopped or
turned back."


IDOUG LITTON Phy Ed; Mas-
ter's, Miss State University "Keep
training rule and always beat Bal-
ho.i and (. i ,


Gym can be relaxing! .


S. Gym can be hard work!"


7-
i_~~.'. ~
.-: I~r~









a

-i-


*1 q


i,


Marian Kredell, Carol Ross. Donna Graham. Shelle l.und
PURPLE PASSION prtesnting thcir t.mnc-u. at


The importance of physical. as
well as mental development in
achieving success in a high\ complexx
society was stressed b\ the physical
education department Its aims were
to teach good sportsmanship and a
sense of fair plaN. to discipline the
mind, and to educate students in lei
sure time activities which can be car-
ried into adulthood The department
strove to give each student, regardless
of his stage of development a chance
to develop his skills, his actirude. and
his physique.
During the year 19'o-'I. Crstobal
High School's girls' physical educa-
tion classes participated in basketball.
volleyball, rumbling, track. tennis,
and various other sports. The boxs'
physical education classes participated
in football, baseball, basketball, swim-
ming. weightlifting. and track
Through these activities as well as in-
tramural and varsir sports. the de-
partment succeeded in achieving its
goals.


lane P.ulI,n.


A


"U


' -f t Aurelia Williams. Supergirl Willie is at it
Beth .irtr The again!


40i-Q. A ,
dl
IA Ir-




c bad, but hockey beas them all
"I hiloughi peedhall wa bad, but hockey beats them all."


m


"Keep '-\ur hand' in iour hips so your pants won't fall down."


g








Science


PAUL HIERONYMUS Chemis-
try, Math; B.S., East Central State
College, M N.S., University of Okla-
homa. "Have an open mind and
then use it."


Michael McCann, Kenneth Hill. "Now this will make me healthy, wealthy, and a r,


CHS boasted a wide-ranging
science curriculum. The student who
followed this program can be assured
of a solid foundation in scientific
knowledge. The courses offered were
Life Science, Earth Science, Introduc-
tory Physical Science, Bil .1c,, Chem-
istry, and Physics.
The seventh-grade Life Science
course taught the basis of life and the
student's role in the realm of living
things. Earth Science, offered to


eighth-graders, was an interesting
study of the structure and function of
the world and its surrounding envi-
ronment. Introductory Physical
Science was a preliminary laboratory
course. Students were taught the pro-
cedures of scientific research and dis-
covery. Biology offered a change from
the world of physical actions and
reactions. This course was highlight-
ed by three dissections during the
year. A basic course in Chemistry ac-.


quainted students with meth,,d, 't
scientific thinking and problem _,.,b-
ing. Emphasis was placed on pcrti.,rm-
ing laboratory experiments and r.il h-
ing logical conclusions. Physis. the
science of measurement, dealt prim.r-
ily with practical applications r
science in daily life. Vector :in.il\ls
and other physical aspects of ,lence
were the major concepts studied in
this course.


EMMA LOUISE MASON -- l.
Science 7; A.B., Randolph-Mat...
Woman's College, M.A, Colglr.:
University. "In order for students .-
learn they must be an active parti,
pant which requires much more tl..n
mere physical presence."


Mad scientists at work!


r

iG-
1~L










...


JAMES D. NORMAN Biology;
B.S., Michigan State Univ.; M.A.,
Oregon State Univ. "Live, love and be
happy for tomorrow we die." "Smile
and have a full life."


latm
LUKE T. PALUMBO Introducto-
ry Physical Science; B.S., Northwest
Missouri State College; M. Ed., Univ.
of Florida. "Things could be better."


"Beware of this plant!"

















CHARLES T. REEVES Physics,
Earth Science, Mathematics, Driver
Education; B.S., B.A., M.A., Arizona
State University. "To thyself be hon-
est and think before you act."


The formula for problem No 2 is nor on the hlck'


Nai-Yuen Shum. "I think the one I just
cut up is the one I needed."


--








Social Sciieces



-O p


ROBERT BERGER Soc. Studies;
B.A., Michigan State U.; A.C., Grand
Rapids J.C. "Get the most education
you can and try to make this world of
ours a better place in which to live.


The purpose of the social science
courses offered at CHS was to help
students learn about their world; its
past, its present, and its relation to
them both now and in the future.
The aim of the social studies in-
structor was to aid the student in
learning to view history in a objective
and unbiased manner, and to give
him a broader approach to such prob-
lems as national and international
relations. Social Science courses of-
fered at CHS included Geography,
World History, U.S. History, and


MARY CONDON World Hist.,
U.S. Hist.; B.S., Northern Michigan
College. "Be sincere about everything
you do, particularly about getting an
education."


American Institutions.
Geography dealt with the study of
maps, climates, and the physical fea-
tures of various countries. World His-
tory was the study of the different na-
tions' pasts and their relationships to
one another. U.S. History provided
the student with knowledge of our
nation's past and its accomplishments
and led him to a better understanding
of our nation. American Institutions
taught the student about the work-
ings of government and the basic


WILLIAM J. GANSEN American
Institutions Social Studies 8; M.A
University of Michigan; M.A.T.E
Purdue Univ. "Treat others as yo'j
would like to be treated."


principles of economics.
The objective of all social science
courses was to lessen misundcrsit.nd
ing of the people of other nation s and
to help the students learn to rtsppct
cultures other than their own.
This year, CHS social science
teachers attended a special workshop
conducted by Dr. Edwin Tent,: n ut
Carnegie Mellon University. Pittrs-
burgh, Pennsylvania. He was an adi-.
cate of the use of original source ma.
trial in the teaching of social studiess


Cheryl C olcman, Mrs. (ondon, Michael
Nk(Cann "Now who is on the pro side and
wio 1i on the (on side?"


-1-
J-
F~..
si
"IIc


Dr. Fenton gives a lecture to a U.S. History class.


-<


rvC


"ik
Pffi~w
*** *^"Tii


4M























EUGENE T. GREGG U.S. Histo-
ry; A.A., C.Z. College; B.A., Colorado
State; M.A., Univ. of Colorado.
"Strive to become rich."


mtE
ROANALD JACOBS World Ge-
ography; Bachelors, Southeastern
State College; Masters, Northeastern
State College. "Make the best of what
ever situation you are faced with."


ROBERT McCULLOUGH Social
Studies; B.S., St. Cloud State College;
M.A., Univ. of Northern Colorado.
"Be kind to animals."


real classroom with real students!


Mr. Gansen. "This is an example of a good
screen."


Long live democracy!


Now this is a







KO Z'C uilds 4Men lelps Students


The Reserve Officers Training
Corps at CHS was established to help
prepare high school students for fu-
ture careers in the Armed Forces, and
for ROTC in college, should they de-
cide to take it. It's chief aim was to
help students achieve the maturity
necessary to become officers and lead-
ers of men.
This year the ROTC was headed
by CPT. Juan F. Mata, who was as-
sisted by SFS Murphy, SFC Picoli,
and SSG Alford. The ROTC unit at
Cristobal consisted of "E" Company,
"F" Company, Color Guard, Drill
Team, Rifle Team, and the Battalion
Staff. The staff this year included Bat-
talion Commander Major John Mar-
tin; Battalions sponsor, 1Lt. Hila
Lyman; S1, 2Lt. Donald Byrd; S2,
2Lt. Daniel Valentine; S3, 2Lt. Jaime
Darraza; and S4, 2Lt. Lewis Valdez.
The Drill Team was commanded by
1Lt. Eligio Thomas, and sponsored by
1Lt. Jean Smith. "E" Company was
commanded by 1Lt. Dennis Maxwell
and sponsored by 1Lt. Jackie Spring-
er. "F" Company was commanded by
1Lt. Isaac Heres and sponsored by
1Lt. Denise Foshee.
Reviews were presented by the
ROTC each nine-weeks during the
school year. A large and important re-
view was Field Night, held on March
27th. Among the types of competi-
tion included were: personal, squad,
platoon, company, and most exciting
of all, Drill Team competition. An-
other exciting competition of the
school year was the Brigade Review.
In order to make competition fair, the
Brigade Review and Field Night are
held on the Atlantic and Pacific sides
on alternate years.


"E" Company


"F" Company








become Officers And Ceaders


CAPTAIN MATA ROTC; B.A,
Pan American College. "Accomplish
what you set out to do at all cost,
with whatever resources available."
f I


-- --


SFC MURPHY ROTC. "Don't
make the same mistake twice. Do it
right the first time and you won't
have to do it again."


SFC PICOLI ROTC. SSG ALFORD ROTC.


"There's really nothing to it," claims Denise Foshee with a confident grin."


ROTC cadets and sponsors attend Jungle Operations Training Center.


Steve Aponte. "Gee, it doesn't look like a
very long drop to me are you sure I need
a parachute?"





























ROTC Drill Team


ROTC Color Guard


Major John Martin, 1Lt. Hila Lyman, ILt. Eligio Thomas.


Steve Aponte, George Rivera, Tony Lyons.


ROTC Girls' Drill Team








Z'ke Cighter Side Of R0 tC'Z ife


UI





)j


Cadets steal a moment of relaxation during ten grueling days at leadership school.


"Hear no evil, speak no evil, see no evil."
^ .
a E r r
*. I. i ,

I-.
f '- .*' .

*i .:
*"x:, '
'-,, *, . "- "- I 1' . ' l/ ; ; ''
,. ..., , ... 0 * e


.- . ,
: 't *
''r
Lit;
-= p


"So this is what they teach you at leader-
ship school."


I . .. *
,, ... ''
S .
I. "
' '. "l .'. '


. .
i -'" -

.. .wL *1 I..

"F" Company Commander Isaac Heres "drops for ten" with a smile.









,irs,' Drill ream Wins


Veteran


Day Parade


The 1971 Girls' Drill Team at
CHS consisted of twenty-nine girls.
They were under the expert leader-
ship of Commander Jan Bjorneby.
The girls performed during halftime
at all home football games in the
Tiger Stadium. They also marched in
the quarterly ROTC Reviews. As an
additional activity, they participated
in the annual Veteran's Day Parade.
At this time, they were selected as the
outstanding girls' drill team on the
1rshmus The girls considered this an
honor which made the long hours of
after-school practice well-worth the
time and effort it required.
The Drill Team also helped with
Orientation Day for the new students
of CHS. They provided guidance and
assistance when necessary.


1 Roberta Cole
(quad leader)
2 I.vnn Gregg
Wo-Lmmandcr)
A. Nance Edmnii on
(squad ieadcr)
4 Linda Brotk
s Pattic Haukt
i, Kaith D)erap,
Viana Ostrrca
s Ann T .
) Ann ionnalcs


10. Kathy Milligan
11. Kathy Pursley
12. Marian Kredell
(squad leader)
1,. Carol Ross
14 Barbara Bloemer
15. Janet Brandenburg
(squad leader)
16. Donna Graham
17 Sherry Coleman
18. Mounven Lyman


9. Terry Overstreet
. Gigi Colon
1. Katie McGilberry
. Mary Norval
. Cathy Gernich
. Nina Gercich
i. Regina Dominguez
i. Ellie Blevins
SCarol Wertz
. Marrianne Verruno
SJan Bjorneby
(co-comdr.)


3i 2




67



U3 yv



















Forward March . About Face!


AMajorettes Perform Durieg

B basketball


wames

Despite uverm helming odd,
against them, the majnrette- Partt
Hill and Tit.i Cobb, presented J tine
performance on the l.iat junir \'arsi
ry game. Thce carried on their rradi.
tion by performing at the bajketb.ll
games. To be a majorette. one mu t
be willing to devote intense hour-
of practice over the 'ummter, and .il
must regular practice .iter ~hlnil
when school begins.
Tryouts were held during tlh
month of April


Pairr Hill and Tita Cobb







CIS

Coimumces

Vear WU//t
r A re New


teachers

NEW TEACHERS: Mr. Lassila, Mr Johnson, Mrs. A i\ll. l, Mr. Fite, Mrs. Stronach.
m 11 l 11 '15 % loll \ 3rn'. w a
lit z
Cristobal High School teachers i- o wT71
began the 1970-71 school year on Au- |ii
gust 31. On this date, the faculty at- -
tended a special meeting at which .
school policy and plans for the com-r. I -
ing year were discussed. Mr. Speir, as-
sistant Supervisor of U.S. Secondary ..
Schools and Mr. Cook, Supervisor of ,
Instruction, U.S. Secondary Schools
attended and were introduced to the
faculty. Following speeches by Mr.
Pfau, Mr. Jeffries, and Mr. Speir; cof-
fee was served to the new teachers in
the home economics room.


We must be prepared, for a new school year begins.





f the f a l r o





S' Mr. Pfau (principal of CHS) gives last
1 minute advice and information to the rest
tryingng cxprcssions reflect the faculty's concern for the new school year. of the faculty.







Caribe Club Spoasors Cultural exchange

Program With Colon Jtigh Schools
7 In order to provide students from
- [ a Panamanian school with an oppor-
i M tunity to observe the workings of the
U.S. school system, the members of
S" the Caribe Club invited the students
of St. Mary's and St. Joseph's acade-
mies in Colon to visit CHS. On the
S.. morning of December 9th, the entire
senior class of St. Mary's Academy
and a number of students from St. Jo-
seph arrived by bus. Each girl was as-
SA signed to a member of the Caribe
Club and whom they accompanied to
class. They had originally planned to
1 I leave at noon, but refreshed by a
Lunch provided by the Caribe Club,
S'" they attended afternoon classes as
well. Both Panamanian and American
) students agree that they had profited
from this cultural exchange.

"I knew I should have brought my lunch'"






Cfi


















"Mrs Farrorosi won't let u; on the p.m tlinor in our ,\ttrd '"
"You're kidding' I'm laid I came so I can
catch up on the news."








Sailors


Sandra Alberga








9. ^
f: ^.


*r


Jay Alonis


SANDRA ALBEFRGA
June 2, 19 51
Colon, Republic of Panama
Entering CHS in the second semester of her junior )car
Sandra quickly became an active member of her class. She
served as treasurer of the Language Lab Club and secretary of
the Spanish Club. Sandra graduated in January 1971, and left
for Riverside City College where she plans to major in busi-
ness.

JAY ALONIS
January 25, 1953
Ancon, Canal Zone
Jay has attended Canal Zone schools for twelve years, six of
these were at CHS. In his senior year, Jay was a member of
the Caribe Club and the varsity track team. He plans to study
engineering and computer science at Louisiana Polytechnic
Institute after graduation.

ALMANUBIA ( AR Ml N AUSTIN
October 13. 1952
Colon, Republic of Panama
Alma came to CHS in her junior year, having previously
attended St. Joseph's in Colon. She was a member of the
Spanish Club, and participated in -. lI.. I.ll intramurals.
Alma plans to attend Canal Zone College and major in medi-
cal r., I, .. .

PATRICIA YAMILET AUSTIN
December 13, 1952
Colon, Republic of Panama
Athletics have occupied much of Patsy's time in high
school. She was a member of the basketball and ,'.I .L.ll
teams in her freshman year and captain of both in her sopho-
more year when she also participated in tennis. In her junior
year, she lettered in three sports and also served as president
of the GAA and co-captain of the Powder Puff speedball
team. Patsy plans to attend CZC and major in physical educa-
tion.

TERRI LYNN BAKER
November 6, 1952
Anchorage, Alaska
This was Terri's first year at CHS. She participated in varsi-
ty volleyball, Her future plans include studies at the Universi-
ty of Arkansas.

ROBERT EARL BARR
March 18, 1952
Charleston, South Carolina
Robert has attended Canal Zone schools all his life, six
years at CHS. He plans to become a policeman.


Fatricia Y. Austin


S/ *//


IA


\lf


Almanubia C Austin


Robert E. Barr







JEAN LYNN BASSETT
June 9, 1953
Jeannie has attended C.Z. schools for ten years, five of
these at CHS. During her high school years, she was a
member of the Spanish Club, the swimming team, and the
Girls' Chorus. Her future plans include attending the Col-
lege of Bible in California, hopefully on a music scholar-
ship.

MICHAEL FRANCIS BEALE
July 16, 1953
St. Petersburg, Florida
Mike came to Cristobal High School in the second se-
mester of his sophomore year. He was a member of the
varsity basketball team. In his senior year he was elected
Homecoming "king". Mike plans to attend college in the
United States.

JAN TERI BJORNEBY
April 26, 1953
Bremerton, Washington
Jan has been an active member of the class of '71. She
was a member of the Girls' Drill team for three years, and
served as commander in her senior year. She was an S.A.
alternate in her freshman year. As a junior, she was a mem-
ber of the French Club and class treasurer. In her senior
year, she served as secretary of the GAA and as a member
of the Senior Privilege Committee. Sports have occupied
much of Jan's time. She participated in speedball, volley-
ball, tennis, band, basketball intramurals, and was a mem-
ber of the varsity volleyball and tennis teams. Jan plans to
attend college in the U.S.

ELIZABETH BLEVINS
January 2, 1952
Colon, Republic of Panama
Ellie has attended Cristobal High School throughout
her high school career. She participated in intramural
speedball during her freshman and sophomore years, and
in basketball and volleyball during all four years. As a sen-
ior, she was a member of the Girls' Drill Team. Her future
plans include study to become either an airline stewardess
or a veterinarian.

LANA GAYE BOONE
July 10, 1953
Abingdon, Virginia
Lana has been an active member of the senior class at
CHS. She was a member of the Caribe Club, and served as
treasurer of the Language Lab Club in her senior year. She
was a member of the yearbook staff for three years, and as
a senior, served as copy editor. In her junior year, she be-
came a member of the National Honor Society, and was
elected president. As a freshman, she received an Outstand-
ing Student Award, and in her junior year, an award for ex-
cellence in the Russian language. As a junior, she partici-
pated in the NSF SST Program at Loyola University. In
her senior year, she was a member of the Senior Class Ad-
visory Council and Board of Directors, and served as secre-
tary of the Student Advisory Committee. Lana's future
plans include majoring in computer science at Loyola Uni-
versity in New Orleans where she received a four-year
scholarship.

VIVIAN VICTORIA BOSEMAN
February 25, 1948
Colon, Republic of Panama
Vivian has attended CHS for each of her four years in
high school. Her future plans include the possibility of a
modeling career.


Senior Homecoming "King" Mike Beale is
escorted on royal walk around the gym.


Jean Lynn Bassett


IJ


Michael Francis Beale


Jan Teni Bjorneby


Elizabeth Blevins






KATHRYN RACHIEIL BIUR(GSS
>koIha.m. Japan

Katlih hasl attend ( IIS throughout her high w(hool
cartccr, and has bccin a mcmher of the (irls' (;leC (lub for
four cars, and tlic (Girls' D)rill Team tor two. After gradu-
ation, Kathi plan, to attend a College of Arts and Music,
S in preparation for a muisial career.


Kathryn Rachel Buress
Kathryn Rachel Burgess


rc


CARMEN LUISA BUTLER
N1oanlbcr 12. 1952
Colon, Republic of Panama
(armcn has been a participant in many organizations
and clubs during lier years at CHS. She served as secretary-
treasurer of the Caribe and Nurses's Aide Clubs, Historian
of the French Club, Vice-President of the Language Lab
Club, and treasurer of the senior class. She also served on
various committees and the Senior Class Board of Direc-
tors. In her senior year, she was elected to the National
Honor Society. Carmen plans to enter Barry College in
Miami and study computer science.

DONALD PATRICK BYRD
June( 1952
Balboa, Canal Zone
Donald has attended Canal Zone schools all his life.
Throughout his high school years, he has been interested
in dramatics, playing leading roles in several Thespian pro-
ductions, and serving as treasurer of the Thespian Society
in his senior year. In the summer of 1970, he attended a
summer institute in drama. Donald plans to attend Canal
Zone College for a year, and then transfer to the U.S.


C-rmen lnei RHnurtr


"Cubby" Clement, Kathy Kraus. "Seniors
just naturally have beautiful legs."


a-


Armando Cabrera


hlitabeth P.ulettc Carter


Raul Eduardo Cistro


ARMANDO CABRERA
April 26, 1953
Santurce, Peurto Rico
This was Armando's first year at CHS. He previously at-
tended Antilees High School In Puerto Rico where he par-
ticipated in varsity track. His future plans include the
study of accounting and business administration at the
University of Puerto Rico.

ELIZABETH PAULETTE CARTER
March 3, 1953
Gartersville, Georgia
Beth came to CHS from Georgia where she was active
in athletics and other school activities. She participated in
soccer, softball, badminton, and archery intramurals, and
was co-captain of the varsity soccer and softball teams. She
was also a cheerleader, a member of the FHA, vice-presi-
dent of the FTA, secretary of the Debate Club, and a mem-
ber of the yearbook and newspaper staffs. She was vice-
president of her freshman class, and secretary of her sopho-
more class. This year she was a member of the Senior Class
Advisory Council and Board of Directors. Beth plans to
study psychology, planning a career in social work or per-
haps teaching.

RAUL EDUARDO CASTRO
July 20, 1953
Colon, Republic of Panama
Raul has participated in many clubs during his five
years at CHS. He was a member of the Caribe Club, the
French Club, the yearbook staff, and served as president of
the Art and Spanish Clubs and vice-president of the Lan-
guage Lab Club. Raul served on the committee for theJr.-
Sr. Prom, and as a member of the Senior Class Advisory
Council and Board of Directors. Raul plans to attend Am-
herst College in Massachusetts and take a liberal arts
course.


-s;


!


,,


IL/i









Class

Officers

4iemplify

"Senior


Spirit"


SENIOR CLASS OFFICERS: Kathy DeRaps, Vice President; Robert Phillips, President;
Judy McLain, Secretary; and Carmen Butler, Treasurer.


The 1970-71 school year was one
of innovation for CHS seniors. Under
the leadership of capable class offi-
cers, and with the expert guidance of
their sponsor, Mr. Fattorosi, the sen-
ior class set out to do great things.
The first project was to secure an
open lunch. A committee was estab-
lished to prepare and submit for ap-
proval a list of regulations, and the
privilege was granted. In order to pro-
vide a sounding board for the com-
plaints and suggestions of seniors, the
Advisory Council, consisting of
twenty representative seniors was es-
tablished. Another new group was
the Senior Board of Directors. made
up of representatives elected by stu-
dents in the senior class. Both groups
worked hard to make the year a suc-
cessful one.


Among the special activities of the
year were a trip to the other side to
visit Canal Zone College, the Senior
Banquet, and the Junior-Senior Prom.
School events of special significance
to seniors were the Jamboree where
Wendy Flores reigned as queen, the
homecoming game victory and the
dance which followed with Rosemary
Christian as queen, and the Christmas
formal at which the Hall of Fame
winners were announced.
It was a year which included those
once in a lifetime events which are so
much a part of being a senior; se-
lecting invitations and cards, senior
skip day, baccalaureate, and of course,
graduation. Altogether, it was a great
year one which the Class of '71
will never forget.


CLASS SPONSOR
Mr Loui, Farur.isi









PATTY ANN CHRISTIAN
June 26, 1942
Bluftield, West Virginia
Patty was a member of the Pep Club at her school in Vir-
ginia before coming to CHS. She was a member of the year-
book staff here, and in her senior year, served as publicity
chairman of the Thespian plays. Patty plans to return to Vir-
ginia after graduation, and enroll in a beautician school.

ROSEMARY CHRISTIAN
October 5, 1953
Coronado, California
Rosemary has attended Cristobal High School for three
years. She participated in "B" League basketball in her sopho-
more year, and the Girls' Drill Team in her senior year. As a
senior, she was selected queen of the Homecoming Dance.
Rosemary plans to attend Texas A&I University where she
will pursue the study of medicine.

CALEB CLEMENT
October 17, 1953
Gatun, Canal Zone
"Cubby" is one of the outstanding athletes in the class of
'71. He has participated in football, baseball, basketball, and
track intramurals, and was a member of the varsity football,
baseball, basketball, and track teams. He was a member of the
"21" Club in his freshman year, and of the "C" Club for the
other three years. "Cubby" plans to attend Canal Zone Col-
lege.

FAITH EMILY COAD
February 26, 1953
Flint, Michigan
Faith entered CHS in the second semester of her junior
.... year. She was a junior varsity cheerleader at her former school
in Michigan. After graduation, Faith plans to become a travel
agent.

FREDERICK COLE
April 13, 1953
Balboa, Canal Zone
ROTC has occupied much of Fred's time in high school.
He was a member of the Boys' Drill Team, and as a senior, a
member of Batallion Staff. He was also a member of the Na-
tional Honor Society and the Senior Class Board of Directors.
Fred's future plans include attending college.

GARY LEE COLLINS
November 13, 1952
Hampton, Virginia
Gary was president of his freshman class at CHS. He was
a member of the "21" Club in his freshman and sophomore
years. Gary participated in intramural and varsity basketball
during all four years in high school. He was a member of the
Student Advisory Committee and the Inter-school Dress Code
Committee. In his senior year, he was initiated into the Na-
tional Honor Society. Gary plans to attend Case Institute of
T I i, .1 .l, in Cleveland, Ohio.


Class


Visits


ZoIe


Frederick Cole














-Aoi
Gary Lee Collins


Pot,- Ann Chr-crsn


Kosemarv (.hnrrlan


\ i


Caleb Clement Jr.









Of '71


Canal


College


JEANNETTE RAMONA COX
August 31, 1952
Managua, Nicaragua
Jeannette was a member of the French Club for four years.
She was a member of the Nurses' Aides Club, and served as
secretary for two years. She was also active in Pink Girls.
Jeannette worked on the year book during each of her four
years in high school, and in her senior year, served as editor.
Jeannette was a member of the National Honor Society, and
served as secretary. She was also a member of the Student Ad-
visory Committee and the Philosophian Society. Jeannette
plans to attend Canal Zone College and later the University
of Florida, studying for a career in medicine. She also plans to
study Spanish during the summer, before attending CZC, in
Mexico or Spain.

KATHLEEN ANNE DERAPS
June 25, 1953
Ancon, Canal Zone
Kathy was a member of the Caribe Club for three years,
and was a member of the advertising staff for the yearbook in
her senior year. Kathy participated in volleyball and speedball
intramurals and was a member of the junior Powder Puff
team. She worked on many committees, and was vice-presi-
dent of the senior class. K.ith\ plans to attend college in San
Antonio, Texas where she will obtain her Bachelor of Science
degree for her career as a registered nurse.

MICHAEL EDWARD DEXTER
July 1, 1953
Fort Benning, Georgia
Mike came to CHS in his junior year, and rapidly became
an active member of the class of '71. In his senior year, he was
president of the CHS Student Association. Mike continued his
participation in athletics at CHS, playing on the varsity tennis
and baseball teams. Mike was a member of the Caribe Club,
the "C" Club, and the National Honor Society. Mike plans to
study engineering at William and Mary or the University of
New Mexico.

PEDRO JUAN DIAZ
February 26, 1952
San Juan, Puerto Rico
Pedro attended CHS for three years. He was a ROTC pla-
toon leader, and a member of the Boys' Drill team. Pedro
plans to enlist in the Army's Special Forces, and Ranger train-
ing, and to attend Officer Candidate School.

WENDY MARIE FLORES
November 1, 1953
Leesville, Louisiana
Wendy was the 1970 Jamboree Queen. She was a member
of the Girls' Drill team in her sophomore year. W\t nd was a
member of the Senior Advisory and Jr.-Sr. Prom Committees.
She plans to attend C.Z.C. for two years, and then transfer to
the United States.

DENISE ANNETTE FOSHEE
February 24, 1953
New Orleans, Louisiana
Denise was a cheerleader and an ROTC sponsor in her sen-
ior year. She lettered in tennis in eleventh grade. Denise was
vice-president of the Caribe Club, and a member of the
French Club and the National Honor S.x, icn Denise plans to
attend college and earn a teaching degree.


Pedro Juan Diaz


Wendy Marie Flores


Denise Annette Foshee












--9





^ ^ ""


'I
i




1 .


John B. Funderburk


T -







Brenda Lee Gibson















Stephen Armand Goulet


Catherine Ann Gercich


Sharon Louise Uoilen


John Michael Hannah


JOHN B. FUNI)ERBURK
January i, 1953
Tucson, Arizona
John participated in varsity track and ..I.l.Il during his fo n .. rs
at CHS. He served on the Jamborec Party Committee. John 1.1l Ii, 1
become either a machinist or a diesel mechanic after graudatio,

CATHERINE ANN GERCICH
January 1. 1953
Lynnwood, California
Cathy has attended CHS for tour years. She participated in N 1.Ik'b1il
intramurals during her freshman and sophomore years. As a senior, ,he
was a Member of the Girls' Drill Team. Cathy also served on the Jr.-Sr.
Prom Committee. Her future plans include study at a college in Cali-
fornia or Florida.

BRENDA LEE GIBSON
December 6, 1953
Fort Bragg, North Carolina
Brenda entered CHS at the beginning of her sophomore year. Sh
participated in swimming, tennis, basketball, and volleyball intramt
rals, and was a member of the varsity tennis team. After graduation
Brenda would like to attend a junior college, travel extensively, an
pursue a career in hairdressing and art.

SHARON LOUISE GOLDEN
April 15. 1953
Anniston, Alabama
Sharon was a member of the CHS senior band for five years, playing
the flute. She officiated at varsity basketball games in her ir. .-iln,
year. After graduation, she plans to attend a a nursing school i: M\i imi,
Florida.

STEPHEN ARMAND GOULET
September 22, 1952
Somerville, Massachusetts
Stephen entered CHS at the beginning of his senior year. At his for-
mer high school he was a member of the A.F.S., the Chess Club rhe
Math League, and the Science Club, and received an award f..r bimng
the best chemistry student in the junior class. He also particip.m.,r in
varsity track and football. Stephen plans a career as a math ten.h.r

PATRICIA GUTIERREZ
July 20, 1952
Fayetteville, North Carolina
Pat has attended CHS tor each of her four years in high scJ.. .I she'
was a member of the Drama Club and assisted with various Tli-hplan
productions. Pat plans to become a woman jockey.

JOHN MICHAEL HANNAH
June 26, 1953
Waynesville, North Carolina
John enjoys motorcycling. He was active in ROTC during hi, trech-
man and sophomore years. He served as a cheerleader in the P-.Vader
Puff game, and as a member of the Jamboree Party Committt. I .hn
plans a career in aeronautical engineering.

ALLEN SCOTT HARMON
September 23, 1952
Annapolis, Maryland
Art is one of Allen's major interests. He was a member of ric .Ai
Club for two years, serving as president in his junior year. He :. ilio
art editor of the newspaper and the yearbook in his senior year Allen
was also active in the French Club and Drama Club. He partic:Fp .cdl in
several plays, and became a Thespian in his senior year. Allen ,.. -n the
"Voice of Democracy" contest at CHS in his junior year. He I- I t
attend the U.S. Merchant Marine Academy, or Chapman FloatiriL ( im-
pus in California. He would like to become an architect or a i..nrier
cial artist.


'I~a~l~~ .


.0wr


Allen Scott Harmon







Caribbean College Club


-Hosts "Senior Vighlt"


D- -k
D ne Frcnesi Hake




_.U

1 :


Isaac Her Mk Sep Heng

Isaac Hcrts Mark Srephern Herrmng


DIANE FRANCES H A L K :
August 21, 1951
Colon, Republic of Panama
Diane has been an active member of many clubs and organizations
at CHS. She was a member of the French Club, the Spanish Club, the
Philosophian Society, the Nurses Aides, the Yearbook staff, and the
Senior Board of Directors; cr' inEr as an officer in several of the clubs.
She also served on the Cafeteria, Senior Advisory, and various dance
committees. Diane plans to pursue a course in business administration,
with plans for a career as an executive rtrc ir

PAUL HERBERT HEADY
March 6, 1953
Olney, Illinois
Paul attended CHS for only two years. At his former high school in
Salem, Illinois, he was a member of the Spanish and Pep Clubs, and
the varsity track team. He participated in the ROTC program at CHS.
Paul plans to major in Public Arts in college with a job in a radio or
television studio in mind.

ISAAC HERES
January 4, 1953
Puerto Armuelles, Chiriqui
Isaac was active in ROTC throughout his high school years, partici-
pating on the Boys' Drill team, and in his senior year, serving as com-
mander of"F" Company. He participated in basketball intramurals, and
as j tre-hrrijn .nd sophomore was a member of the varsity football
team Aticr gradua.nJn, Isaac plans to attend Florida State University.

MARK STEPHEN HERRING
)frr I , 19i
Ancon. Canal Z, ne
Mark has attended Canal Zone schools all his life. Six of these years
were at Cristobal High School. After graduation, Mark plans to learn a
trade


i6


-. I







LCdr C W Murphy, Mrs. Linda Nelson, Capt. A. L. Gallin, Miss Leslie Berger, Mr. Mer-
rick E Banks, and Dr. Levin.


On Tuesday, January 19th, at 7:30
p.m., at the Women's Club Building
in Margarita, the members of the
class of '71, their parents, and friends
attended "Senior Night." This activi-
ty is sponsored annually by the Schol-
arship Committee of the Caribbean
College Club.
The program included a panel of
speakers from various vocational
fields and was stimulating and inter-
esting for all.
Following the meeting, refresh-
ments were served. At this time, the
seniors were given an opportunity to
question each of the speakers individ-
ually concerning his or her special in-
terests.







Senior Class Elects


r "


V


Frederick John Highley















Stephanie Bridiga lies


FREDERICK JOHN HIGHLY
October 19, 1953
Colon, Republic of Panama
Fred has attended Canal Zone schools all his lite, including six years
at CHS. He participated in football intramurals.

NANCY HUSON
May I, 1953
Colon, Republic of Panama
Nancy was in Nurses Aides for three years, and was a Pink Girl for
two years. She was homeroom representative in her sophomore year.
She participated in volleyball intramurals and in the Powder Puff
Speedball Game. Nancy plans to attend Brigham Young University.




STEPHANIE BRIGIDA ILLIES
October 2, 1953
Colon, Republic of Panama
Stephie was in the Spanish Club, Language Lab Club, and the Girls'
Glee Club. She took part in volleyball and speedball intramurals. Ste-
phie plans to go to college and become an occupational therapist.

ERIC THOMAS IRION
July 27, 1953
Oceanside, California
Eric attended CHS for five years. He participated in basketball intra-
murals in his sophomore year. Eric plans to go to -.Il g.


Eric Thomas Irion


ROBERT RUDOLPH JOHNSON
January 8, 1953
Minneapolis, Minnesota
Robert has been at CHS for three years. He plans to travel after
graduation.

SHERRY ANN KERN
Ju/y 109, 195i
Mobile, Alabama
Sherry was in the Caribe Club and was an S.A. representative. She
participated in Volleyball and was on the Drill Team. Sherry plans to
attend C.Z.( then go to the States to earn a degree in data processing.


SIi


R ixbK Rd.ll'p, J..d,-,,...


Sherr) Ann Ir'ri


"t;;









koard Of Directors



ANTONIA KLASOVSKY
March 12, 1953
Cristobal, Canal Zone
Toni was on the Student Advisory Committee and the Board of Di-
rectors. She plans to attend a junior college in Florida and major in
humanities.

FREDERICK EUGENE KNAUSS
October 15, 1952
Nashville, Tennessee
Fred was on the Swim Team and earned his letter. He plans to join
the Army and become a helicopter pilot. He wants to go to Vietnam.


Antonia Klasovsky Frederick Eugene Knauss





NEAL A. LaROCHE
August 28, 1952
England
Neal attended CHS for only one year. He plans to become an art
teacher. i

ANN MARIE LAURITZEN
May 24, 1953
Baltimore, Maryland
Ann Marie was in the Caribe Club and the Band. She plans to attend
college and major in Biology and Oceanography.



Neal A. LaRoche Ann Marie Lauritzen















S-e






SENIOR BOARD OF DIRECTORS
Front Column: Diane Hauke, Carmen Butler, Mike Dexter, Judy McLain. Center Column: Robert Phillips, Wendy Flores, Raul Castro, Kathy
DeRaps. Back Column: Lana Boone, Beth Carter, Dennis Maxwell, Denise Foshee.








RODRIGO LINDO
ll V .*, April 25, 1953
Panama City, Republic of Panama
r "Rod" was a member of the Spanish Club tor four years and was sec-
retary-treasurer in his sophomore year. He worked on several commit-
^'Ma b tees. Rod plans to attend college.

SSHELLEY MADISON LUINI
Sr June 10, 19 3
k Buffalo, New York
Shelley was a cheerleader for two years and participated in .ik rliIll
and volleyball. She was a member of the G.A.A. and the Caribe Club.
Shelley plans to attend college in New York and become an English
Teacher.

Rodrigo Lindo Shelley Madison Lund
HILA P. LYMAN
October 14, 1953
Bremerton, Washington
( Hila lettered in swimming in both her sophomore and freshman
years. She was secretary of the junior class. Hila was on the Girl's Drill
Team, and was Drill Team and Battalion sponsor. Hila plans to attend
Secretarial School.

JOHN HARTLEY MARTIN
March 14, 1953
SPanama City, Republic of Panama
John was president of the junior class. He was ROTC Battalion and
l. iDrill Team Commander. He played intramural basketball for four
years. John plans to attend a Military Academy or join the Armed
Forces.

Hila P. Lyman John Hartley Martin


JAIME MARTINEZ
August 5, 1932
Colon, Republic of Panama
Ott Jaime was active in ROTC and was on the first Drill Team to com-
pete in the States. He plans to join the Army as an officer after college.

b DENNIS PAUL MAXWELL
April 19, 19-5.3
New York City, New York
Dennis was vice president of his sophomore class. He was in ROTC
four years and was "E" Company Commander. Dennis plans to study
Architecture at the University of Florida.


Jaime Martinez Dennis Paul Maxwell


S^ JUDY ANN McLAIN
April 27, 195.3
Colon, Republic of Panama
Judy was in Nurses' Aides and the Thespian Society, and was presi-
dent of both in her senior year. Judy won several acting awards and had
parts in several plays. She plans to attend college.

SARAH LOUISE McLEAN
December 9, 1952
Cristobal, Canal Zone
Sally played basketball and volleyball She worked on the Junior
Privilege Committee and the Senior Advisory Council. Sally plans to
travel in Europe after graduation.


Sarah Louise McLean


Judv Ann McLami



















-f. -


lose Jaime Ntedin3


Karhryn I'aric lillligin


Susr. Ward Miendernhll


Alcida Moinrtenerro


Don Alme Olen


Neil Clitfr.n Parnon


JOSE JAIME MEDINA
March 29, 1953
San Jose, California
This was Jose's first year at CHS. He was an S.A. representative, a
member of the Tradewind and Caribbean Staffs, and a ROTC platoon
leader. He was also a member of the varsity football, baseball, and bas-
ketball teams.

SUSAN WARD MENDENHALL
December 23, 1952
Springfield, Ohio
Susan has attended CHS for only two years. She was very active in
athletics and other school functions in the U.S. and continued her in-
terest at CHS. She participated in varsity and intramural %.rimmir-,'.
tennis, basketball, and volleyball, and was a member of the GAA.
Susan plans to attend Miami University in Oxford, Ohio, majoring in
physical education.

KATHRYN MARIE MILLIGAN
April 23, 1953
Bozeman, Montana
Kathy was a member of the Nurses' Aides Club, and of the Pink
Girls. She served as a student assistant. Kathy played volleyball in her
freshman year. She also served on various decorating and publicity
committees for plays and dances. In her senior year, she was elected
Carnival Queen. Kathy plans to attend Canal Zone College or Monta-
na State University, majoring in elementary education. After college,
she plans to attend airline stewardess school.

ALEIDA MONTENEGRO
February 14, 1953
Colon, Republic of Panama
"Monty" attended CHS for two years. She was a member of the
Spanish Club and participated in volleyball and basketball intramurals.
Monty plans to attend college and pursue a career as a computer pro-
grammer.

WILLIAM A. MURPHY
July 7, 1953
Fayetteville, North Carolina
"Murph" attended CHS for two years. He participated in basketball
intramurals and varsity basketball and football. He was active in
ROTC, and a member of the Boys' Drill Team. He was selected out-
standing MI for the fourth nine weeks. He was also a member of the
senior privilege committee. "Murph" plans to specialize in electronics
in college.

DON ALME OLSEN
June 6, 1953
Whitefish, Montana
Don was active in the sports program at CHS, partriip.iring in varsi-
ty football and swimming and football intramurals. Don plans to at-
tend Canal Zone College, and perhaps transfer to an oceanographic
school.

NEIL CLIFFTON PATTON
February 7, 1952
Colon, Republic of Panama
Neil was one of CHS's most our ,tandinr athletes. He participated in
varsity baseball, track, and football, and lettered every year. He was se-
lected most valuable player of the 1;ri.'.70 school year, and also made
the All Zone Football Team. Neil plans to become an aviator or a den-
tist.

JANE MARY PAULSON
April 10, 1953
Ancon, Canal Zone
Jane participated in volleyball, basketball, and speedball intramurals.
She worked on committees for the Sadie Hawkins Day Dance and the
Jr.-Sr. Prom. Jane plans to attend secretarial school.


Jane Mant Paulson







ROBERT RANDOLPH PHILLIPS
March/ 16, 1953
Montgomerv, Alabama
Robert has been in CHS for three scars, and in this time, had be-
come president of the Caribe Club, Vice-President of the NHS, a "C"
4cl >Club member, President of the Senior Class, and ROTC Battalion Ex-
T ecutive 0111... He lettered in football twice, and twice in baseball. He
S also attended the University of I. ..I for a NSF program, and attend-
ed the Naval Post-graduate School at Monterey, California. Robert
k Plans to study pre-law and then go on to Law School.


Robert Randolph Phillips


Josephine Marie Porbes


Toby Ray Phillips


Ingrid Portier


TOBY RAY PHILLIPS
December 1953
Burgaw, North Carolina
This has been Toby's first year in CHS and he has lettered twice in
track. His future plan is to become a marine biologist.



JOSEPHINE MARIE PORBES
June 11, 1953
New Orleans, Louisiana
Josie has attended Canal Zone Schools tor two years. After gradua-
tion, she plans to get a job and plans on going ahead with her musical
education in piano and chorus.

INGRID PORTIER
September 28. 1953
Djakarta, Indonesia
Ingrid has attended CHS all through her high school years. She was as-
sistant stage manager in the play, "Bell, Book, and Candle" and "The
Black Flamingo." She plans to go to the States and get a job.







-a x-


*4: :iB j i9I


"Actually, it was worth breaking my leg just to be able to put my feet up in Mr. Bock's class," comments senior, Wally Russon.


ro_























Chris Bailey Richardson
,k...:..4
A .


Dann% Ras Robinson


lasmin Anna Rivera


Nescor John Rodriguez


Picture


Not


Available


"aren Lnn Sihill


CHRIS BAILEY RICHARDSON
December 26, 1952
Seattle, 'Wahington
Chris participated in varsity and intramural volleyball during her
three years at CHS. She received a "Driver of the year" award for the
year '69-'70. In her senior year, she was sponsor of"E" company. Chris
was married and plans to continue her education.

JASMIN ANNA RIVERA
October 31, 1953
Cham, Germani
Jasmin was a member of the French Club at CHS. F .11. ,%l inig gradua-
tion, she plans to attend college, major in I nu.ii_'t. and then travel.





DANNY RAY ROHINo)N
April 20, 1953
Covington, Kentucky
Danny was a member of the Tradewind Staff, the Caribbean Sports
Parachute Club, the Civics Club, the Drama Club, and the choir. He
played basketball in his sophomore year. Danny plans to attend college
in Texas, Kcnruk'., or North Carolina.

NESTOR JOHN RODRIGUEZ
September 18, 1953
Santurce, Puerto Rico
Nestor has attended CHS for two and a half years. He plans to study
music and architecture after graduation.




KAREN LYNN SCHILL
April 25, 1953
Galion, Ohio
This was Karen's first year at CHS. She was a member of the Span-
ish Club, the G.A.A., and the newspaper staff. In her senior year she
was editor of the second page (editorial page) of the Tradewind. She
also played tennis in her freshman and senior years. Karen plans to
major in medical t,,hn-il, ,\ at Canal Zone College.

NAI-YUEN SHUM
September 17, 1953
Macau, China
Nai-Yuen has attended CHS for two years. He hopes to become a
chemist.


Nai-Yuen Shum


JAMES H. SPANGLER
March 18, 1953
San Pedro, California
This was Jim's first year at Cristobal High School. He participated
in intramural and varsity track at his former school. After ior Bl]u.li;n.
Jim plans to become an automobile mechanic.

JACQL'E .INE FAITH SPRINGER
December 8, 1953
Ft. Eustis, V'ireini:
Jackie was a member of the Caribe Club. She marched with the
Girls' Drill Team, and in her Senior year, was the sponsor of"E" com-
pany. Jackie plans to become an x-ray technician.


Jacqueline Fsiih Springer
















DOUGLAS ROBERT STEVENS
April 11, 1953
Panama City, Republic of Panama
Doug was a member of the Spanish and Language Lab
Clubs. In his senior year, he served as historian of the first,
and vice-president of the latter. He lettered in baseball in
both his junior and senior years. Doug plans to attend col-
lege in Texas, majoring in languages and history with
plans for a career in the diplomatic corps.

ELIGIO FERNANDO THOMAS
January 7, 1951
Panama City, Republic of Panama
Eligio was active in ROTC at CHS, and in his senior
year, was commander of the boys' Drill Team. He also par-
ticipated in junior varsity basketball. Eligio plans to join
the army, and perhaps later attend college.

LEWIS EDWARD VALDEZ
November 19, 1953
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
ROTC and dramatics have occupied much of Lewis'
time in high school. He has attended Leadership School
and participated in several Thespian productions. He
played football in his junior year, and was also elected to
the National Honor Society. Lewis plans to attend college,
and perhaps later join the army.

JOSE F. VALENCIA
June 8, 195i
San Juan, Puerto Rico
Joe was a member of the varsity baseball, track, and
swimming teams. He was also active in ROTC, marching
on the Boys' Drill Team, and in his senior year, serving as
executive officer of "F" Company. Joe plans to attend
Brooklyn College in New York.

DANIEL PAUL VALENTINE
October 1., 1953
Detroit, Michigan
Danny was the yearbook photographer for four years.
He was a homeroom alternate in ninth and tenth grades,
and in his junior year, served as treasurer of the SA. He
was also active in ROTC. Danny plans to attend college,
join the Air Force, and pursue a career in the field of avia-
tion.

SYLVIA ANN VAMPRINE
Novemtner 1, 191is
New Orleans. Louisiana
Sylvia was a member of the Nurses' Aides Club and
served as historian for one year. She played in the CHS
band for four years, and was a member of the Tradewind
Staff. She served on various dance committees, and was a
varsity cheerleader in her senior year. Sylvia plans to major
in law at L.S.U.


*0


LINDA ALICE VEST
November 6, 1952
Ft. Clayton, Canal Zone

THOMAS KENNETH WALLENIUS
April 24, 1952
Helsinki, Finland

TERRY LEE WALLINE
November 22, 1953
Fort McClellan, Alabama
Terry participated in swimming and water polo. He was
active in ROTC, a member of the Color Guard in his jun-
ior year, and of the Boys' Drill Team in his senior year.
Terry plans to attend college in California, majoring in ar-
chitectural engineering.

KAREN WESTERBERG
August 15, 1953
Flint, Michigan
During her high school years, all of them at CHS,
Karen was a member of the Caribe Club, the swim team,
the Girls' Chorus, and the Tradewind Staff After gradua-
tion, she plans to study computer programming.

JENNY DEL MILAGRO WIRTZ
March 18, 1951
San Jose, Costa Rica
Jenny was a member of the Spanish Club, and served as
treasurer during her junior and senior years. She partici-
pated in varsity ,. J 11, ..II during her freshman and sopho-
more years, Jenny plans to become a nurse.

PRICILLA ANN ZAVINSKY
January 22, 1953
Terrell, Texas
This was "Penny's" first year at CHS. She was a mem-
ber of the Nurses' Aides Club, In her junior year, she re-
ceived a $25 savings bond for her bookkeeping. Penny
plans to attend I ,tirrn.i Beauty College.


Jenny del Milagro Wirtz


SA i




Pricilla Ann Zavinsky


Jose F. Valencia


Douglas Robert ns
Douglam Robert Stvcns


Eligio Fernando Thomas


Lewis fdward Valdez









aces Without o acts


Sr"


Ralph Ender


George Scheibe
George Scheibe


Alexis Normandia


And Aacts Without aces.


MICHAEL R. ANDREE
June 5,. 1953
Annapolis, Maryland

/DAVID RAYMOND DIAZ
September 9, 195 i
Baltimore. Maryland
David played varsity football during his junior year at CHS, and
helped plan the Jamboree party. He plans to attend technical school
after graduation.

DANIEL ' 1 I Y FERGUSON
june 26. 1951
Macon, Georgia

RICHARD ALLEN KRESGE
October 9, 1 )s
Ancon, Canal /one
Rickv plans to attend trade school after graduation.


THOMAS ADDISON PURSLEY
July 9, 1952
Suffern, New York
Tom was active in sports during his high school years, participat-
ing in intramural football and wrestling, and playing on the varsity
football team. He was a member of the "C" Club, and in his senior
year, served as secretary. He was also a member of the Math Club
and the Rifle Team, and was active in ROTC. Tom plans to attend
the United States Military Academy at West Point, New York.

DANNY DALE TWEEDY
December 23, 1952
Victervillc, California
Danny was a homeroom representative in his sophomore year.
He plans to enter an apprenticeship program in Tucson, Arizona,
planning a career as a carpenter.

MARIA DE LOS ANGELES ZAYAS
January 4. 1952
Mayaguez, Puerto Rico
Maria was a member of the Spanish and Pep Clubs. She plans to
become a psychologist.


. .


Davie Teves


. .






Senior faces Display 1axy Moods ..


r
1W!:


-- -a


Danny Robinson


I










John Martin, Dennis Maxwell


- 'Stephanie I ..
Stephanie Illies


Danny Valentine, Sherry Kern, Mr. Reeves






Camera Captures grief (limpses Of Saeior /c. .

PARADES . ELECTIONS
I fml. .


Ellie Blevins, Jane Paulson, Rod Lindo, Shelly I un. ( irn.' il
Denise Foshcc, Dennis Maxwell, Cathy Gercich, '. .., I I .. -

CONVERSATIONS ..


0ii



Q ., n, K ,rl.. . lll, '
,n.1 l

Diine Hjukc jnd Snrdr Alhcrei


Aleida Montenegro, Jeannie Basset, and
Vivian Boseman.
AND MORE CLASSES ...


.-.. _. _' Js *11-- -< ...-._: ,,e-

4A -i- .r .I B

Alma Austin. Lana Bonne, Inerid Portier, Jenny -' i I i r e H .n l ri in It r I \'ilin .I n. PIU'I n. nl ( Ili hC
Alma Austin, Lana Bonne, Ingrid Portier Jenny \X r I F \i i Ii \\ iin, Nd~ph l ict P'j'-1 r d(1,--r. cL:(


N ii u t u rn hun.. NM r ,mirrli. 1)..,u *.L r -n ,.bt'.t ul.n, nt m d l,. tt rr-





JtroduciH . .
(he fall Of lame


'-El


f'


~~~~~~-- 4...~.r't.r*~(]III~~







I- t.


Mr.


and Miss C6HS


MAickael Veter


- Class


Of


'77


. 4 .


'4


I-- -


--4


DiaHe -Hauke

















AMost Jntellectual


Robert Phillips


ana foone


Most
Iichael Dexter


Likely


ro


Succeed


Denise 7oshee


~


494






_*,,, a
^^^a 4 l-- ?^ I\


i~arumrr,


Rest
Dressed
Carame Kutler
Rodrigo Cido


Rest
lookiiq
fokn if tnderburk
Wendy Alores


I:


c








Rest
Dancers
Carmen Hutler
Raul Castro


Friendliest

IHila Cyman
Dennis JIaell
Denise foshee








Most
talented
Judy aMcCdaif
ZDomald Ryrd


most
Athletic
Patsy A ustiH
NVeil Pattom


W'llEU






Also PreseHtiHg RuHers-Up . .


Vqm~


1st Row: Robert Phillips Mr. CHS, Most Likely To Succeed; Shelly Lund Miss CHS. 2nd Row: Michael Dexter Most Intellectual; Lana
Boone Most Likely To Succeed. 3rd Row: Raul Castro Best Dressed; Wendy Flores Best Dressed. 4th Row: William Murphy Wit-
tiest, Best Dancer; Beth Carter Best Dancer. 5th Row: Jose Medina Best Personality; Susan Mendanhall Most Athletic. 6th Row. Allen
Harmon Most Talented; Rodrigo Lindo Best Looking.

AMd Chose Jot Pictured ...


Wittiest
Patricia jutierrez
Mark J-erriln


Kunners-up.
Sandra Alberga Most Intellectual
Rosemary Christian Best Looking
Toni Klasovsky Best Dressed, Most Talented
Sherry Kern Wittiest
"Cubby" Clement Most Athletic
Hila Lyman Best Personality


h'est

Personality
jfam jorneby
Dennis JMawell
























A time in tke lie of each girl
and boy
A time o sorrow, and yet of

#radfuation realization
brings,
Of tke end of many things
Classes, dances, football
games will be no more,
the magic of the kigh
school year is o'er
though some may consider
all things done,
Chey soon will larn
(ife's just begun









Juniors


5-.k


4 /


Cr

<'4


sizzz- z~z


my
~f~

/


a3t -
^ _.


rI~


iN'


IW


Brian
Allen
Barbara
Banks
Barbara
Betcher
Henry
Borscllino


Martha
Anton
Michael
Barger
Gerianne
Blanchette
Debra
Boswell


Michael
Apodaca
Jai me
Barraza
Robert
Bloemer Jr
Rita
Boyland


At\


-w r


Sheila
Alberiga
Paul
B, wl

Marir
Boonn


vj)atie
Alger
Baker
Frank
Berry
Richaird
Boot h


1



























I


-I


4"


4'v1v


bd a


Janet
Brandtnbu.ir
Helen
Castro
Frank
Cicchetto
Mark
Collins


Linda
Brock
Cheryl
Caudill
Pamela
Coad
Sonia
Colon


Carlos
Brown
Jay
Caudill
i/Aminta
Cobb
Wayne
Couts


Catherine
Carlisle
Deborah
Cheshire
Roberta
Cole
Ivette
Cumin rlL''


Mary
Cash
Randy
( I ,i . .
./,Chcryl
Coleman
Karen
Currier


yr)
h


2


^


* r-












I--, -. r


ii-,

'it


k


Emilie
Daniel
v/Clifford
Ferrell


- A


John
Day
Maria
Fontanez


0-

kI
William
Deaton Jr.
Andrew
Foshee


I



1-


Nancy
Edmonson
Stephan
Fugleberg


ft
*q r














14,/


Jimmy
( ;i win
Ann
(ion/Ale/


William
Gillespie
Zan
Green


Nadia Robles, "The feminine mystique
at work!"


Shelia
Dancer
Brenda
Egger


Mardettr
( i.n Tcr
(nogucn


m




















CLASS OFFICERS: Harry Townsend (Vice-President), Cathy Carlisle (president), Patricia
Paine (Treasurer), Jackie Parker (Secretary).


The class of '72 was the largest and
one of the most active and spirited
classes of Cristobal High School.
Through the efforts of class officers
the Juniors obtained an open lunch
on Tuesday and Thursdays of each
week. Another highlight of the year
was the selection of the class ring
which was round with a gold stone.
The Juniors will long remember
PSAT and NMSQT which are among
the many tests they took in prepara-
tion for college. The girls in the Jun-
ior Class organized and presented a
fashion show which demonstrated the
do's and don't of pants wear. Juniors
also planned and presented a Junior


Class Assembly. They were also re-
sponsible for the annual Junior-Senior


Prom
iors.


honoring the graduating Sen-


Carol Ross, Marian Kredell, Jackie Parker, Lynn Gregg, Sheila Alberga, Cathy Carlisle, Mary
Norval, Titi Cole, Karen Currier, Nancy Edmondson. The do's and don't of dress wear.


Barbara Grier Raymond Gsell
Joseph Herring Kathleen Hess


Edwin Hammond
Kenneth Hill II


Mark Hanly
William Huffman


Marian Gregg
Patricia Hauke
















U't


C-~ 'V



K)





0r


AA }


'dl


June Ilund
Katherine Kraus
Kathleen MiGilbcrry


yuniors


Irma Mon clova
Patricia Paine


James Jackson
Marian Kredell
John Meeker


Douglass Jeffries
Christina Loizeaux
Shvla Miller


Paulette Jordi
Donald Mans
Michael Minchart


Daniel Knauss
Michael McCann
Dale Mitre


6aranted Open Cuch Z'wice A Week


John Musser 11
Louise Palmer


Mary Norval
Ronald Palser


Beverly Olsen
Marc Parker


Stanley Oster
Deborah Pate


'1


L'


4,


A


S

.- I 1
4


. : .P;>',:,. '... lr


cy--
r






















Robin Pritham
Marlene Rice


Raymond Ramos
Susan Ridge


Jose Recio
Randy Robinson


Carmen Reed
Nadia Robles


Lourdes Reyes
Carol Ross


Class


Of


'72 Picks Vellow Stone 7or Ring


Deborah Rowley Joseph Romeski Juan Sanchez Gary Sheibe Frank Scott
Michael Scott Arthur Serig Higinia Shaffer v-James Shafe r tStephen Shobe
Ronnie Sills Judith Simmons Valarie Simms Jean Smith Michael Snider






Juliors


Display


Cheir


zCalents


funior


Class


Assembly


I.


I

K'


Kathryn Stephens Peter Swain
Loisa Thomas Harry Townsend


Reggie Southerland
Catherine Tcrwilliger
Robert Tschuml


Mattia Spagna
Dorothy Terwilliger
Carol Wertz


Michael Spagna
Ehukai Teves
Aurelia Williams


The one and only, Brenda Egger!


Susann Zachry Maribel Zayas


At


Michael Wood Ann Worthen


Marisol Zayas






latecomers


Douglas Jeffries. "I'm standing like this be-
cause there's no ball."


Linda Brock, Ann Gonzalez, Mary Norval. THREE FOR THE ROAD.










Sophomores


I.



NiiAl
%%


\ .. '


4


\.l


0L


/I


Donna
Baker
,~ Timothy
Blanchard
Jcttrcv
Briem
Susan
Burge
(Gcerald
C otfin


lamrnes
Barr
Paul
Blechcr
Edward
Brings Jr.
Kathryvn
Bush
Lourdcs
Colon


Niuikl.i
Ad,111un1
Roscnr\

lurbari
Blocnimerr
B roh n

IJ, IIIrc


(,il
A podai a


B< k
L Ptriuot
Brown
.ulum
Cimino


Stephen
Aponte
Michael
Bjornebv
J IPam
Bridwcll
Karl
Bundv

Cirulli


Marilyn
Baxter
VeffTrv
Blevins
Kathleen
Brown
y/Diane
Caroll
Nv/Kathleen
Colpe


Ilr


B`ddl


"--


)


;F. I
"4
:_rrrr
"' "''
;r:-




Full Text

Jiternatiaoal Christmas;

Seme Of Christmas Comcert
















U.. W u I ian Mr. Fattorosi. "The Legend of Babushka."


The Intermediate Band At 7:30 Tuesday evening, Decem-
ber 22nd, the Cristobal High School
auditorium was the scene of the annu-
al Christmas Concert. Participating in
this traditional event were the Inter-
mediate Band, the Senior High Band,
and the Girls' Chorus, all under the
direction of Mr. Edward Carwithen.
This year the concert had an inter-
national flavor; songs and musical se-
lections from such countries as
France, Germany, Russia, and Spain
were presented. Mr. Louis Fattorosi,
an English teacher at CHS, .2a e read-
ings from the literature of these
countries, which aided in setting the
mood.
The Intermediate Band, composed
of Junior High School students, pre-
sented a number of selections which
were well received by the audience.
The Girls' Chorus Following their performance, the Sen-
ior High Band played a number of
unusual and difficult selections. A
highlight of the concert was the ap-
pearance of the Girls' Chorus, who
were dressed in formals, .dding a fes-
tive note to the occasion. Among
those deserving mention for solo per-
formances are; Ronald Palser, Judy
McLain, and Jean Bassett.

The Senior High Band






KATHRYN RACHElL BURGFESS

SYokolhama. Japan
K.athli has attended (CII throughout her high school
career, and has been a; member of the Girls' (Glie (lub for
four cars, and the (irls' Drill Team for two. Atter gradu-
ation, KathN plans to attend ;i College of Arts and Music,
i in preparation for a musical career.

CARMEN LUISA BUTI.ER
SNarnelbcr 12. 1952
Colon, Republic of Panama
Carmen has been a participant in many organizations
and clubs during her years at CHS. She served as secretarv-
treasurer of the Caribe and Nurses's Aide Clubs, Historian
of the French Club, Vice-President of the Language Lab
Club, and treasurer of the senior class. She also served on
various committees and the Senior Class Board of Direc-
tors. In her senior year, she was elected to the National
Honor Society. Carmen plans to enter Barry College in
Miami and study computer science.

DONALD PATRICK BYRD
June 0, 1952
Balboa, Canal Zone
Donald has attended Canal Zone schools all his life.
S Throughout his high school years, he has been interested
in dramatics, playing leading roles in several Thespian pro-
ductions, and serving as treasurer of the Thespian Society
in his senior year. In the summer of 1970, he attended a
S summer institute in drama. Donald plans to attend Canal
Zone College for a year, and then transfer to the U.S.


Cirmnn I ,ei RIurler


"Cubby" Clement, Kathy Kraus. "Seniors
just naturally have beautiful legs."


a-


Armando Cabrera


hliiabeth Paulece Carter


Raul Eduardo Castro


ARMANDO CABRERA
April 26, 1953
Santurce, Peurto Rico
This was Armando's first year at CHS. He previously at-
tended Antilees High School In Puerto Rico where he par-
ticipated in varsity track. His future plans include the
study of accounting and business administration at the
University of Puerto Rico.

ELIZABETH PAULETTE CARTER
Marc 3, 1953
Gartersville, Georgia
Beth came to CHS from Georgia where she was active
in athletics and other school activities. She participated in
soccer, softball, badminton, and archery intramurals, and
was co-captain of the varsity soccer and softball teams. She
was also a cheerleader, a member of the FHA, vice-presi-
dent of the FTA, secretary of the Debate Club. and a mem-
ber of the yearbook and newspaper staffs. She was vice-
president of her freshman class, and secretary of her sopho-
more class. This year she was a member of the Senior Class
Advisory Council and Board of Directors. Beth plans to
study psychology, planning a career in social work or per-
haps teaching.

RAUL EDUARDO CASTRO
July 20, 1953
Colon, Republic of Panama
Raul has participated in many clubs during his five
years at CHS. He was a member of the Caribe Club, the
French Club, the yearbook staff, and served as president of
the Art and Spanish Clubs and vice-president of the Lan-
guage Lab Club. Raul served on the committee for the Jr.-
Sr. Prom, and as a member of the Senior Class Advisory
Council and Board of Directors. Raul plans to attend Am-
herst College in Massachusetts and take a liberal arts
course.


I" 1


Kathryn Rachel Burge


rT


Ac






,March 25 Speedball iame aives


Freshame Ckance


Zo Show Class Spirit


I






Cherri Hieronymus (secretary-treasurer), Victor Lee (president), Carol Baker (vice presi-
dent).


"Be sure you get all the crumbs tt "


The freshman class this year partic-
ipated in the Homecoming parade,
the Freshman-Sophomore Brawl, the
Fresh-Soph Speedball Game, and the
Fresh-Soph Dance.
The Freshman Queen, Laura
Brock. Her escort was Phil Miller.
Reigning at the dance was Princess
Carol Baker and Prince Fred Wanio.
The Speedball game was held on
March 25. The Freshman girls played
the Sophomore girls, and half time
entertainment was provided by the
Cheerleaders.


'p~L


"If you ask me, I think you two have it all wrong!"


. I


"I


I


John Dohle, Gerald Coffin. "Will you stop goofing off and get to work?"


Sand\ MA. "This is really Ltr..


I
I


3LC~_I i~ip~;








become Officers And Leaders


CAPTAIN MATA ROTC; B.A,
Pan American College. "Accomplish
what you set out to do at all cost,
with whatever resources available."
I


.-- -


SFC MURPHY ROTC. "Don't
make the same mistake twice. Do it
right the first time and you won't
have to do it again."


SFC PICOLI ROTC. SSG ALFORD ROTC.


"There's really nothing to it," claims Denise Foshee with a confident grin."


ROTC cadets and sponsors attend Jungle Operations Training Center.


Steve Aponte. "Gee, it doesn't look like a
very long drop to me are you sure I need
a parachute?"










faculty, Staff and Curriculum Jndev


Administration 30, 31
Alford, Rotc 55
Allen, Joanne 32
Art 36
Berger, Robert 118, 52
Blanchette (Mrs.) 32
Bock, Richard W. 44
Bright, Adamary A. 45, 33
Campbell, Barbara L. 48
Carwithen, Edward R. 46
Cheshire, Jr., Herbit D. 38
Clinic 32
Commerce 37
Condon, Mary L. 52
Cowley, Lawrence A. 44
Dedeaux, Louis F. 124, 168, 154, 48
Dobbins, Joel B. 38
Elfers, Jane K. 126, 38, 132
English 38, 39
Fattorosi, Louis J. 165, 65, 38, 39,
134


Fattorosi, M. June 48, 153
Fite, Ronald S. 60, 43, 91
Fite, Barbara D. 37
Foreign Languages 40, 41
Gansen, William J. 53, 52
Gegg, Anne D. 128, 129, 40
Gregg, Eugene T. 53
Griffiths, Jacinta E. 32
Grubbs, Randall H. 44
Guidance 33
Harris, Joan F. 145, 48
Hieronymus, Paul J. 50
Holloway, Jesse C. 43
Home Economics 42
Howard, Telma I. 130, 131, 40, 41
Howell, Roy E. 45
Hoffman (Coach) 155, 147
Industrial Arts 43
Jacobs, Ronald D. 53
Jeffries, Paul J. 31
Johnson, Clare W. 60, 139, 37


Knight, Carol J. 45
Koziol, Edwin M. 36
Lassila, Ronald L. 60, 43
Levin (Dr.) 32
Library 34
Litton, Douglas B. 168, 48, 156
Mason, Emma L. 50
Mata, Juan M. 55
Mathematics 44, 45
Mazzoni, Bernard 45
McCullough, Robert E. 127, 53
McNaughton, Elizabeth 42
Mowery, Robert L. 33
Murphy, Alejandro D. 55
Music 46, 47
Norman, James D. 99, 151
Office Staff 32
Palumbo, Luke C. 33
Palumbo, Luke T. 51
Pfau, Grace S. 35


Pfau, James H. 60, 117, 30
Physical Education -- 48. 49
Picoli, Frank L. 55
Reeves, Charles T. 127, 51, 79
Riefkohl, Stella C. 40
ROTC 54, 55, 56, 57
Science 50, 51
Sharick, Earl C 35
Smith, Dorothy H. 39, 38, 80
Social Studies 52, 53
Special Education 35
Stearns, James E. 41
Stronach, Glenda S. 60, 39
Tanner, Martha I. 39
Taylor, Marion B. 32
Weaver, Fiorella
'W'cll. Dayton N. 34
Wilferd, Ugolena 39
Will, William 41, 39
'& illhim. Rebecca D. 60, 39


Student AdeC


Abeyta, Raymond
Abresch, Ernest 124, 140, 95
Adams, Clyde 151, 156, 116
Adams, Emilio
Adams, Nickilda 96
Alberga, Charles 104
Alberga, Deborah 104, 135, 132
Alberga, Sandra 135, 164, 62, 80,
132
Alberga, Sheila 128, 129, 88, 135,
134, 139, 91, 132
Alexaitis, Sheri Lynn 120
Alexaitis, Jr., John 104
Alger, David 116, 120
Alger, Pattie 88
Alger, Vickie 118
Allen, Brian 88, 123, 140
Allen, Lonnie 119
Allen, William 116, 120
Alonis, Jay 62, 23
Amason, James 120
Ambum, Buddy
Andersen, Carl 115, 118, 127
Anderson, Shawn 114
Andree, Michael
Andree, Willian 104
Anton, Martha 128, 129, 88, 132
Apodaca, Cynthia 114
Apodaca, Gil 96, 128, 122
Apodaca, Michael 88, 124, 140
Aponte, Julio 161
Aponte, Stephen 96, 129, 47, 55, 56
Arbaugh, Susan 104
Austin, Almanubia 6, 62, 80
Austin, Donald 104
Austin, John 116, 120
Austin, Patricia 62, 85
Austin, Paul 119
Austin, Robert 113, 116
Austin, Robert 112, 116
Austin, Susan 119
Austin Jr., Donald


Austin, Elaine 128
Autry, Debie 111
Baitel, Barbara 117, 120
Baitel, Paul 88, 155, 140, 156, 132
Baker, Carol 104, 148, 107
Baker, Donna 96
Baker, Debbie 120
Baker, Diane 113
Baker, Glen 88
Baker, Paul 119, 116
Baker, Terri 62, 152
Balmer, Kathy 115
Banks, Barbara 88
Barger, Michael 88, 140
Barger, Steven 116
Barnett, Marilyn 113
Baronne, Joanne 116
Barr, James 96
Barr, Peter 115
Barr, Robert 62
Barraza, Jaime 88, 161, 26
Barraza, Evelyn 104
Barriteau Jr., John 112, 116
Bassett, Jean 63, 80, 132
Baxter, Marihn 96
Beale, Mary 112
Beale, Michael 155, 63
Beale, Roger 104
Beebe, William 88
Behre, Thomas 33, 111
Beltran, Jaime
Bensen, Christopher 104
Berry, Frank 129, 88, 140
Betancourt, Margaret
Betancourt, Rosemary 96, 130, 102
Betcher, Barbara 88
Bird Jr., James 119, 116
Bisot, Donna 96
Blorneb. Jan 58, 164, 125, 63
Bjomeby, Michael 96
Blair, Marjorie 114
Blanchard. Stanr'y


Blanchard, Timothy 96
Blanchette, Gerianne 88
Blanchette, Paula 104, 111
Bleicher, Beth -118, 120, 139
Bleicher, David 104, 148
Bleicher, Paul 96, 138, 100, 147,
148
Blevins, Elizabeth 58, 63, 80
Blevins, Jeffrey 96
Bliznik, Barbara 118
Bloemer, Barbara 96. 128, 58, 125,
152, 145
Bloemer Jr., Robert 88, 124, 155,
140, 148, 119
Blout, Edward 118
Blount, Lucy
Bocanegra, Tina 120, 42
Bock, Robin 96
Boman, James
Bonilla, Arnaldo 104
Boone, Lana 128, 135, 34, 136, 133,
80, 71, 82, 139, 23, 63, 86, 134
Boone, Maria 128, 88, 127, 148,
139, 134
Booth, Richard 88, 148
Borsellino, Henry 88, 33
Boseman, Vivian 6, 63, 80
Boswell, Debra 88
Boswell, Michael 120
Boswell, Steven 113
Bowers, Carl 104
Boyland, Charlotte 104, 122. 11l
Boyland, Rita 128, 129, 88, 122,
123, 10, 127, 139
Bradby, Robert 113
Bradbury, Margaret 112
Bradbury III, William
Bramlett Jr., Robert 120
Bradenburg, Janet 89, 58
Brannan, George 104, 120


Brannan, Sheila 112, 118
Brannen, George
Brannen III, William
Bridwell III, Arthur
Bridwell, John 113
Bridwell, Pamela 96
Brien, JcltriN 96, 163, 103
Bringas, Carmen 113
Bringas Jr., Edward 96, 129, 12'
Brock, Laura 104
Brock, Linda 89, 58, 95
Brock, Steven 114, 116
Brockman, Robert 104
Brown, Amber 104
Brown, Billie 112
Brown, Carlos 89, 124, 10, 155, 140
Brown, Debra 104
Brown, Donald 104
Brown, Elisa 115, 42
Brown, Janet 120
Brown, Jonathan 120
Brown, Kathleen 96, 135. 103
Brown, Melinda 96, 129, 130, 103
Brown, Patrice 96, 12
Brown, Terri 114, 34
Budd, Debra 104
Budd, Desiree 113
BulIr.~erl Denise 103
Bullinger, Kurt 113
Bundy Jr., Earl 96
Burac, Francisco 118
Burbine, Anthony 114
Burge, Susan 96, 128, 129, 10
Burgess, Elizabeth 104
Burgess, Kathryn 64
Bush, Kathryn 96
Butcher. Leo 104
Butler. Carmen 6, 164, 1(. ,5 M,
64, 71, 83
Butler, Ines 112
Bynoe, Carlos 119








RODRIGO LINDO
V ., April 25, 195.3
Panama City, Republic of Panama
f "Rod" was a member of the Spanish Club for four years and was sec-
retary-treasurer in his sophomore year. He worked on several commit-
-D a tees. Rod plans to attend college.

SSHELLEY MADISON LUINI
r June 10, 1953
Buffalo, New York
Shelley was a cheerleader for two years and participated in ikf rl.ill
and volleyball. She was a member of the G.A.A. and the Caribe Club.
Shelley plans to attend college in New York and become an English
teacher.

Rodrigo Lindo Shelley Madison Lund
HILA P. LYMAN
October 14, 1953
L Bremerton, Washington
Hila lettered in swimming in both her sophomore and freshman
years. She was secretary of the junior class. Hila was on the Girl's Drill
Team, and was Drill Team and Battalion sponsor. Hila plans to attend
SSecretarial School.

JOHN HARTLEY MARTIN
March 14, 1953
Panama City, Republic of Panama
John was president of the junior class. He was ROTC Battalion and
... iDrill Team Commander. He played intramural basketball for four

lF years. John plans to attend a Military Academy or join the Armed
f 1^ Forces.

Hila P. Lyman John Hartley Martin


JAIME MARTINEZ
August 5, 1952
Colon, Republic of Panama
O tt Jaime was active in ROTC and was on the first Drill Team to com-
Spete in the States. He plans to join the Army as an officer after college.

S" DENNIS PAUL MAXWELL
SApril 19, 195.3
New York City, New York
Dennis was vice president of his sophomore class. He was in ROTC
four years and was "E" Company Commander. Dennis plans to study
Architecture at the University of Florida.


Jaime Martinez Dennis Paul Maxwell


JUDY ANN McLAIN
April 27, 195.3
SColon, Republic of Panama
Judy was in Nurses' Aides and the Thespian Society, and was presi-
S- dent of both in her senior year. Judy won several acting awards and had
parts in several plays. She plans to attend college.

SARAH LOUISE McLEAN
December 9, 1952
h Cristobal, Canal Zone
Sally played basketball and volleyball. She worked on the Junior
Privilege Committee and the Senior Advisory Council. Sally plans to
travel in Europe after graduation.


Sarah Louise McLean


Judv Ann McLami


























S' Frst Rowu Steven Brock. Robert Day, Mi-
chael DeVault, Brvan Simpkins, Edward
Stroop, Michael Collins. Ricky Wilson.
l^ |Second Row: Donna Deaton. Shawn Ander-
Sr4 1 son, Elizabeth Smith, Pushpa Mayani,
.. Ruth Hudgins, Brenda Goodwin, Margaret
f Weigart, Margaret Jaketic, Marcia Coffin.
As- :. Third Row: Paris McIlwain. Nancy White,
S'I Stephanie Mowery, Devonv Dandridge.
Tilda Edwards, '\, Ik Tom, Sharon
S' McCann, Glenda Mika.

-r IV
".-4. ..

'." .-W r" . *-. .. -., .. '

"For-r-r-r-e!"













Aft



lint Row:. Scott Parker, Richard Sli.iaui, Anthon Burbine, Glen Hess, Jimmy Cash, Leslie Recio, Jeff Gcsney, Mike Romero. Second Row:
Nancv W'iliford, I.aura Gregg, Pat MOlN I)oris Hfogaboam, Terri Brown. Marjorie Blair, Diana Ruiz. Third Row: Mike Cliette, Robert Wil-
mont. Rav Wheeler, John Shobe, Steve Kardonski, I)avid Thompson. Robert Fernandez, David Woods, John Moncivais, Alex Nieves, Dave
FI.rnsworth. Eunice Zaihrv. (indd Apoda a.








C/IS Co-Ckampiwo JIu balboa Relays









_ ....l -----'







"Well, Billy, I'll tell you what you do..." advises Coach Agee.

"P 7 -, ....
1.1 ( i h k


'. I


"This is the part of track we like best," sign Ernest Abresch, Frank Ciccheto, and Billy
Deaton.


*' -U
c* *
r... '-

"Eat your heart out, Nureyev!" exclaims
Cubby Clement.

SCORES
CHS...65 BHS...72 CZC ....
CHS...53.5 BHS...91.5 CZC.....3
CHS 65 BHS.. 78 CZC .....3


One week before the beginning of
the track season, a meeting was
called, and all interested persons
asked to attend. Those willing to at-
tend the two-hour daily practice ses-
sions became members of the varsity
or junior varsity teams, depending on
their ages. CHS participated in three
interscholastic meets this year. Track
events at each meet included: hurdles,
relays, sprints, and distance running.
Field events included: the shotput,
the pole vault, the discus throw, and
the long and high jumps. In addition
to the regular meets, CHS also partic-
ipated in the two-day Balboa Relays.
They were co-champions with Balboa
in this special event in which Rain-


Smiling Billy Deaton displays trophy he
won as outstanding participant in the Para-
iso Balboa Relays.


bow City, Panama City, and Colon
teams participated.
The 1970-71 track team was one of
the best ever from CHS. Willie Huff-
man broke the record in both the dis-
cus throw and the shot put. Members
of the record-breaking 880-yard relay
team were: Billy Deaton, Neil Pat-
ton, Ed Bringas, and Frank Cicchetto.
The outstanding runner of the season
was junior, Billy Deaton. His success
as due to natural ability, dedication,
hard work, and a willingness to be
coached. An excellent team combined
with the expert coaching of varsity
coach, Robert Agge, and jr. varsity
coach, Randy Grubbs, to produce a
very successful track season.









...
FTF"~7!Z


JAMES D. NORMAN Biology;
B.S., Michigan State Univ.; M.A.,
Oregon State Univ. "Live, love and be
happy for tomorrow we die." "Smile
and have a full life."


fitm
LUKE T. PALUMBO Introducto-
ry Physical Science; B.S., Northwest
Missouri State College; M. Ed., Univ.
of Florida. "Things could be better."


!



"Beware of this plant!"
















CHARLES T. REEVES Physics,
Earth Science, Mathematics, Driver
Education; B.S., B.A., M.A., Arizona
State University. "To thyself be hon-
est and think before you act."


Nai-Yuen Shum. "I think the one I just
cut up is the one I needed.'


The formula for problem No 2 is nor on the hlck'


--








ScieNce


PAUL HIERONYMUS Chemis-
try, Math; B.S., East Central State
College, M N.S., University of Okla-
homa. "Have an open mind and
then use it."


Michael McCann, Kenneth Hill. "Now this will make me healthy, wealthy, and r:,c


CHS boasted a wide-ranging
science curriculum. The student who
followed this program can be assured
of a solid foundation in scientific
knowledge. The courses offered were
Life Science, Earth Science, Introduc-
tory Physical Science, Bi1 .L:,, Chem-
istry, and Physics.
The seventh-grade Life Science
course taught the basis of life and the
student's role in the realm of living
things. Earth Science, offered to


eighth-graders, was an interesting
study of the structure and function of
the world and its surrounding envi-
ronment. Introductory Physical
Science was a preliminary laboratory
course. Students were taught the pro-
cedures of scientific research and dis-
covery. Biology offered a change from
the world of physical actions and
reactions. This course was highlight-
ed by three dissections during the
year. A basic course in Chemistry ac-.


quainted students with meth,,dh ,t
scientific thinking and problem _,.,b-
ing. Emphasis was placed on pcrtl.rrm-
ing laboratory experiments and r,.l h-
ing logical conclusions. Physis. the
science of measurement, dealt priim.r-
ily with practical applications r
science in daily life. Vector :.n.il\is
and other physical aspects of ierince
were the major concepts studied in
this course.


|i

EMMA LOUISE MASON -- l.
Science 7; A.B., Randolph-Mar..i
Woman's College, M.A, Col jl.:
Universirv. "In order for students ,.
learn they must be an active parti,
pant which requires much more tl .,
mere physical presence."


Mad scientists at work!


r

iG-
1~L






































NOT PICTURED Ravmond Abtec
Rand\ Amburn, Carl Bojer. Fjrl Bunls.
Elizabeth Cimino, Mliihatl E..ins. Est-r
Gonzalez, Lorraine CGuiltb le. Mirk Honcr-
baum, Bobby Hughes. Ron.ild Hurlburi


Debbie Cares, Cherrie Hieronrmus "%X'e arc I' ouing on 21


Charlotte Boyland. "I just hope that balloon can take it!"


Vick) Tipton "Hou did I e er g r .iu.k in
this rut?"


atecotmers


L"O rb, A.: n brn
Ro J..,i, klh ,.







Caribe Club Spoasors Cultural exchange

Program With ColoH Jtigh Schools
7 In order to provide students from
- I H a Panamanian school with an oppor-
i M tunity to observe the workings of the
U.S. school system, the members of
the Caribe Club invited the students
of St. Mary's and St. Joseph's acade-
mies in Colon to visit CHS. On the
S., morning of December 9th, the entire
senior class of St. Mary's Academy
and a number of students from St. Jo-
o seph arrived by bus. Each girl was as-
SA signed to a member of the Caribe
Club and whom they accompanied to
class. They had originally planned to
leave at noon, but refreshed by a
Lunch provided by the Caribe Club,
S'. they attended afternoon classes as
well. Both Panamanian and American
I students agree that they had profited
from this cultural exchange.

"I knew I should have brought my lunch'"











fi



II I
," B, I












"Mrs Fartorosi won't let u o(n the pm tloor in our i,\ttrd "
"You're kidding' I'm _,id I came so I can
catch up on the news."







pation After Riotous Campaipf


Michael McCann, "Good things come in
little packages!"


Buddy Short, James Kunkel, Brandt Irion, and
ington started out this way?"


Rita Boyland, Jackie Parker, Heidi Sweeney, Beverly Olsen, Brian Allen, and Debra Gosney.
"George, George, George of the Jungle."


Denise Foshee. "Are you sure GC.'ric- Wash-

Each year a nominating committee
considers long and carefully the quali-
fications of various students and then
selects those best suited for the job as
S.A. officer candidates. These candi-
dates then enter the exciting competi-
tion known as "Campaign Week."
Each candidate strives to obtain the
students' votes by hanging posters,
coining slogans, and passing out but-
tons and tags. The highlight of the
week is the campaign assembly, dur-
ing which candidates and their man-
agers speak and various amusing or
informative skits are presented. On
election day, students vote for the stu-
dent they feel is best qualified for the
job, realizing that the election be re-
sponsible for running CHS the fol-
lowing year is much more than a
mere popularity contest.


Chris Cox, "I'm only doing it for a friend!"


Katie McGilberry and Mark Hanley. "This doesn't compare with a mini-bike trail!"









,irls' Drill ream Wins


Veteran


Day Parade


The 1971 Girls' Drill Team at
CHS consisted of twenty-nine girls.
They were under the expert leader-
ship of Commander Jan Bjorneby.
The girls performed during halftime
at all home football games in the
Tiger Stadium. They also marched in
the quarterly ROTC Reviews. As an
additional activity, they participated
in the annual Veteran's Day Parade.
At this time, they were selected as the
outstanding girls' drill team on the
Irshmus The girls considered this an
honor which made the long hours of
after-school practice well-worth the
time and effort it required.
The Drill Team also helped with
Orientation Day for the new students
of CHS. They provided guidance and
assistance when necessary.


1 Roberta Cole
(quad leader)
2 .vnn Gregg
o-nimmandcr)
A. Nance Edmondson
(squad ieadcr)
4 Linda Brotk
s Pattc Hauke
6 Kaith 1)erarps
Viana Ostrrca
s Ann T .
Ann A( nnalcs


10. Kathy Milligan
11. Kathy Pursley
12. Marian Kredell
(squad leader)
1 Carol Ross
14 Barbara Bloemer
15. Janet Brandenburg
(squad leader)
16. Donna Graham
17 Sherry Coleman
18. Mounven Iyman


9. Terry Overstreet
. Gigi Colon
1. Katie McGilberry
. Mary Norval
. Cathy Gercich
i. Nina Gercich
i. Regina Dominguez
i. Ellie Blevins
SCarol Wertz
. Marrianne Verruno
SJan Bjorneby
(co-comdr.)


7 1



63 t







Dedication ..........
informa! ... ..........
Formal . . . . . . .
faculty and Curriculum..
Classes ............
Organizations ..... ..


. . . . 4
................ 6
............... 28
............... 30
............... 60
.............. 122


able

of

Contents


4


Jn Keeping With Che Modern 'rend towardd greater
f7leibility A yearbook Organization, Che CM S Annual
Staff Js lJtroduci/ng An 8tirely NVew And Different For-
mat Jn Che 1971 Caribbeai Departing From Che 'radi-
tional Concept Of Separate Sections, each iJtroduced y A
Division Page, On eacIh acet Of /Che School ife; Che
yearbook Js Divided Jntto Only Cwo MAain Sections, 7or-
mal And Jnformal. Appearing lJn Che Formal lalf Are:
Administration And Faculty, Class Pictures, Organization
Pictures, Ceam Photos, Queens Ad Ceerleaders, Adver-
tising, And Jdder. Ciis Section ContainsAll he Formai-
ty Required Of A Good yearbook. J1 (Che citing Jlfor-
mal Section, We l ave Attempted Co PresentAn llUinter-
rupted Candid Story O0 School Cife, fust As Vlou pe-
rieiced It.


Sports. ..................
Special Activities .............
Editor's Page .................
Uiger Roosters ................
Advertisements ................
Jider .. ...................


..... 140
.....158
.....169
.....170
..... 173
..... 187


I,
































ROY HOWELL Alpebra IB. Gen
eral Math A, BS, Shippen'barg Si
College. I S. Florid) S re L'nirv
"Accept people on the basj c.l heir
actions. nor their ippearane


CAROL J KNIGHT Lale Since
". Mith jnd A. B Auburn L'r,,t
' Read a. much and J jaricd nri.rel
as ,ou p,.,.,ibl\ -.n


BERNARD R MAZZONI Math
6. Algebra I. B S. lr-bant.n \'lley
Cullree M .. Penn Srre L'nr, 'Ev-
endas hda uld be i i ucd da\ nd Jo-
mo.rro i a blerer J.i


Nancy Edmondson. "I g\te up, I've had


Calculus proves to be a .-h.llcngmin class









I (i t(.i
Nhi .ld Ns John T O'DI)nncl Jr
r and NMr Richa.rd ()l)'innll
IIMC R T Oldl)iha
SF': Abel l ) li\are
cuiha S (O'Neill
l.1lAnes )rrego

Mr and iMrs Luin R. Orti
SO)rnti/
P' Osbo(rne
R W \Owen
Mr. and MrNs Harland )OxIc
Miss Sandra Pacte
Mr. I'nrirquc Pagan
MNrs. E. T, Painm
Mr ind Mrs Inuke C Palumbo Jr.
Mr and Mrs. Luke C. Palumbo Sr.
Mr. and Mrs. Luke T. Palumbo
Mr. and Mrs. C F. Pantova
Sarah Parks
C T.R, and Mrs. Roger R Peaskc
Mr. and Mrs. Ronald L. Pennock
Col. anid Mrs. Robrto Peralta
Hectcr Perez
Mr and Mrs James Pfau
Mr. and Mrs. Carl A. Pinto
Sonia Podial
Charlie and Mike Poer
Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Polite
Mr and Mrs. Darwin E Pope
Poticr Fanmil
Maj. and Mrs. Frank M. Potete
Mr. and Mrs. Poulin
K. S. Prichard
Maj. and Mrs. R P. Prothers
Dr. and Mrs Jaime Pujals
Frene Rabaghat
Capt and Mrs. A E. Rainey
Darci Riam.lho
Capt. E. B. Ramier
Mariend Riamirez
A A. Rankin
Mr and Mrs Robert Raukin
Donald 1Rahill
Edwa aid Read
Jose Rec io
Mr .md Mrs J. Redugoi
Carmenit Reedt
Mr. aind Mrs J Reid
Di and \IMrs Paul Revello>
Mr and Mrs Rtlxs'
Iis Ri miilund
NiMr and lMrs. r1 F Ridge
Mr and \Mrs. Viintnt Ridge
Mr and Mrs. (arl () Riggs Jr
I.'I'C ami MrN Theooreo Ric s ih
SI 1 Donald ki\cra
j]o e RI\eIaI

.h and Mrs, Roberts
l]i k and 1.l Rbson
Rots RodnIl


Tohn lRublcl
Mir and iMrs. Wallv F. Russon
ShiMev Salt/
Vilmna Eihsa Sampson
Charles A. Sanche/
John IH. San che
iMr and Mrs. John Sanders
Al Sandrock
Carlos Santiago-Gonzales
SFC and Mrs. William Santiago
oce and Sonia Schack
Mr. and Mrs. G. C. Scheibh
Mrs. E. G. Shell
Mrs. Schwinn
Mrs. Scott
Ine/ Scott
Gracicla R. de Severance
Capt. and Mrs. Harold W. Shad III
John Sherwood
Clover Shobe
Mr. Fred Sholtes
SFC and Mrs. William P. Sieben
Edward Silva
Ellis H. Simpkins
Mrs. E Singh
CTRCS and Mrs. Horace P. Sirmons
Capt. and Mrs. P. L. Skrable
Van Stamper
David Stanley
Capt. and Mrs. R. K. Stanley
Gatun Fire Station
Mr. and Mrs. J. E. Stearns
Shirley Stccle
Cothrew B. Sterling
Mr. and Mrs. R. R. Stoluy
S. R. Stough
Mr. and Mrs. J. C. Smith
Mrs. Lucille Smith
Mr. and Mrs. M. Smith
Mr. and Mrs. Rodolto T. Smith
Lowere Snyder
Dr. and Mrs. W. M. Snyder
Karsten Sorensen
Dorothy Spagna
Mr. and Mrs. Neal F. Sparrow
Mrs. John P. Spear
Amelia Sperling
Mr. and Mrs. John B. Spivey
Dr. and Mrs. R. Antonio Suescum
(Capt. and Mrs. Roger H. Swain
Wallace R. Swank
Mr. and Mrs. F Tahev
SFC TaundrN
Mrs. Marion Tavlor
Capt. and Mrs Thor B. Tcllctsen
Aline Tcllman
MrN and Mrs A G. T., .11...
Fhukai iTeves
Mrs. Paula Theall
Thiomps on
Ncndcll Thompsi on
Angel I. l)ial Torres
Mrs Robert Toucrdv


Mr and Mrs HarrI E Townsend
Jose L. Truvillo
Shirley TIv
Mrs. Tyler
Mujoja Tyler
Cectilia Ubbcn
Joe Valencia
Capt. and Mrs. Jose B. Vasquez
Mr. and Mrs. Pete B. Vasquez
Mr. and Mrs. Clinton W. Vaught
Delia Vedio
Juan R. Velez
Juan Ventura
Ria E. Voight
Sylvia Voight
Mr. and Mrs. Joseph A. Vowell Jr
Mr. and Mrs. R. E Waggoner
Mr. and Mrs. F . Wainio
Barbara Walcott
Lawrence E. Walker
Walline
Dr. and Mrs. V. W. Walters
Mr. and Mrs. R. L. Ward
Cindy Watson
Mrs. C. C. Weigart
Mr. and Mrs. W. E. Weigle
Capt. and Mrs. A. T. Welden
Mr. and Mrs. Dayton Wells
Mr. and Mrs. Richard Werder
Bill Wesley
Zorro Wesley
Karen Westeberg and Family
Mr. and Mrs. V. Westerburg
Mr. and Mrs Weston
Mr. and Mrs. John M. N\ Il.
R. L. Whulu
Albert and Maria Wiber
Dr. and Mrs. Wiggins
Gloriela X\ ii ,
David A. Wild
Mrs. Wilfred
Mr. and Mrs. Wilkinson
Mr. and Mrs. Howard Will
Mr. and Mrs. Raymond R. Will
Robert R. Will
Mr. and Mrs. J. R. Williams
SFC Wilson
Mrs. Winder
Mr. and Mrs. H. L. Wirthams
Jenny Wirtz
Mrs. Hallv Witcher
Mr. and Mrs. 1. D. Wood
Mrs. Gladys Wudgin
Mrs. and Mrs. Merlin B. Yocum
Harold Young
Karen Young
Mr. and Mrs. Yrey
Carmen T. Ysdimer
Paul Zuleta









Of '71


Canal


College


JEANNETTE RAMONA COX
August 31, 1952
Managua, Nicaragua
Jeannette was a member of the French Club for four years.
She was a member of the Nurses' Aides Club, and served as
secretary for two years. She was also active in Pink Girls.
Jeannette worked on the year book during each of her four
years in high school, and in her senior year, served as editor.
Jeannette was a member of the National Honor Society, and
served as secretary. She was also a member of the Student Ad-
visory Committee and the Philosophian Society. Jeannette
plans to attend Canal Zone College and later the University
of Florida, studying for a career in medicine. She also plans to
study Spanish during the summer, before attending CZC, in
Mexico or Spain.

KATHLEEN ANNE DERAPS
June 25, 1953
Ancon, Canal Zone
Kathy was a member of the Caribe Club for three years,
and was a member of the advertising staff for the yearbook in
her senior year. Kathy participated in volleyball and speedball
intramurals and was a member of the junior Powder Puff
team. She worked on many committees, and was vice-presi-
dent of the senior class. K.irh\ plans to attend college in San
Antonio, Texas where she will obtain her Bachelor of Science
degree for her career as a registered nurse.

MICHAEL EDWARD DEXTER
July 1, 1953
Fort Benning, Georgia
Mike came to CHS in his junior year, and rapidly became
an active member of the class of '71. In his senior year, he was
president of the CHS Student Association. Mike continued his
participation in athletics at CHS, playing on the varsity tennis
and baseball teams. Mike was a member of the Caribe Club,
the "C" Club, and the National Honor Society. Mike plans to
study engineering at William and Mary or the University of
New Mexico.

PEDRO JUAN DIAZ
February 26, 1952
San Juan, Puerto Rico
Pedro attended CHS for three years. He was a ROTC pla-
toon leader, and a member of the Boys' Drill team. Pedro
plans to enlist in the Army's Special Forces, and Ranger train-
ing, and to attend Officer Candidate School.

WENDY MARIE FLORES
November 1, 1953
Leesville, Louisiana
Wendy was the 1970 Jamboree Queen. She was a member
of the Girls' Drill team in her sophomore year. W\t nd was a
member of the Senior Advisory and Jr.-Sr. Prom Committees.
She plans to attend C.Z.C. for two years, and then transfer to
the United States.

DENISE ANNETTE FOSHEE
February 24, 1953
New Orleans, Louisiana
Denise was a cheerleader and an ROTC sponsor in her sen-
ior year. She lettered in tennis in eleventh grade. Denise was
vice-president of the Caribe Club, and a member of the
French Club and the National Honor S.x, icn Denise plans to
attend college and earn a teaching degree.


Pedro Juan Diaz


Wendy Marie Flores


Denise Annette Foshee



























Debbie Carey, Cherrie Hieronymus. Cin-
derella never had it so good.


I' -


mmwIl


Debbie Carey. "It
time."


better evaporate in


David Welch Walter Weslic Wayne West
fMargl ita W.lmons l le Wdlson lDOnnrs Wood


T h


Si -








Paula V\augh t, Rcncc Cliettc. "L.t' s ce, a
tcw boiling hips r was it salt i rostals>"


-9.


Fr.ts Woudenbcrg
FredrLk Waimo


Rmon bben Jrame Vlcnine
tiirnen VCD Ramona Vidrt


i.-Paull Vaught
,-'atherine Weigart


L-Clffford Welch
Vicks Whipple


C











Upon entering the classroom, a student assumes more than a seat, he assumes all
the privileges and responsibilities which accompany his position in this place of
learning the school. Having brought together the teachers and the taught, the
school has fullfilled its function what follows is determined by these individu-
als.
Often, it seems, minds are more eager and alert as the day begins, and the op-
portunities afforded by the morning hours should not be missed. To bring to
each student success at last this is the goal of every morning class.


1I-1


L


Diane Carroll


Mike Hayden


r








Seventh And eighth traders Are


VFron Row: Robert Austin, Lawrence Moochler, Roger Welch. William Cronan, Jeffrey Carwithen, Ricky Lyons, Mario Ubben. Center Row:
Marccla Montiva.i, Margarita Zamarripa, Norccn Kauter, Linda Loizeaux, Karon Mittc. )Doris Tomlin, Eileen Robles, Mary Mills, Susan
NMcndo/,a. Back Row: Ch eryl Williams, James Dexter, Patricia Sanchez, John BarritCau Jr., Margaret Bradbury, Leslie Gibson, Anthony Ware,
Juan Claramunt, Margarita Young.


F:r, n Ri: Murra( ebb. lames Mu,,ecr. MI.rk Perusse. Rex janscn. Paul Hopkins, Antonio Scott, Angel Irizarry. GCntlr Row: Gail Gregg, Bil-
lic Brown, Kimlberx MN u ell. Mona Christi.an Rcnce Nay, N lMarv Jo Beale, Katherine Mever. BRad- Rim: Carol Fluharty, Gloria Olivarez, Linda
.ir Ir,A lnics Butler. Y~'nne Smith, .Madeline Pujals, Cin(d Ferguscon, Linda Stamper, Manr LaRoche, PI. ..II Husband, Evelyn Withrow,
!mla i,,mnnon. Lumanne Swisher
























Chris Bailey Richardson


Dann% Ras Robinson


Jasmin Anna Rivera


Nescor John Rodriguez


Picture


Not


Available


"aren Lsnn Sihill


CHRIS BAILEY RICHARDSON
December 26, 1952
Seattle, W''ahigton
Chris participated in varsity and intramural volleyball during her
three years at CHS. She received a "Driver of the year" award for the
year '69-'70. In her senior year, she was sponsor of"E" company. Chris
was married and plans to continue her education.

JASMIN ANNA RIVERA
October 31, 1953
Cham, Germ.in
Jasmin was a member of the French Club at CHS. F. .11. iri, gradua-
tion, she plans to attend college, major in ln.u.i .t. and then travel.





DANNY RAY ROHIN,0)N
April 20, 1953
Covington, Kentucky
Danny was a member of the Tradewind Staff, the Caribbean Sports
Parachute Club, the Civics Club, the Drama Club, and the choir. He
played basketball in his sophomore year. Danny plans to attend college
in Texas, Kcnruk'. or North Carolina.

NESTOR JOHN RODRIGUEZ
September 18, 1953
Santurce, Puerto Rico
Nestor has attended CHS for two and a half years. He plans to study
music and architecture after graduation.




KAREN LYNN SCHILL
April 25, 1953
Galion, Ohio
This was Karen's first year at CHS. She was a member of the Span-
ish Club, the G.A.A., and the newspaper staff. In her senior year she
was editor of the second page (editorial page) of the Tradewind. She
also played tennis in her freshman and senior years. Karen plans to
major in medical tlhn-,il, ,\ at Canal Zone College.

NAI-YUEN SHUM
September 17, 1953
Macau, China
Nai-Yuen has attended CHS for two years. He hopes to become a
chemist.


Nai-Yuen Shum


JAMES H. SPANGLER
March 18, 1953
San Pedro, California
This was Jim's first year at Cristobal High School. He participated
in intramural and varsity track at his former school. After ior ,lu..;i. n.
Jim plans to become an automobile mechanic.

JACQUELINE FAITH SPRINGER
December 8, 1953
Ft. Eustis, V'ireini:
Jackie was a member of the Caribe Club. She marched with the
Girls' Drill Team, and in her Senior year, was the sponsor of "E" com-
pany. Jackie plans to become an x-ray technician.


Jacquehne Fallh Springer












Congratulations
to the
Class of 1971
From

UNITED FRUIT COMPANY
Box 5016
Cristobal, Canal Zone


YAMAHA
"It's A
Better Machine"
Compliments
of
TEXAS
ANTILLES
LIMITED

Compliments of
The Vincentian Fathers
HOLY FAMILY CHURCH
Margarita
Canal Zone







Congratulations to the Class of 1971
PANAMA CANAL YACHT CLUB


Box 5041
Cristobal, Canal Zone


















Refreshed from a relaxing lunch
hour, students returned at 11:30 to re-
sume their regular routine. Each after-
noon included three hours of classes
- with the exception of seniors with
sixth-period study hall, who were per-
mitted to leave early. For some, the
enthusiasm characteristic of the
morning hours appeared to wave;
while others seemed to have awak-
ened at least. All, however evidenced
an increased restlessness as the hour
approached 2:15 and the ringing of
the final bell.


U
ui~~-e~-
I'- -


SI. ..


r I
"- -I'-" lliln
Iim
n'"M


~--I
r
: I I


i


i


PP~,







JOSE JAIME MEDINA
March 29, 1953
San Jose, California
This was Jose's first year at CHS. He was an S.A. representative, a
member of the Tradewind and Caribbean Staffs, and a ROTC platoon
leader. He was also a member of the varsity football, baseball, and bas-
ketball teams.

SUSAN WARD MENDENHALL
December 23, 1952
I Springfield, Ohio
I Susan has attended CHS for only two years. She was very active in
athletics and other school functions in the U.S. and continued her in-
terest at CHS. She participated in varsity and intramural -*,.imn'irn'.
II i tennis, basketball, and volleyball, and was a member of the GAA.
Susan plans to attend Miami University in Oxford, Ohio, majoring in
lose Jaime Mcdini Susar3 Ward Mendernhll physical education.
"...,:' ..... KATHRYN MARIE MILLIGAN
April 23, 1953
S Bozeman, Montana
S Kathy was a member of the Nurses' Aides Club, and of the Pink
Girls. She served as a student assistant. Kathy played volleyball in her
S freshman year. She also served on various decorating and publicity
Committees for plays and dances. In her senior year, she was elected
Carnival Queen. Kathy plans to attend Canal Zone College or Monta-
4. na State University, majoring in elementary education. After college,
she plans to attend airline stewardess school.

ALEIDA MONTENEGRO
February 14, 1953
Colon, Republic of Panama
"Monty" attended CHS for two years. She was a member of the
Spanish Club and participated in volleyball and basketball intramurals.
Kathrvn Marie Mllliin Alcida Montenregro Monty plans to attend college and pursue a career as a computer pro-
grammer.

WILLIAM A. MURPHY
July 7, 1953
Fayetteville, North Carolina
"Murph" attended CHS for two years. He participated in basketball
intramurals and varsity basketball and football. He was active in
ROTC, and a member of the Boys' Drill Team. He was selected out-
( standing MI for the fourth nine weeks. He was also a member of the
senior privilege committee. "Murph" plans to specialize in electronics
., -- in college.

DON ALME OLSEN
June 6, 1953
Whitefish, Montana
Don was active in the sports program at CHS, particip.iing in varsi-
Wllham A Murph, Don Alme Olen ty football and swimming and football intramurals. Don plans to at-
tend Canal Zone College, and perhaps transfer to an oceanographic
school.

NEIL CLIFFTON PATTON
February 7, 1952
Colon, Republic of Panama
Neil was one of CHS's most outtanding athletes. He participated in
varsity baseball, track, and football, and lettered every year. He was se-
lected most valuable player of the 1i;,i,.70 school year. and also made
the All Zone Football Team. Neil plans to become an aviator or a den-
tist.

JANE MARY PAULSON
April 10, 1953
Ancon, Canal Zone
Jane participated in volleyball, basketball, and speedball intramurals.
She worked on committees for the Sadie Hawkins Day Dance and the
Neil Cliff on Panton Jane Man Paulson Jr.-Sr. Prom. Jane plans to attend secretarial school.













Alfonso Robinson
Deborah Robinson
Tony Robinson
L-'dna Robles
Isaac Ruiz









Luis Ruiz
Sheryl Ruoff
Arthur Rurledge
Peter Sanchez
.Ssdra Sanchez


tt"a~b .M...W -



"I thought all Indians were on reservations these days!" Juan soni, wilhU sntiago
Jerry Shannon Alizabeth Simmons
Michael Simms Kathym Smith


I Mauk Spangler
Robert Stem
Alice Stiebriz
Rhonda Strube
Joe Swoan









Susan Swnstrnom
L--David Tare
Kamanki Teves
Vicki Tipton
L-Ana Ubben


a.,L O


109
























- '- A m
After a satisfying lunch, students head to
the student's lounge.


More complaints were heard con-
cerning the lunch hour than perhaps
any other facet of school life. Lunch
was served in four shifts; those on the
early shift complained that it was too
early to eat, and those on the late
shift complained that it was too late.
Once in the cafeteria, however, no
one seemed to have any real trouble
eating.
The lunch hour provided a brief
respite from classes which was wel-
comed by all. Juniors and seniors took
advantage of their open-lunch privi-
lege to "eat out" on alternate days. In


spite of this, and the many meetings
scheduled during the lunch hour, the
cafeteria was always filled with hun-
gry, noisy students; eating, chatting
with friends or doing a little last min-
ute studying. Those wishing to leave
the cafeteria early, spent their lunch
hour in the pleasant surroundings of
the student lounge located directly be-
neath the cafeteria.
In spite of the frequent complaints,
most students found the lunch hour
one of the most relaxing and enjoya-
ble periods of the school day.


W~~~8"
i;!J


Senior + Open lunch + Car = Happy
Heart.







iji ris:i^




Raymond Robertson. "I'll have a chili dog and please include the hot dog!"


_---------p -
Lr,








Ahdustrial Arts













RONALD FITE Mechanical JESSE C. HOLLOWAY Shop; RONALD LASSILA Shop; B.S.,
Drawing; B.S., East Texas State M.S., Oklahoma State College. "Get Los Angeles, Calif.; Lic. Sorbonne.
Univ.; M.S., East Texas State Univ. the best education you can." Mr. Lassila is a native Californian
Mr. Fire's home state is Texas. He and has taught in San Francisco, Eng-
is the Junior Class sponsor. He enjoys land, Turkey, Phillipines, and France.
the Canal Zone and his hobbies are His hobby is boating. His advice to
water skiing and hunting. students? "Work."



The Industrial Arts department at
CHS attempted to provide pupils .
with insight into their own interests;
Ito develop their abilities to work with
'their hands and with tools, and to
Sharpen their interest in creative
cratrs The Industrial Arts department
offered four groups of courses; Me-
chanical Drawing; Wood Working,
Metal Shop, and Plastics.
Mechanical Drawing I taught stu-
:dents to visualize how an object is put
together Neatness, correct lines, mea-
surement, and following instructions
were stressed. Mechanical Drawing II Students display varied attitudes toward mechanical drawing.
was a continuation of this course for
students planning to continue their
!education in this field. Woodworking
:students learned about tools, joints,
:shop safety, and the operation of
power tools. They used their knowl-
:edge to carry out projects. Metal Shop
'I taught the basic skills of bench-
:work, forging, welding, sheetmetal,
tand machine operation. Plastics stu-
dents learned the properties of plas-
tics and how to shape them into use-
ful objects.


"They didn't tell me about this when I filled out my class selection sheet," grumbles Robert
Johnson.













DOUGLAS ROBERT STEVENS
April 11, 1953
Panama City, Republic of Panama
Doug was a member of the Spanish and Language Lab
Clubs. In his senior year, he served as historian of the first,
and vice-president of the latter. He lettered in baseball in
both his junior and senior years. Doug plans to attend col-
lege in Texas, majoring in languages and history with
plans for a career in the diplomatic corps.

ELIGIO FERNANDO THOMAS
January 7, 1951
Panama City, Republic of Panama
Eligio was active in ROTC at CHS, and in his senior
year, was commander of the boys' Drill Team. He also par-
ticipated in junior varsity basketball. Eligio plans to join
the army, and perhaps later attend college.

LEWIS EDWARD VALDEZ
November 19, 1953
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
ROTC and dramatics have occupied much of Lewis'
time in high school. He has attended Leadership School
and participated in several Thespian productions. He
played football in his junior year, and was also elected to
the National Honor Society. Lewis plans to attend college,
and perhaps later join the army.

JOSE F. VALENCIA
June 8, 1953i
San Juan, Puerto Rico
Joe was a member of the varsity baseball, track, and
swimming teams. He was also active in ROTC, marching
on the Boys' Drill Team, and in his senior year, serving as
executive officer of "F" Company. Joe plans to attend
Brooklyn College in New York.

DANIEL PAUL VALENTINE
October 1I, 195,3
Detroit, Michigan
Danny was the yearbook photograph or t or our years.
He was a homeroom alternate in ninth and tenth grades,
and in his junior year, served as treasurer of the SA. He
was also active in ROTC. Danny plans to attend college,
join the Air Force, and pursue a career in the field of avia-
tion.

SYLVIA ANN VAMPRINE
Novoeher 1, 191,i
New Orleans. Louisiana
Sylvia was a member of the Nurses' Aides Club and
served as historian for one year. She played in the CHS
band for four years, and was a member of the Tradewind
Staff. She served on various dance committees, and was a
varsity cheerleader in her senior year. Sylvia plans to major
in law at LS.U.


Jose F. Valncia


iir


Jenny del Milagro Winz


SA i




Pridla Ann Zavinsky


Douglas Robert Stevens


Eligio Fernando Thomas


Lewis Edwand Valdez


LINDA ALICE VEST
November 6, 1952
Ft. Clayton, Canal Zone

THOMAS KENNETH WALLENIUS
April 24, 1952
Helsinki, Finland

TERRY LEE WALLINE
November 22, 1953
Fort McClellan, Alabama
Terry participated in swimming and water polo. He was
active in ROTC, a member of the Color Guard in his jun-
ior year, and of the Boys' Drill Team in his senior year.
Terry plans to attend college in California, majoring in ar-
chitectural engineering.

KAREN WESTERBERG
August 15, 1953
Flint, Michigan
During her high school years, all of them at CHS,
Karen was a member of the Caribe Club, the swim team,
the Girls' Chorus, and the Tradewind Staff After gradua-
tion, she plans to study computer programming.

JENNY DEL MILAGRO WIRTZ
March 18, 1951
San Jose, Costa Rica
Jenny was a member of the Spanish Club, and served as
treasurer during her junior and senior years. She partici-
pated in varsity ,. 11 I. .I during her freshman and sopho-
more years. Jenny plans to become a nurse.

PRICILLA ANN ZAVINSKY
January 22, 1953
Terrell, Texas
This was "Penny's" first year at CHS. She was a mem-
ber of the Nurses' Aides Club. In her junior year, she re-
ceived a $25 savings bond for her bookkeeping. Penny
plans to attend F ,tirr. Il, Beauty College.







Witches And UWarlocks JHaunt C/S


CAST: Diane Caroll, Donald Byrd, Andrew Foshee, Judy McLain, Lewis Valdez.


The annual fall dramatic produc-
tion of the CHS International Thespi-
an Society was John van Druten's ro-
mantic comedy, Bell, Book, and Can-
dle. Van Druten takes an apparently
simple love story, peoples it with
some delightful modern-day witches,
and creates an aura magic in a prosaic
New York apartment building. The
talented young actors and actresses
succeed in bringing some of this
magic into the CHS auditorium on
November 6 and 7. Audiences were
enchanted by the story of Gillian
Holroyd, a beautiful young woman
with the power to cast spells and per-
form supernatural teats. She used her
powers to win the love of Shepherd
Henderson, the unattached young
publisher living upstairs, but forgot


one important fact a witch in love
may lose her powers. This is exactly
what happens to Gillian and audience
sympathizes with her attempts to ad-
just to life as an ordinary mortal amid
the teasing of her Aunt Queenie and
her warlock brother. All are delighted
when Gillian finally wins her man
and the play closes on a happy note.
The outstanding performances in
the demanding roles of this play by
CHS actors, three of whom were new-
comers to the stage, received much
deserved applause. Credit for the suc-
cessful presentation of this play also
goes to the hardworking students
who designed and constructed the set,
h-ndllkl publicity, make-up, 'i'hting,
programs, and props, and to Mrs. El-
fers.


Faith oad The Finishin Touch.
Faith Coad, The Finishing Touch.


.AiN







Queen Rosemary Greets Victorious


)~u


-


Caleb Clement, Jane Paulson, Shelley Lund, Mike Dexter, Wally Russon, Queen Rosemary, Jose
Phillips, and Hila Lyman. The queen and her court.


Each year, following the Home-
coming Football Game, a dance, hon-
oring the members of the team and
returning alumni, is held. This year,
the dance was an exceptionally joyous
occasion as it was celebrated the day
after Cristobal's third undefeated
game of the season, a 26 to 8 victory
over arch-rival, Balboa High School.
A completely transformed cafeteria
was the scene of this festive event on
Saturday, October 31, 1970. The
dance officially began at 8:30 with the
presentation of the court by Master of
Ceremonies, Wally Russon. This
year's queen was the lovely Rosemary
Christian. Accompanying her were
four other attractive girls from the
class of '71, especially selected by the
members of the football team to pre-
side at this special dance. They were:
Princess Cathy Gercich, Princess
Shelley Lund, Princess Hila Lyman,


ti
j6


I'


Medina, Cathy Gercich, Neil Patton, Robert


and Princess Jane Paulson. Acting as
escorts for the queen and members of
her court were: Neil Patton and
Wally Russon, Jose Medina, Michael
Dexter, Robert Phillips, and Caleb
Clement.
Music for the evening was pro-
vided by "The Cheese," a rock and
roll band composed of Cristobal High
School students. A large number of
students attended the dance, spending
much of their time at the refreshment
counter where they consumed copious
quantities of soft drinks and other re-
freshments. A pleasant evening was
enjoyed by all who attended.
The girls' Athletic Association and
the Letterman's Club, co-sponsors of
this annual event, are to be commend-
ed by the many hours of hard work
necessary to make this dance an out-
standing success.


QUEEN ROSEMARY


:i t

: 7
z
i.


19


u


Ir








Race rom aatun Co Pina J(hil)ghts "C" Club


utitiation


Stting: Andrew Foshce. Mike Spagna, Car-
los BrowF n Harry Townsend, Ernest
Ahbrcsth, Frank C ilchctto. Standing: Coach
Dcdaux (.sponsor) Bill Deaton. Jim Jack-
son, Will Huttman. Peter Swain, Robert
Blcincr., Mike Apodaca. Mike Snider.

Outstanding male athletes at CHS
were eligible for membership in the
"C" Club. This organization gave rec-
ognition to those who excelled in
football, swimming, track, basketball,
or tennis. All lettermen were invited
to join during one of the two initia-
tions held during the year. Aspiring
members were required to perform
humorous and often embarrassing
feats. On the final day of the initia-
tion period, the future members ran
from Gatun to Pina where they com-
pleted their "ordeal."
The "C" Club collaborated with
the GAA in presenting the highly
successful Homecoming Dance for
the victorious CHS Tigers.


Af










"That's it, Apodaca, up and down." orders Bill, Deaton.








A
-i-


s --
Maran Kredell. Carol Ross, Donna Graham. Shelley Lund, Jane Paulson,
PURPLE PASSION prescnring thcir t.imr.u' ait


The importance of physical. as
well as mental development in
achieving success in a high\ complex
society was stressed b\ the physical
education department Its aims were
to teach good sportsmanship and a
sense of fair plaN. to discipline the
mind, and to educate students in le,.
sure time activities which can be car-
ried into adulthood The department
strove to give each student, regardless
of his stage of development a chance
to develop his skills, his attitude. and
his physique.
During the year 19rO-'l. Crstobal
High School's girls' physical educa-
tion classes participated in basketball.
volleyball, rumbling, track. tenni,
and various other sports. The boxs'
physical education classes participated
in football, baseball, basketball, swim-
ming. weightlifting. and track
Through these activities as well as in-
tramural and varsir sports, the de-
partment succeeded in achieving its
goals.


L'


A


I J


"Ul


-- Aurelia Williams. Supergirl W'iich is at it
Beth Carter. The again!


Sa


I/ 7


I thought speedall was bad, but hockey beas them all
"I thought speedball was bad, but hockey beats them all."


"Keep your hands on your hips so your pants won't fall down."


::v 7,


g





Scenes


ehlid Sports


-- ~a'or~itc


Zime Yor Many Students
I


Dan Tweedy, Dan Valentine, Eric Tucker, Mike Apodaca, Mike Barger.


Cathy Carlisle, Sylvia Vamprine, Katie
Kraus. "Don't be mad, Cathy."


Robert Phillips


A bench eye-view of the game.


4irs' Zennis
Tryouts for girls tennis were held
in February and the season ran from
March 5 to March 26. Practice was
held everyday after school at various
courts in the community. This was
done to give the girls practice on dif-
ferent courts where the ball bounced
differently and the direction of the


wind varied. General qualifications
were dedication to this individual
sport, self-discipline, and endurance.
Many hours of hard practice were
necessary to make a good tennis
player. The girls' equipment was fur-
nished by the school except for the
rackets which the girls supplied
themselves.
A new scoring system was intro-
duced in which play continued until


one girl won six games. It there was
a 6-6 tie, one game called "sudden
death" was played, the winner of
which was declared the winner of the
match.
Four matches were played this
year. Two against Balboa, and two
against Canal Zone College.


LS


..-*-
=a


~n:
i i B









?aces Without o acts


Sr"


Ralph Ender


George Scheibe
George Scheibe


Alexis Normandia


MICHAEL R. ANDREE
June 5,. 1953
Annapolis, Maryland

/DAVID RAYMOND DIAZ
September 9, 195 i
Baltimore. Maryland
David played varsity football during his junior year at CHS, and
helped plan the Jamboree party. He plans to attend technical school
after graduation.

DANIEL '. I 1I Y FERGUSON
June 26, 1951
Macon, Georgia

RICHARD ALLEN KRESGE
October 9, 19 s
Ancon, Canal /one
Rickv plans to attend trade school after graduation.


THOMAS ADDISON PURSLEY
July 9, 1952
Suffern, New York
Tom was active in sports during his high school years, participat-
ing in intramural I. ..-- iII and wrestling, and playing on the varsity
football team. He was a member of the "C" Club, and in his senior
year, served as secretary. He was also a member of the Math Club
and the Rifle Team, and was active in ROTC. Tom plans to attend
the United States Military Academy at West Point, New York.

DANNY DALE TWEEDY
December 23, 1952
Victervillc, California
Danny was a homeroom representative in his sophomore year.
He plans to enter an apprenticeship program in Tucson, Arizona,
planning a career as a carpenter.

MARIA DE LOS ANGELES ZAYAS
January 4, 1952
Mayaguez, Puerto Rico
Maria was a member of the Spanish and Pep Clubs. She plans to
become a psychologist.


. .


Davie Teves


. .


And acts Without aces.



















Digitized by the Internet Archive
in 2010 with funding from
University of Florida, George A. Smathers Libraries













http://www.archive.org/details/caribbean1971 cris







Students


Njaoy


Comforts


Of Remodeed

Cafeteria


.. and a lowered, insulated ceiling gave the cafeteria a new look of elegance. Included
among the comments of students were such remarks as ...


.i ..i got cla
M.%, it's got class!" .


"It's like eating in fancy r u
"It's like eating in a fancy rr *rauriar
























Mrs. Hoard, Brenda Ege r. Bcrc Pr I
Olsen, Debra Go'nev. Jacquelinc Pirker. Pi/Ak ir W ork
Nancy Ridge. Olga Gonzjlcz. N5clih
Orriz 125 Hours


The Pink Girls helped their corm
-muniry greatly during the summer
months. They voluntarily offered
their services at Coco Solo Hospital
In order to be eligible tor this pro-
gram, each girl was required to take a
two-week first aid course. In addition.
a one-week training period, during
which the basics of hospital work
were taught, was required The girls
learned how a hospital functions and
how to care for patients with various
needs.
In order to become a full-fledged
Pink Girl, each girl had to work a
total of 125 hours. In the hospital, the
Pink Girls were casually referred to as
"Pinkies They were expected to ad-
here to the commands and advice of
their superiors who were registered
nurses. The fun-filled summer of
hard, but rewarding work was cli-
maxed by a private graduation cere-
mony attended by the group's spon-
sor, Mrs. Howard. and various civic
minded citizens.


Ada Onrz resusiiates "Annie "


Mr Bird intrurit the Pink (.irl, n Firt Aid


,ii
~o OBo~o -:








Skit Opens National uinior


Honor Society Iitiation


On December 17, five new mem-
bers were initiated in the National
Junior Honor Society. The old mem-
bers presented an amusing skit, ex-
plaining the qualities of scholarship,
leadership, character, citizenship, and
service required for membership in
this organization. Following the skit,
a "tapping" ceremony was held. The
selected students were escorted to the
stage for the traditional candlelight-
ing ceremony. Mr. Pfau congratulated


the newly initiated eighth-graders and
presented them with pins and certifi-
cates of membership. A reception,
honoring the new members and their
proud parents was held in the home
economics room following the cere-
mony.
The National Junior Honor Socie-
ty held its spring initiation in March.
At that time, seventh-graders were el-
igible for membership.


Mr. Pfau hands out certificates of member-
ship to the initiates.


Mario Pino, Margaret Kienzle, Cathy Perret, Barbara Baitel, and Sheryl Smith. HAPPY MO-
MENT.


Alfred Sandrock, Cherri Danielsen, Susan
Gilbert, and Brian McCann. "They call us
the BRAINS'"


Parents of the initiates relax at the recep-
tion.


Brian McCann, Cherri Danielsen, Susan Gilbert, Janna Loizeaux, Alfred Sandrock, and Kath-
leen Dexter. Old members wait patiently to begin the i-pTini ceremony.








CARIBBEAN SPORTS

PARACHUTE

CLUB

















Hangar 1147 Behind
The High School


CIA MARITIMA ITURRALDE
Apartado 1737
Colon, Rep. de Panama

KERLEY NAUTICAL SUPPLY
P.O. Box 4192
Miami, Florida
33101


Cables:
COFER-Balboa, C. Z.


P. O. Box 192
Balboa C. Z.


L. K. COFER, INC.
Steamship Agents
Captain of the Port Building, Balboa, C. Z.
Post Office Building, Cristobal, C. Z.
Balboa 2-2572 and 2-2998
Cristobal 3-3206 and 3-1743


PUT A LITTLE

LOVE

IN YOUR
HEART


Courtesy
of
PAN AMERICAN
MAIL LINE









Compliments
of the
GATUN YACHT
CLUB






































































Debra
Coe
V/Mark
Davila
STrina
Ferguson
Barbara
Goodwin
Karan
Harden


Alexis
Coleman
Ted
Deaton
Thomas
Finneman
'Karen
Goulet
Kimberly
Hartshorn


William
Ciccolo
Laveda
Dancer
Ramon
Diaz
Rebecca
Gewin
Gregory
Grist


Renee
Cliette
Michelle
Darcy
Karen
Fauber
Maria
Gonzalez
Francisco
Hamilton


James
Collins

Del Busto
Steven
Fo'r % di
Daniel
Green
Brian
H ,J'.,


Anne
Crouch
Raymond
De Vault
Clifford
Gabriel
Clarissa
Grr CL .r
Cynthia
Heath


I
S


..44










































Carol Wertz. Karen Currier. "Reservation made. Fork over!"


Denise Foshee. "It's the real thing ap-
petite!"

ff nI


K fL. .W
Lunchtime is a good time to make friends.


Sylvia Vamprine. "I can't help it! I'm hun-
gry'"








Compliments


ELBERT


S. WAID POST NO.


THE AMERICAN LEGION
FRANCE FIELD, C. Z.
Air-Conditioned Bar


Open 24-Hours a


Day


Bingo Thursday and Sunday
Meetings
2nd Wednesday of Each Month


LESLIE R. THOMAS
Post Commander






1970


Varsity Ald Yumiar Varsity koys'


Kneeling: Dee DeLapp, Wallace Russon, William Huffman, Mitchell Blanchette, Walter
Ilund, David Robertson. Standing: Mike Jeffrics (asst. manager), Coach Dedeaux, James
Kunkel (manager).


Now
]i 7


"O.K., you guys, you have to get this right!"


An awkward position does not prevent Dec DeLapp from shooting for the basket.


VARSITY
SCORES
CHS 48 .. BHS 51
CHS 27 .. ..... CZC 55
CHS 41 ..... BHS 53
CHS 40 .. .... CZC 55
CHS 36 .. BHS 40
CHS 39 ....... CZC 50


\\. llal n, tH ul n.t.,r, H I'l... \\ I.ll,., h Fiilhcr'







KO Z'C uilds ,Men Helps Students


The Reserve Officers Training
Corps at CHS was established to help
prepare high school students for fu-
ture careers in the Armed Forces, and
for ROTC in college, should they de-
cide to take it. It's chief aim was to
help students achieve the maturity
necessary to become officers and lead-
ers of men.
This year the ROTC was headed
by CPT. Juan F. Mata, who was as-
sisted by SFS Murphy, SFC Picoli,
and SSG Alford. The ROTC unit at
Cristobal consisted of "E" Company,
"F" Company, Color Guard, Drill
Team, Rifle Team, and the Battalion
Staff. The staff this year included Bat-
talion Commander Major John Mar-
tin; Battalions sponsor, 1Lt. Hila
Lyman; S1, 2Lt. Donald Byrd; S2,
2Lt. Daniel Valentine; S3, 2Lt. Jaime
Darraza; and S4, 2Lt. Lewis Valdez.
The Drill Team was commanded by
1Lt. Eligio Thomas, and sponsored by
1Lt. Jean Smith. "E" Company was
commanded by 1Lt. Dennis Maxwell
and sponsored by 1Lt. Jackie Spring-
er. "F" Company was commanded by
1Lt. Isaac Heres and sponsored by
1Lt. Denise Foshee.
Reviews were presented by the
ROTC each nine-weeks during the
school year. A large and important re-
view was Field Night, held on March
27th. Among the types of competi-
tion included were: personal, squad,
platoon, company, and most exciting
of all, Drill Team competition. An-
other exciting competition of the
school year was the Brigade Review.
In order to make competition fair, the
Brigade Review and Field Night are
held on the Atlantic and Pacific sides
on alternate years.


"E" Company


"F" Company
























Melody Hoffman Parry Holt
Bruce Jackson 6y ce Janosik


James Huffman
V/Michael Jeffries


V~-- -I
'4


Iris Hernandez Anne Herring
Marcia HumphreytPamela Husband
jennv Jimcncz William Jimenez
Karen Jones Sandra Kaufer
D)a\id Lec Victor Lee


Cheryl Hieronymus
Leif Irion
vjames Jones
Cheryl Kresge
Ann Lovd


Eager Freshmen impossible to hold still.


,au ..,





tura
Iinr Iiia


T -



Tonv Lyons


Kim Marohl Deshea Mason


Sandra May \Susan Mccullough























EUGENE T. GREGG U.S. Histo-
ry; A.A., C.Z. College; B.A., Colorado
State; M.A., Univ. of Colorado.
"Strive to become rich."


mtE
ROANALD JACOBS World Ge-
ography; Bachelors, Southeastern
State College; Masters, Northeastern
State College. "Make the best of what
ever situation you are faced with."


ROBERT McCULLOUGH Social
Studies; B.S., St. Cloud State College;
M.A., Univ. of Northern Colorado.
"Be kind to animals."


real classroom with real students!


Mr. Gansen. "This is an example of a good
screen."


Long live democracy!


Now this is a










--,9






rl ^


'I
ri



1 .


John B. Funderburk


2\








Brenda Lee Gibson














Stephen Armand Goulet


Catherine Ann Gercich


haron Louise Uoioen


John Michael Hannah


JOHN B. FUNIDERBURK
January i, 1953
Tucson, Arizona
John particip ated in varsity track and ..il.III during his four ,. irs
at CHS. He served on the Jamborec Party (Committee. John plar 10
become either a machinist or a diesel mechanic after graudation.

CATHERINE ANN GERCICH
January 1. 1953
Lynnwood, California
Cathy has attended CHS for four years. She participated in N 1.Ik'bil
intramurals during her freshman and sophomore years. As a senior, ,he
was a Member of the Girls' Drill Team. Cathy also served on theJr.-Sr.
Prom Committee. Her future plans include study at a college in Cali-
fornia or Florida.

BRFND4 LEE GIBSON
December 6, 1953
Fort Bragg, North Carolina
Brenda entered CHS at the beginning of her sophomore year. Sh
participated in swimming, tennis, basketball, and volleyball intrami
rals, and was a member of the varsity tennis team. After graduation
Brenda would like to attend a junior college, travel extensively, an
pursue a career in hairdressing and art.

SHARON LOUISE GOLDEN
April 15. 1953
Anniston, Alabama
Sharon was a member of the CHS senior band for five years, playing
the flute. She officiated at varsity basketball games in her "r. ,-lirn
year. After graduation, she plans to attend a a nursing school i: Mlhi imi,
Florida.

STEPHEN ARMAND GOULET
September 22, 1952
Somerville, Massachusetts
Stephen entered CHS at the beginning of his senior year. At his for-
mer high school he was a member of the A.F.S., the Chess Club-. he
Math League, and the Science Club, and received an award f,.r bingI
the best chemistry student in the junior class. He also particip.l. d in
varsity track and football. Stephen plans a career as a math ten. h.r

PATRICIA GUTIERREZ
July 20, 1952
Fayetteville, North Carolina
Pat has attended CHS for each of her four years in high scJ.. .I she,
was a member of the Drama Club and assisted with various Tih.-pan
productions. Pat plans to become a woman jockey.

JOHN MICHAEL HANNAH
June 26, 1953
Waynesville, North Carolina
John enjoys motorcycling. He was active in ROTC during hi. trc'h-
man and sophomore years. He served as a cheerleader in the P-.ader
Puff game, and as a member of the Jamboree Party Committt. Il hn
plans a career in aeronautical engineering.

ALLEN SCOTT HARMON
September 23, 1952
Annapolis, Maryland
Art is one of Allen's major interests. He was a member of rlc .Ar
Club for two years, serving as president in his junior year. He :. iIso
art editor of the newspaper and the yearbook in his senior year Allen
was also active in the French Club and Drama Club. He partic:p tIEId in
several plays, and became a Thespian in his senior year. Allen ,.. the
"Voice of Democracy" contest at CHS in his junior year. He I n- to
attend the U.S. Merchant Marine Academy, or Chapman FloatirnL im-
pus in California. He would like to become an architect or a I..mmn er
cial artist.


'I~a~l~~ .


1


Allen Scott Harmon






fJuiors


Display


rCheir


zCalents


funior


Class


Assembly


I.


I
WI


Kathryn Stephens Peter Swain
Loisa Thomas Harry Townsend


Reggie Southerland
Catherine Tcrwilliger
Robert Tschumn


Mattia Spagna
Dorothy Terwilliger
Carol Wertz


Michael Spagna
Ehukai Teves
Aurelia Williams


The one and only, Brenda Egger!


Susann Zachry Maribel Zayas


At


Michael Wood Ann Worthen


Marisol Zayas













Compliments
of
DELCARGO, INC.
Cristobal
Canal, Zone


Congratulations
to the

Class of 1971
From

C. FERNIE AND CO. INC.
Box 5042
Cristobal, Canal Zone







Sophomore Nloat J tHomecomting Parade


CLASS OFFICERS: Beth Wainio (vice-
president), Nancy Ridge (president), Deb-
bit Meeker (Sec.-Treasurer).


This year's sophomore class was
outstanding both as a group and as
individuals. Scott Loizeaux and Paul
Bleicher received High Honors dur-
ing the first semester.
The sophomore class was active
both in special class activities and
school events as a whole. They organ-
ized a float for the Homecoming
Game Parade, choosing Debbie
Meeker and Jan Janosik as their rep-
resentatives.
In cooperation with the Freshman
class, the sophomores sponsored the
Freshman-Sophomore dance on Feb-
ruary thirteenth. Ted Scott and Barba-
ra Bloemer became king and queen
for the evening.
Another sophomore worthy of
mention is Edythe Marsh winner
of the "Non-French Student" contest
sponsored by the French Club during
the French Week.
The enthusiastic sophomore offi-
cers planned several exciting events
for the spring


CLASS SP NM',(
Mr. Norman


.MarriaNobel Art


Marrianne Verruno. Proud \'nner of"Nobel Art Award".


Judy Dohle. Pr..iuiny for the future?


Sw


ii6


~l~nsr ~





PAGE 4

Digitized by the Internet Archive in 2010 with funding from University of Florida, George A. Smathers Libraries http://www.archive.org/details/caribbean1971cris

PAGE 5

. ., . "- .. ., ... " .. .t .. 6 . enribbenlf J 97 J eristobal HigH SCHool eoco Solo eallal ZOlle V(Jlume 54 . ,.: .; .: __ oi ..

PAGE 7

route of eontents Dedication. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 In/oflllal ............................. 6 'Jorll1al ............................. 28 'Jacllltll and elirriClt!IIIII ................. 30 elnsses .......................... 60 Organizations. . . . . . . . . . . 122 Sports ........................... 140 Special.Activities .................... 158 Editor's Page ........................ 169 "Ciger Eoostas . . . . . . . . . . . 1 70 .Advertiselllel1ts . . . . . . . . . . . 1 73 InticK ............................. 18 7 In Keeping Witlt "Cite .Modern "Crend "Coward (jreater 'JleKibilitll In VearbooK Organization. "Cite e.HS .Annllal Sta// Is Introdlicillg.An Entirclll/Vew .And Dif/erent 'JorlI1at III "Cite 197J earibbean. :Deporting 'Jrolll "Cite "Craditional eoncept 0/ Separate Sections. Eaclt lntrodl/ced EII.A Division Page. On Eaclt 'Jacet 0/ "Cite Scltool,Cife; "Cite VcnrbooK Is Divided 111tO Onlll "Cwo .Main Sections. 'JorlIfal.Alld In/orllfal .Appearing llf "Cite 'Jorllfal .Half .Arc: .Adllfinistratiolf .Altd 'Jacllltll. elass Pictllres. Orgalfizatioll Pictllres. "Ceallt Pltotos. Qlleens .And ekeerlenders .Advertisillg .Alfd IlldeK. "Cltis Sectioll eontaills.A1I "Cite 'Jorllfalitil Reqllired O/.A (jood VearbooK. 111 "Cite EKciting In/orlIfal Section. We .Have .Attellfpted "Co Present.A1I Ullintampted emtdid Storll 0/ Scltool,Cife. JIISt.AS VOII tKperienced It.

PAGE 8

i)edicatioll Mrs. Adamarll Srig/tt

PAGE 9

(jllidnHce eOIlHSe/Or /(etires A/ter 36 Venrs At eJls The CHS annual s taff wishes to dedicate th e 197 1 Caribbean to Mrs. Adam ary Anders on Brig ht in recog nition and appreciation of h e r man)' years of devoted serv i ce to [he st u dent s of Cri sto bal High School. Mrs. Bright was born in Jacksonville, Florida. She attended sch oo l in HoustOn, Texas, during her early years, bur returned to Jacksonville to complete her seco ndary ed u cation a t Duzal High School. She received her A B in Educati o n at Flor ida Stat e College for Women in T allahassee, and completed h e r g raduat e work for a degree in histOry at the Univ e r sity of Ann Ar bo r in Mi chigan. After te aching a t Jack so n v ille J un Kathie Danielsen s milingly receives assi stanc e fro m Mrs. Bright in p lannin g her college ca reer. i or High School for a short t im e she came to the Canal Zone in 1935. Since that time she has served capabl y and well in man y pos iti o n s at Cristobal Hi g h School. Among these are: a teacher of sevenrh and eighth grade Englis h soc ial science, vocatio nal guidance, social studies girls advisor, and che posicion as a Guidance Counselor wh i ch s he has held from 1 to the present. Dur ing her many years at CHS, Mrs. Bri gh t received a number of Om standing Service Awards for her d i stingu ished service to the Canal Zone Schoo l s Di vision. In addition to teachin g and counseling Mrs. Brig h t also sponsored a number o f sch ool activ ities and o rganization s such as the National H o n o r Society. It was Mrs. Bright who originated the Zeph yr and the Car ibe Club. She is truly an outstanding organizer; efficient and hard-working. Mrs. Bright has done a great deal of traveling during her years at C HS, visiting many countries in bmh Central and Somh America, as well as in Europe. B oth faculty and srudents a r e sadde n ed b y the journey Mrs B right i s abom to make as she retires from th e faculty of C H S H er guidance will be long remembered by rhe countless srudents whose educations and careers s h e helped plan Mrs. Bright a d\ jses S h y l a Mille r on her schedule f o r next rear

PAGE 10

v4 JVew Venr J!egilfs. Elena tvbxwell and Brenda E gger ... Stephanie !lILes. Almanubia Vivian ) enO\ \,{/ini'. :lOd Ctrmen Butl er. Dough.'> J effries, t-.lr. J ohnson, : tnd Nancy Edmol1!1on.

PAGE 11

Mr. H ieronymus (S.A sponsor) and t>.ti chad Dexter (S. A president). Debbie t>.tcckcr The halls of C H S were a mass of con fusion on September 1, 1 970 as hun dreds of students co ngregated around the bulletin boards on which h omeroom numbers were posted. Others lingered to chat with old friends or to make new acquaintances ; summe rrime experiences were shared and compared. The perenni. al excitement of the "firs t day of sch oo l was in the air. This enthusiasm persisted throughout the orientation assembly, in which srudents were welcomed to CHS, new teachers introduced, and the new Srudenr A ssociation office r s installed. H owever, with the ringing of that first bell, order began to emerge as srudents fell back into rhe familiar routine of school life AnOther school year had begun.

PAGE 12

The deserted halls are quie t :l soft breeze whispe r s through the empty corridors there is no indication n o w of the activities and incidents which the coming day may bring.

PAGE 13

Suddenly, the st i llness is sha ttered by th e s l amming of a locker door the sounds of shuffling footsteps shouted I I r,om'."";,,n, and noisy greetings are once more A new day has the magic of [he morning is

PAGE 14

10 'Cite Yell RiNgs, Seats fire fiSSIIHfed Ann Terwilliger, Dolores Santiago, Iveu e ery. Susan B urge. C hri s l in:l R i t:l Cummings, (:trim Brown. Sus:l nn ZachBo),I :md Issa c H e r es

PAGE 15

)10fllillU /(,outille /(,esuJl1es Senior High Band II

PAGE 17

" Upon entering the classroom, a srudent assumes more than a seat, he assumes all the privileges and responsibilities which accompany his position in this place of learning -the sch ool. Having brought tOgether the teachers and the taught, the school has fullfilled itS function what follows is dete rmined by these individu als Often, it seems, minds are more eager and alert as the day begins, and the opportunities afforded by the morning hours should nOt be missed T o bring to each srudent success at last -this is the goal of every morning class. "Parches" Brow n Mike Hayden

PAGE 18

14 More complaints were heard con cerning the lun ch hour than perhaps any mher faeel of sch ool life Lunch was served in four sh ift s: [hose on the early shift complained that it was roo early to eat, and those on the I:Hc shift complained that it was roo Iate Once in the cafeteria, however no one seemed to have an) real trouble eating_ The lun c h hour provided a brief res pite from classes which was wel comed by aiL J uniors and seniors took advantage of their open-lunch privi lege to "eat out" on :1ltern:ue days I n spite of this, and the man) meetings scheduled during the lunch hour, the cafeteria was always filled with hun gry, noisy srudents; eating, chatting with friends or doing a little las t min ute studying. T hose wishing to leave the cafeteria early, spent their lunc h hour in the pleasant s urrounding s of the student lounge located directly benearh the cafeteria. I n spite of the frequent complaints, mOSt students found the l unch hour one of the most relaxing and enjoyable per iods of the school day. After a satisfying lun c h stude nts head (Q the student's lounge. Senior + Open lunch + Car = H appy Heart R aymond Roocrt so n 'I'll have a chili dog and please include the h ot dog!"

PAGE 19

Lunchtime is :l good time [0 m:lke friends IS

PAGE 20

,. Studelfts elfjolf COJl1/ orts 0 / Cafeteria and a lowered, insulated ceil ing gave th e cafe teria a new look of elegance Included among the comments of students were such remarks as .. "Man if's gOt class!" . .. "It's like eatin g in a fancy rcstaurar "Very Quiet and

PAGE 21

.. enjoy the beaU[ies of the outdoors". 17

PAGE 22

18 R efreshe d fro m a r e laxin g l un c h h o u r s rud ents r e r urn ed a t 1 1 :30 to res um e rh e ir r egu l a r r o utine. Each after n oo n included duee h ou r s of classes with th e exceptio n of se n iors w i t h s i xth-period srudy h all, w h o we r e per mitt ed to leave earl),. For so m e, rhe enthusias m c haraneri st i c of th e m o rnin g h o ur s appea r e d t o wave; w hil e ot h ers see m e d to h ave awa k e n ed a t l east. All h o w eve r evide nced a n inc r eased r estless n ess as th e h o u r a pproa c hed 2:1 5 a n d t h e ringi n g of the final bell.

PAGE 23

'9

PAGE 24

20 rigers :Display 8ager 811tHusiasJlf lor A/terl1ool1 Activities Jose Medina and Mike McCann

PAGE 25

2,

PAGE 26

22 With th e ringing of th e final bell at 2:15, m any s tudent s ru s h cagerly t o the waiting buse s thinkin g only -" Free! at last!" Others also hurry a n x i o u s to begin the ex tr a-curric ular a c tivitie s whi c h play s u c h an impor t ant role in th e life of a s rud em. Enjoying th e co mpan y o f th ose who s h are s imilar ince r ests; whcthcr it b e an advanced math or foreign lan g uage class, s p orts, drill tcam journali s m o r dramatics, it i s a ple a s ant and profitable way ro s pend an afte rnoon Stephanie lilie s :lOd DeOis e F o s hee J ean Smith a nd J ose M edina

PAGE 27

L ana Boone, Jay Alonis, Michael Dexter. S[ephen GOUIcL Susan Men denhall 23

PAGE 28

l. ,. The se ttin g o f the s un bro u ght a c han g e in the appearan c e of both the schoo l and th e s tud e nts. With (he c o min g of darkn ess, another of th e man y facets of CHS w as r e v e aled. -The e v e nin g activities. This was th e tim e for bonfires and foo tball g am es ; s wim me e t s a n d tr a ck m ee t s; h ours of pra c tice and r eviews for ROTC cadets

PAGE 30

TEEN CLUB DANCES Ned Patton Rosemary Christian. Wall) R usson . . AND FORMAL S Jimmy Barraza 2.

PAGE 31

Hila Lyman, Robert Phillips. CONCERTS: Practice for the cast and crew of various plays: Dramatic Productio n s . . all those activitie s without which school life would be guite inc o m plete.

PAGE 33

I ( if 2. .A Place Of Ceornilfg ls ro Ceorn. .Alfd Vet 'lrollf 'Doli ro 'Doli It .Also Becomes .A Place ro five, .A Bridge rltot SPOlfS rite vop Of .Age .Alfd Brilfgs rogetlter rite reoclters .Alfd 'Cite rOllgltt. rite JlllllfOlt ,Milfd ,MIISt Reoclt llf lts OWlt 1Jirectiolf 'Coword lts OWIf vooL .Alolfg 'Cite Potlt Of Ci/e Olfe ,MOil ,Meet .A JlIIJldred 'loes -Or.A rltollsolfd 'lriCJIds 2

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30 Admillistrat ioll JAMES H PFAU Criscob:J1 High School Princip:J1 T o the Yearbook Staff: "Thanks for {he Mem ories i s the title o f a so n g that was popular somt years ago. As we record in this book the events of the 1970-71 schoo l year at CristOb:l1 Hi g h School we can surely say with g r at imd e and even a bit of pride "thanks (or the memories." You who have s tu died har d a nd have g i ven of )Iourselves to school ac tiv iti es have shown by your Tiger spirit that the busiest people are also the happiest people. Best wishes to all of you as yo u cont inue you r educa tion here or e lsewhere. Although your highest commitment may well be to academic ex cellence, )'OU would not be wise (Q pursue schola r ship at the expense of the development of an honorable character, physical well.being. or a pleasant personaliry. I t is hoped that the discipline of commitment to t h ese gualities will earn you a happy freedom of spir it and a sense of accom-plishmem. Ma)' you continue ro mark eac h milesrone with s:Hisfact i o n and happy memories. James H p fau Princip a l ''I'm a firm believer in Ih e 'Tigers'!"

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PAUL J. JEFFRI E S B A., Colo"do State College ; M A., Colorado Slate College ; Graduate Work, Univ Sou th e rn Cali fornia Ca lif \'(I estern University. "See k a pr ofess i on or occ upati on th:H i s c hall eng ing and enjoyable Smile and be happ y." SUPER I N TENDENTS STAFF, U.S. SC H OOLS: M e R oss Anderson. Supervisor, Physical Education and Athletics, U.S. Schools; Dr. Ken n eth Lake, DireCtor of Curriculum; Mr Stewart Brown. Supervisor, swimming pools and 53ftry; Dr Charles Latimer, Deputy 5uperimc'ndem of Schools ; Mr. James Cook. Supervisor of i nstruGion. U.S. Secondary Schools; George \Xlillin gham, Supervisor of In struction, U.S. Secondary Schools; Mr F A Castles, Superintendent of Schools (sftlted), Mr. Vernon Caruria. Supervisor of I nstruction. U.S. Elementary Schools; Dr. Victor H err Supervisor of Mu sic, U.S. Schools; Dr James \XJolf Coordinator, Special Educnion; Mr David Speir, Assistam Superimend ent U .S. Secondary School; Mrs. S hirl ey l\takibbin Supervisor of instrunion, U.S. Schools; Mrs Frances Sampsell. A ssistam Superimendem U S Elementary School s; Mr Zander Krowitz, Administrative A ssistam; Mr. R obert Dahlsrom, Supen'isor, Education Data Processing. 31

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32 Office Staff The lomp<..'tCnr of the C H S offile s ufi hlndled all genera l clerical work for rhe :tdministration and faculty. I ncluded amon g their duti es were offici:ti co rr es pondence and paper work The)' were :1lso in cha rge of operating office ma c hine s and the incercom sys t e m a nd an swe rin g th e t e leph o n e. They main tained the record a nd file s of eac h s tu dent, mailed report car ds and sent and received tran scri pts. eliJlic The clini c was an im portant prov i s i on f o r rhe health and safet y of Cristobal H i g h School students. The c1in ic was sta ffed w ith trained nurses who provided emergency fir s t aid; :lI1d per form ed certa in r outine chec k s o n eac h stude nt. The clinic was a l so :1 pl:tce for s tud e nt s to r es t when unwell :lI1d for the s torage of each s rudent s' per manent h e !.lth r ecords. The clinic a l so spo n sored rubcrcu l os i s and c h est X rays for s rudent s i n certain g r ades. Dr. Levin Ihe Publi c Helllh Offi ce r for the AtI:lnti c Side, vis i ted the school almost every morn i ng Dr. C h eve lle the schoo l phy sic ian for the Cana l Zone Schools, was :lVaibble every Wednesday. MRS ALLEN. MRS TAYI.OR, fl-HSS GRIFF I T H S DR LEV IN. KAREN M cKOWN. MR S IlLANCHETTE thiS will cool }our fC\'cr b it

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Mrs Brigh t Lauric Nairn Y o ur appointment i s at 11:00 on Frid ay." Mr Mowery Tho mas Belu c, William Santiago H enry Borselliono "You both want t o go to Kings' Point?" Guid a nce is the process of helping persons make the best possible de cisions co n cerning their lives and aiding (hem in solving (heir problems. It inclu des helping srudenrs choose the proper courses to t ake in sch ool, and aiding them in deciding whae careers to follow afte r their education is com pieced Such decisions re9uire that a per so n have full and corren kno\vI edge about himself and his world. T he guidance counselors at CristObal H i g h School aim to provide students with informati on so rhar they may m ake rhe beSt possible decisions in life The rwo principal methods used for this are counseli n g, a nd testing. Counseling consists chiefly of discus sions berween a srudent and his coun selor concerning his interests. apti rudes and special problems. Testing is an important guidance tool. Apti. rude pe r sonality, and intelligence tests provide counselors with much Vllidolfce ADA MAR Y BR I GHT Counselo r B A F lorida Sme Unlv, M A Un,, of M ichigan, "Life will nc\'cr be dull if you will conunue t o learn ROBERT MOWERY Counselor; B Sand M ,S. Umv "Takc of [he oppomlnltlC5 in high school" LUKE C PALUMBO Anendancc: Counselor, B SEd. W Musouri Sme "Theft' is no substltutc for v"ork to be and .. useful information Other important guidance tools are books, pamphlets, and films used to help srudents decide o n cou r ses of srudy and furure careers. 33

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3 ibrar!l The library. with its V:lS t (ollectio n of books, was a familia r s topping place for C H S stud e ntS. Throughou t the year, they used the library and its many resources. The quiet. academic atmosphere made it the perfect place for studyi n g and peaceful solitude found there provided an excellent bac k grou n d for the readin g of books. Students m a d e good use of th e library during h ome r oo m and srudyhalls; checking out books for reports, u s ing r eference books or s impl y b rowsi ng through th e libra ry's collect i on of paperbacks and magazines. Me Wells, the sch oo l libr ar ian "Peace a t last!" was always available for s tudents who needed help in locating a c e n ain book or in makin g a spec ial r e p ort. There were a l so at least two girls servin g a s library assistants each period. The y helped s tudents use the c ard cata l og and chec k out boo ks. DAYTON N WELLS-BS. Univmiry of l alho, M Ed. University of Oregon RCld 10 help you Whll you W:lnt to be" Faith Coad, Patricia Christi3n. J anna Loizeaux. Terra Bro wn. Lana Boon e, C lover Shobe, Barb: u a Yerxa. Jeanne Calkins. Libr3ry Assi s tants.

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GRACE S. PFAU -BS., City College; M A Uni versity of Minnesota "Iftalemed, C1-people C1n their diSSlUSeonccrn WLth POSI1L\C. conccnt"d thc:y should be to correct rhe ills they so rightly deplorc ." Special 8ducatioN Duke Collins and De Jesus Ruperto help l\ilrs. Pf.'lU corren papers. EARL C. SHARICK-EduC1-tion ; B A., M.S. I llinois "Work h:ud St:lY in school .. The Special Education department was added t o th e CHS curriculum in 1 960. I n Special Education, srudents received extra h elp in their academic srudies, learned crafts, and learned the perspectives of human relationships and civic responsibilities. The r emedial reading program pro-R eading holds the interest of the R emedial Reading class. vided special instruction to improve reading skills and helped assure a sru dent of success in keeping with his abiliry. Seemingly average srudems imp roved the 9ualiry of their reading skills with the help of the Special Education D epartmem. Mr. Sharick helps his class drill in math with flash cards. 3S

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36 Art EDWI N M KOZIOL -An: B A Micnig:1n Univ F ind out wlm your :a.nd prepare.' [0 mttt thcm in order 10 g::J.in con trol of your life :.is f:a.pidJy :lnd com pletely as possible Anists w:J.itin g f o r an in s piration! Brenda Gibson. With :t s weep o f the bru s h a masterpiece is netted. Class P o rtrait I n c r eative arts, a s tud ent l e arn s to express himself th rough diffe r e nt med ia. With rhis in m ind [he fol l owing course s wer e taught at C H S this year. Arc 7, an introduc t ion to drawing, painting, lettering, ce ramics, c r afts covering te chniques, an d rhe u se of tool s -with emphas i s plac e d on deve loping skills, imaginati o n and art judgement. Art 8, a re i nfor c emenr o f knowledge gained in Art 7, with g r eate r emph a s i s p l aced o n the ba sic elements of des i gn. Art I a ba s i c be ginning an cou r se for all s rud c m grades 9-12 w hi ch emphasized the developmen t of d r awin g s k ill and t h e s t udy of des ig n co n cepts It inv o lved drawing, pa i nring, lercering, p os ter ma king a n d a variety o f crafts. A rt II, an advanc e d art course f o r all studcms grades 10-12 I t inv o lv e d art apprecia tio n a nd a deeper in ves tigat i o n of des i g n and co l o r theory with emphasis placed o n indi v i dual o rgan i z ati o n and the c arryin g out of a n projects. T he student h ad a n opportunity (0 d evelo p skills in the area of hi s choi ce, Art I I I w h i c h included appreciat i o n and advanced cr ea t i v e work

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SlIsiNCSS tdllcatioN '" Would you be lieve [he class avera ge is 85 w pm ? \'Qo ul d you believe 35 wpm wilh 3 errors ? The Business Educatio n depart ment offe r ed an excellent s elecri o n of courses for th e s tud e nt pl a nning a career in business, as well as f o r tbe co l lege-bound srude nlS. The s kill s and knowledge tau ght b y thi s d ep artm e nt will be usefu l regardless of th e srudent 's future occ upation General Business gave th e s tudent s a bas i c understanding of bus iness practices useful in daily living. Typ i ng I gave srudents an o pportuniry to develop speed and accuracy o n a rypewriter. The y were tau ght to type l etr c r s, tabulated reports manuscript s, and business forms. Typing II was a continuation of T yp in g I with e m phasis on co n sta nt practice f o r i n creased spe ed and accuracy. Senior s takin g Shorthand learned to read write and take dictation Another cou rse offered only CO senio r s was Bookkeeping In thi s course, sruden t s learned the fundam enta l s of s ing l e and double-entry boo kke e pin g lind were g iven practical problem s f o r the applicati o n of th ese s kills. Geor ge and J ohn find girls more inter es tin g than bookkeeping. DLAN E FITE Typing I II, Soc 7; 8 ,S, EaSI Tuu U Mrs File home In Plnlml, the !fopical wClth er She is oflginall) from TC'Xls, IlUghl II Jr. HIgh i n Irving flvorne hobb,C's skiing. bolling, lnd fishing H er ld t o students) "Sc Individulls" CLARE W JOHNSON Shon h:lnd, Bookkeeping, Busi B S, BemidJI SllIe College, M Ed, Washlng l on Col Dunng his first )Clr al C HS, Mr J ohnson was )earbook lnd held of EduCltion IXfrom his regulu dUlles :lS telcher WlS born In and tlugh{ for sc\en )Oon including being principal Adna HIgh School In Wuhington He cnio}s fishing. bo'llo1lng, :and SCUbl dIving His is. more en;a) ing good {hlngs lboul lnd kss {I)'lng to c hlngc il" Thi s is almost as bad as L atino" 37

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38 ellglish Engli sh, an extensivel), wide field, was one of rhe large s t departments at CHS. It was a required subjeer for all students, since the ability to understand and to use well his native lan guage deemed necessary for a student's success in any endeavor. Regular English classes included th e study of grammar, composition, and literature. I n addition to these regular cou r ses; rhe Engli s h depart ment also included journallsm, speech and drama, and remedial reading I n journalism the s tudent learned to write in newspaper form and receive d much practical experience. Speech and drama was a course which taught the srudenrs the art of ora l expres sion. Besides this, the course required a great deal of r esearch work. Remedial reading provided students who required ext r a help an opportunity to improv e (heir r eading ability Books read in rhe various classes include ;}ohlJlJy TremailJ, Greal Exper+ latio1JJ, A Tal e o[ 7ill o Cities, The HOl/se oj Seven Gab/", The Red Badge oj COl/rage, WI//hering Heigh", lArd Jim, and The MoomlolJe. Mrs. Smith "My goodness! \'{fha t are the Seniors coming to!" H E R B I T 0 C HESHIR E English: 8 .S, University of T:arnp;l J.B. DOBB I NS E nglis h I I J our. n;llism, B5, University of Virgin ia. M Ed. Unl\" o f Virginia HAM LET: Act I, Sc. HI -Polomus to bertes" JANE ELF E R S English III, Speech and B S. Univtrsiry of WIS' consin goals most im portam to you and be perseverant in Khieving them Don', be relUCtant to serve others and the commul)lty Don't be afraid to gl\'e of Aim high. prepare palnst;lklngly; serve. and work"

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LOU I S J. FAlTOROS I English III : B.S., l-tEd, Rut gt'rs University "No tynnny is morc intolcnble than that of dlc self.rightcous reformcr or th c ovcr zealous phihnthropisr Thc w o rld c m txdestr oyed by tOO much haIred o r 100 mu ch lovc, bUI thc lmcr is m orc dlngcr" O\.IS husc it is more tnsidtou s DOROTHY H SMITH Engli s h 12; GLENDA STRONACH English and B .S, Ohio N o rthcrn U ., Mil., Dcn\'cr Mu s i c; B M us,Ed" B A Tnniry U Univcrsity Mrs Stro nach IS ( rom Tens and taught in C u run du beforc coming t o C H S She Cn;O)5 ('(0 108). a n d spons T o th y own :;clfbe t!\lC," MAR T HA TANNER Engli s h A B U N C. "Li\'ec\' cr yd l)' t o Ihc\' cl')' fulle s t -enjoy'" / TONI W ILFEROEng hs h BS, FloI" ida Stale" Ihcsc u rnes' '" til be 1fl()th er period Ih a l I "",11 add :15 onc I\'c I,\ed thr o ugh Mrs. Elfers That was some class Mr Dobbins. .. 1 deserve thi s rcst." I h ope 1 don't for get the idea o f that pIa) befor e class i s OUt" REBE CCA WILUAM GC'Ognph) Engluh 8 and 9, BA A ndcr:son College-M n W i lha ms' home SUIC U \'(rCst Virg lnLl Shc h a s U'1\cled through man) ltatC1 :and CTlJO}'S rndtn8 and s .... 'mmtng "Usc )"our -think' listen' rnd'" 3.

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40 loreigl1 'col1gl/oges "Welcome t o the camp." ANNE D GEGG Frcn{h, bun, SA. Cornell Um\'crsll\,lI.l S In &lu Clllon, Cornell UnL\ I ..enn 10 do thmgs on umt' lI.bkc POSI1I\C' (OOlnbuuons (0 xhooJ and ,our communi TElMA I HOWARI) Spanish. Busines s Il A, H unter College, M A, I-Iumer College "Ik lnd rcspc:(tfuJ lllllcns III your (ommunmcs lnd good exam pies of mouls (0 \Our rc=cr'i .. STELLA RIE F K O H L Spanish. Fren c h B A. Ne ..... York Un!\ A. Columbll VnI\ N Y "N('\(;r 10 look back InIO thc rlSI -alv.l)S (0 flcc cach da)' U LI come's ... mhOul 1 t houllh! of thc fur"r .. When will t hey eve r lea rn ? I s It third declen s ion. acclIs:lti \ 'c. masculine. plur.d, or comp:u:ltive? r ill mixed lip!

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JAME S E. STEARNS Spanish II. Ill IV, Russian 11. B S Ed. t.1 A Univcrsity of Flo rida. "Spend morc lime' on thc 5ubjc('ls Ihlt arc hlrd for )'OU Ihan on your bvorile'S W ILLIAM L. WILL Spanish 7 and 8, English 9 ; B S Econ. Xavlcr Univ ; M Ed. Uni\'. of Florida t-.kWiJlisanalivcl Slhmian Hc laughl in Floridl before' c o ming t o CHS. His hobbics arc golfing, swim ming, tcam sportS and rC'lding. Life' i s shott, so be satisfied in w hat you arc doing Toni Thomas. "It's right i s n't it? " How can I conce ntr.lte o n H ablar when I"m thinking of HIM? T he foreign language department a t C H S was a wide and imeresting one. I t s aim was to increase a student's understanding of th e history and c ulture as well as rhe language of countries other than hi s own. I n order ro fulfill rhi s aim C H S offered cour ses in three m odern languages ; Fren ch, Spanish, and Ru ssian. Three years of each language we r e offe r ed, s tudents bein g placed in the level ap p r o priate to their development. I n ad dition a second y e ar cou r se in Latin was offe red I n all language courses spea kin g writ i ng, readin g and understanding of the language were s tr essed. The Audio-Lin gua l Method, ALM was a new sys tem used (Q te ach Spanish and R us s ian. This sys t em involved inten s i ve o ral p ractice in the la n guage lab o ratory. Mr s H oward "I'm n o m odel!" 4t

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.2 }lome 8col1omics ELIZABET H Home' Economics; B .S, ShIt College "Whlt you do {or don't do} tOOl)' ) 'OUf future" J osef:. G o n z ale z and Anna Summerlin. "You're off : ln inc h'" The homemaking p r ogram placed emphasis on three areas: food s and nutrition, clothing selection :md con strunion, and family living. It was th e aim of the department to provide girls w i th knowledge helpful for their furures as homemakers. Junior high home economics srudent s learned the basics of sewing by m aking simple household articles and garments. They were also taught the ba s ics of cooking which included the p r epa r ation and serving of formal and informal meals. Senior high srudents were offered one semes te r of sewing which included personal grooming, the plannin g and constn.lction of clo thi ng, and a study of persona l and family relacionships. I n the second semes ter's cooking classes, stude nt s w ere taught the fundamentals of nutrition rhe use of recipes, mea l plann ing, marketing, and various methods of pre serving food. Tin a B ocanegra, Pat D e Vault, E lisa Brown "Do we have to sta nd in line to help ?" "Cookies". I t's messy but it's fun!"

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RONALD FITE -8 .S, E:ut M S, East Umv Mr stlle is is Juni or Clus sponsor He enjOys the C:mal Zone his skiing :md hunting The I ndu s trial Art s department at C H S auempted to p rovide pupils w i th insight inco their own int e rests; to develop their abilities t o work with t hei r hand s and with tool s, and to s h a r pe n t heir intere s t in crea tiv e c r af ts. The I ndu s tr ial Ans department offered f o ur g roup s "f co ur ses; M e chanical Drawing ; W ood Working, Metal Shop and Plastics. Mechani cal Drawin g I t aug ht Students [Q v i sualize h ow an object is put tOgether Neatness, correer lines, measurement and f ollo win g instruClions wer e s tre ssed. Me c h anical Drawin g II was a co ntinuati o n of thi s course for student s plannin g to continue their educati o n in thi s field. Woodworking student s learned about tools, joints shop safety, and the operat i on of powe r tools. They used their kn owl edge to carry o ut proj ects. M e t a l Shop I taught th e basic s kill s of bench wo r k forgin g, wel ding, s h eetmeta l and mac hine operation Plastic s stu dents learn ed the properti es of plas tics and how to s hap e (hem into useful objects. JESSE C H OLLOWAY Shop, MS., Oklahoma Stllt: Colkge "Get beSt cduC2t1on you cm J Hillstrial Arts RONALD L\SSIU Shop; B .S, Los Calif, lie.. Mr laSSila IS a name Californian and tlught In San Francisco, Eng. land, Turkey, and Fnnce HIS hobby is boating HIS ad\ice to "They didn't t ell me :abom Ihu when 1 filled out my c1:ass selection sheet," grumbles Robert Johnson. 43

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44 Mathematics RICH ,.\RD \'(1 BOCK -Algebn II. Anl[}SI5. Calculus. B /I. Unl\ of N A, Um\ of H ouston "Don', be:: 1r1\IlI" I n this modern age. as well as in th e P:lst, m:Hhem:1tics r em ain s a b asic pan of everyolle"s life. T he C H S mat h depanment offe red :dl the m a th courses requi r e d (or success i n co l lege a s well as in r h e students' daily lives. F ive math co urses offered w e r e t o b e t a ken i n o rder as eac h was a prerequisite o f t he subse qucnt o ne. These courses were Algeb r a I. G eo m etf Y Algebra II, Imrodunion 10 Anal ),sis, and Calcu lus. Gen era l i v l arh, :tnd I ntrodu c tion to Algebra were also offered for stuclelHs n o t majori n g i n mat h General M ath cap tured t he cle menrary for m s of m:uhe m atics. It pus hed the stuelcms [Q h:1\'c a m:Hhemar i cai bac kground Algebra I. the first ste p up the b d de r ro hig h er 1113thcm:uics caugh t th e princ i ple s of mathemar ics. W ord mastery of t h e lan guage of m:Hhema t ics was a{[;:tined i n t h i s course. Geometry dealt with the art of drawing. Pr oving the o rems was a major part of geometry. T he students learned how t o deal with s pace figures Algebra I was also reviewed for [he students. Algebra II taught the princip les of fanoring. poly n o mials, log a rithms, and basi( trigonomet ry. The paucrn of reasoning was also le:trned in thi s course. LAWR ENCE A COWLEY I. Gromell') BA, Trlnlt)' Um\'. t.1 II, SouthC':i5!ern SWC' L lve Me' \'Oursdf" Introduction [Q Analys i s we nt d ee p e r intO trigonometry Linear and guadrati c e guat i o n s wefe srudied i n g r eat depth. F uncti o n s and r elari o n s w ere th e beg inning nori a n of (hi s cou rse. RANDAL L G RUBHS -1I.hlh, B A J ewell College "00 nOi gel behm d m life beouse n I S hlrd to C':ltch up" Calc u lus the laS t ste p up a s t ee p ladder of m athe m atics i n hig h sch oo l was a college prep a ratOry co urse in t r oducing t h e f u ndam e ntal s of d i f f e r e nti a l calculus. M ath cla ss i s ;l t ime for man y thi n gs. f rom s fudy i n g to rea ding comic boo ks.

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ROY HOWELL -IB, Ge::ne::f21 A; B.S., Shippc=nsbur g 5 1 Colkge::; M.S. Sme:: Univ "A((e::p! on Ihe:: basis of Ihdr not the::ir Nancy Edmondso n I give up I v e had it." CAROL J. K N I G H T -Life:: Science 7, 7 and 8; B.S. Auburn UnLV. Read as much and:lS varic=
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46 Music EDWARD R CARWITHEN -Music; B Fmc Arr,. Umy Florida, 1'.1 Am, Eutman 5I;hool or Music The following courses were offered thi s year in Music. Music 7 and 8; the exploration of all kinds of music and music skills with emphasis placed on music fundamentals as a step co the enjoyment of music. Ikginning Instrumental Class; a spccialii'cd class for s rudent s desiring to learn the basic techniques of a band o r an orc hestral instrument. It open to all grades but it is recommended that a student wishing to participate in advanced music classes begin Ihe :;rudy of inStruments in seventh grade. Educttional value stressed arc: reading of musical notation, development of good lOne and the ability to express o n eself with confidence on a musical instrument. Also stressed arc pride in personal achievement. concern for group results, and the of concentrating on details to build con fidence and ability. Int ermediate I n strumental Class; a class for students having had one or [wo semesters of work in beginning in strumental class. Thi class open to all grades. It provides ch,nee for students to work with symphonic music of easy to medIUm difficulry The educational values arc: continuing explor:nion of musical ex pression, building of confidence in personal ab iliti es, and striving to do one's best. Senior Band is a special ized class for srudents with at least one year or the equivalent of begin. ning or intermediate instrumental The B:md r elaxing before class begins. class. This is an activiry group. It serves the schoo l by providing music for assemblies, football games, pep assemblies, and Other occlsions. Con certs arc planned to expose the s ru dent to th e classical and modern mu sical world. Srudents are encouraged to participate in musical groups of all kinds. These includ e col lege, eommu niry, and jazz groups. Values s tr essed are; self discipline, appreciation a n d tOleration of new sounds a nd musical experience, and exploration o f the srudent's abilities in music. The music program also provides courses in 7th and 8th grade c h orus and senior chorus where stude nt s learn how to s ing a n d read music. The Girl s' Chorus performing at the Christmas Concert. Ted $cO[[ and Steve Aponte perform at the elementary sch ool. R onald Palser ''JUSt six more measures to go FI'''tJ AnnUUnlZtn K sthy Ik.tet Lnd> Mentknh>1I Ikshto Muon Ann Chm Benson Sue M cCulloU8h ... 1 Ann Cirull, CJ.:.m't/J L nd, M efntk Ann Teno-,Ihs(r Bub>r.> Bloemer L ....... Em,lr D>noel ColInjohnson Ikbbte Ml(, Lnd. lXbb'e P'le PJ11)'Rodrosuel Thom., Wesley A lorcStlcbrou K>lhy Ihlmef J,mColI,ns TlOmulkhre Alu,s Cokmln Jelnefft H(rn>nUc' Sunn R,dS( v.mpronc &uo..""'/J Tony Bm f.hrdeueG.,nn SopS ..... Lbby P,IK' s"x J,mCh,ldrtu K>ren M ew(\,: R O)'Gou EdrlheMmh jo>nneReld Tm",s"x Robon Pmhlm Ted ScOff PelerS,nehel Frtrtfhlllml Bonn,eW,IIoJ R,u Boyl>nd W,llotS>nUl8 &.".", J,mn BklcMr M,ke B,otncby JJmeJJonel B",nLo,( J,mmy!iuffm.n MEMBERS OF THE BAND TnJ1IIptl SfC"'tA ponte CherylOIKn R on P>IK' EdGolckn J m V.lentlnc Drummond Cr.>,sRobtmon A llen R"h,rdson Chqenn R,,'cr:> T,m Bllnch>rd RI}J"1uon P>ulBIClchcr B,llyG,IeJp,e ik'nlyOltotn N>ncyGreu Gcorse R,ver.> FrmV>nWoondenbc:r8 Bobby HU8het T ., Don OIKn Guy D,mun, ... GreuGnSl D,n Vllentlne M,keWtll"ml Robtn fern,ndu JohnAlo>"u 4 7

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48 Physical 8dtlcatiolt BARBARA L CAMPBELL P hysi GIl 135 Ed. Bbe k Hil ls College; Grlduau." Credit, \V':l.5h Sme Vnn. Central \ V'lsh SWt' Col lege BH5T "Be qUIck to CrIIl(17C -but If you do h:l.\'(' :I. solution !O go Wllh the-crltlclsm l JOAN F HARRIS Physinl &lu A B (lnll Zone J r College, B .S. B :nry College, M A New York UnivCfsHY "Don't sec k an esclpc from the pressures lCCOmpan) Ing your )'oulh through cheap thnlb 11m could ruin }our whole life You c:tn't affo r d 10 th row aW J} ) 'our )oung ),clrs The dock can'! Ix:-s lopped o r t1.Jrncd back" DOUG LITTON -Ph)' Ed. Master' s MIS S SUIt" Unl\'crSLty. K eep tr;lInlng rule s -lna beal Ihl bo l l nd C o Bcgt"" -;/ LOUIS DEDEAUX Ph ysical Edu cation. B S O k lah oma A&M Col lege. M S Okhho ma Sm(' UnlY "Find out wh ; u rou do lx-St 3S e3r1)' l S possible, then tlke pride In )
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-Marian Kr edell, Carol R oss, D onna Graham, Shelley Lund, Jane Paulson, Beth Caner. The Aurelia Willi:tms Supergirl Willie i s :u it again! PURPLE PASSION p r esenting their famous aG. The importance of physical as well as mental development in achi eving success in a highly complex society was stressed by the physical edu c ation department. I ts aims we r e to teach good sportsmans hip and a sense o f fair play, to discipline the m ind, and to educate sruderas in leisure time aniviries which can be car ried into adulthood. The department strove co g i ve each studenc, regardless of hi s stage of development a chance to develop his s kills, his anirucle, and hi s ph ysique. Dur ing the year 1970-7l, Cristobal H i g h School's girls' phys i cal educatio n cla sses partic ip ated in bas ketball v o lle y ball, rumbling tr ack, tenn is, and v a r ious other sports. The boys' ph ysica l education classes part i cipated in football, baseball, b asketball, swim ming, weightlifting, and track. Through these activities as well as intramural and var sity sports, the department succeeded in achieving its goals. I thought speed ball was bad, but h ockey beatS them a11." "Keep you r hands on your hips so your p:tntS won', fall down." 49

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so Science PAUL HIERONYMUS Chemistry. Mach; BS, E:1.St Ccntr:tl Swc College, N S, Univc rsiry o f Okla h Offili. "HlI\'C lin o pe" mind -',1nd thcnus.eit" CHS boasted a wide-ranging science curriculum. The student who followed this program can be a ss ured of a solid foundation in sc icmific knowled ge. Th e courses offered were Lif e Science, Earth Scien c e, I l1(roductory Ph ysic, I Science Biology, Chemistry, and Phys i cs. The seventh-grade L ife Science course taught the basis of life and (h e student's role in rhe realm of livin g things. Earth Science offered co Mi c hael M cCa nn K e nn elh Hill. "Now Ihi s will make me healthy. wealthy and wise." eighth.graders, wa s an interesting study of the strucrure and function o f the world and its surrounding e n v i ronment. Introductory Ph ys ical Sci ence was a preliminary laborarory course Studencs were taught the pro cedures of sciemific re se ar c h and discovery. Biol ogy offered a change from the world of physiClI anions and r eactions. This cou r se wa s highlighted by three dissection s during rhe year. A basic course in Chemistry ac-. quaimed students w ith methods of sc ientifi c thinking and p roblem solv ing. Emphasis was placed on pe r form ing laboratOry experiments and reach ing logical conclusions. Ph ysics, the scie n ce of measurement, dealt primar ily wirh pracrical app lications o f science in daily life Vector a nal ysis and other physical aspeers of sc i ence were the major concepts s rudied in this cou r se. Mad scienti sts at work Et--U .. I A LOU ISE M ASON -Life Science 7, A B Rlndolph M3con W om an' s College, to I A . Colgl{e Univefsity In order rOf stude nt s 10 learn they mus t be 3CILVC' parti ci pam which rC'
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L U KE T, PALUM BO -I ntroduCtory P hY5ial BS, M issouri M Ed, Umv of F lorida. T hings could 1x: "Bewar e of [ h i s plam!" C H ARLES T REEVES PhYSICS, E:mh &luauon, BS, B A, M A Arizona "To thyself be: hon and think )'ou let Th e f o rmula for problem No.2 is not on the clock! JAMES 0 NORMAN Biology; BS . Michigln Univ, M A Univ, and IX" h;lPPY for tomorrow du:" "Smile ;I!ld have;l fuUlife" NaiYuen Shum. "I thmk the one I just cut up is the one I needed." 51

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Social Sciences R O B ERT BERGER -Soc Studies. 8 A M idllgan Sme u., II C Grand R:apLds J C. "Gel {he moSI y o u a n a nd II)' t o m a k e ttm w o rld o f o urs :I pllcc In w hi c h 10 hve The purpose o f rh e soc ial sc ience course s o rr e r e d at C H S was to help srucle m s learn a bout th eir w o rld ; its pa s t ir s presc nt. a n d it s relati o n c o th e m boch n o w a n d in the furure The a im o f the soc i a l s tudi es in s tru cto r w as to aid th e student in learnin g to v i e w hi s tory in :l obje ctive and unbia sed mann e r and to give him a b ro ader app ro a c h to s uch problems a s n atio n a l and i nt ernatio n a l re l a ti o n s Soc i a l Sci e n ce cours e s of fer ed at C H S inclu de d Geograph y W orld Histor y U.S. Hi stOry and Cheryl Coleman, Mrs. Co ndon. f\l i ch:ac l "Now w h o i s o n ,he p r o side and 1<; on [he (on s ide;" MARY CONDON W orld H i s!., U S H i sl ; B .S. N onhc r n Mic higa n Collcgc "Be sincc r c lbout c\ cry thlng )ou do, p lrticullrly lbout g C ttlng In cQucltion Ameri can Institutions. G eog raphy dealt with th e stud y o r m3p s, climates, a n d th e phys i cal f e a ture s o f v ari o u s countri es W o rld HistOry wa s the s tud y o f the diffe r e nt na tion s' pa s t s and th e ir rel a ti o n ships to o n e anocher. U.s. HistOry pro v i ded the s tudent w i th kn o wl e dge o f our nation' s pas t and it s a cco mpli shme nt s and led him to a bener und e r standing o f o ur nation A merican I n s tiruti o n s t a u g ht rhe s rudenr about rhe w o rk ings o f governm e nr :tnd the bas i c WILLIAM J. G A NSEN A m:-rlnn in sunnions Socill Stud l c s 8 M A U nI\ CfSlty o f M lChigln MAT E, Pur duc UnlV_ ""TrClt o t hcrs as you 9.'ou l d lik c to be trC'lltcQ .. p rin c i ples of ec o nomi cs. The objective of all social sc ience cours e s wa s to l e ssen mi s unde r s t and in g o f the pe o ple of oche r nati o n s and to help the s tudent s l e arn to res pe c t cultures oche r than th e ir o wn This y ear C H S soc ial sc i e nce teacher s arrended a s peci:tl wo rk s hop conducted by Dr. Edwin Temon of Carneg i e M ellon Univer s i t y Pinsburgh, Pennsyl vania H e wa s an advo c at c o f the u s e of orig inal sourc e mat e rial in the teaching o f soci31 s tudies. Dr. F e m o n g i v e s a leCtur e t o a U S H i story class.

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EUGENE T. G R EGG -U,S. History. A .A. CZ. Collegt'. I} A. Colorado Sme, M A. Um\ of Colorado "Strive t o become nch .. ROANALD JACOBS W o rld Ge ography. Bl chelors, SouthelStem Sute College, M uters, Northeulern 5ta1e College "t.hke the beSt of W hll ever slrultion )'01.1 lre flce
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1(0 re J!//ilds Men "E" Company F Company 54 Jlelps Studelfts The Reserve Offi cers Training Corps at CHS was established to help prepare high school students for futufe careers in the Armed Forces, and for ROT C in college s hould they dec ide to take ii:. I t's chief aim was to help students achieve the maturity necessary to become officers and leaders of men. This year the ROTC was headed by CPT J uan F Maca, who was assisted by S F S Murphy, SFC Picoli, and SSG Alford The ROTC unit at CristObal consisted of E Company UF" Company Color Guard Drill Team, Rifle Team, and the Banaiion Staff. T he staff this year included Battalion Commander Major J ohn Martin; Battalions sponsor, I Lt. Hila Lyman ; S I 2 Lt. Donald Byr d; S2, 2 Lt. Dan i el Valentine ; S3, 2Lt. J aime Damza; and 54, 2 Lt. Lewis Valdez. The Drill Team was co m manded by I Lt. Eligio T homas and sponsored by i l L Jean Smith. "E" Company was commanded by 1 Lr. Denn i s M axwell and sponsored by I Lt. J ackie Springer. "F" Company was comma n ded by ILt. I saac H eres and sponsored by 1 Lt. Denise F oshee. R ev i ews were p r esented by the ROT C each nine-weeks during the school year. A large and important rev i ew was Field N i ght, held on M a rch 27th. Among the rypes of comper i tion i n cluded were: per sonal, squad, plat oon, company and most exciting of all, Drill Team compe titi on. A n Other exc i ting compe r i rion of the school year was the Brigade Review. I n order to make competition fair, the Brigade R eview and Field Nigh t are held on t h e Adanric and Pac ific sides on alternat e years.

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Become Officers And Ceaders __ -;i & CAPTA I N MA TA ROTC ; B A. College A ccomplish what you set OUI 10 do 11 all COSI, with Whlltcvcr resour ces lIYliiabk" SFC MURPHY ROTC. "Don'1 make Ihe Slmc miS[llk(' [Wic, Do il r ight Ihc firSI t ime and }'OU w o n'l have to do it ag:ain . SFC P ICOU RO TC. R O T C cadets and sponso r s attcnd Jungle Operations Train i n g Center SSG A LFORD ROTC Steve AfX>nte. it look like a very long drop to me are you JII" I need a parachute?"' 55

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ROTC C o l o r GlIard Maior J oh n I LL H i l a L yman. I L L Eligio Thomas. Steve A ponte George Ri\' e r:l. T on) Lyon s s

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rite igltter Side Of Rore ife Cade t s steal a moment of relaxati o n during ten grueling day s at leader ship school. "So IhLJ is what they teach ) OU at leader ship sch ool." ..... -"F" Co mpan y Commander I saac H e r es "drops for [cn" with a smile 57

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s. virts' ZJrill ream Wilts Veteralt's ZJay Parnde I Robcm Colc Iclder) 2 Lynn Gregg (Ocommlndcf ) 3. Nln(" Edmvndson bdcr} LInd:.!. Brock Plltl(' H;lUkc r, K:.I,lh\ VLanlOsucl Ann Trrwtll,,gcr Ann Gonllies 10. Kll.!h y MdllSln II Kllhy P ursley 12. Mamn Krcdcll (S
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Patry Hill and Tita Cobb (jlJmes D espite overwhelming odds againsr them, the majorertes Patry H ill and Tica Cobb, presented a fine performance on the last Junior Varsiry game They carried on rheir tradition by performing at the basketball games. To be a majorcrre one must be willing ro devore intensive hour s of practice over the summer, and almosr regular practice after school when school begins. Tryouts Wete held during the month of A pti!. 5.

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60 NE\'({ TEACH ERS L:lsSlb. Johnson. \Xlilliams, Mr. Fite. Mrll. Stronach Cristobal H igh School tea c her s began the 1970 school year o n Au guS t 31. On this d:He. th e faculr) I : H tend ed a specia l meeting :n whic h school policy and plans for th e com ing year were d i scussed. Speir, assista nr Supervisor of U.S. Secondary Schools and Mr. Cook, Supervisor of I nstruction, U.S. Seco n cb r y Schools attended and were introdllced to th e faculry. F ollowing speeches by lr. P fau, Mr. J effries. and Mr. Spei r ; cof fee was served to the new teachers in the home economi(s room. eJiS eommelfces Vear With 'live New reachers \'(,I e mus t be prepared, for :l !lCW sc h ool year begins. Mr. p fau (principal of C H S) gives bst mimll c :ldv i ce and in formation to the rest of the f:tcult),

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earibe eltlb Spollsors etllttlral 8xcitallge Program Wi/it eololl Jligit Scitools I knew I s hould have brought my lunc h!" "Mrs. Fattorosi won 'I let us o n the gym noor in our oxfords In order to pr ovide students (rom a Panamanian school with an oppo r tunity to observe the workings of the U.S. school syStem the members of the Caribe Club invi(cd rhe srude m s of St. Mary's and St. J oseph's acade mies in Colon [Q visic C HS. On the morning of December 9th, the entire senior class of Sf. Mary' s Academ y and a number of s rudents from St. Joseph arrived b y bus Each g irl was as signed to a member of the Caribe Club and wh o m th ey accompanied to class. They had o r iginally plann ed to leave at noon, but refreshed by a lunch provided by the Caribe Club, they attended afternoon classes a s well. B oth Panamanian and American srudents agree that they had profited from thi s cultural exchange. "You'r e kidding I'm glad I came so I Cln catch up o n the n e ws." 61

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Seniors A lon i s A]m:a.nubil C. AUSlLn .2 SAND H A A LIlEHGA June 26, 1951 Colon. Republlt of PJnlml Entering ( H S In the ::.cwnd sem("tcr of her JUnLor S:mdrl clui ckh heume :10 JtllVC member of her She served as treasurer of the L anguage Lab Club :lOd SCHell!) of the Club. S:mdr:l grldu:l.tcd in Janu. lry 1971, :md lef t for Riverside Cit)' College where she plam, TO Inljor in b u s i ness. JA Y ALO N I S j011lun y 25, 195J A neon. Canal Zone Jl), has ltlcndcd Caml Zone school s for rwelve },ClfS, six of th ese were at C HS. I n his sen ior \'(':lr, J:l\ was :l member of the Caribe Club lnd t he tr:lc k tel m. H e p bn::. to !)tudy e n gineering :lnd compu ter sci ence a t Louisilna P o l ),tedlOic I n s tItut e aft e r gr:tdu a tio n AUST I N October n. 1 952 C o l on. Republic of P lnam:a Aim:. came to C H S in her junior vear, hav i ng p r evious I), a tt e n ded St. J osep h' s i n Colon. She w:as :a member of th e Sp a nish C l ub, an d p a rt icip at ed in volJeyb:dl i nt ram ur:ds. Alm a plans t o a tt cnd Ca n a l Zone College ,lI1d major in medi cal t ec hn o l ogy, PATR I CIA AUSTIN December JJ. 1952 C olon R e p ublic of P anama At hletics havc occ u p i ed much of P : H Sr's tlme in h igh school. Shc was a membe r of t he basketb:lll and vollcyball t eams i n h e r fres h man year :lI1d captain of bo th in he r sop h o m ore ye:ar w hen she a l so partici pa t ed in tennis. I n her j unior y ear s h e lett e r ed i n three sportS :U1d :liso ser ved as presidt: nt o f th e Gi\i\ a n d cocaptain of th e P owder P u ff spced b all tcam P a tsy p lan s t o men d C Z C and m ajor in p hysical cduca t ion. T ERRI LY N B A KER N(Juwlbtr 6, 1952 A nc horlge. Alaska T his w:as Terri's firs t year:al C HS. She p:m l lipatcd in V:USI ry volley b all, H er future plam intlude s tu dies a t th e ry o f A rkansas. ROBERT EARL B A RR M a r (h 18, 1952 C harles t on, Sou l h Carolinl R obert has :l.tIcnded Canll Zone sch ools 311 h i s life, S I X years at C HS. H e pla ns to become :a policema n .. R o ben E Bur

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Michael Fr:aneis Bale JEAN LYNN BASSETT Jun, 9, 19)3 Jeannie has auended C.Z. schools (or ten years, five o( these at CHS. During her high school )ears, she was a member o( the Spanish Club. (he swimming team, and the Girl s' Chorus. Her furure plans include attending the Col lege o( Bible in California, hopefully on a music schola r ship. MICHAEL FRANCIS BEALE July 16, 1953 St. Petersburg Florid:1 Mike came to Cristobal H igh School in the second se mester o( his sophomore year. H e was a member o( the var sity basketball team I n his senior year he was elected H omecoming "king". Mike plans to : lttend co llege in the United States. JA TERI BJORNEBY April 26, 1953 Br emerton, \Xlashington Jan has been an anive member o( the class o( 71. She was a member o( the Girls' Drill team (or three years, and served as commander in her senior yea r She was an S.A. alterna t e in her ( r eshman year. As a junior, she was a memo ber o( the French Club and class treasurer. I n her senior year, she served as secretary o( the GAA and as :1 member o( t he Senior Privilege Commiuee. SportS have occupied much o( Jan's time. She participated in speedball, vo lle y. ball, tennis, band, .basketball intramurals, and was a memo ber o( th e varsity volleyball and tennis teams. J:m plans to attend college in the U.S. ELIZABETH BLEV I NS J alll/ary 2. 1952 Colon R epublic o( P:1nam:1 Ellie has attended C r istobal H igh School throughout her high school C:1reer. She participated in intramural speedball during her (reshman and sophomore ye:1r s. and in basketball and volleyball during all (our years. As a sen ior she wa s a member o( the Girls' Drill Team. Her furure plan s include srud)' to become either an airline stewardess or a veterinarian. LA A GA YE BOONE July 10, 1953 A bingdon, Virginia L ana has been an active member o( the senior class at C HS. She was a member o( the Caribe Club, and served as treasurer of the L anguage Lab Club in her senio r year. She was a member of the yearbook staff for three ),e:us, :md as a sen i or, served as copy editor. I n her junior year she be came a member o( the Nati onal Honor Society, and was e1ened president. As a (reshman. she received an OulStand ing Student Award, and in her junior year. an award for ex cellence in the Russian lan guage. A s a junior, she partici. pated in the SF SST Program at Lo),oh University. In her senior year, she was a member of the Senior Class Ad visory Council and Board o( Direnors. and served as secre tary of the Student Advi sory Committee. Lana's future plans include majoring in computer science at Loyola Uni versity in ew Orleans where she received a fouryear schohrship. VIVIAN V ICTORlA BOSEMA February 25. 1948 Colon, Republic of Pan3ma Vivian has attended C H S for each o( her four years in high school. Her future plans include {he possibility o( a modeling career. Senior H omecoming King" Mike Beale is escorted on royal walk around the gym. Vj\'i1n Victoria 63

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K llhryn RlChd Burgess Donlld Pmick tlizabclh Pauleu(' Carter 64 KATIIRYN IIAClI E L BURGESS A larfh 10. lCJ5j Y okoh;IIlU, ).II);1n K.ltll\ h.l:i .Htcnded CHS throughout hcr high SdlOOI career, and Ius been .1 IlH.:mlx:r of the Girl; Gke Club for four \Of'>. :I!ld the: Girh' Drill TC:l.1l1 for two. Aft er gndu :tli on. K.HIl\ pbns co : mc:nd :a Collc.:ge of An :lnd M usic. in prep:ar:ItIOn for .1 rnu,>i l.ll career LUISA BUTLER Nowllbll' 12, 1952 Colon, R epubliL of P:tn,lTll:t Carmen h:l:; been a lJ3rt icipa nr in fll.lny o rganiz:uio n:; lnd clubs during her ycu,> :It C HS. She :.ervcd as secre tary treasurer of the C:l.ribc :md Nurses's A ide Clubs, H i stOr i :ln of the F rench Club. Vice Presidenc of the L a n gu:l.ge Lab Club, :Inc! treasurer of {he She :Ibo served o n various commi ttee:; :l1ld (he Senior CLiss !3o: lrd of Direccorso In her senior ),C.lf. s h e W:l$ dcucd to the National H onor Society. C3rmt: n pbns TO enter Bury College in Mi ami :lI1d study com puter science. DONALD PATR ICK BYRD jllne6. [951 B:llbo:l, Can31 Zone Donald has :lttend ed Cllnl Zone s( hool s all his li(e Throughout his high school ye:lrs, he h:t:;, ocen intere s ted in dr:un:uics, pb}'ing Ie:lding roles in severa l The:;,pi :lI1 pro duCtions, :lnd serving a:;, (f('.lsurer of th e Thespi3!l S(Kiet)' in hi s senio r ye:lr. I n the summer of 1 970, he :lttended :l summer institute in dr:ul1:l. D o n:lld pbns t o attend C:ln:l l Z o ne College for :t yC:tr, .md th e n tt":ln:;,(er to the U.S. Raul Eduardo CaStro ARMAND O CABRERA Apn1 16 1953 S:lmurce, P eu n o R ico "Cu b by" Clement. K athy K raus "Senio r s JUSt n a tur:llly h : lve be:lutiful legs." This W:lS Anmndo's firs t ye:lr:lt C H S H e previously a t tended Antilee s H igh School I n Pue rt o R ico where he participated in var s it y lr:Ic k H i s (mure pbns include the study o( :tcco untin g :lnc! business 3dministr3tion 3t the Univer s ity o( P uert o R ico ELIZABETH P AU LETTE CARTE R Marrb j 1953 Gartersville. Georgi:l B eth cam e to C!-IS (rom G eo r g i l where s he W:lS :\C[ive in :lthletics and o ther sch ool :lc.tivities She puticipat ed in soccer. so ftb:lll. b : ldmint o n. and ar c hery intr:H1Hlr:lls. and W:lS co-c apt:lin o ( th e v3rsity socce r :lnd so(tb:ll! teams. She was also :l c heerle : lder, : 1 memocr of th e F HA. vice-presi dent o( the FT / \ secr et3rv o( th e Debate Club. : lIld 3 mem ber o( the yea r boo k and ncwsp:lper S I:l((5_ She w:ts vice pre side nt o ( h e r freshm:ln cbss. :lnd secrctary o f her sopho more c bss. This yea r s h e was :l member o( the Senior Cbss Advi so r y Council :tncl BO:lrd o ( D irectors. Beth plans to study ps),chology. pbnning :l C3reer in social work o r per haps t(,:lc hin g. RAUL E DUARDO CAST R O J ul), 20. 1953 Colon. R epu bli c of P .mam:l Raul ha s p:lrticip:lted in man y club:;, during his five yeus at C H S H e w:t:;, a member of th e Caribe Club. (he Fre n c h Club, th e ),e:trbook S(:l(f. : md served :l:;, pre s ident of (h e Art 3nd Spanish Clubs :lnd vice-president of the LangU:lge Lab Club. R :lul ser ved o n the co mmittce for the Jr.Sr. P rom. and :lS a member o( the Senior Cbss A dvi sory Council and B oard o f Direct ors. R aul pbns to :lttend A m herst College in Mass a c husett s :tnd (ake a liber:tl : m s cou r se.

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flass Officers exempli/I! ((Senior Spirit" CLASS SPONSOR r..lr. Louis Fauorosi SENI O R C LASS OFFICE R S : Kathy Dc R aps, V ice P resident: R obert Phillips President : Judy Mc L ain. Secretar), ; and Carmen Buder. Treasurer. The 1970-71 school year was one of i n novat ion for C H S seniors. Under t h e leade rship of capable class offi cers, and wit h the expert guidance of th e i r sponso r Mr. Fattoros i the sen io r class set out to do g r eat things The first pee jeer was (0 secure an open lunch. A commiaee was estab l ished to prepare and submit for ap proval a l ist of reguiarions, and the p rivi lege was g r anted I n order to pro vide a sounding board for the com plaints and suggestions of seniors the A dvisory Council consi s ting o f twe nty representative seniors was e s r ablished. Another new group was the Senior Board of Directors, made up of representatives elected by s ru dems in r he senior class Barh groups wo r ked hard to make rhe year a suc cessful o n e. Among the special activitie s of rhe year were a trip to rhe other side to vis i t Cana l Zone College. the Senior Banquet, and the Junior-Senior Prom Schoo l events of special significance to seniors were the J amboree where Wendy Flores reigned as queen the homecoming game vierory and the dance which followed with Rosemary Chri s rian as queen, and the Christma s forma] at which the Hall of Fame winners were announced It was a year which included rh ose o n ce in a lifetime events whi c h ate so much a part of being a s eni o r ; se leering invita r ions and card s, se ni o r skip day, baccalaureate a nd of cou r se, graduarion Alrogether it was a great year one which t h e Cl ass of '7 1 will never forger. 6.

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ClC'mC'nt Jr 66 PATTY ANN C HRISTIA N JUlie 26. 8ludicld. \X/est Virglnll Pam \\lS :t member 01 the Pep Club.lt her slhool In Vir ginia before lOmtng co ClI S She W:1::. l member of dlc.: \elfbook 'tlft here. :md 10 her -.enior \('ar. ::.ef\'ed as publtw\ ch:tirmln of the The::,plall pll\s. pllns to return to Vir ginia lfter gradultion. lnd enroll in a beallliciln school. C HRISTIAN Oc/ober 5. 195J Coronado California R osemary has attended Cristob:ll H igh Sch ool for thrce years. S h c p:lrticip:lted i n 8 LC:lgue b:tskctball in her sopho more year, lnd the Girls' Drill Team in her senior ye:lr. A s :l. senio r she was selencd Cjueen of [he H omecoming D ance. R osemary plans t o :mend T exas A&I University where she will pursue the study of medicine CALEB Ortober 17. 19JJ Gatun, Caml Zone "Cubb)," is one of [he outsland ing athletes in the d:l.sS of '71. H e has p:lrticip:tted in football. baseball. basketball. lnd [rlck inu:lmurals. and was a member of the vlrsin' football. baseball. basketb:tll. :l.Od track te:tms. H e WlS:t of the "21" Club in his freshlmn ye:l.f. :md of the "C' Club for the Other three years "Cubbv" pllns co attend CU1:t1 Zonc Col lege FAITH EMI LY COIID F ebrlNII) 16, 1953 Flint Faith entered CI-IS in the seco nd semcstcr of her junior yelr. She WlS l junior vlr siry chcerle:tder ; H her former schoo l in M ichigan After grldllltion. F:lith pllns t o become a trlvel agent. FREDERICK COLE Apr" I). 19JJ BalbOl Canal Zone ROTC has
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Of )71 eOlfol eollege JEANNETTE RMIO A COX AuguJlJ/,19)2 Mana gua, Nicaragua )eanncnc was a member of the Fren ch Club for four years. She was a member of [he urses' Aides Club. and served 35 secretary for rwo years. She was a l so 3C1iv(' in Pink Girls J eannette worked o n the year book during each of her four years in high school, and in her senior ye:lr, served as editOr. jeannenc was a member of the National Honor Society, and served as secretary She W3S also a member of the Student Ad visory Commiuee and the Philosophian Society J eannette plans to attend Canal Zone College and bter the Univers i ty o f Flo rida, s rudying for a career in medicine She also plans to study Spanish during the summer before attending CZC, in M exico or Spain KATHLEE N ANNE DERAPS JUlle 2), 1953 An con. Canal Zone Kath y wa s a member of th e C:uibe Club for three }'ears, and was a mamber of the advertising staff for the yearboo k in her senio r year. K athy panicip : Hed in volleyball and speedb all intr amu r als and was a member of the junior Powder Puff tcam She worked on many commiuees, and was vice-p r esi dent of the senior class. Kath y plans to :mend college in San Ant o n io, T exas where she will obtain her Bachelor of Scien ce degree for her c areer as a reg i ste red nurse MI C HAEL EDWARD DEXTER Jul y I, 19>3 Fon Benning, Georgia M ike came to C H S in his junior year. and rapidly became an active member of the class of '71. I n his senio r year. he was pr esident of the C H S Student Association Mi ke continued his parti cipation in athletics at C HS. playing on the varsity tenn i s ,and baseball t eams. M i k e wa s a member of the Caribe Club, th e "C" Club, and the ational H o nor Socie ty. pl:ms to srud)' engineering :H \ '(Iilliam and tvlary or the University of New fl-kxico PEDR O JUAN DIAZ Ftbruary 26, 1952 San Juan, P uerto Rico P edro auended C H S for three years H e was a ROTC platOon leader, and a membe r of the Bo ys' Drill t eam. P edro pla ns to enl i s t in the Army' s Special For ces. and Ranger train ing and to attend Officer Candidate h ool. WENDY MARIE FLORES Novfmbe r I 1953 Leesville, Louisiana \'(Iend y was the 1970 Jamooree Queen. She was a member of the Girls' Drill team in her sophomore year. \'(Iendy was a member of the Senior Advi sory and Jr..Sr. Prom Commiuees. She plans to attend C.Z.c. for tv.' o years. and then transfer t o the United States DENISE A ETTE FOS HEE February 24, 1953 New Orleans, Louisiana Denise was a cheerleade r and an ROTC sponsor in her sen ior )'ear She lettered in tehni s in eievemh grade. Denise was vice-pre sident of the CJribe Club, and a member of the French Club and the : Hional Honor Society Denise plans to att end college and earn a teaching degree Deni5C Anncllc Foshee 67

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Armlnd Goulet J ohn f>hchlcl Hlnnlh Allen ScOtt I hrmon .s JOHN B FUNDERBURK jml/wl) J 1953 Tucson, Arizon:1 John pani<.ipated in var!licy track and football during hi:; four years at CHS. He ser.ed on the J amboree P arry C ommittee. J o hn plans to become either a machini s t or a diesel mechanic :lfter graud:ttion. CATHER INE ANN GERCIC H januar y I. 1953 L y nnw ood, California Cathy h:ls attended CHS for t o ur yelrs. She participated in volleyball intramurals during her freshman and sophomore years. A s a senior, she was a t>.-1ember of the Girls' Drill Te:lIn Cathy also served on the Jr.Sr. P rom Committee. H er nnurc plans include s tudy at a college in Cali fornia or Florid:!.. BRENDA LEE GIBSON December 6. 1953 F o rt Br agg. North Carolina Br enda entered C H S at the beginning of her soph o more yea r Sh parti cipated in swimming. tennis, basketball. and volleyball intraml r als, and was a member of the v:l.rsiry tenni s team After gr:l.duatiol Brend a would like to attend a junio r college. travel extensively, an pursue a career in hairdressing and art SHARON LOU ISE GOLD EN Ap';/ 15, 1953 Anniston Abbama Sharon was a member of the C H S senio r b:l.nd for five yeus, playing I the flute She offic i:l.ted 3t \ usit), b3sketball games in her freshma n year. A fter gra duation. s he pbns to attend:t :t nurs ing sc h ool in Miami, Florida S TEP H E N ARMAND GOULET September 22. 1 952 Somer. i lle, M 3ssachusetts Stephen entered C H S :It the beginning of his senior ye:tr. At his for'l mer high school he W;IS a member of the A F S., the Chess Club, the M ath L eague, and t h e Science Club. :md received an award for being the beSt chemistry student in the iunior cbss. H e 31so p3rticip3ted in v:lfsity track :md football. Stephen phns 3 c3reer 3S a math teacher. PAT R I C I A GUTIERREZ jllly 20, 1 952 Fayettev i lle, Noreh Carolim Pat h:ts :tttended C H S for each of her four years in high school. She wa s :l. member of the Dram:t Club :tnd :tssisted with various Thespi:1O productions. P at pbns to become :t woman jockey. JOHN MI C H AEL HANNAH june 26, 1953 Waynesville, Nonh Carolina John enjoys motOrcycling H e was :Jctive in ROTC during hi s fresh man and sophomore rears. H e served as a cheerle3der in [he P owder Puff game, and :'IS a member of the J :tmboree Parr y Committee. J ohn pla ns a c:treer in 3.eron3L1tiC:l.1 engineering ALLE N SCOT T HARMON September 23, 1952 Ann apolis, M:tryhnd I i I Art i s one of Allen' s m:tjor interests H e W3S a member of the Art Club for twO rears, se r ving :ts preside nt in hi s junio r year. H e was also I 3rt editOr of the newsp:tper and the yearbook in his senio r year. Allen was also 3ctive in the French Club and Dr:tma Club. H e panici pated in several plays, 3.nd became :l Thespi:ln in hi s senior year. Allen won rhe "Voice of D emocracy" co nte s t at C H S in hi s junior } ear H e plans 10 attend the U S Mer c h:mt t,,!:tr ine A c :tdemy. or Ch3pm:m Floating Cam' pu s in California H e would like to become an :trchitcct or : 1 com mer cial:mi st.

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Caribbean College Club ..Hosts ((Senior Night" DIANE FRANCES H AUKE AugJI 21, 19.51 Colon, Republic of Panama Diane has been an active member of man)' clubs and organizations at C HS. She was a member of the French Club, the Spanish Club. the P hilosoph ian Society, the Nurses Aides, the Yearbook staff, and the Senior Bo:trd of D irectors; serving as an officer in several of the clubs She also served on the Cafeteria, Senior Advisory. and various dance committees. D iane plans CO pursue a course in business administration, with plans for a career as an executive secretary. PAUL H E RBER T H E A D Y March 6, 19)3 O lney. I llinois P aul attended C H S for only twO years. At his former high school in Salem, Ill inois, he was a member of the Spanish and Pep Clubs, and the varsity track tcam. H e participated in the ROT C p r ogram :H C H S P aul plans t o major in P ublic ArtS in college with a job in a radio or t elevision studio in mind I SAAC HERES januaT) 4, 1 9)3 Pu e rt o Armuelles. Chiri
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70 S t cp h anlc Bndl,!p IIlic s ROBERT R UDOLPH JOHNSON j,wllal ) 8, 1953 t>.t inncapol is, t",l i n neso t a Eric Tho mas Iri o n Senior elass 8lects FREDERICK JOH N HIGHLEY O(/ob(,r 1 9 1953 Col o n. R e pu b lic o f P : m a ma Fred has : m e nd ed Can:al Zon e s c hools all his l ife. includi ng s i x year s at C H S H e parti c ip a tcd i n football intralllur a b NANCY H USON lvI tl)' I 1 953 C o l o n R e publi c of P a nama Nanc}, was in Nurses Aid es for three year s a n d wa s a Pink Girl for rwo yeaTS Shc W : I S h o m e room r e pre se ntat ive i n h e r so ph o m ore year. She p :mic ipatl:d in vo llc y b:lll irmamllral s and in the P o wder Puff Speedball Game Nancy plan s t o att e nd Bri g ham Y o un g Univ e r s ity STEPHANIE BRIGIDA ILUES October 2 1 953 C o l o n R epubli c o f Panam a Stephi e was in the Sp : lIli s h Club. L:lnguag e Lab Club, and th e Girl s Glee Club. Sh e (ook part in v o lle y ball and s pe e dball imramur:tls. StC phie plan s to g o t o co llege and be co m e an occ upati on:al th e rapi st. E RI C T HOMAS IRION JIlIy 27. 1 953 Ocean s ide Califo rnia Eri c mended C H S f o r fiv e ye:lr s H e p a rti c ipat e d in ba s k e tball imTa' mural s in hi s so ph o m o r e year. Eric plan s t o go (0 college R o bert ha s been at C H S for three Yl:ars. H e plan s t o tr : w e l :lfter g r:ldu :Hio n S H ER R Y ANN KER N Jill) 1 9 19>3 M obde, Alabama S h e rry wa s 111 th e Canbe Clu b a n d wa s an S i \ rep rt:s enta tivl: Sh e p a rticipat5!d i n V o lle y ball :md was o n th e D rill T eam S h e rry plan s t o a tt end C.Z. C the n go t o the S(a t c!i (0 earn a deg r ee i n data pr oc e ss i ng R obert Rud o lph J o hn so n Shcrl) Ann K crn

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Hoard Of Directors Am onia Khso\'sky NEAL A L,ROCHE AlIguJl28, 19)2 England EUSeTlC' Knauss A TO IA KLASOVSKY March 12, 1953 CristObal, Canal Zone Toni was on the Srudent Advisory Commiuee and the Board of Di rectors. She pbns to :mend a junior college in Florida and major in humanities. FREDER ICK EUGENE KNAUSS Or/obe, 15, 1952 Nas hville Tennessee F r ed was on the Swim Team and earned his [em : r I-Ie plans to join the Arm y and become a helicopter pilot. H e wants co go to Vietnam Neal attended CHS ror only onc year H e plan s to become an art teac her ANN MARIE LAUR ITZEN May 24, 19>3 Baltim ore. Maryland Ann t>.larie was in the C:uibe Club and the B :md. She plan s to auend co lleg e and major in Biology and Oceanograph)'. SENIOR BOARD OF DIRECTORS Fron' CO/lll11n: Diane H :lUke. Carmen Butler. t-.t ike Dexter Judy McLain. (;nupr Co/limn: R obert Phillips \'(/end y Flor es, Raul Cas tro DeRaps. Blick CO/limn: Lana Boone. Beth Carter, Denni s M axwell. Denise F oshee. 11

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Rodng o Lmdo Shc]!cy Madison Lunu P John Hmky r.hrlln IXnni s PJul t.hxwcll Judy Ann M c b m louISe' t>lt 1 .c1 n RODRIGO LINDO April 2), 1 9)3 Pan3ma Cit) Republi c of P an:am:a "Rod wa s a member o f t h e Sp am s h Club for four and was secretary-m:-asur e r in hi s sophomor e \ e J r H e w or k ed on <;/.:\ c r a l com mittees Rod pbns t o :m e n d (allege SHELLEY LUND JUllf 1 0.1953 Buffal o N e w Y ork S helley W ; I S a c hcerk::ad e r for tw O a n d p:mlllpated in ba s k etb:all and v o lle yb:al!. She a m e mber o f th e G A A :and th e Caribc: Club Shelley plan s to ; I([end co lle g e in N e w Y ork :and bewm e : m E n glis h t eac her. HILA p LYMAN OCJober 1 4 1953 Br cmert o n. \Xlas hin g t o n I lila l e ttered in s wimmin g in bo th h e r sopho m o r e and fres hman ycar s Sh e w:as secre tar y o f th e j unior I l i b W:lS o n th e Girl" s Drill T eam, an d wa s Drill Team and Bamlio n s p o n so r H ila t o :It{end Sccretari:al School. JOHN HARTLEY MARTI M ( lrr b 1 4 1953 P anama Cif)'. R epubli c o f P :IIl:Ull.l John was pre s ident o f th e j uni o r H e \\'; I S ROTC B:mali o n and Drill T eam C o mm:andcr. H e played intr:amural ba s k e tball f o r four ye:lrS. J o hn phns t o attend :a tvl ititar y Audcrn)' o r j oin the Armed F orces. JAIME MARTINEZ Aug w I 5 1 952 Colon. R e publi c o f P.lIlam:l J:aime wa s activ e in R O T C a n d w:a<; o n the fir s t Drill Team t o com pete in th e St :ues H e plan s t o join the / \ rm y a s a n office r aft e r college. DENN I S PAUL MAXWELL A pril 1 9, 1 9)3 New York City, New Y o rk D enni s wa s vice pre s i dent o f his sopho m o r e I -Ie W:lS in ROTC four year s : lIld wa s ""EO. C o mpan y C omnunde r Denni s plan s (0 study architecture :at th e Univer sity o f Flo rida JUDY ANN M c LAI N April 27, 1953 C o lon R epubli c o f P an:una J ud y W:lS in Nurs e s' Aid es and th e Thcsl'i:ll1 So<.i e {\,. and was presi dent o f both in her seni o r yelr Jlld), w o n eve ral a ( tin g award s :and had part s in several play s She plam t o att e nd college SARAH LOUISE M c LEA Dert'!Jlber 9 1 952 Cri s t o b :!!. C:mll Zon e S:alt)' pla y ed bls kctb:all :lnd v o lle yb:al!. S he w o rke d o n th e Junior Pr i v ile g e C o mmitt ee and the Senio r A dv i so r), C o un cil S:alh plan s to travel in Eur o p e after grlduatio n

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N('iI CliRton P luton j:.l.n(' M:.l.ry J O S E J A I M E Marcb 29, 1953 San j ose, California This was j ose's first year at C HS. He W3S an S.A. representative, a member of the Tradewind and Caribocan Staffs. and a ROTC platoon lead e r H e was also a member of the varsity football baseball and bask e t ball teams S U S A N WARD M EN D EN HALL December 23. 1 952 Spr ingfield, Ohio Susan has attended C H S for only twO years. She was vcry active in a th letics and Other school functio n s in the U.S :1Ild continued her int erest a t C H S She panicip:lIed in varsity and intramural swimming. t en nis, baske t ball, and volleyball, and was a member of the G A A Susan plans ro anend [vf iami Universit y in Oxfo r d. Ohio. majoring in physical education KATHRYN MARIE MILLIGAN A p ,i/ 23, 1953 Bo zeman, M ontana K athy was a memoc r of t h e Nurses' A ides Club, and of the Pink G irls. She served as a student assistant K athy played volleyball in her f resh man year. She also se r ved on various decorating and publicity c ommi tt ees for p lays and dances I n he r sen ior year, she was elected C a rn ival Q ueen K athy plans to attend Canal Zone College or !>.I onta n a Stat e University. majo r ing in element:lry eduCltion After college, s h e phns t o atte n d airline stewardess school. ALEIDA MONTENEGR O February 14, 1953 Colon, R epublic of P :lnama M onry" atte n ded C H S for t \",O years She was a memocr of the Sp anis h Club and part icip3 t cd in volleyball 3nd basketb3ll intramur:lls. M onty pla n s t o attend college and pursue a career as a computer pro gram mer. WILLIAM A M URPHY July), 1953 Fayett eville, North Carolina M urph attended C H S for ["wo years. H e participated in bas ketball int r a mu r als and varsity basketball and football. H e was a c tive in ROTC, and a memocr of the Boys' D rill Te3m H e was seleCted out s tan d i ng [ vII for the fourth nine weeks H e was also a memocr of th e sen ior priv i lege commi t tee. "t-.lurph" phns to specialize in electronics in college DON ALM E O L SEN June 6, 1953 \'Qhit efish, M ontana D on was active in the sportS prog r am :H C HS. participating in var s i t y f ootball and sw i mming and football intramurals. D on plans to at t e n d Canal Zon e College. :lnd perhaps transfer to an oceanographic sch ool. NEI L CLiFFTON PATTON Febrllary 7, 1 952 Colon, R epub lic of Panama Neil was onc of C H S's most ou t st:lnding 3thktes. H e participated III vars ity baseball. (rack. and football. and lettered every year. H e was selected most valuable player of the 19<>9-70 school year, and also made th e All Zone Footb:lll T e:lm. Neil plans to occome an avi:ltor or a den tist. JANE M A R Y P AULSON Ap,;1 10, 1953 An con. C3nal Zone j ane part icipated in volle yba ll. basketball, and speedball Lntramurals. S h e worked on committees for the Sadi e H aw kin s Da ) D :mce and the j r.-Sr. Prom jane plan s to 3ttend sec retarial schooL 73

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74 )\. Toby R2.y Phillip s J osephme Muie P orbes I ngrid P o nier = ROBERT RANDOLPH PHILLIP S AltJrch 16. 1953 M ontgomery. Abb am:t Roben has been in CI-IS (or duct: },C; lfS. :md in thi:; lime. had become presidenc of t he C arib<: Club. Vit(" Pr c:;idcm of the N HS. a "C" Club member. President of the Senior Cia!!!!. :'Ind ROTC B:Ht:l.lion Extcuti"c Offi cer. H e lettered in foo lball :md tv.' icc in baseball. H e also atlendcd the Univer:.ity of F lorida for a N S F program. ::Ind : m cnd ed th e P ost-gradu:tte Sch ool :H fo,.lomerey. Californi:t. R obert P lans 10 study pre-bw :md th e n go on to L aw School. TOBY I,AY PHILLI P S Dfcembfl" 7 1 953 Burg:tw, N o rth C:lfotin:! This 11:I.s been T oby's first yea r in C H S :md h e has kucred twice in tr:lCk Hi s fuwre pbn is 10 become:1 !lurine biologist. JOSEPHINE MARIE PORIJES )/11/(' II, 19.53 N e w Orl eans, Louisi:lIl:l. J os ie h3s 3ucnded C:1nal Zone Sch ools for rwo years. A fter g radua cio n s h e phns [0 ge t 3 job and phns on goi n g 3he3d with her mu sic31 edUC3tion in p i 3no and c h orus. I NGRID PORTIER September 28. 1953 Djabrr3, I ndonesia Ingrid ha s attended C H S 311 through her high school years She was assistant s tage m:lna ge r in th e ph)', "B ell. Book. 30cl Candle" :lf1d T he Bhc k Fbmingo .. She pl:tns [0 go [0 th e Statts 3nd get a job. '"Actually, it ::"lS worth breaki n g my leg just to bc :lble to put my fee t up in Me. B oc k' s c b ss:' co mment s senior, \'(f all y Ru sso n

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D:mn y Rly R obinson Picture Not Available Jam es H.Sp:mgkr Ne stor J ohn R odriguez Jacqueline Faith Springer C HRIS BAilEY RIC HARDSON December 26, 1952 Seattle, \X/ashington Chris participated in var sity and intramural volleyball during her three ),ears at C HS. She received a Dri ver of the year" award for the year '69-'70. In her senior )'ear, she was sponsor of"E" company Chris was married :md plans to continue her education JASM I N ANNA RIVERA October 31, 1953 Cham, German), J asmin was a member of the French Club at CHS. Following gradua tion, she plans to attend college, major in languages, and then travel. DANNY RA Y ROlliNSON April 20, 1953 Covington, Kentu cky D ann), was a member of the Tradewind Staff, the Caribbean Sports P arachute Club, the Civics Club, the Drama Club, and the choir. H e played basketball in his sophomore year. Dann), plans to attend college i n Texas Kenrucky, or North Carolin3. NESTOR J O H N RODRIGUEZ September IB, 1953 Sancur ce, P uertO R ico NestOr has attended C H S for twO and a half years. H e plans to srud)' mu sic and architecrure :tfte r graduation. KARE N lYNN SCHill April 25, 1953 Galion Ohio T his was Karen' s first ) ear at C H S She was a member of the Span. ish Club, the G.A.A., and the newspaper staff. In ber senior ),ear she was editor of the second page (editorial page) of the Tr:ldewind. She also played tenni s in her freshm:ln and senior ) ears. Karen plans to major in medical technology at Canal Zone College. NAI YUEN September /7, 1953 t-.I:tcau. China aiYuen has :mended C H S for tv.'0 years. H e hopes to become a chemist. H SPA GlER Mar(h lB. 1953 San Ped ro, California Thi s was jim's first year at Crist0bal High School. H e participated in intramural and varsity track at his former school. After graduation. J im plans to become an automobile mechanic. JACQUELINE FAI T H SPRII GER Dfftmber B, 1953 Ft. Eustis. Virginia Jackie was a member of the Caribe Club. She marched with the Girls' Drill T eam. and in her Senior year. was the sponsor or"E" com pany. Jac kie plans to become an x-ray technician 75

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7. Doug! R oben SrCVrM Eligio Frrnando Thoma, DOUG LA ROBERT STEVE S Aprtlll, 19)3 Panlilmlil City, Republic of Panlilmlil D oug was a member of the pan ish ,and, Language Llilb Clubs_ I n his senior year, he served 3S h l stonan of the first, 2nd vicepresidem of the Jaw:r H e lClIercd In baseball In both his Junior and 5Cnior years Doug pl2ns to. attend col lege In Texlils. mliljonng m lang.uages :md history with plans for 2 oreer In the dlplom :w( corps ELI 1 0 FERNANDO T H OMAS january 7, 19)1 Panama City, R epublic 0 Panama Eligio was active: In ROT C at C H and In his senio r year, w:u commander of the boys' Drill H e also par. ticipated In junior varsity Ehglo plans to JOin the army, : md perhaps later attend college. LEWIS EDWARD VALDEZ Not,ttl/ber 19, 19'3 Philadelphia, Pcnn .. ylvania ROT and dramatIC., have occupied much of Lewis' time in high school H e auended Leadership School and participated in Th espian produCtIons. H e played football In junior )ear, and wa\ also elected to the Nati onal H ono r Society 10 attend college. and pedups later Join the army JOSE F VALENCIA Jllllt8,19l1 an JU.1O, Puerto RI(o joe wa\ :I mc'mber of the V;tr\1ty baseball, track. and swimming Icarm l ie abo ,I(IIVe in ROTC marching on the B oys' Dnll TeJm, ;md m h ... '!emor )e.r. serving as exewll\,c o(fiu;r of ","" Comp.lO), Joe plans to attend Brookl)'n College In l'W York DANIEL PAUL VALENTI E O"obI, n, 19)1 DetrOit. 1).1011), was the )e,lrbook pho tographer for four )ears. H e wall .1 hOn1('roolll :lhcrn:Hc In ninth and tenth grades, :tnd tn Junior )e.Ir, .!ocrved treasurer of the SA He wa, :11'>0 .1(ti,(' tn ROT D,lnn, plans to attend college, jOin the Air Force. Jnd .l clreer in the fidd of avia-r-__ Lcw_"_f:dwud Valdu lion JOK F Vairncia SYLVIA ANN O lt",/l1I I, 19H New Orleanll. 1..oul,i,lO.1 S)'lvia was .1 member of the Aldell lub and sened ;}, histon.1n for one \c'ar She pl.t)'ed In the C H S band tor four and \\l'! .1 member of the TradewlOd St'lff She on \ mou'! d.tnte and was a \,u .. lt) thetrle.lCler In her senio r ,e.l(. SVI\'l.1 pi am to major in bw at L .SU. R oS(man' Christian. Beale, Hila Ll'man. The attractive senior float wa .. a ajor attraction at the HomecomlOg Pade. LI DA ALICE VEST NOlembfr 6. 19.52 Ft. Clayton, (:lOal Zone KE NET H \XI ALLENIUS Aprrl n 19)2 HeiSlOkl. Finbn d TERRY LEE W AI.LlNE NOlember 22, 19'3 Fort M cClellan. Alabama Terry participated In swimming and water polo, H e was active in ROTC a member of the Color GU:lrd in hi s jun. ior year, and of the Bo)'s' Drill Team in lIcnior )'ear. Terry plans to a([end college 10 Calrfornia. majoring in ar chitecrural engineering KAREN WESTERBE R G Augwi lJ, 19.53 Flint M ichigan D uring her high school all of them C HS. Karen was :I member of the Caribe Club. the team. the Girl s' Chorus, and the Tradcwind Staff 1 \ fter grJdu:!tion, she plans to study computcr programming )E Y DEL I-oIILAGRO W I RTZ Mar(h 18, 19.5/ San j ose, Costa Rica J enny was a member of the Spanish Club, .lOd served as treasurer during her Jumor and semor years She p:lfll(i pated In varsity volleyball durrng her frcshman and sopho more years. j enny plans to become a nurse PRICILLA ANN ZA V I NSKY January 22,19.53 T errell, Texas This was P enny's" first year at C H S She was a member of the Nurses' Aides Club I n her junior yc:u, she reo ceived a $25 savings bond for her bookkeeping. Penny plans to attcnd Fayetteville Beaury College Pn cill a Ann Zavinsk), 77

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78 laces WitHout lacts R:.tlph E nder Akxis Norm :mdi:.t Grorgc Scheibe O H'ic T cves Alld lacts WitHout laces M I C H AEL R ANDREE JUNe;, 1953 Annapolis, tvl:trybnd .IDAVI D RAY MOND DIAZ September 9, 1953 Baltimore l\l:trybnd David played vusity football during his junior year ,H .C HS, : md helped pbn the J :1mboree party. H e plans to ;l.t(end 1('(hn1(:11 school after graduation_ DANI E L WESLEY F E RGUSON JUlie 26, 195/ t-.lacon, Georgia RICHARD ALLEN KRESGE October 9, 19.53 Ancon, Canal Zone Ricky plans 10 mend trade schoo l afler gr:ldu:llion. THO MA S ADDISON PURS L E Y july 9, 1952 Suffern, New Y ork Tom was anive i n SPOrtS duri ng his high school years. p:micip at ing in intramur: d footb all and wrestling, :lIld pbying on Ihe var siry football team. H e was :1 member of Ihe "C'. Club, and in his senio r year. served :lS sec r et:lty. H e was also :1 member of Ihe lvl:uh C l u b and the RiOe Team :md was :lcl ive in ROTC. T orn pbn s to :Jtte n d I he United States M ilitary A cademy al \X'est Point. New Y ork. DANNY D ALE TWEEDY Df(('mber 23, 1 952 Viclcrville, Cal i fornia D:1nny was a homeroom rep resentative in his sophomore year H e plans to enter an apprenticeship progr:ull in T ucson, A rizo na, pl:mning :1 clreer as a carpe nt er. M A R I A D E LOS ANGE LES ZAYAS jfUI/Wry 4. 1 952 M ayaguez, P uerto R ico M ar i:l W:lS a m e m be r of the Spanish and Pep Clubs She p l a n s 1 0 become a psyc h ologist.

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Sellior Joces Visplo!! .MOil!! .Moods . S[Cph:lOie lIJies John Martin, Dennis fl.hxwell ,.

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80 CaJlfera Captllres Briel (jliJlfps(s 01 Smior 'ole ... PARADES Ellie Blevins. J ane Paul son. R od Lindo. Sh ell ) L und. Carn;v:!.1 Queen K ath), M illigan. Denise F o shee. lI.\:J.;..well. Cath, G e rcich \X/ c nd ) Flores and I kd, Carter CONVER SATIONS Al c i da Montenegro .Jeanni e B asset, a nd Vivian B oseman AND CLASSES CLASSES. ELECTIONS A lm a Aus tin boa Bonne. I ngrid P ort i e r J enn\' \'\Iirtz. Is:t:tc H eres. Armand o Cab rera \Xlilli am lI.l urphy. Jane Paul so n. and George

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J II/roil/cillg . Jloll Of lame -eloss Of j71 . Mr. and Miss eJis .,Michael 'Dext e r 'Diane H a/iKe .,

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Most llttellectllol Robert PItiI/ips COIIO /1oolle Most ikelU ro SlIcceed .Michael 'Dexter 'Dellise Joshee .2

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nest ,CooKiNg JIII/dabllrk WClldl/ Jlores nest :Dressed Camfell Elltler Rodrigo ,Ciltdo 83

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84 Sest Voncers CarllfCIt Siltier Ralll Castro lriendliest .Hila ,{!Jllfalt 'J)Clfltis Maxwell VClfisc 'Jos/tcc

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Most Athletic Pats!! Allstin /Veil Patton Most /Jlld!! McCain :Donald H!!rd .5

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8. Also Presenting Up lSI Row: Itolx: rt Philli ps Mr. C HS, M os t Likel y T o Su ccee d ; S h elly Lund Miss C H S 211d Row: Mic hael Dexte r M os t I ntel l eCtual ; L ana Boo n e M os t Lik ely T o Succeed 3 rd Row: Ibul (astro -BeS t Dresse d ; \'\I e nd)' Flo r es -Bcs( Dr essed 4 tb Row: \Xlilliam Murph y -Wittiest, B est D ancer, Beth C:mcr -Iks ( Dan cer. jIb Row: J ose lvtcdina -Iks l P crso n : dity ; Sus:m Mcnd : mhall M os t Athletic. 6 ,h R()Iu: Allen H armon -t-f osl T alented: R od rig o L indo -BeS t Look ing And /Vot Pictllred. Wittiest Patricia (jlltierrez .Mark )farillg nest Persolttllity /lOll I!jomeb!f :Dellllis .Maxwell /(lIltlterS-lIp: Sandra Alber g:t -t-,' I ost InccllcCfml R osemary Chri s tian -Bes t Looking T oni Kl:tsovs k y B es t Dressed. Mo s t T alented Sher r y K ern \'Vitti e s "Cubby Clement M os t Athleli c Hib L y man -Iks l P c rson:tlir y

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.A time in tlte life 0/ enclt girl and bO!l .A time 0/ sorrow. and !let 0/ jO!l; (jrndllation realization brings. 0/ tlte end 0/ man!l tltings elnsses. dances. /ootball games will be no more. rite magic 0/ tlte Itiglt scltool !lear is 0 ) er rltollglt SOllfe Ilfa!l consider all tltings done. rlte!l soon will /cam Cife's jllst beglln 87

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jlllliors Sheil) \l"Pawt Brian l\h nh;l Michael Alberg' Alger Allen Anion Apochu PJ.u] Gkn B ubar.! l\ fiducl Jaunt B.lIId BJker B,mb B .lrger Bur;lt;l \X'illi.lm Fcmk Barbar.1 G e n : mne R obert Bdx: Bcrn B CI( ]u:r B].I!l (hc.:I I C I3loerner Jr. !\bnJ Rlllurd H enr" Debr,1 RILl B oont: Booth B m well Bo,l.lIld

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J anet L inda Carlos Catherine Man Brandenburg Brock Br own Carlisle C'ash Hden Che,) I J" Deborah Rand, Ca:MO Caudill Caudill Cheshire Frank Pamela V'mintl R oberta VCh,,,1 Ciu .. hccco Coad Cobb Cole Coleman t-.brk Sonia \'(I:1\ne htne Klrcn Collim Colon COUC) Cummings Curner '9

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90 S h eli:t D ;l.ncer Bren d a E gge r i\\.lfClem: G,lrnLr Gn:gon Goguen E milie D :tniel vCliffo,d Ferrel! )irnmv GLwln Ann GOIllJlcl J o hn D y Maria F ontanez William Gille s pie Z:tn Green \'V'illi:tm N:tnc y D c:tcon Jr. E dm o nson A ndre w F o s hee Steph:1!1 F uglebe' g N:tdia R o bles, ''The feminin e myslique al w ork!

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CLASS OFFICERS: H a rry Townsend (Vice-Pres ident) Cathy Carlisle (president), Patricia Paine (Treasurer) Jackie Parker (Secr e tary) Class A sse mbly. They were also respon s ible for the annual Junior-Senior C LASS SPONSOR MR. F I TE Prom honoring the graduating Seniors. The class of '72 was th e lar gest and one of t h e mOs t active and spirited classes of Cri stObal H igh School. Throu gh the efforts o f class officers the J uniors obtai ned an o pen lun c h o n Tue sdays a n d Thursday s of eac h week. Anothe r highlight of th e year was the selection of the class ring which was roun d with a gold StOne. T he Juniors will lon g r emember PSAT and NMSQT which are among the many tests they took in preparation for college. The girls in the Junior Class o rganized and presented a fashion show whic h d e m o nstrated the do's and don t s of pants wear. Juniors also planned and present ed a Junior Carol R oss Marian Kredell, Jackie Parker, Lynn Gregg, Sheila Alberga, Cathy Carlisle, Mary Norval. Titi Cole. Karen Currier, Nancy Edmondson. The do's and don'ts of dress wear. M :.tri:tn P:ttrici:t Grier Joseph Herring lUymond Gsell Hess Edwin Kenneth Hill II M:uk H:tnly WiJli:un 9,

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'2 J une IJund K atherine K raus K athleen t-.II.Gillxrry Jame s J:ackson t-.l:arian Kr edell J ohn Meeker D ouglass J effries Christina Loi7eaux Shyl:! t-.l iller P:l.Ul ette J ordi D onald t-.I:ms Michael i'.lin e h :ut Dani e l Knauss M ichael M cCann Dale Mitte !lllltiors (jroNted OpeN 'cliNch '(wite A Week Irma t-.l o n clo\a P atricia P:line J ohn t-.l usse r II Louise P!llmcr i'.bry Norval R onald P alser Beverl y Olsen Marc Park er Stanley O s ter D eborah P ate

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R obin Prith:1m Marl ene Rice Deborah Rowley Michae l Scot{ R onn i e Sills R aymond Ramos Susan Ridge Jose R ecio Randy R obinson Carmen Reed adia Robles Lourdes Re)'es Carol Ross elass Of J72 Picks Vel/ow Stolte lor /(iltU Josep h R omeski Arthur Scrig Jud ith Simm ons Juan Sanchez Higini:1 Shaffer V alar i e Simms Gar)' Sheii>< vjames Sh:lflt:x Jean Smith Frank Scon vStephen Shobe Michael Snider 93

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9. Reggie Soucherbnd Catherine Tcn\!illiger Robert Tschumy [o..tichaei \'(food /Juniors Visplay rlteir ralents At /Junior (lass Assembly Mattia Spagna Dorothy Terwilliger Carol Wertz Ann Worthen Aurelia \'(Iilliam s Susann Zachry The one and only, Bre nd a E gger! Maribel Zayas Mari so l Zayas

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Ernes t Ab r es h M ichael M cCann Sha r on Smith Ans tey Catl ett I rma M onclova P uuloa Teves J ean Smith. W ho's on a diet?" Not P;(/ufed: L ynne Goguen, J uan Gonzalez D ebra Gosney, P atricia H ill, R oger J ohnston, M axine L a R oche Will i am Le Doux, J oel L ee, Paul R hoads, R alp h R ichmond, D olo r es Santiago ,Catecollfers Douglas J effries I'm standing like this be cause there's no baJJ. L inda B rock, Ann Gonzalez, M ary Norval. T HREE FOR THE ROAD. '5

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SophoJl1ores Nitklld.l (iii Ste ph e n D o n n:! \/.1: UllC!) t-.I:lrily n A d.lIn, Apocbl.l A po nt e B:J.ke r B :lrr Baxt e r l ).lnn.l t-.t l lh:tel P.1U1 vjerr" IkunlOllrl Ih,ot B l.lnt hud B1ei(hcr Blevins 13.1rh.lr.l ...,I Rohm ;/P,lIn Jdlrc\ E d .... .lrd K athleen Bloemer BtKk Brid,\dl B ru: m Bnng:ts.Jr B r own j\lthnd.l V P.ltrlll' K:lrl K.Hhrvn "\/'Diane Bro wn B r o w n Bumh B u rge Bu::.h C:afOl1 ).unn Lulu 0 \nl1 ../G cr: lld 'V'K:tthlc e n Childro, CiminO Grulh Collin Col o n C olpe

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/Lavera v'Leland vWanda v'Guy K alhie Marc Cook e Cummings Cummings Damiani Danielsen D enis Brian Jane J ohn / Judr Rosi!:!. Har!,) Deraps D ohle DohJe D ohle D ominguez Dowell V'Joseph K ath!,)'n vRathleen Edna Esteli!a Pedro Ender Farrington Fauber Ferguson Ferris Fomanez Robert Ronald Lisa VN;na Cornelius F ord Fors}'t h Jr. Furr Gercic h Gibson Goeberrus Edward V1-ienry vPeter VPatrice Esther Olga Golden Goldmann Goldmann Gonier Gonzalez Gonzalez 91

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\/Dtbr:l .,fRo, .,fRo) T o m th e TIGER' Go .. nn (jut( Gregg G:,e11 1.1mb V'\J,lnO V Lmd:t D<.:nnis l i n .. I lorn Iluft H urlbut lXhor.lh ./JU\C l\f Lthdl" VP,ol j.lkt-Ul ./uhn\on Kn .. kr K ilmcr vi K,;lLt John &ot I':r.lu" Llsher Ix<.: v'Bn.m v L.lwr<.:nl<': ,(E dl
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SOpH0Jl10re 'lIon! In }ioJl1ecoJl1ing Pnrnde CLASS OFFICERS, Beth W,;n;o (v;ccpresident), Nancy Ridge (president). Debbie Meeker (Sec.-Treasurer). Thi s year's sophomore class was outstanding -both as a group and as individuals. ScOtt Loizeaux and Paul Bleicher received High Honors during the first semester. Th e sophomore class was active both in special class acriviries and school events as a whole. They organized a float for the Homecoming Game Parade, choosing Debbie Meeker and Jan Janosik as their represenratives. In cooperation with the Freshman class, the sophomores sponsored rhf Freshman-So phomore dance on February thirteenth. Ted Scott and Barbara Bloemer became king and queen for the evening. Another sophomore worrh)' of mention is Edythe Marsh -winner of rhe lONon-French Student" contest sponsored by the French Club during the French Week. The enthusiastic sophomore offi cers planned several exciting events for the spring. Marri:mne Verruno Proud \'(Iinner of Nobel An Award" Judy Dohle. Practicing f o r (he future'

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Kathryn Smith. "Maxis forever!" Ada Oni? P au l Peralta Warren Phillip s Rosa Perez Bett y Queen vElena Maxwell J udith Menges VBarbara Moody Viana O:me:a I I I Sheila M ayan i linda rvlerrick Manuel Mun oz T erri Overs tree t Paul Bleicher tries his lund at {"yping. \ M:ark M cKenney vPeg,gy Mdler R obert Nordstom vPeter P:lCheco vDebra M eeke r J ack M o hlman M y rta Olivera Elizabeth P alser

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Debra M eeker, "You can't say she wa sn't Els:l. S:l.nchez Vickie Schaub Theodore ScOtt Al Simms Paul Sanchez)r Diane Schloredt Pedro Simmons v.Joseph Smith 101

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102 SophoJl1ore elass eonsists 0/ J 4 J Students James Collins An example of utmost con(entratlon \. Jose Toro vM:uia Toro Elizabeth \'('aimo Luann Ware M,man Crouch. "'\,ho .. an I'm umomtort abJcj Vl\brilnne Verruno \ .. / Martha Vest Susan Willis vLinda \'(foods oscmarj Betancourt. I \OU'" Patri c i a Snider Yvonne Thoma s Mary Spivey Judith T omlinso n Michele Kessler. I f I could ani) under stand (his!"

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,CntecoJl1ers Jeff Brien Bullinger Melinda Bro wn \/George Cruz OT P I CTURED : Juan Bue n v\Xlilliam Branner III Carl Cout s fo.lari:m Cr o uch R obin Hartsh orn Jan Jan osik vAng elin c L a R oche Ange l Torre s vDamaris Torres H enr) D ingman V"Toni T orres Elaine Dus in R,lph Zach:w, Edy th e Mar s h Kath y Bro wn Michele K essler "Come n o w it can't Ix that boring," M ardcnc Garner, Patrice Gonier ., Are you [wo ti p'f
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lres/tmel1 Ch:trles Deb or:th J ohn \ '\filli:tm Sus:tn v6on,ld Alberg,l Alberg' A lex:titi s A ndree A rb :lUg h Au:>(in Carol Evelvn R odger ChristOpher P : lUb D:l.Vid Baker Barr,ln Beak Bensen B bnchclcc Bleic her Arna ldo Carl Ch3rlOtte G eo rge A,lIncb vGur:t Bonill:! B ower' 130\ bnd Br:tnnen B ridwtll B rcx.k R obert Amocr vDcbD D o n:l.ld D ebr:'! filiz:lbelh B rockm:m Brown Brown Br o wn Budd ./ Leo }'bn Jeanne D cborJh Al: m 00< Butcher Ihrd C:llk1n!! Carc), Chc!!hire Chn.'>ti.1!l 10.

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\,\ /illi:l.m R enee Debn Alexis James Anne Ciccolo Clicue Cae Colcm:J.n Crouch L:l\"cd:t l>.t ichelle 0'1:l.rk Ted Vfncem:t Ra\'mond D ancer Dar,) D a\'ib. D eaton D el Busto De Vault Rlmon Kar e n Vfrina Thom:l.s Ste\en Clifford D iaz Fauber Finneman Fors}th Gabriel R ebecca l>.bri:t B:lrb:u:I vKarcn D :tniel Chrissl Gewin Gonnl0 Goodwin Goulet Green Gn:gon Grego!,) F r:tncisco K:tf:tn Kimberl, B rian Cynthia Gri s t H amilton Hlrden H artshorn Held\ Heath lOS

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Iris H crn:mde7. A nne H e rr ing Mar cia H umphreyJYamela H usband L eif I rion \..-/1enny jimenc7 Willi am jimene7. 03mes jones Kar en J ones Sandra K aufer Cheryl Kresge DJ \'id L ee Victor Lee Ann Loyd Laura Lucts Tony Lyons Kim f..1arohl 106 M elody H offman H oll B ruce jackson Jd}' ce J anosik J ames H uffman vI'f ichael Jeffr ies E ager F res h men impossible 10 hold still. D eshea M ason S:mdra f..l:!y ifusan M ccullough

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March 25 Speedball vame vives lreshmeN ChaNce Z'o Show Class Spirit Cherri Hieronymus (secretary-treasurer). Victor Lee (presidem). Carol Baker {vice president}. The freshman class this year panicipated in {he H omecoming parade, the Freshman-Sophomore Brawl the Fresh-Soph Speedball Game, and the Fresh-Soph Dance. The Freshman Queen, Laura Brock H er escort was Phil Miller. R eigning at the dance was Princess Carol Baker and Prince Fred Wanio. The Speedball game was held on March 25. The Freshman girls played the Sophomore girls, and half time emertainrnent was provided by the Cheerleaders "Be sure you get all the crumbs off" I f you ask me, I think ),ou [v"Q h1\'C it all wrong'" John Dohle. Gerald Coffin. \'Vill ),ou StOp goofing off and get to work?"' Sandy May "This is really groo\"yl" 107

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108 ......t\ntotN."'.1 o..",lC)l .. n v1v.nNomut.d .. n..-.. Onor."dl \'\ /ayne \'{/est lobon VLtId.Mc ..... nhlJ joIuI.'ln .... P""o .'1.,. b Podro.'1"",Iu .. J .tot.'1o.>r< vCn"ob J .'1.IIOJ "Smlight down the hall. the last room on the r i ght." v'IXInd.On" )o<,.P.dro M.n."" P l"..., .. Port... ltJ"lN., o.londollcu.

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Tonyllobul ..... !.-I!IIrullobln Sho"Jlluof!" A"",,,lIy'kdt< fTc So ... k. .. s.. ... hc. I th o u g ht all I ndi a n s w e r e o n r eserva t ions these d:lYs! s.. .... s .. -.nwom \...--Do.MiT". K.,...InT ..... V "koTip
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).mt,V.!cnun R.mon". V,dro r""Wo..cknlx<, W ... ", I reall y h ope it works," PlUla Vaught, Renee Cliette. "Let's !lee. l few boiling (hips. or WlS it Slit (f".,''>uis?'' ......".ul.V.u8 h vK"h."n
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,CntecoHlers NOT P ICTURED, Ra),mond Abele. Randy Amburn, Carl Bowers. Earl Bundy, Elizabeth C imino, Michael Evans, Ester Gonzalez. Lorraine Guilfoy l e, Mark H oner baum Bobby H ughes, R onald H urlburt Debbie Carey, Cherrie H ieronymus "We are IS going on 21?" Charlotte Boyland. I juSt hope that b:l.l1oon can take It'" Vicky TiptOn "How did I ever get suck in this rut?" '"

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Seventh ;Ind Eighth (Jroders ;Ire F'Oll! R Oll: R ober! l \lI\UI1. I..lwrentc f'..l oolh1c r R ogcr \X/c lth. \Xfilli:ml Cron:IIl, J effrcv Clrwithen. Ricky i'o.l:trio Ubben. Cml e r R ow: 1\1.lf(c1.1 1\1.lf,I..(.lricoi Z.lmJrrip.l. Noree n K.lukr. l .ind.1 l .ni/l:.;luX. K.lron j\l ittl'. Don, Tomlin. E ileen R oble" i\ l ary ivlil1s, SUS:l.11 t-.lcndo/,\ nul R oll': Chen I \'(/i1I i:llm, Jame!) D extcr. P .unU,1 S.lIllht,/. J ohn l3.lrrllt'.IlI.Ir. i\ 1 :Jfg.lfl:t Bmlbury. L C!llic Gih!lon. Amhony \'<':lre. JU:1n CI.lr.UllUnt. i\ lug.lrlcl Young. Fml1( Rllu. I\lurr,l\ \X'ehh. J.IIlK' I\l.lrk Peru,'>(.', R n J.1Il' cn. P.1lI1 Ant onio StOtc. / \ngc::l Gnur R Oil': G:lil Gregg. B il he Bro\\n. KllnlX'rl, <:hri"'1I,II1, R(;tH:c N ;\\. :-.l.ln 1 0 Ikile. K.lIhennl' i\1c\er l3.uk Clfol FIlIh:lrt\, Gloria Olivarez. Lind:!. ('.lrLl.I. 111(: .... BlItkr. Yvonnt "imlth. \l.lddinc P up\..... LlIld.1 St.lmper, LdtIXh e. Pn)(..db HlI .... b.md. E \('l\n \,\ /ithrow, "'htil.1 B r.Lnnnn. L lI.mll{: ... \\i .... ht:r

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Overwhelmed With riger Spirit Frollt Row: D oyle Dancer Jr., A ndrew \ '(Iick, P atrick D :tniel. J ody Shon. J ohn Bridwell. Andrew N orval, Albn R odriguez. emler Row: Y olanda H unnicut. N oreen Will, D esiree Budd.J:tnct K a t sumotO, D on n:!. R eifsn},der, j ulie t-.l oe bus. Btlrk Row: R oben Ramirez, Steven Boswell, Leste r For sg ren D L a P o n a Jr., R obert Au s t in, D :tvid Mitte, J oseph W e i c h ert, Anth o n y Spooner, Kurt Bullin ger. Fro m Row: D on:tld J effries Jr.. T homas G:tbriel. R i ch:ard H oagland R obert Nicholson. Alberto \ '\Iilmont. \ X/alter Guilfo yle, Thoma s \'G'ilder. R obert f..IO:HS. J ames C:lmpbell. CmlrT R o u': Cher y l Evans. P :uricia Calpe. Marilyn Barnett. Carmen Bring as. N:t)'ra r.. l on, Kay Housley. Kim berl)' \'(Ioodcoc k P:mi c j l Lord K ip H o lloway. 8fUk R ow: R obert Bradby. Charles l\l urphcy, Diane Ruoff. R:l.mirez. Anne Richardson, K aren i'-IcKo wn. Ameii:J. Smith. L i s andra R uiz. D iane Baker. Denni s Stephens. Theodore De Boor. 113

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" Forrrr -e!' Fm/ Rou': Steven Brock R obert D:ty, Mi ch:ld D e V :lUh. Bry:m Simpkins. E dward Stroop, Mich3e1 Collins. R icky \X/ilson. Second Row: D onn:! Deat on. Sh3wn Ander son, Elizalx:{h Smith. P ushpa ivl ayani, R uth H udgins, Brenda G oodwin. tvhr gare{ \Xleigart. tvl:ir gare t j:lk e tic. M arcia Coffin. TJ)lrd R o w : Paris Mcilwain. Nancy \'(Ihit (', Stephanie t-.' I o w ery. Dev on)' D andridge. Tild:l. Edw:l.rds. Vielka T om. Sh:l.ron M cCann Glend:l. t-lik:l.. Fm/ RolL': SCOtt Parker. Rich:ud Sth:lUb. Anthony Burbine. Glen H ess. Jimmy Cash. Les lie R ecio. J eff G csney, M ike R o mer o. Second Row: N:l.nc) \Xliliford. Laura Gregg. P3t D oris H ogaboam, Terri Brown. t'--briorie Bbir. Di:l.na R uiz T I)lrd Rou': M ike CliCHe, R obert \'(Iil mont. Ra, \'(Ih eeier. John Shobe. Steve K:l.rdonski. David Thompson. R obert F ern:mdel. D:lvid \'(I oods John t-I oncivais, Alex Nieve s Dave Farnsworth. Eunice Zachry, Gnd, Apod:tGl

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t lrJl RoUl: P e t er B a rr. M i k e R idge, G r eg Coo per. C h eyenne R ivera R o bbie Currier, Geo r ge Fryer. Ric h:u d D o well. Second Row: K ath y B 3imer Vioianda God i nez K ath y r V l urph y P att y Valentin e M ar y R i chmo nd. L i s bet C oc, K a th y D ex t e r T hird Roul ; B arb ara Y e rxa. Ann O Don n el Elisa B rown, Ph i l i p \Xlilkins, Sue Gilbert V i cki M a)" Mlrio P in o, Plt Newbur y Les lie i co laiso n Cath y Perret E v el y n H e rnand ez, Ann M ills, C h e rr i Schwindt. Fin! R o w : R ene R a m irez. R obe rt o Y ou n g NestOr Hernlndez, B rian McC a nn G eo r ge M edina Dee D i lli n J o hnny o tt R eggie R obin so n Seco nd R o w : t-.l i k e O r r eg o Vic k i K i)'on:1g.t. D e bra H u g he s t-.I:trg aret K i enz l e S usie M u n oz, B arbarn H iggins, \X/a h er Cummings. Third R o w : \ '(/ a),ne D l iley P atric k M ood),. Dln R e i f s n y d e r R oc k y L u ger. Eddi e 501:1s. J ose Veg:!. Fra nk R o rk e. Bill Vest, Carl A nderson. 115

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"6 Fron! R o w ; Bill)' S c ott. K arl Simm s Carl os Co ronad o L uke Green. Steve Barger. Mik e M c D on nell. Centf r R o w : Ann a Summeriin, j osefa G on zale s J>.lary M o n civ:tis C:tr o line Pric e She rry H ill. j o anne Baro nn e Sonia Tellefs en. E1izaiX'th Snider Bar k R o w : S:tr:th R osado, L awrence Escobido. H ubert H ammond, Michael D oc kery. CI)'de Adams Steve H erring R oiX'rt L ee. D eborah H arden Fro llt R ow; Anthon), Parker, Angel T oro. R obert D a)" R obe n OSlcr. S C OI! P arker. R u ssell Gille s pie Cente r R o w : John A u s tin R o bert Aus tin. R eggie Robinson, K arl S imms. T homas Gabri e l Mike R omero. George Deje sus. B t l c k Row: Cheye nn e Rivera, C arl os Coronado, Geo r ge Medina Steve Bro ck, Alfred Sandroc k Eward M o rr ell, Mari o Pi n o, P aul B aker, Glvnn M oo re. 7 Front Row: Mark P r use. Pat D aniel. A nt h o n y S poon er, Alocno Wilmont, Roben Cu rri er. Gle n H ess. eenu r Roll': N estor H em.mdcz. J dfrey Carwi th en. J ohn Cnl z J ame s Dexter, j ames F auber, C r a i g D ohle, W illiam Allen S t eve Bugcr, Ale x i s Nieves. Bark R Olli: J ame s Bird, Clrde A dams, R obert \,{/i1mont, Bill Vest J oh n B:trriteau. D .wid Alge r David Gonier. Philip \Xfilkins, t-..l icluel R idge. S/lle Scores Victory Over void F ootball has alway s been an ex tremel y popular spOrt with the junior high sch ool boys at CHS. This y ear, for rhe first time they p layed regula. tion II-man football. I n September, over eighty seventh and eighth grade boys tried o m for the team. Of these, fifty six were chosen and divided into tw O teams the Blue and the Gold. The two teams p r a cticed on alternate days and competed against o ne anoth er in three games. The first game ended in a tie, with a score of 6-6. The Blu e Team won the remaining games, with scores of 22-0 and 14-6 re s pectively. Outstanding player s for the Blue T ea m wer e: George M edina (quarter back) Glenn Moore (fullba c k) Mari o Pin o ( end ) and linemen Paul Baker Alfred Sandrock, R egg i e R obin so n Mic hael R omero, Carlos Coro nado and Edward Morr ell. Outsranding player s for the Gold Team were : Alexi s Nieves (quart e rb ac k) Philip Wilkins (fullba c k) Cra i g D ohJe (nan ker) and linemen James Bird, Mi chae l Ridge, R obbie C urri e r D avid Alge r and Bill Vest.

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Skit Opel1s ;Natiol1al fful1iof J/0110f Society Jl1itiatiol1 On December 17, five new members were initiated in the arionai Junior H onor Society. The old memo bers presemed an amusing skit, explaining the gualities of scholarship, leadership character, cicizens hip and service r equired for membership in this o rgani zation. F ollowing the skit, a capping ceremony was held The selected s tud ems were escorted to the stage for the [caditional candlelighti ng ceremony. Mr. prau congratu l ated the newly initiated eighth-g rader s and presenred them with pin s and certificates of member ship. A reception, honoring the new member s and their proud parent s was held in the home economic s room following rhe ceremOn)f, The arional Junior H onor Sociery held its spring initiation in March At that time, seventh-graders were e l igible for membership. Mari o Pi no, Marglret Kienzle C:Hhy Perret. Barbara Baite!. and Sheryl Smith HAPPY MO ME T Me Pfau hand s out cenifi cHcs of member ship to the initiates. Parent s of the initiates relax :u the recep ti on. Alfred Sandrock. Cherri Danielsen, Susan Gilben, and Bri:m M cCa nn 'The) call us the BRA I S!" Brian M cCann. Cherri D anielsen, Sus:m Gilben,j:mna Loizeaux, Alfred Sandrock, and Kath leen Dexter Old members Wlit patienth to begin the tlpping 117

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11. /Junior Jliglt :Debate flub Presents Assembly T he J unior H igh D ebate Club was organized in an effon to provide S[Udents with an opportuniry to express their thoughts and feeli ngs on various issues. t-.lany of th e tOpics disclissed wer e based o n events c urrently in the news. The s pon so r o f rhe club was Berger. This year rhe Debat e Club deb3led for the different Junio r H i g h h o me rooms. The s tudent s served a s judges of rhese debares. The club als o pres ented an assembly for the entire Juni o r Hi g h s tudent body. The judgment of this debate was left to the audience. Susan Gilbert, Lori F lore s Mar g:tret J aketic, D onna R eifsn y der. Beth B leicher, Sheila Baran nan "Now what was 1 s:lying?" Sillillg: L ori F l ores { vice. pre s ident) Cheri D:lniel sen (president), Susan Gilbert { secretar y } Cl'Il/fr R Olli; Susan Styles. Sheila Br : lnnan, M argaret Jaketic, Beth B leicher, Donna Reif snyder, J osefa Gonzalez Mr. Berger ( sponso r) Btlck Row: Valerie Owen, Clove r Shobe, Sonja Tel!efsen J anna loizeaux, Deborah H ughes. Carl Ander sen, Philip \ Xfilkins, A l fred Sandro ck. Front Row: J a mes Snider, L eslie Sills. Nelson San c hez, Ru ssell Gille s p i e, Edward B lount, F r:tnci sco B urac, Surse Pier point. Center R ow: M elanie Hames, Vickie Alger,Janet tvl ize, Barbar:t Chavez, B arbara Blizni k. Sylvi:t Voight, Gnd)1 \Xfatso n B tlck Row: Andre P erret Leo Cimino D ino ScOtt. \Xfilliam Tschumy. Don:tld T omlin Bru ce Hunter, Roben O s ter.

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Fro nt Row; M ichael Cain, Paul A ustin. Lonnie Allen, Paul Loibl, Angel Toro, Arm :mdo Luna. R icky Diaz Second Rou'; Kim \'(felty. J ackie J o h nson, Gl o ria Good. Susie Riggs. Lucy Blount, Shtrly Smith. Julia R obertson, Nob Swi:m, Soni a Thomas. Back Row; M ichael Smith. Paul Baker M ike O sborn, Jimmy B ird. Carlos Gierrero, Carlos B y moc, Eddie t-I orrell. Front Roll'; Garry ll und t-l i chael \,(filli3ms. George Dejesus. Jeff Hoffm3n, Dean Couts. Lori Flores. t-laurie Moore, Susan Styles. Center ROil.'; Charles H ughes. jvlichtle Vre) '. Jimm) Feelev, Buddy Fauber. J:met Santiago. t-I:tr y Fluh3rt}, Jill Paul son. Back Rout: Billy Kern. Jose Rodri guez, V31dez Ch3\ 'is, Susan Austin. Sarah P olire. Pegg y \'( fhipple, Cheri D::mielsen. Cind) Runi on. Ralph Stone. O:tvid Evans. Guy \'(fese 119

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120 Fronl R ow: Michael B os well Anthony P arks, John Cruz, John K iyonaga, B arry Simpkins, Craig D ohle, Roben Bram lett. Cmll' r R ow: Deborah J:hker, A da Norman dia, J anna Loizeaux, Clo\;er Shobe, Cynthi a Smi t h, Sheri J an et Br o wn Back Row.' Davi d Gonier, J o'11I1 Ste ph e n s. Gary J uan L aboy. Glynn t-.l oore. Alfr ed Sandr oc k George B rann.ln. P .wl G:trner Fro m R Olc J o hn Co llins. Rl(k y Ph ares, J im M cC arri ck. Barney Nono n, D u k e Co llin s, J o nathan Br o wn. R :mdy Goss. L uke Skr:t ble. Cf11ftr R o ul. Gary F erns. Thom3s Sni der Yveue R odriguez. Clara Stone. Beth Bleiche r Angel 0liver3. R a lph Vas'luez. Btlck Roll': J o hn Aus tin. R ichard R :lmos, D:ln K elly K e l vin Gregory Juan Viera J a ck T ate J :tllles Am : l so n F orest Kin sey, Gus Co r onado, John Dav i so n Frolll R ow: P aul Lucas, Da vid / \ I ger. J oc Phillips, R o n :dd Gri s t, \X!'illi:lI11 All e n een U r Row: Valeri e Owen. Patricia DeVault. An d rea P3c h eco, Eliz:locth R iverJ. Alice F erns. Barba r a B3itel, Ann R utledge Btlck Row: R ita Castro. Ka ren Tahey. Tim Bo caneg r : l Bonni e \,\ / ill is, L inch H erna ndez. K :lren D e Boor, Aicb R odriguez.

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junior Jlig/t Student Association Serves As Unifying gorce gor Students Front Row: K athleen Dexter, James D exter. She rry Schwindt. B(lCk Row: M r Cheshire ( spon. sor ) B r ian M cCann, SUfse Pierpoint, Linda Garcia. Patry Valentine. Pan), Colpe, J anet K at sumoro, K aren Minc, Barbara Ycrxl, Debbi e Hard en. Sus:m Austin, Euni ce Zachry, P:micia Sanchez, Carmen Bringa s. Nancy White. Front Row: Charles H ughes. Dee Dilli an. Mark Perusse. Allen R odriguez. l\l:trk ovak. K athy M urphy BfICk Rou' : Donn:! R eifsnider. Sheib Br:mnon. l\lrs. T anner. Glenda Mika K athy Meyer. M:tr garet Jahtic. Surse Pierpoint. A nne Richardson. Margaret \Xlhipplt. Ruth H udgins, K athy Balm e r Debbie H ughes. Barbara Ycrxl. Sherry Hill Sherry hwinclc. The Srudenr Associarion is the backbone of any school. This is true of the junior as well as the senio r high school. T he CristObal J unior H igh School Student association served as a unifying force for the sru dents and afforded them an opportu nity co voice t heir thoughts and opi n ions on various issues. Through the S.A., students were able co participate actively in th e government of their schoo l and thus aid in making it a more pleasant place in which to learn. The year 1970-71 was a highly suc cessful o n e for Cristobal's Junior High Student A ssoc i ation. Continu ing from the point it stopped last year, it went on to make this an active and excit i ng year. Amon g the activities plann ed and carried oue by rhe S.A. we r e th e Blue and Gold Intra mural F ootball games, and various drives and dances held throughout the school year. The Zephyr was the J unior H igh counterpart of the C H S Tradewilld. The staff was composed of sevenrh and eighth g r ade stude nt s interested in learning th e fundamentals of jour nali sm while pro viding a valuable ser vice co their fellow students. Under the guidance of their sponsor, Mrs. T anner, these students published a paper o nce each month. Each issue contained articles concerning events and tOpics of interest to junior high students as well as an advice column cartoons. and leners t o rhe editor 121

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122 N: mcy Edmonson ( Secre tary) r ... l ichael Dext e r de m ), p-l i c h:lel ;"kCa n n (Tr elsu r er). I ,Yo, S.A. encourages Student Partici (Pres ident ) Doughs J effries (Vice,P r e s i -T he S t udent A ssociat i o n ha s be e n a n import ant p:m of th e sc hool life at CristOba l Hi g h School for m a n)' years. I t \ vas o r ganized in 1 932 to e n courage th e exc h a nge of id e as a m o n g s tud ents, to c r ea te frie ndlier r e lati o n ships a m o n g s tud e nt s, and to in c r e a s e srude nt parti cipatio n in sch oo l a c tiv i ties. I t s primary purpose i s to f unctio n as an org ani z ati o n in whi c h s rud ents may pra c ti c e r e ali stic all y the ba s i c prin ci pal s o f democra cy and l e arn (0 h a ndle the res p o n s ibilit i es whi c h a cco mpan y th e privilege s o f s elf-governme nt SlfIl!1g: D rum m o n d l\kN.lUg ht o n .Jud v T o mlin:)on. Sher,] K ern. T oni K u h y i-.like [;" :lI1s. emit/' R oll': Di:l!1C' D :l11ccr K :Hhy FarringtOn. K a th\' Ch erri Ann Ricl B o vbnd. i-.1.11knc RI((:. lkth C:JI'{cr. Di:lnc H : wkc i3rl c k R oUl: E d war d Bring.l'>. Clurlo(((' b nd. G eorge R iver: .. R od Lindo Greg G o g uen. J ohn t-.bnin. G.l n Stileilx-, Gil J\pocbCl

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potion A/ter Riotous eampaign Michael M cCann. "Good things come in little p:Kkagcs!" Buddy Shorl.James Kunkel. B randt Irio n. and Denise F o shee "'Arc: y o u s ure Geo rge \\:Ia s h ingtoll stln ed Out thi s w :l.y) Rita Boyland. J ackie Parker. H eidi Sweeney, Beverly Olsen. B ri:m Allen. and Debra G o sney Ge orge. George. George of the Jungle Each yea r a nominating commin ee considers long and carefully 'he qualifications of various srudems and then seleCts th ose beSt sui t ed for the job as S A office r cand ida,es_ These candidates then emer the exciting compet i tion known as HCampaign \Xfeek." E ach candidate s rri ves to obtain the s tudent s' votes by han ging pos t ers, coining s l oga n s, and passin g out buttons and tags_ The highlig ht of ,h e week i s the campaign assembly, during which ca ndi dates and their man agers spea k and various amusi n g or informative s kit s are presented On election day, s tu de nr s vOte for th e Studen, ,hey feel is best qualified for the job, reaJizing that the election be respons ible for running CHS the foll o wing yea r is much more than a mere popularity conrest. Chri s Cox. '"I'm only doing it for a friend!" K atie and H anley "This doe sn"t co mpare with a mini bike tra d '23

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"4 Kaee lrofl1 vattllt (0 Pilta Jliflltliflltts ((e" eltlb J Ititiatiolt S"'IIlK' Andre\', F o,ht:t:. Spagna. Carl o.. Br<)\\ n. Il.m... Town,end. Abn>lh. Fr.lIlk Citdlttto. J/
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v.A.A. Composed 01 rop (firl Athletes The Girls' Athleti c A ssociation was the female equivalent of th e C Club. The members were g irl s who demonstrated outsranding a thl e ti c abi lity through their p articipation in th e CHS a thleti c p r ogram. A spiring member s were r equired to participate in all intramural sportS and iener in at l east cwo vars ity sports. I n addicion these girls had to pass a grueling initiati o n s imilar f O r hat of the "C" Club. Members of this club, under the dircnio n of their sponsor, Mrs. H a rri s, se rved as officia l s at all intra mural games. The G.A.A. coope r ated with the C Club in sponso r ing the annual H omecoming D a n ce. This year for rhe fir st time they also competed again st Cris r oba l' s male a thl etes in the IOl y mpi cs." Front R()w: Jean Smith (trea surer), Shell), Lund {vice-president}. Aurelia \'(Iilliams (presi dent), Jan B jorne b y ( secretary), t-.farlene Rice, BlICk R o u': Nancy Edmonson, J ane Dohle, R oberta Cole, Barbara Bloemer, Sue J udy Dohle. Karen Currier. :tnd t-.brian Kredell. "Up, up and away!" 125

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12. rltespial1s Presel1t rW(J Olltstal1dil1g Plays Slfling: D ebbie P a t c Ca.th y Carli sle, Judy tvlc L ain. Di: tne H :mkc:. Mr s Elfer s ( s pon sor). Stf llldin g: D o n:lld B y rd, Allen H :mno n The purpose and aim of the I nt e r national Thespian Soc i ety wa s the advancement and impr ovement of rh ea ter arts i n seco ndary sc hools. The C H S chapter auempted to arouse in tcrest in th e dram : ni c art s and g:lVC s tudents interested in drama a c han ce to work w ith its man y facet s; make up, direction. and ,Kli n g. An y high sch oo l st udent who earned t e n poims wa s elig ible (0 be come a thespia n Mrs. Elfer s wa s th e s p o n so r This yea r the Int ern:Hion:tl Thes pi an Soc i e t y a t C H S p r od uced fWO plays pr ese nted to th e publi c in th e C H S aud i tor i um o n e in N ove mber. and one i n r vl:trch Th e fall dramati c pro-duccioll wa s the romanti c co m edy -Be/l, Book. And Candle. The cas l includ ed vete ran actors, J udy rvlcL1in a n d D o n ald B y r d a nd new comers, Dian e Ca r roll, L ew i s Val dez and An drew F os h ee The pla y wa s w ell rece i ved by both C H S students and the ge neral public

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Debate Club /!romiells Millds Steve Shobe, Mike McCann, Patricia Paine, Mr. Gregg ( sponsor), Beverly Olsen Michael Snider, Jimmy Gewin, Rita Boyland, K enneth Hill, Maria B oo ne. The Debat e Club was o rganized wirh the aim of providing students with an opporrunit y to expre ss their views on c ontrover sial issues of the day. Over population the dress code, euthanasia, and mher topic s provided subjects for weekly debates. For each debate the club members we r e divided into rwo group s, pro and can. Either the sponsor, !vLr. Gregg o r one of the student s served as a judge. Each tcam member was given one minute in whic h to pres ent his a r guments, then the opposing team offered its r ebuttal. The highlight of the y ear for 'his club was the Speech Festival, in whi ch they competed with a debating tcam f rom Balboa. Safety Club 811courages Safety Practices The Saf ety Club was formed in o rder to e ncourage safery practices amo n g th e srudents of C HS. Mr R eeves a n d his assistant, Mr. McCuJl oug h a ided th e student members in carrying out thei r aims. A m ong these a ims were t h e organization of month l y fire d r ills and demons trations o f correct m ethods for putting out small fires. These fire d r ills and demonstra t i o n s played a n important part in k eeping C H S srudents prepared for emergencies, nOt only at school. but a lso at h ome a n d e l sewhe re. Silling: Me. Reev es, ( safery advisor), Mr. M cCuJlough, ( s afety assi s t ant advisor). S ianding: Carl Ande r so n Mike Osborn. Diane Hauke. P e ter Pach eco. P a try Valentine. 12'

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12' Caribe Club Mel11bers reaCH lo r tntire SCHool :Da!! f I Front R(!Il. t-.1:milJ Anton. N.InC\ Edmond ... on, :"hn Non.d. Pml H .ltlkc (hi)cori:lll). R ol:x:n Phdllp, (pre'ldc.:nt). LIIl.l Boonc. Dcb or. lh PJtt', SU,.U1 Burj..\c.:.,Jel11ncu(' Cox (wft,. Roll': Ann GOI17:llo, Ann L :lurit7e n. J:llkie P.Hkcr. P lukuc.: .lordi. Sheil:t Alberg:l, Aurdl:l \XhI 1L1lm. t-.t.lrit7.:l. Thom:l.). Christ\ L oi/e:lux. C.Hln Clrlt ... le. B:lrb:lr:l. Bloemer. P.Utl P:l.lne. Rlt.1 130\ bnd. D o lores ... Ge M ('ron.sor) fluk Row: Gil Apod.l<..l. EblOc Au)tlO. EIiZJlX"th Wl.lllllO. Cornel IllS Goc. .. btrtu,. J oseph W f .lfren Phdltp .... I l.irn T ow n ,el1(l. Sheth L und. luch Tomlinson. J.li..kLe Spnnger, LlI1d.1 I ... B oone. N:llll}" Ridge The Caribe Club (Futur e Teach ers of America) \Va:, formed for the pur pose of promoting J beuer und e r sta nding of the tC3l:hing pr ofessio n All st udents with a "B" aver age were inv i ted to join following the second of their freshma n year. On November IS, 1 970, the new mem bers \\Cre initiated at the I nitiation B.lnqutt held .It the Brazos H e ights Golt Club. K :lthv Kr:lUS :Inc! K:ltln w elcome p,lrt'n!' on Visitor)' I):l.\. o n Ono ber 27. I n F ebruary, ,he Caribe Club s p o n so red Tea c her Appreciation Da), in h o n o r of ,he facuity of C HS. Thi s \v:'IS tht s ixth year for the club to s pon so r this aCtivity. The members also s p o n so r ed [h e s ucce ssful Srude m T e:'lcher's Da y o n Apr i l 22. This y ear was the firs t time [h3[ th e s tudents tau g ht cla sses for [he e ntir e da),. All a g r eed [hat thi s was a c hallenging : md rewarding experience. The club :'Ilso vis it e d Coco Solo Elementar y S c hool, and a L atin American school in Colon R epublic of P anama Anmher activity o f the Caribe Club was their tutoring prog ram tvlemb e r s aid e d weaker s tudents who ne e d ed help in their s tudies. Fre quentl) membe r s t ook ove r e nrire cla ss periods for [e:tcher s when s ub s ti tu[ es wer e nOt available

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l'1:e eirc/e lroltfois JJ Promotes lltterest lit lroltce Dol ores Sant iago, S u s:mn Z3c hry Susan B urge. and R ita Boyland. F rench is not that hard! Je !':lime !" HLe Circle Fr ancais" met rwice a month in order to stimulate student interest in the language history and culture of France To achieve this aim, spec ial guest speakers o r selected members presented repon s on various 5 ubjccrs. The clu b was spon so r ed by Mrs. G egg. Only those students who ob tained a B average in F rench we r e eligible for membership. T hese seudents we r e initiated a t a banquet held at rh e Br azos H e ights Golf Club. Each initiate was required (Q recite a poem, s in g a so ng, o r perform a s kit. The French C lub members were in volved in a number of inte r esting activities during the ) Iea r. They spon so r ed Fr e n c h Week and elected the annual Mi ss France." They also v isite d the famous passenger liner "The Fran ce." Front Row: ivcu c Cummings, Sus:!.nn Zachry. M:!.rtha Am on, Cornelius. Goelx-Itus. Paulette J o rdi. Jac kie Parker. L inda H ess, Susan Burge, Jeannett e Cox. 0111" Rou': Nanc y Edmond son. Patricia Hauk e. ;..lar\, Norval. Debbie Pate. Aur elia \,(/illi:!.ms. brill:!. Thomas. Sheila Alberga. June Ilund, Nancy H orn. Ritl Boyland. T erri O"erstrcet. Dolores Samiago. ;"Irs. Gegg. B.lek Rou': Stephen Aponte. Bri:!.n DeRaps. Frank Berry. Edward Bringas. R obe rt Nordstrom. Bill Gillespie. ;..tclinda Brown. Pllri(e Gonier. Cadn Hess 129

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.30 Nurses Aides Impart Christmas Spirit (:'0 People 01 agarterita I Fm/ Row: W Oniz. R 5lmbe. B Olsen. A Ortiz, tv!. Olivera R Vidro, D R obinso n R B ct:mcoun. E F erguson. K H arde n Second Row: T F erguso n, M Garner, R H artSh o rn, T. Over s treet, P H :Juke, A \X/illiams. N R idge, iv!. T homas. J P :lrker. P ) ordi. Thml Row: M rs. H o w. ard (Sp o n sor),JJimenez M GOnl:1lez. 1'. T o rre s, O Gonz:l.lez. M T oro. S Vamprine.J Cox. A Coleman. tv!. \'\I ilrnom. S Willis. D Gosney, D G os n ey, J. !lun d, J. Tomlinson, ]'\'1. F ontane7. F O llrth Roll': I. D D : mcer. T. C o bb. N Ortiz. v \Xlhipplc R Oielc. M N H orn. P P aine. K Steven s T T homas. B Egger tv!. B rown. D M ee k e r C. Smith. R Mun oz. E. M arsh. I. r.,4 ondova. S i'.by-The Nurses' Aides Club was a very popular o r ga n izati o n at Cristo b a l H igh. It s members were g irl s inter ested in nursing or anOther medica l profession. The clu b e n courage d an d s timulated th i s interest b y inviting guest s peake rs, s howing films, and plan nin g field trip s to h ospita ls. The mOSt important field tr ip thi s year was the an nual v i sit t o La Gar terita in Garun L a k e, on D ece mbe r 12. The purpose of this tr i p was to give C hri s tmas gifts to rhe people o n the island, espec ially the c hildr e n The Stude nt A ssoc i ation ass i s t ed rhe Nurses' A i de s c lub thi s year in co l lectin g food a n d used c l o thin g for (hi s purp ose. T h e police d i vis io n p rovided the club with a bunch as transportation. I n orde r to beco m e a m ember o f th e Nurses' A i de s Cl ub o ne mu s t be a freshman girl wear a c ardboard nurse' c ap o n th e da), of th e init iation and sa)' the pledge with t h e Oth e r ini tiat es du r ing a s pe c i a l m ee tin g. NE\'(IINITI ATE S

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Mrs. Howard, Brenda E gger, Beverly Olsen, Debra Gosney, Jacqueline Parker Nancy Ridge, Olga Gonzalez, Nodia Orriz. The Pink Girl s h e lp ed th eir community g reatly during the summer months. They volunt arily offere d their services at Coco Solo H ospital. In order 10 be eligible f o r thi s PIOgram. each girl was re9uired to take a two-week first aid course. In addition a o ne-week training period. during which the basics of hospital work were caught. was required. The girls learned how a hosp ital funcrions and how to car e for p atienrs with various needs. I n o rder 10 become a full-ned ged Pink Girl each girl had 10 work a IOta I of 125 hou rs. I n the h os pital the Pink Girls were c a sually referred to lS "Pinkies." They were expecred to adh e r e to the commands and advice of their superiors who were registered nurses. The fun-filled summer of hard, but rewarding work was climaxed by a private g raduation ceremony a!te nd ed b y the group's spo n sor, Mrs. Howard. and various civicminded citizens. PillK (lirls Work 125 }lours Ada Ortiz rcsuscimcs "Annie." Mr. B y r d instructs the Pink Girls on First Aid. 131

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'32 SpaltisH Club Participate s lit Carltival Parade r I S eated, l s I R o w : C o rneliu s Goebertus J ud y T omlinso n J:tc k i e P:ark e r Jenny W irtz, P:lu ie n c J o rdi Jean nie B asset M i ke M i n e h a rt 2 n d Row: r-b. rt 3 Anto n S usan Zachery D o ug S t ev en s D iane H:l.uke, R a ul Ca stro, S andra Albe r gl. P : m y Ha uke Mui3 F o ntane z Iveu e Cummings. Standing: Kathy P ur sley, R od Lindo, 15:1:1.( H e r es P :IUI B aild, R :dph Ender M:l.ry N orv:!.l, M :uk H a nley, J oseph Ender, Greg Gog uen Ste p ha nie l ilies, Sheila Alber g a Debbi e Pale Debbie A lber g a :l.nd S p : lIli s h Club s pon so r M rs. E lfers. Who said th:H S p anis h had t o be spo ke n o nl), at S pani s h Cl u b mee t ings? The Sp anis h C l ub a t C HS was o r g ani z e d f o r the pur pose o f e n co ur ag in g Spani sh-s pe akin g srude nt s to beco m e 3cr ive in vari o u s acti v iti es a nd to incr e a s e their und e r s t a ndin g o f th e L atin Ameri can co untri es. M ee tings w e r e h eld tw i c e eac h m onth, a n d m a t ter s o f int e r es t co m e mber s wer e d iscu sse d All di sc ussi o n s we r e co n d u ct ed in S p a ni s h The officers o f th e Spa ni s h Club thi s year wer e : R aul Cas t ro Pr es i d ent; Di a ne Hauk e Vice-Pr es i de nt ; S a ndra Alb e r ga Secre t ary a n d J e nn y W i rt z Tre a s ur er. The c lub was s p o n so r e d b y Mrs. Elfer s wh o h e lp e d w i t h t h e o r ganiza tio n o f vario u s a ct i v iti es a n d a tt e nd e d all m e etin gs.

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Student Advisory eOJ11J11ittee Provides Sounding Soard lor Student Opinion Karen Currier, C:Hhy Carlisle, Mich2d Dexter, una Boone (recording secretary), Wally Russon. Jeannette Cox, Robert Phillips, Nancy Ridge, and V ictor Lee. "Why didn't somebody ( ell m! th e r e was a meeting toda), ? queries Chairman Jose Medina as h e 2nd Robert Phillips hurry to a meeting The Student A dvisory Committee was o r ganized at the suggestio n of Mr Pfau, with rhe cooperarion of Michael Dexter President, and Other members of the Cristobal H igh School Student A ssociation. T he pur pose of this group was to se r ve in a n advis ory capac iry to the principal of CHS. M embers wer e carefull y select ed in order that each club and o rgani zatio n in the sch ool, and each class might be r epresented M embers served as a sounding boa r d, bringing to the a u ention of Mr. Pfau the com plaints, comments and suggestions of their fellow srude nts Jose Me dina served as chairman of the group, and Lana B oone act ed as r eco r ding secret ary. Meeti ngs were held on the first M o nda y of each month. Among the topics discussed wer e the r easons be hind school r egu lati o n s and the possi biliry of changi n g them, modifications in the dress code, and possible changes in the athleric schedul e Members coope rared with othe r o r ga nizations in planning and carrying our act ivities and projects of interest to the majoriry of th e stude nt body Among these were: a special assembl y in cooperation with [he Canal Zone Yourh Council, the Olympics" in which th e GAA and "C" Club partic ip ated, and the P owderpuff Speedball Game in which the Junior and Senio r girls participated 133

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134 Pltilosopltion Society Is Jormed A new dub at CHS this ycar, the Philosoph ian Sotiety was formed b y a group of srudents interested in intel lectual :md literar y pursuits. The club's aim was to provide students with an oppon-u nit)' for discussion and exploration of the various aspects of philosoph}' and liter:trure It en couraged snlderns to deve lop and illl-, prove theif abilir) to express them selves; e ither through group d i sc uss ion, or individually through r ea ding, c reati ve wrir ing, or p oetry Memb ership was o p e n to all hi g h sc hool srude nts, but W:J.S limited to fifteen at any o n c time. I ntere s t ed Students applied through l\ l r Faltor os i, the club 's s p o n so r o r thro ugh any rwo members. Regular meeting s we r e h eld rwice each mont h wit h various ex tra meetings sc h edu l ed for after sc h ool and o n weeke n ds. T he se extr a meeting s were planned for pla ces s u c h a s th e bea c h w h i c h offered an atmosphere of informal association tha t helped the club members to disc uss freely and hone s tly. D ebbie Pat e, Dian e H auke D enise F oshee, Mike D ex t er.Judy M c L ain, Shel i a Alber ga, L ana Boone, Allen H a r m o n { vice c h airman ) Jeann e n e Cox, D onald B y rd R obert P hillips ( chai rman) Maria B oone, Thomas P ur s ley, K athy De R ap s ( se cretary) Mr. Fatt o r os i P : ltt i H au ke. eJls Offers 3 1)riversJ td. Sessions Drivers' Training was an ex tremely p o pular co ur se among C H S Students. It was offered three tim es du r ing the sc h ool year Eac h sess i o n l ast ed six wee ks. Me etings were held after sc hool in room 341 for one h our and forry-five minutes, M onday through Friday. The instructor, Mr. R eeves, presented lectures and film s in order to give students t h e ba c k ground i n tr affic laws safe ty, and automobile mechanics necessary to enable them ro become good drivers. I n addition ro classroom instruct i o n ten hours of drivin g were required before students were e l igible ro rake (he road test and obtain a l i cense. Driver education s nldcnt s bra ce them s elve s for :l.IlOther horror movie." 1

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SiJling on Floor: D ouglas Stevens (vice.pr esident). Silling: Raul Castro, Diane H :luke, Ralph Ender, Sheila Alberga (president) Lana Boone, Patricia Hauke Sand r a Alberg:l (trea s urer) SltUlding: J enny \,(/in2, Kath y Brown, Maritza Thomas, Stephanie l ilies, Deborah Pate, Deborah Alberga Edithe M arsh, T erri Over stree t ,Caltguage ,Cab Club ProJl1otes lltterest lit 'loreiglt /Vatiolts L anguage L ab members ope-roue the lab for th e benefit of o ther students. T he LANGUAGE LAB CLUB is an organization for tri.lingual stu dents who are s k illed in the operation of the language lab equipment. These students assist the teacher s of th e var ious foreign languages by setting the equipment in the lab and taking co n t rol of the console. Members attend bi-m o nthl y meetings held in the language labor atory. Maner s of interst are presented to the members by th e officers, and lively discussions often result. The sponsor, Mr Srearns is always presenr to make certain that order is maintained. Several inreresting field trips are scheduled during the year. Members visit passenger liners of the countries whose languages the member s have srudied. These excursions provide the members with an opporruniry to con ver se with native speakers and to learn something about their culture. 135

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136 J(everelld PaUlle vilest Speaker At loll Jnitiatioll Of /Vatiollal J/ollor Societu jcanncu c C ox, Michae l D exte r R o ben Phillips, Lana B oone M oments bef o r e the assembly begins, old m embers o f (he N H S relax o n stage Mr.s, Valdez, JC"liInne n e C ox, Ltwis Valdez, and Rc:v. Cla r e nce Pay ne, admit the a rovin s miles of Interested onl oo k e r s 35 th e !nutat e l i ghts his candle. PP g R oben Phillips speaks o n CharaCter, one 01 the four cardinal virrues of rhe NHS like Dexter ligh(S the green candle of adership, symbolizing growth. Mrs. Valdez, Carme n Butler, Mrs B cr. ing remo n y continues r-. Iike D exter, Rev Payne. The candid NATIONAL HOl O R SOCIETY MEMBERS: Firr/ R o w : J eannette C o x ( secretary-treasur. er), Lana Boone (pres ident), Robert Phillip s (vi ce-pres idcnt) Second Row: Carmen Bude r D enise Foshee, M i chael Dexler. Tlurd Row: leWIS Valdez, F r e d C ole. Membership in the acio n a i H onor Society has become nationally recognized as one of the highest honors whic h may be besrowed upon a high sc h ool stude nt. The Canal Zone Caribbean Chapler was form ed for (he purpose of providing reco gniti o n co those srudencs who have excelled in all aspectS of CristObal High S chool lif e Srudencs who have a minimum grade po int average of 3 00, and have demonstrated outstanding leadership, charaCter and service are eligible for membership in this sociery. Two initiation ass emblie s are prese nt ed to rhe student body each year, one each semester. At the fall initiatio n only seniors may be induCted. This year, th e assembly was held on November 19rh The rheme for rhe program was, "Where do we go from h e r e ? and Reverend Clarence Payne from the Canal Zone Youth Council spo k e on th e subject of young rebels. N e w members announced at this time were : Sandra Alberga Carmen Butler, Fre d Cole Gary Collins. D enise F oshee and Lewis Val dez At the spring initiation, nOt more than 15% of the senio r class, and nor more rhan 5 % of rhe junior class may be considered for eleCtion. 131

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131 S/IIw g: K : m n Sthill. K :lthv F a rrin gton. Irma lvl o n clov:l. t-.1.1rit7:1 Th o nw. (managing e d itor). K a r en \'\ /cs t e rlx:r g S /,,"dlll g: Mic hael McCann, J O'iC t-..kdin.l. r-. I II .. h : u : 1 D cxter. T oni Tho m a s A lle n IluTl1on. P.llll B ltH.hcr Pink /60K vives "Crmlewind Insight "Co eJls Thi s )'ear' s TRADEWIN D st a ff wo r ked t oward faster pu blicati o n a n d a more e nt e rt aining news p aper. W o rk ses s i o n s wcr e h eld a f t e r school three "The .m\wcr to ellS p ro blem s:;" d ays a w ee k The e dit ors. r eporte r s, t y p ists. a nd ph otOg r ap h er s devOte d man y h o ur s of th e i r o wn t i m e to th e pap e In ord e r to g et the eIHi re s tudent bod y inv olve d in makin g t he TRADEWIND a vital and inter e s tin g part of o ur school new i deas wer e n ec e ss ary. One s uch idea was T H E P INK BOX. This box s erved a s a "ca t c h all" f o r school happenings. Stud e nt s w e r e e n c oura g ed ( 0 drop in l e u e r s to H E L P ((he new advice co lumn) i e a e r s to the e ditOr, p oc ms, bit s o f goss ip and anything the y f elt mi g ht be int e re s tin g and amu sing f o r th e ir schoolmat es. Mr. D o bbin s was T RADEWIND adv i so r (h i s y ear ; i t WaS h i s s econd y e ar in thi s p os iti o n H e devOted mu c h o f his time and e n e r gy to publis hin g an int e r es tin g, info rmative n e w s pap e r The s taff co n s i s t e d o f man y mem ber s, eac h with varie d and vita l tas k s to p erfo rm The hour s o f hard work r eguired f o r th e publi c ati o n o f a g ood paper all see m e d w o rthwhile when th e TRADEWIND r e turned f rom th e pr ess.

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rite e/ocK flare JIf; Slit rite VearbooK Staff WorKed Olf The yearbook staff had the c hal lenging r espo n s ibil i ty o f produ c in g and editing the C H S yearbook the Caribbean. The staff con s ist e d o f a group of effic ient s tudents wh o work ed ti r e l es sly aftcr school in o r d e r to meet th e dead lin es establ i s h e d b y the publishing company. With the guidance of their s ponsor Mr John son, a n d th e help of an ambitiou s group of photographe rs, the Staff a c complished their duty wirh o ut un nece ssaty delay The staff intr odu c ed man y inn ova ti o n s this year One wa s a new sys t e m of ed itin g, whereb y th e staff mem bers, excluding th e ed i tor and the A llen H arm o n "The s ub j e ct i s marvel o us, bur the photograph y i s l o usy! co p y editOr w e r e un ass i g n ed. E ac h st a ff m e m be r did th e wor k whic h had co be d o n e, reg ar d l ess of (h e s u bject matter This n ew sys tem p r ove d to be very p r acric ai. An o th e r i n n ovatio n was an e ntirel y n e w a rrangem e nt o f the Caribbean itself. Al so in o rd e r ro compensat e for s h o rt age o f funds, th e staff spo n so r ed a numbe r of co nt es t s to stimulat e yea rbook sal es. A s a result, s t a f f mem be r s hi p e nl a r ged to in clude ju n i o r as w ell as se n ior hi g h s c hool s tu de nts. This was do n e in ap preci a ti o n o f their gen erous d o n atio ns and enthusias ti c sal es o f Tiger B oos t ers -----Marit z a Tho m as, jeann e H e Cox P ut it here." N o, he r e." Sheila Albe r ga. "StOP grinning and ge t to w ork!" Mr. j o hnson ( s pon so r), Rita Boy land. Maritza Thomas, M aria Boone. A llen H armon. j eannene Cox (editor). Sheila Alberga, Lana Boone ( cop y editOr) Beth Blei ch e r Thomas P u r s l ey. K athy De raps, De bra P ate '3'

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140 eristobal flig/t Sc/tool Produces F r onl R Olli: P aul B :litd. B ill De aton M i k e Snide r S l cp h:1.1l F ug l eberg, T o b y Ph illips Ral p h R i c h mo n d, Frank ( i c ch e n o C arl os Br own, J uan S a n c hez. Second R o w : Cal e b Clem e n(, Jim J a c k so n, Joe R oz me s ki. A nd r e w F o s hee. H arr y Townsen d. Fr:mk B erry \'(f arre n P hillip s, Mik e Barge r Bill L e D oux Arthur Ser i g. J o hn Mike Spa gna. Tbm/ ROlli: Neil P att o n (CQ-c:aptain ) .l ose Medin:!.. R o be n Philli p s, D o n Olsen J ohn D:l.Y, Bri:tn Allen. l\likc ApocbCl .. r-..1 :Hti:1. Sp:lgn:t. R obe n l3loc mer \X1illi:l.I11 H uffm :l11, P et e r Swain, E rne s t A br esc h Wall y Russo n (co c apt a in) This ) ear s inrersch o b s t i c C1umpion Tiger s w ill l o n g be remembe r ed a s the be s t t eam e v e r t o p l a y i n th e C a nal Z o n e. They a c h ieved w h a t no o t her t e am ha s an undefe a ted s e a son all th e way from th e Jambor ee co th e P a l m B o wl. Criscobal 's firs t t a s t e o f vic t o r y c ame i n th e Jambo r ee. I n th e firs t quart e r th e T i g e r s d e f e ated t he Bull d ogs wh e n guarte rba c k N eil P a n on, (hr e w f o r 41 yar ds f o r t h e o nl y tOuc h d ow n The College D ev i l s w ere una ble ro srop th e mighty Tiger s in t h e seco n d q u arter and o n ce ag ain Cristo bal cam e o u t o n tOp 7-0 The firs t ga m e o f th e r eg ular sea son o n ce again broug ht vicro r), to t h e T i g e r s whe n they ove r powe r e d Can a l Zone C ollege b y a sco r e of 22 <0 6. The q u a lit y of rh e p e rform a n ce in th a t first g am e was typical o f that in th e ga m es whi c h f ollo w ed. Balboa 's h o m eco min g was s mashe d wh e n C r i sto b a l o utpl ayed and o tlt sco r ed them 338 This was th e hi g h sco rin g g am e f o r th e T iger s th i s y e a r Touc hd o wn s wer e mad e b y Neil Pat ro n Bill y D ea ton R o b e rt Phillips, a nd Willi e H u ff man wh o sco r e d twi ce The fir s t home ga m e f o r th e Ti gers proved a thrill e t f o r all. T h e g am e w as und e cided ulHil th e laS t f e w se conds wh e n C u b by"' C l e m e nt in t e r cep t e d a p a s s f r o m College gua rt e r ba c k Russ B o w e n thu s co ntinuin g th e w innin g s treak to thre e s tr:ti g ht wins. The fina l s e a s o n ga m e, betw ee n Balboa a nd Cri sto bal a gain di s pla y ed th e Tige r s uper i o rit y a s the), c ru s hed Balboa with f o ur win s and no losses. Cri s robal be c ame (he I ntersch olastic Champi o n s f o r th e ye ar 1970-71. T h e Annual United Fun d Palm B o wl Game br o u g ht the Ti g ers up a g ain s t a s t ro n g team co n s i s tin g of outstandin g players from both B a l boa and C o lle g e The Dev i l D ogs we r e d e t e rmine d ro o bt ain r eve n g e for the l oss e s suffe red a t th e cl aw s o f th e Tig ers. Yet eve n their co mbined effo rt s was not en o u g h ro srop th e pow e rful Cri s t o bal ma c hin e D e t enni n e d t o k ee p the i r und e f ea t e d re c ord th e Tigers s l ipp ed b y th e AII Stars to win 7-0. It was a fittin g cli max to a foot ball seaso n whi c h Cri sro bai T i g er s will n o t soo n f o rget.

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J(,ecord-!6reakilfg lootball ream E nt h usiastic support (ro m fans at bonfires, student s at pep assemblies, and fathers at f oo tball games And expert coaching. combined t o pr oduce results visible from the moment the team 141

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142 Appeared on the field ... throughout the season, beginning with ViCtOf), in the J amboree and conti nuin g ?:iger Victory lit Paillt nowl w ith victOries in eac h of th e regula r s ea so n g am es th e d e f e at o f th e All Scar s i n the a nnual P a l m B owl

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eliJl1axes Undefeated Season the presentat i on o f trophie s at a spe ciaJ assembly honoring the v ictOri o u s Ti ge r f oo tball team J:r.mbortt &pt. &Opt. (X, ex, (X, Pllm Bowl Nov. C H S 14 C H S22 C HS3) C H S 13 C H S 26 C H S 7 BHS 0 18 9 I. lO IJ SCORES czc CZC B H S CZC B H S All-Scm And finall y the seJect i o n of seve n Tigers for the All -Zo ne t eam. 8 o 143

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, .. Cheerleaders: Power I!ehilld Lying: K at h y K raus and Syl via Varnprine Btuk Row: Calhy Carlisle, K a r en Currier a nd Denise F os hee C H S Cheerleaders it has been said rh : u behind every successfu l man there i s a woman -ce rtainl y chis must also be tru e of a s u ccessfu l te am. T he 1 970-7 1 school year included it hiscor y making foot ball season for [h e C H S Ti gers. T heir vinories ccnainly gave Cri sto b a l 's five l ove l y young c heerleader s so mething co c he e r about as the y remained undefea ted in game af t e r game. Before each game h owever these enc r getic girls practi ced for many tong. hard hours perfecting new c heer s and routine s to c h ee r th ei r team to v i ctory. They painted posters, planned pep assemblie s spo nsored co me s ts, :md di s tributed s pirit ribbons in an effort to inc r ease stude nt inter est in athl et i c events, and sc hool s pirit in general. These girls, w ith their s miling faces and attractive unifo rms, were inde e d an a sse t to their team and to th e ir school. "We've come to s ing a p r aise. :1 hearty "00 iI d o it. :Ill right!!!' chee r to r;l1se

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A-Ceague Yasketball ream eaptures eltampioJ1sltip game Witlt Score 0/ 28-2 J Front Row: B a rbara Bloemer, Robena Cole, Aurelia \'(filliam s (captain), Marlene Ricc. Linda Hess. :mcy Gregg. Susan Zachry (manager), &lck Row: Susan 1\.lendenhall, Marian Kredcll. Jean Smith, Emilie Daniels, Beth \'(/lni o. K:Hh y Hess, E stelit:! Ferris {manager} C H S 3) C H S 23 C H S J3 C H S 28 "Whatsoever you ask for you shall receive." SCORES BI-IS 33 CZC 19 CZC 22 BI-IS 21 A d ripping bur happy Mrs. Harris is pulled from the pool following her "vinory dunking." At the close of the intramural basketball season, those girls who demo onstrated the grea teS! skill and ability wefe selec ted to p lay on the Var sity of A L eague T eam. Each team memo ber had to be a junior o r senior and maintain a "C" average. This was a year of innovatio n for t he Cristobal High School Girls' Bas ketball team. I t was the firs t year in which a team was composed of only five girls. Also for the first time numbers appeared on the front of the uniforms. The 1970-71 season commenced in September and continued unril the end of Ocrober The girls played !eams from Balboa H igh School and Canal Zone College rwic e each and remained undefeated throughout the season. T o climax their successful season, the girls went on to a 28-21 victory in the championship game. ,.,

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146 ((16" ,Ceagu e P laces 2nd In Sasketball Cristobal players b:mte (0 r egain possession of the ball. The B-League Junior Varsity Girls' Bas ketball le arn was composed of freshmen. sophomores. and so me younger, less expe rien ced juniors The procedure for sel ecti n g team member s was the same as that for ALeague These girls wore the same uniforms as their varsity coun terpart s, and practiced many l o ng, hard hours after school in an effon to improve their skills and teamwork. They pla yed only rwo games, bolh against Balboa They lost bolh games, but some of I hese girls will undoubtedly prove an asset to next year's A -League team because of the experience they have gained. Emily Damel executes a free-thr ow C H S tigr esses "jump for joy" as another basket i s m:J.de. "You girls get dried off and go take a s h ower:'

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rennis ream eomposed Of rot/fnament Winnefs 1st Row: R odr igo Lindo, R a l ph R ichmond, Douglas J effries, Mich ael J effr i es, Paul Bleic h er, and Jese J ohnson. 211d Row: Coach H offman, Michael Snider, M ichael D exter ( captai n) and Eric Irio n Coac h H offman pr ov idos extra insura nce by cove rin g th e backcourt as Paul B leicher and Mik e S n ider prepare to r eceive a serve. A fter a hard day of praCtice, the members of the tennis team relax Members of ,he CrislObal High School var sity tennis team were se leCled by means of a preliminary elimination rournamcnt. Those boys winning a sufficienr number of matches and meeting the minimum scholastic requirements were eligib l e f o r the team. Practi ce sessions were held each af(fmoon af,er school from 2:45 until 4:30 at various tennis throughoUl the community Tennis compe tition this year cons isred of two interscholasric marches and a triangular mee t in which CristObal, Canal Zone College, and Bal boa particip3led. CHS6 CHS 1 CHSi CHS SCORES CZC BHS BHS CZC 147

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t48 111 Medlel/ Alld lreestl/Ie /(eltll/s Seated: Cheryl H i e r o n y mu s Debbie (:lrey. C h ery l Olsen C hri sry Loize:aux, LuAnn \XI:tr e, M :tri:t Boon e, Edyth e M ar s h and Carol Bake r Sttll1dmg: I J I R oll': ScOtt L oi7C3UX. J oe Smith. Gcr:tld Coffin. Fred K nauss. B everly Olsen. l3arb : l r a G
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SwimmiNg ream Captllres lirst Places Edythe Mars h ... one comes up for air. Judith Simmons ... prepares to execute a reverse gainer. SCORES C H S .. B H S CZC 73 159 24 89 150 15 71'h. 138 I\' h 83 169 20 Later interested spen3tOfs w,iHch from [he stands as a graceful diver. And after the mett ... the triumphant, o r perhaps on l y hopeful. swimmers, relax and enjoy the long train ride home. I

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150 Scelfes I!eltilfd Sports Javorite rime Jor Malf!! Studelfts Dan T w eedy, D :ln Vale ntin e Eric Tuc ker Mike Apoda c a Mik e Barger. Roben Phillip s C:Hhy Car l i s le, Syl via Vamprine, K atie K raus. Don't be mad, Cathy. A benc h c)'c-vi e w o f th e game (lirts J relflfis Tryouts for girls te n n i s we r e h e l d in February and the season fan f r o m March 5 to March 26. Pr actice was held everyday after schoo l a t v ari o u s Courts in the community. T his W:lS done to g ive the g i rls prac t ice o n d ifferent COUftS where t he ball bounced differently and r he dire c t i o n of th e wind varied. Gen eral 'Iualifi c ation s w ere d edic:ui o n t o thi s i ndiv i dual s pon selfdi sc iplin e, and enduran ce. Many h o ur s o f hard pra ctic e W C fC nec essary [Q mak e a g oo d ( enni s pla y er. The g irls' e guipm enl wa s fur nis he d b y th e sc hool ex cept for (h e rac k e t s whi c h th e g irl s s uppli e d thems el v es. A n e w sco rin g sys tem was intro du c e d in whi c h pla y c onri nu e d ulHil one girl won six g ames. It th e re was a 6 6 t i e o ne game c alled "sudden death" was pla y ed th e win n e r of which wa s d e clar e d th e winn e r of (he match Four mat c h e s wer e pla y ed this year. T wo again s t Balb o a and twO a g a i n s t Canal Zone Coll ege.

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CJlS Co-Champiolt lit no/boa J(e/aus "This is the part of trac k we like beSt," sign Ernest Abresch, Frank CicchclO, and Billy Deaton "E:1o[ your heart OUI, Nureyev!" exclaims Cubby Clement. SCORES CHS BHS CHS B) BHS C H S 6) BHS 72 CZC 91.) CZC 78 CZC One week before the beginning of the track season, it meeting was called, and all interested persons asked to attend. Those willing to at tend the rwo-hour daily practice sessions became members of the varsity or junior var s iry tcams, depending on their ages. CHS participated in three intersch o lastic meers this year. Trac k events at each meet included: hurdles, r elays, sprints, and distance running, Field events included: the shorput, the pole vault, the discus rhrow, and the l ong and high jumps. In addilion to the regula r meets, CHS also participated in Ihe two-day Balboa Relays. They were co-champions wilh Balboa in this special event in which Rain Smiling Billy Delwn displ:"lys trophy he won :"IS outstanding participant in [he Para iso Balboa Relays. bow City, Pan ama City, and Colon teams participated. The 1970-7I track team was one of th e beSt eve r from C HS Willie Huffman bro k e Ihe r ecord in both the d iscus throw and the shot put. Member s of the r eco r d-breaking SSO-yar d relay team were: Bill y D earon, Neil Pat ron, Ed Bring as, and Frank Ciccheuo. The outstanding runner of the season was junior, Bill y DeatOn. His success as due to natural abiliry, dedication, hard work, and a willingnes s fO be coached. An excellent team combined with the expert coaching of varsity coach, Robert Agge and jr. varsiry coach, R andy Grubbs ro produce a very successful trac k season. lSI

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152 (;;4 JJ And ((JjJJ CeafJlle Pla!fers A L EAGUE Sltwdmg : Sher r y K e rn M:lI1:tger; Judy Dohle. S u s:ln M endenhall; Debbie R owley; Teri Baker ; B:lrb:l.ra Bloe mer ; :md J enn y W i rtz K IIl'l'/illg : Aureli a \Xlilli:ullS and C:uhy Stevens. co-ca pt:lins. Debbie R o wley practic e s "set ups" J enny Wirtz, Cathy Stevens. J ud y D ohle. B arbara Bloeme r A urcli:l \Xlilliams. "Judy {his is no time to be doing jumpi n g j:teks!"

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Attend Volleyball elinic At (h e conclu s ion of the intr amural vo lle y ball seaso n th e varsity vo lleyball tcams, A and B League, were seOlder, m o r e experienced gi rls made up the A League team while girls new to the sport were p laced o n the B League team. The g irl s drilled and practiced ev ety day after schoo l f r om 2:15 until 4:30. Empha sis was placed on bump and se l drills. The achie ve ment of power with co ntrol in all a reas of p lay was stressed. A new fearur e in volleyball play thi s year was the s ele ctio n of a M os t Valuabl e Player f o r each ga me Winners for this year were: Aurelia Wil liams, Susan M endenhall Barbara Bloemer and Gigi Col o n An othe r first of the 197 1 volleyball seaso n was a clinic presented b y an AAU rated officia l Sgt. E sco bid o. M anagers of this year's team were Stell a F e rri s and Sherry K ern. Mrs. FattOcos i was the coach f o r both A and B League teams. A League players pause f o r a m o mCn! of prayer before the game begins "B" LEAGUE Standing: Linda Hess. Beverly Olsen. Patt), Snider. Linda Huff. J:me Dohle. and Gigi Colon. Knftli ng: Beth \X/ainio and Titi Cole. co-captains. 153

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7970 Varsity ANd JUNior Varsity }6oysJ Kneeling: Dee D e L app. Walla ce Russo n. William Huffm an, Mitchell B lanchene, Walter Ilund, David Robertson. Sltll1dlllg: Mike J effries (asst. m:mager), CO:lch Dedeaux. James Kunkel {m:tnager}. "o.K., yo u guys, you have to ge t this right!" An awkward positlon docs not prevent Dee D e L app from shoOting for th e basket C H S 48 CHS 27 C H S 41 C H S 40 C H S 36 C H S 39 VAR S I TY SCORES B H S )1 CZC)) BHS j3 CZC )) SH S 40 CZC )0 William Huffrn:tn. Higher. \'
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Basketball }fove Active SeaSON M e m bers o f th e Cristobal H i g h Schoo l Varsity Bask e tball t eam were sele c t e d by th e a thletic coaches f r o m thos e boys w h o demo n s trated ourstanding performa n ce i n int ramura l s o r who dem o n stra t e d unusual a bilit y during special tryouts E a c h t e a m member was r e guired { O mec e c ertain qualificatio n s i n regar d to s c h o lars hip, h e ight a n d speed H e also had t o be willing to a n e n d aftern oo n o r evenin g p ractice sessi o ns. All hig h sch oo l boys wer e elig ibl e for var s ity, but senio r s could nO[ play o n t h e junior var s ity team w hi c h wa s s e l ecte d in r h e sam e m anner. This year rhe Tige r s comper c d in six ime rsch o lastic games -three each aga i nst BH S a n d czc. I n addi tio n they p artici pared in numerous practice ga mes against R a i nbow C i t y H i g h S c h oo l a n d th e U S Navy. A hig hli g ht of th e year 's compet i t i o n was the Can a l Zone Invirar i onal T o urn a m e nt The coac h e s this rear were: Coach DeDeaux (Varsity) a n d Coa c h H o ff m a n (junio r V a r s ity) D e e D elapp was n am ed M ost V alua bl e Pla y er. S itti ng: Mike J effries {ma nager}. K!1fflmg: Ped r o Simmons, Caleb Clemem Carlos B r o wn, J\' l i c hae! Beale. Paul Baile!. Gary Collins. Siandmg: Coach Hoffman Francis co G o nzalez, And r e w F oshee. R oben B loemer, J oseph H erri n g. Geor ge Scheibe, Eligi o Tho mas. Joe Herring, Geo rge Sch e ibe. Give nlf the b all'" "Look l oo k a t t hat ball go!" 15S

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1S6 7:igers P l all elose Easeball SeaSON 5mm g Iff R Oil' : J oe R o z me s ki, R alph R i chmond, I saac H ere s George Cruz, P edro Simmons, Mik e Snider. 2nd RoUl: Ernest Abre sc h Frank Cicch e to. J ose Medin:!, G eorge: S c heilx". P,ltIJ Baile]. Cubby Cltmt'IlL SItI!/tim g: Willie H uffman. J im J a c k son D o ug Stevens Roben Phillips, Dexter, Donald M an s Neil Pmo n, :lIld CO:lch L itton Frank Cic c he t o p r epare s to hit a homenm. The 197 1 ba se ball seaso n wa s fro m J an u ary 10 to Marc h 19. C H S p layed f o ur g ame s ag:1in s r B H S and four again s r CZc. A l so, a practice game again s t th e alumni was h e l d about rwice a m onth. Tryours were held the fir s t week of t h e ba se ball seaso n The qualifications for each position wer e diffe r e nt but in general th e following qualitie s were desir e d: a good eye long, good, arms, s kill in throwing and cat c hing, and a gui c k reaction P ractice was h e ld after sc h ool o r in t h e eve nin g for approximately twO hours. Aft e r the reg u l ar eig h t -game sea son, th e All -Stars p l ayed t h e I nt e r scholastic L ea g u e Champio ns. This yea r s b aseb all co a c h es were Mr. Litton and Mr. A gee.

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R oben P hillips. "De t e rmin ation pays!" Titi Cole, Marlene Rice, Jean Smith, Sue M endenhall Ready girls?" M ike Spagna sails into the air for rwo points. ((e)) eillb Wilts Smtls/tilt{J Victory JIt 1st ((Olympic gtlmes)) ----.--Mike Spagna. "No wonder the girls won this event! Ano th er first in rhe 1970-71 sch ool year was th e Olympics h eld in the C H S gymnasium on D ecembe r 23, 1 970 at 7 pm. This competiti o n between {he outstanding male and female athlete s a r Criscobal was o rganized throu g h t h e combined efforts of the GAA and the "C" Club. The boys were di vided into rwo te ams, rhe Gl obe Clappe rs" and the Gungarias." The girls wer e also divided into twO reams, the nAIl-Americans," and the uBunnies." The evening included competirion i n basketball, batrleball volleyball, and various relays Sophomore girls under the direction of Mrs. Harris refereed rhe games. T he girls succeeded in capruring only e i ght points, and the boys scored a smashing victory with a total of rwenty-rwo points. A good time was had b y all, participants and spectarors alike, and it is hoped that this competiti o n may become an annual evenr. Jose: M edina, M arlene Rice, T iti Cole, J oe R osmeski. Th e victors displa y their prize ribbo n s while the defeated display good sportsmanship:' 151

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158 21 sf ANNual f/amboree :Dedi J anie Souder, Roben Will, Wendy Flores. John Sande rs. D arlene Daly. "So metime s it :til seems w o rthwhile! The twenty-first annual J amboree provided the kickoff for the mos { suc cessful foo t ball season in Tiger history. I n Tiger Stadium on September 18, 1970, the C H S football team had its first taste of victory in th i s traeli cional pre-season game. The firs t Jamboree was held twemy yea r s ago. I t was first con ceived by former CI-IS coach, Luke P alumbo, as an exhibition game for the three participating learn s: BHS CZC, and CHS. Over the yea rs, it de veloped into its present form, in which the (cam scoring the mOs t points is prescIHed with a trophy. Play is divided into three 9uarrers each team play ing th e other rwo once. This yea r the Jamboree wa s dedi ca r ed to two former C H S students John Sanders and Robert Will. These fWO young me n we r e both injure d wh i le se rvin g their coumry in Vietn a m The c h eerleade rs, color guard the drill tc ams, (he football tcams, and the spectato r s were all part of rhe e x citeme n t which was hig hli g hted b y the presentation of th e Jambor ee queens: J an i e So ud er, B H S; Wendy Flores, C HS; a nd D arlene Daly, CZc. The pomp and s plend o r displayed made rhe J amboree II memorable event as a lwa ys, but it w as the victory o f the Tigers over both the ir o pponents that made it a perfect evening. I n the fir s t q uarter Cristobal downed Bal boa when quarte r back Neil PattOn threw II pass to Willie Hu ffman, who ran 4 1 yards f o r a touchdown. Cubby Cle m e nt then kic ked the extra point, and the quar ter ended with II sco re of 7-0. [ n the second guarter, Cristo bal again c am e o ut on top when Neil Panon sco red a tOuchdown o n a pass interce ption The third and final quarter played by BHS a n d CZC ended in a sco rel ess tie

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cnted t'o VietllaJlf VeterallS Kl.th y K raus Karen Currier, Denise F os hee. N eil P a n on. and Sylvia Vamprine. The game's l eading rushe r eil P:m on. wh o carried {he ball 12 times for 61 vards. has his moments of a p prehension JAMBOREE QUEE S : Janie Souder of Balboa, \'{fendy Flo res of CrislObal, and Darlene Dal y of Canal Zone College; at the pre-game pep assembly with their esCOrts: Caleb Clement, J ose "'!e dina, Neil Panon, Walla ce Russon, Thomas P ursley, and R obert Phillips. \'(fend y Flores. Queen of the 21st Annual Jamboree. 1S9

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Q ueen /(oselltllrll (Jreets Victoriou/l Caleb Clement. J :me Paulson. Shelley Lund. Mike Dexccr. \'(1all)' Russon. Queen R osemary. Jose lvlcdina. Cath)' Gcrcich. Neil P:mon, Robert Phillips, :md Hil:t Lyman. The queen :md her com!. QUEEN ROSHltlRY Each year follow i ng the H omecoming F ootball Game a dance, honoring the members of the team and returning :dumni, i s h eld. T his year the dance was an exceptionally joyous occasi o n as it was celebr:Hcd the day after Cristobal's third undefeated game of the s eason, a 26 to 8 v ictory ove r arch-rival, Balboa High Sch ool. A completely transfo rmed cafet eria was r he scene of this festive event o n Sarurday October 3 1 1970. T he dance officially began at 8:30 with the presentation of the court by Master of Cer emonies, W:dl y R usson. Thi s year's queen was the lovel y R osemary Christian. Accompanying her were four orher aucactive girls from the class of '71, especially selected by the members of the football ream to p reside at this special dance. T hey were: Princess Cathy Gerci ch, Princess Shelley Lund. Princess Hila Lym,n, a n d P rincess Jane P aulso n Acting as escorts for the 9ueen and members of h e r court were: Nei l Pano n and Wally Ru sso n J ose Medina, Mic hael D exte r R obert Phillips, and Ca l e b Clement. Music for the evening was provided b y "The C h eese," a r oc k and r oll band composed of CristObal Hi g h S c hool srudentS A lar ge numb er of srudents attended the dance, spending much of their time at rhe refr eshment (cumer whe r e they con sumed cop i o us 9uantities o f soft drinks and Other reo f r eshmems. A ple:lsanr evening was enjo yed by all who attended The girls' Athleti c Assoc iation and the L etterman's C l ub, co-sponsors of this annual event, are to be commended by the many h ours of hard wor k necessary to make this dance a n outstanding success

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: r}gers At J(ol11ecol11illg Vallce A transformed Clfctcria provides an ide:ll setting for the H omecoming Dance. Pr incesses, Jane P aulson, Hil:l Lyman, Shelley L und, and Cathy Gcrcich. and their escorts join Queen R osemary Christian and her escort. Neil Patton in the traditi onal "Queen's D ance." "THE CHEESE," jimm)' Barrau. Rolic Mann s, David D iaz, and Julio Aponte. '"

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,.2 Witches Alti Warlocks Jlaultt eJls CAST: Dian e C:uoll. D o n :dd B yrd, Andr e w F oshee Judy I\IcL ain. L ewis Valdez. The an n ua l fall dramatic produc. tion of the CHS Int e rn a ti onal Thes pi an Society wa s John van Drut en's romantic comedy, 13e//, 13ook, alld Call die. Van Druten takes an apparentl y s imple l ove slOry. people s it with some delig htful modern-day witches. and crea t es an aura m agic in a p rosaic New York apartment buildin g. The t ale nt ed you n g acto r s and a c tre sses s uc ceed in brin gi ng some of this magic infO the C H S aud i tor ium on November 6 and 7. Audience s we r e enchanted by ,he story of Gillian H olroyd, a beau tiful you n g woman with the powe r to cas t spells : tnd per form supernatural feats. She lIsed her powers to win the l ove of Shepherd Henderson, the unattached you n g publisher living upstai rs, but forgot one impon:tnt fan a witch in love ma y l ose her powers. This is exanly what h a ppen s ro G illian and audience sympathizes with her attempt s to adJUSt ro lif e as an o rdinary monal amid the t easing of her Aunt Quee nie and her warlo c k brother. All e d elighted when Gillian finally win s her mall and th e pby closes o n a happy nme. T he outstanding p e rformances in rhe demandin g r o l es o f 'his play by C H S actors, three of whom were ncw co mer s t o the st:tge, r ece ived much deserved applause. Credit for the successfu l pre s entat i on of thi s pla y :tlso goes ro the hardworkin g students who de s igned a nd construned th e s et, han dled publici,) m a k e.up, ligh'ing, program s, a nd prop s a nd to EI fers. F aith Coad The F ini shing T ouc h

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AuditoriulH /11 nell nook Al1d eOl1dle Di:me Carol! and Donald Byrd. "No peeking!" CAST Gillian H olroyd Diane Caroll Shepherd H e n derso n D onald B y r d Miss H o lroyd ( aunt Qu eenie ) Judy M c Lain icky H olroyd Andrew Foshee Sidney R edlirch Lewi s Valdez Pyewacke, "Sinba d Direcror Mrs. Terence Elfers Srage Sue M endenhall Assi s t ant M anager Ingri d P ortie r Di:mc CaroB and Donald B y rd, "Now, (his i s my Grandmummy's secret brew!" Judy lI-lcLain and Donald B yrd. "Ooh! Thi s chair feds lumpy!" Robert F o rd. Jeff Briam, and R onnie Fors},th. THE LIGHT CRE\X '.3

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"4 flail 0/ lame ;Named At Christmas lormal "Shake ie, bur don't break it!" Lewis Valdez, Judy McLain. and Sandra AIbcrga Don't they ever StOP t:llking?" The Christmas Formal, held at the Sky Room on December 19, 1970 was the climax of many weeks of hard work for the members of [he Senio r Class Advisory Council and Board of DirectOrs who made up the commit tees which o r ganized and planned (his successful dance. Sruclents d:mced to the music of the "What For" amid decorations on the cherne "Right D own Santa Claus L ane." The pre sentation of the Senior Class Hall of Fame made thi s evcm one of the most memorable of the school year. Michael Dexter, "Mr. C H S M ark H erring, John F underburk, Rod Lindo Carmen Buder, and \X1endy Flo r es. H all of Fame Winners. Denise F os h ee, Hila L yman, Dennis Maxwell. Jan Bjo rneby, Donald Byrd J udy M c Lain, Mark H erring. Hall of Fame Winners.

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J Itterltoti(Jltol eltristmos; rlteme 01 eltristmos e(Jltcert The Girls' Chorus The Senior High Band Mr. FaHorosi "The Legend of Babus hka At 7:30 Tuesday evening, D ecember 22nd th e Cri stobal High School auditorium was the scene of rhe annual Christmas Concert. Participating in thi s traditional event were the Intermediate Band, the Senior H igh Band, and the Girls Chorus, all under the direCtion of Mr Edward Carwithen. Thi s year the concert had an imernational flavor; songs and musical sele ct i ons from such countries as France, Germany Russia, and Spain wer e presented Mr. Louis Fattorosi, an English teacher at C HS, gave read iogs from the iirerarure of these countries, which aided in setting rhe mood. Th e Inte r mediate Band, composed of Junior High Sehool srude nrs pre sented a number of selections which were well received by the audience. F ollowing their performance, rhe Senior H igh Band played a number of unusual and difficult selections. A highlight of the concert was the appearance of the Girls' Chorus, who wer e dressed in formals, adding a festive nOte ro the occasion. Among those deserving mention for solo performances are; Ronald Palser, Judy M cLain, and Jean Bassett.

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166 J(ore endets /flfd Spolfsors /fttelfd f1. O. z: e. T homas P ur sley For seven days o n several wee k ends in the month of F ebruary, the jungle su rrounding F e Sherman became the t emporary "home" of a number of students. T hese srudents were R O T C cadets and sponsors from Balboa and Cristoba l H ig h Schoo l s w h o were pttrt i cipating in the R O T C program. The purpose of t his p ro g ram was co trai n students co move, shoot, communicate, and s u stain themselves in a jungle environ m e nt. The arm}' provided eguipmcm a n d instru cto r s; p a rti c ip ants p a id f o r the i r own food. The tr a i n in g inclu de d s e v e r a l h ours of class room in s tru ct i o n num erous exc ur s i o n s to near by F o rt Sh e rm an, t arget d e t ect i o n airbo rne tr a i ning. boa t tr a inin g. river crossing, a n d a tri p to t h e mock Viet Co n g vii lage l oca t ed o n th e F renc h C an al. P a r ti cipants wh o g r aduated ( r o m th e course we r e g i ve n th e titl e, H o n o r ary J ungle E x p e n ". T his yea r s out s tan d in g grad u a t e f ro m C H S wa s cad e t co r po r a l Orlando R eyes.

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16' /!OlftJllet )lolfors ()IS C ettermelf The final ath l etic event of the 1969-70 school year wa s the annual Lettermen 's B anquet. On this occa sion the outstanding athlete's in all SPOrtS received recognition of their abil iry and awards for thei r service to C HS. The Banquet was held on Ma y 9, 197 0 at the France Field American Legi on. Dinner wa s served and a film of the 1969 P alm Bowl wa s s hown. C r istObal High School's coaches, Lit ton and Dedeaux presented the boys with letters in ba s ketball ba se ball, football, {cnni s, and track The most valuable player in each spOrt received a tfophy. Among the honored g ue sts at the banquet were the c heerl eaders, and the guests which each b oy brought. I t' s not often that athletes ge t a meal like thi s!" M ike D exter receives a letter in tennis from Coach Dedeaux. Ann H irons presents Coach Litton with a token of the team's appr ec i ation. \ '\fell we can't all win a trophy!'"

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Mar c h 12, 1971 Dear Readers: Toda y is the day I and th e o ther members of th e yearbook scaff have long dreamed of reaching. I t marks the completion of the rre mendou s task o f com pilin g a nd edi tin g the 1971 Caribbean. A s I heIp our sponsor Me. J ohnson with rhe packaging of our final shipment of copy, I recall the events, people, and places which arc recorded in chese pages. I also think of a number of individuals w h o assisted with the many essenrial, bue oft e n unrecognized tasks involved in the s uccessful production of a yearboo k On behalf of th e yearbook staff I wish to extend a s pecial thank you {Q Mrs. Condon who supervised the sale of advertisements and (Q Mr. Gansen who dedicarcd much of his time {Q the phOtography department. I also wis h to thank the Taylot Publ i s hin g Company Compagnani Alema n and Quelgue j e u S.A. for (heir collabo r ation and rhe business firms for their patronage The yearbook s taff had only a limited amount of time in which to record an a l most unlimited number of events, bur every effort was made to make our coverage of rhe schoo l year as complete as possible. I s i n cerely h ope that you have received as much pleasure in reading this book as we did in edi ting iL Sponsor Business Manager E ditor Cop y Editor ...... ... . A ssisrant Editors. Very trul y yours Jeannette Cox E dito r ..... Mt. J ohnso n ... Mrs. Condon ... J eannette Cox ...... Lana Boone ........ Maritza Th omas Rita B oyland Ivlaria Boone M argaret J acketic Beth Blei cher T ypist . ........................ Sheil a Alber ga Ph otographers .................... . ... Dann), Valentine D ebbie P ate Artwork Advertisements .... Allen Harmon ......... K athy D e R aps J eannie Basscn Rau1 CasrfO t

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170 \X' B Ahrndl R.m1On A( 1.:\l.:do p.ISG C II B oh .lnd I.m Agcl.: P.lul Llm Al.Jhm :-'I r .1Ilt! ( AlIxrg.1 Jnd ... L. Allx'rg.1 Sh(:iI.l Allx rc. 1 .md Clhm R .n A ldridgc .mel E L. t \ lger Alkn p.l r, JO:lIlne Allen p.lr .mel \ I r ... \X/ illi;tm Alon" ( torgll L Ander ... on Fred R Andree Clpt. lnd R Andrc\\\ Ctpt and p.l A nncn p.lr .md D and Nthon Au,lln R oben L .md F.lmih Apod. lci Famih G 10m A A ponce J ohn \X' A,k e\' 'D 13adc.--, J\tr and Flo\d B.tkt:r R BallO\ D ori'i Ban T \Y/ B.mnes .t\l r ;lnd Mrs_ I Connlel B.lrbos:l .t\l r and J a(k 1llrger B arr and Kenn elll .t\lr and D -un:! E Bca<.h .t\fr lnd Mrs. D E. B ell ;tnd D.1Ughtcr L E B ell .t\l r :md Mrs l3ell.md R W Ikmnghoff and r-.lrs Ed B CIN: n r-.lr and r-.l r ... B obb, B endc\ .t\l r and p.l r s E. J I kr,ger p.lr and i\lrs A J J R Bt" t p.1r, A Ikl.mwun (hn, Ikl.lnwun t-.lr and i\lry J A Bl.llko w ,kl, Sr t-.lr lnd Alfon ... o HI,.I\ D t:nm, B ight Fm\ Binglum p.lr and '.t\l r, J Blorm :h, l)or;l t-.l r :md R (I\xn BLmlhutc p.lr .md t-.lr,_ Il. uold E BLlkc p.hr-,' Blt'nnt'rll.I""u r-.lr, St.ln!t, L B lilllik t-.lr .lI1d .t\l r, Rlth.m\ \X' BOll.. r-.tr .Intl F Bon r-.I.m,t IX)()I1t r-.lr, (,(:or,gt 1300n<: r-.lr ... I kl'l.:nun .md F.ullIh Lourdn A Bm<:m,m E,thc.--r B on] \X' Sr.lIllil Vcnu!I Brann;l!) .t\lr :!nd t-.lrs J B re''iel Eh i,1 P Bring,t, Allen S .lIld Celia S 13ro\\ n .t\lr, (lInn E B rown t-.lr :md t-.lr, F : l\ .t\1 Bro\\ n t-.l r and \y/illi;ltll r-.I Bro\\ n t-.l r :lIld D E Bnl<.e D F Bullinger r-.l r Jnd t-.l r!l, Bunnel r-.l r, R L B unnel t-.lr :lIld T J Burbln e t-.l r :md .t\lrs I Burges, G Bur n t-.fr :lnd t-.l rs_ t-.l ichael BUr7.1 t-.f r and t-.t rs_ R : l\ m ond G Bu,h Gloria .t\brtin Cab31k r o A Cablcn t-.l r and r-.lrs. R L Cakla<;ure .t\l r and r-.lrs, \'Villia m C Calkin... E 13 CaJlomn and Famil), r-.l r and C;lmalho Mr and C. R C:unpbel1 JIIl1 Clmpbell Mr and H H C:lTt)' C3pt and T. H C:lrli,l<:' H elen L. Car roll Delia E C:mer .t\lr E R Can-I.'ithen Mr R oland \X' T t-.lr and .t\l r!l bm Cell u<. i Mr. G F Ch:!ser t-.lr. and r-.lrs, H C H Childress (St-. I :lnd t-.lrs. \'1/ I I Childrey, S F C 1-1 Childress t-.lr and J oe L ou I l Jr r-.l r :!nd t-.lrs. E Cirulh T o n ) Cixlx:11 Mr" BarbaLl L Clark I Io,,,k (alth C Clenlt"nt Joyce Cln'enger SGT and t-.lr!l_ J1I11I11\ D ClO\\cr, I r :!nd r-.lr, J Collin ) Cole t-.l r and i\lr'i Geor.g<: \XI Co!cm.lIl J o.mn ColIl(:f t-.lr and t-.l r, AlI)(:rt B Collilll t-.I.lrk \'V,dttr A C ollin, i\l r .mcl Colon E Comertord i\l r ,1Ild t-.l r, E J Compter .t\bn Condon .t\l r and Conw:!} r-.I.m.l A Corokc.--.t\l r lnd I\l r!l J S t-.l r .tnd I\l rs, \Y/i1ham 1-1 Cox J eanne Cnt''is r-.l r .1I1d i\lr s J ohn L CroiX p.1 Currier Alden Curti') D:tll1lllll R J D : miel<;en R D eaton W M Deat o n :lnd F.lmil), Dt:Jcsu,) Mr and t-.l rs_ David M r and r-.lr!l, D C Deni s Angelica S D erickson M r and M r s H 13 DeVo h Mr. ;lnd .t\l r s Aurel io Dc.--\Y/itt M r and p.l r s F. Di;l7 t-.lr and t-.l rs. H A D Olke r y L. D oke H R D o mene c h .t\l rs. Done) Z ona V Dowell O<:br:1 Dunkill s j\lr and .t\l r!l. \,(/ illiam Eggeb Mr and .t\f rs. George Egge r J r t-.l r and J\lrs. George R E golf Mr and Mrs. T E lfers Frank End<:r Em Erncst Leonor l Esmbido t-.I E s u:') t-.l r and .t\l r<; D R Fall t-.l r and t-.t rs_ J oe FJllett K:!th) FJub e r S F C :md M rs. J ose F ernando Mrs. Dor othy F erro Gilbert R F e rr o D I r and t-.l rs_ R on:lld Flte Pat and Lank\ Flore s t-.t r and .t\l rs. Charle s \XI. FI}'n Mr and Mr!l_ R obert Fors ythe L TC and t-.lr.s. G F oshec t-.lr. :tnd .t\l r s S T. Frankel J o hn :lI1d Su<: Fren.slcv "t-.l r and t-.lr!l. K O t-.l r :Ind Mr s R ichard t-.lr ... Gall ogher SGT and G \X/. Gant c r ?-.hria G;lrci;l SSG and P:tul Gariba, E nriqu e Gan::! t-.tr and G eer t-.lr ,mel t-.lr') R obert GeKg Hdcn J Ger<.ith Capt and i\lrs \XI Gillt'!lplc Gilbert Gilm ore

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lI.hritz3Gitz Mrs. P ovide Gitz Cornelius GocbertuS C3rol O Goerr3 Mr. 3nd Mrs. H ow3rd Golden J e3nne J. Goldman Mr. and Mrs. H enry Goldmann Gabri elle H Gonzalez Ed G ordon D ebra Gosney Mr. and Mrs GOIt Capt and Mrs. T homas \Y.!. Goves Mr and Mrs. R:lnd:lll H Grubbs Mr. and Mrs. \Xlilliam R Graham R oger A Grah:lm \XI. Grant R oben Greer G ene Gregg Mr and Gregor) Mr. and Mrs. D E Grier Miss Jacinta E Griffith s lI.lrs. Grist Mr and Mrs. Juan J. Guevara Tiram a Hall Mr and iI.' lrs. Arnold F Hames Mr. and Mrs. Eugene E H amlin, Jr. SGT and l\lrs. D H H ammond Mr and Mrs. R obert J. H ancock David R H a rbur ger R o nald L. H arg i s M r and Mr s P B H arrwetl, J r Di" n e H auke ?>.Irs. J ames H auser Th omas Head R J. H elmerick s L. H ess l\1r. and iI.' l rs. Paul H ieron)mu s Mr and Mr s T H H iggin s Mr and il.l rs. L. G H ighley Mr and il.l rs. Ro), Hill Mr. and Mrs. \Xlilliam G Hill R ichard H ine s Maj. and Mr:.. Vernon W I I hnkel M r and Mr s R l\1. H iron s C apt. and il.l rs. L. H H ixon I nsula H ogaboam 1vl r and t-.lrs. M H olc omb Mr and il.lrs. \Xlilfred H old J r Jud), and Bob H olden E milia H olge r:iOn J ames L. H omer Mr. :lnd Mrs H opkin s Mr ?>.1. C. How3r d l\l r and M r s Charles Wl. H owe il.l r Roy H owell R F Huldt9ui:.t Jr lI.l r :lnd Mrs. Dcnni:. R H uff J ames J H usnik Capt. and t-.l r s R H utchinson Dr. and t-.lrs. O C. Irio n t-.lr and t-.lr:.. R ona l d Jacobs Soosters A E J akeu c Phillip s J3me s M rs. Ralph Jame s Mr. and l\l rs. Ja.leekc r Fr:lIlk Madig ar M L 1\1alo R t-. hnns Mr. and 1\l rs. W E 1\l arck t-.Ir. and Mrs. Alfred G f'..brc Mr. and 1\l rs. Tom Mars h t>.1r. and Mrs. Louis E Mantn M rs. S F !\bso n III Juan t-.lat:t Capt and l\l rs. R o bert S ?>.lata 1\l r and 1\l rs. M c C o rn c k Mr. and M rs. l\faurice f'..f<.Culloug h R E Capt and l\l rs. G A 1\IcDon a l d Capt and 1\l rs. Pat !\1cDonal d }'I rs. T:ls hik o M cDonald Pat and Pam l\IcDonald L t Col. and M rs. Jam es t-.IcKe nm Karen Capt and 1\l rs. Arthur 1\IcLe a n 1\lrs. Jame s t-.1ct-.tade Capt. and 1\l rs. D rumm ond f'..f<.Na ught o n A M cZeno J aime 1\l edina Capt. and M rs. J. Finle) Meehan M r and l\l rs. Dabne\ B il.l eeker Capt and M rs. J o hn \'V kekcr r..1. \X'. f'..fenger 1\l r and Mrs. Paul 1\1 Menges H arve y 1\l i c hacl f'..l r and Mr!i. Ch arles R 1\lIl1er R E and 1\l rs. Jac k 1\l dh gan 1\lr. and 1\l rs. Th o m:ls E f'..ltne hart 1\1r. and M rs. Da\"e t-.lins k e\\ George r..litc hell e T h omas r..l i zene r t-.l r and f'..f rs. 1\ltzrachi Frank f'..fcx:liz:u l\lr:.. N G 1\t o nceval s Aleida M o ntene gro 1\ 1 r;). V . f'..[ organ Mrs. J os eph M orrisen 1\1r. a'1d Mrs. R obe n L t-.h ers 1\lr:.. Luida N e lson Donni e N ettles Jr \Y.!ilbert l e) :tn d Famil ) l\l r and 1\l rs. NicoLus en 1\1r. Nicol ette 1\l rs. 1\laria I I i e \es t-.fa,. and Mrs. G P N oble III l\1r. lorma n l\l rs. 1\l3rgar i t l .t o r mandla 1\l r a n d Mrs. R E. Oberholtzer 1\l r5. O c hoa R obert O'C onno r 1 71

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172 I (){tl"T -t-.l r .lIld lohn T O Donm:11 I r i'.lr .lIld RldlJrd O Donndl R T Oidium Ahd OII\.m:1 (<.:dlu .... (Y"kdl ./-1111<:' i'.l r .md ;"Ir, Ortll M r .111<1 ;"Ir' LUI' R Oml ;\; Ortll I' O,hornt R \'\, OWU1 i'.l r .lI1d I\.lr, I l.lrl.md 1\.11" :-'.II1<1r.1 P .ltt' I\.l r E nrltllK P.I,I.:,1I1 I : T P .l!lle .lOt! I\.lr' Luk e C P.dumho J r :-'I r .Ind I\.lr' Luke C P 31umho 'Sr )olr .md I\.lr' l.uk e T P.llumho l\.l r .md I\.lr' C F P.IIHO,.1 Sar.lh P.lrk CT R .lOd I\.lr' Roger R PC;I,h' :-'Ir and I\.lr' R on.lld L Pennock Col .1Ilt! I\.lr' Roberto Per.IIt.1 I-kller Peru :-'I r :lnd I\l h 1 :II11C, Pl.1u l\.l r .md I\.lr' 'C.lrI A PlIltO 5om,1 Pockll C1l.1rli(' .111<1 l\.1tk e Pocr l\.! r .lOd l\.l h Thom.h Point" l\.Ir .1I)d l\.lr' D.lf\ vin E Pope P o tlcr F.lmil, l\b!_ .lI1d l\.lr, Fr.lIlk l\.1 P oce tt : ;"I r :Inti l\.lr, Poulin K S Pnlh.lrd ;"b!_ and l\.lr, R P Prmhcr, Dr and l\.l h Jllme Pllj.lh Frt'ne R.Ji).I.Rh.1t Capt .lIld I\.lr' A E IblflC\ O,ul\ R .lm.ll h o Clpt E B R.lmler l\.\.uilIHI H.,unirt'! A A R.lI1kln l\.l r .In
PAGE 177

Congratulations to the Class of 1971 From UNITED FRUIT COMPANY Box 5016 Cristobal Canal Zone Compliments of MOTTA INTERNACIONAL, S A Box 417 Colon Panama 173

PAGE 178

174 C omplimen ts of the CRISTOBAL Y.M.C.A. BARBER SHOP Compliments of the MARGARITA FLORIST "Service is our busin ess ," H ours: Mon. Thru Sat 8 00 A.M.-8 00 P M W e Watch-Match-Dispatch. RUPERT AND JOE BLACK Y our Fa .... orit e Barb e r s F o r Appo intments Call 3 2 797 -AIR CONDITIONED-E s tabli s h e d in 1909 Phone 3 191b 7997 First St., Margarita C Z BOl 1355 Cristobal, Canal Zone BOYD BROTHERS STEAMSHIP AGENCIES, LTD. Box 5077 Cristobal, Canal Zone Compliments of E. J BERGER ATTORNEY AT LAW Box 5081 Cristobal, Canal Zone

PAGE 179

Congratulations to the Class of 1971 PANAMA CANAL YACHT CLUB Box 5041 Cristobal Canal Zon e 17,

PAGE 180

IT6 AVEC LES COMPLIMENTS DE CIE. GLE. TRANSATLANTIQU E FRENCH LINE Cristobal, Canal Zone \ Compliments of DR. MELCHOR SA YOC D en t ist 80' 5006 Margarita, Canal Z one Compliments of NORTON LILLY & COMPANY, INC. STEAMSHIP AGENTS AND OPERATORS United Fruit Company Building CRISTOBAL 1837 Tel. 3 1801 1756 Balboa Port Captain Building Tel. 2 1841 1746 Compliments of CRISTOBAL SHOESHOP 14th Street Cristobal, Canal Zone Tel. 3

PAGE 181

Congratulat ions to the Class of 1971 From UNITED FRUIT COMPANY Compliments o f TEXAS ANTILLES LIMITED Box5 0 1 6 Cristobal, C a n a l Z one YAM AHA It's A Better Machine Compliments of The Vinc e ntian Fathers HOLY FAMilY CHURCH Margarita Canal Zon e 177

PAGE 182

"8 Compliments of GIL MORLAND From C. B. FENTON AND CO., INC. Box 5015 Cri stobal Canal Zone

PAGE 183

Compliments of DELCARGO, INC Cristobal Canal, Zone Compliment s of the TARPON C LUB Box 1322 Cristobal Canal Zo n e Congratulations to the Class of 1971 From C FERNIE AND CO. INC. Box 5042 Cristobal, Canal Zone 179

PAGE 184

180 Compliments of I'lalian I.ine With the Compliments of W. ANDREWS & CO. LTD. Compliments of the COCO SOLO LIONS CLUB Courte s y o f th e CRIS T OBAL Y.M .C.A RESTAURANT Telephone Cristobal 3 Panama 25 I Compliments of J. J PALOMERAS FRENCH BAZAR Colon ALMACEN SURANY, S. A. P.o. Box 503 CASA BEE'S, T.le" PA 226 Tel. 7 5070 Cable: Shagwan B T. MA YANI, S A Colon, Fre e Zone Ap.,t.do 316 Colon, Rep. De Panama

PAGE 185

Congratulations to the Closs of 1971 From B.P.O. ELKS LODGE #1542 Box 1542 Cri s tobal Canal Zone 181

PAGE 186

'.2 Compliments of CANAL ZONE CUSTOMS ASSOCIATION Box 1295 Cri s t obal Canal Zone AUTHORIZED DEALER MEYERS MANX NORDSTROM e HUOS S .A. Box 1566 Colon Panama

PAGE 187

Compliments From the CANAL ZONE POLICE ASSOCIATION Cristobal Congratulations to the Class of 1971 From TROPICAL RADIO TELEGRAPH CO. -P-Cristobal Canal Zone PRUDENTIAL-GRACE LINES, INC. PANAMA AGENCIES CO. General Agencies Cristobal, Canal Zone 183

PAGE 188

184 V F W POST I 00, MARGARITA, C .Z. Compliment. of lIT ALL AMERICAN CABLE & RADIO INC. 8o. 5032 Cristoba l Canal Zone Compliments of BIR HAR'S BOUTIQUE Colon Panama i /"!f)'{! & ,J;" Compliments of BREAKERS CLUB Compliments of INTERNACIONAL DE LlCORES S.A. Colon, Panama INTER-AMERICAN LINES BI-Weekly-Independent Service to From New Orleans and Miami and Central America Phon e Panama 25-4933 Cristobal 3 528

PAGE 189

KN!iM ROYAL NETHER LANDS STEAMSHIP CO. Compliments of LT. G. H. MOUMBLOW MEMORIAL POST #3876 VFW INC. Cri s tobal Canal Zone

PAGE 190

, .. Congratulations to the Class of 1971 From HOSPITAL SAMARIT ANO Compliments From the MAVIS BEAUTY SHOP Colon Panama Congratulations to the Class of 197 1 From MADURITO'S SA Colon, Panama Col on Panama P o. n o x ROO TELEPHONE 7.03 I I C;01 .0'. H O F I "t..'" JI!!!. 1 '210 --------9cl. I1I1tI FrOllt Strecl {'-ulon. H C I of Panama WE MAKE AIUC,'I"
PAGE 191

Compliments of ELBERT S. WAID POST NO. 2 THE AMERICAN LEGION FRANCE FIELD, C z Air-C o nditi o n e d Bar Op e n 24Hour s a Day Bingo Thur s day and Sunday Meeting s 2nd VVe dnesday o f Eac h M o nth LESLIE R THOMAS Post Commander 187

PAGE 192

188 CARIBBEAN SPORTS PARACHUTE CLUB Hangar 114 7 B e hind T h e High Sc ho o l CIA M A R ITIMA ITURRALDE Apdrtado 1737 Colon, Rep. d e Panama KERLEY NAUTICAL SUPPLY P .O. Bo, 4192 Miami, Flo r ida ]]101 Cables: COFERB.lbo., C. Z P. O Bo, 191 B lbo. C Z L K COFER, INC S teamship Age nts Captain of th e P o rt Bui lding B alboa, C. Z P ost Offic e B uilding Cristobal C Z B.lbo. 2 2572 .nd 2 C r istobal ) 3206 and 3-1743 Court esy of PAN AMERICAN MAIL LINE C omplim ents of the GATUN YACHT CLUB PUT A LITTLE LOVE IN YOUR HEART

PAGE 193

'laculty, Stall and eurriculuJlf Jndex Adminutr:l.Iion 30, 31 Alford, R o t c -!I' Alkn. -32 An-36 R ob w -118. ,2 Blanchew.-(Mrs.)-32 Bock, Richud W -,j. j Brigtll, A dam u), A -4'. 33 Campbell B : ubm L -48 Carwi(hen, Edw:ml R 46 Cheshire, Jr . Habit 0 -38 Clinic-32 Commerce -H Condon, M:l.I) L. -,2 Cowley, llwrence A -4,1 Dedeaux, louis F -124,168,1,".,18 Dobbin s Jod B -38 E lfcn, Jlne K 126, 38, 132 English 38. 39 Fmo r osi, louis J. -16,. 6,. 38, 39, 134 A bt'yn. Raymond !threseh. Ernest -1l4 140,9' Adlms, Clyde -1)1, 1,6. 116 A dlms, E milio Adams. Ni ckilda -96 A lb(rga. Charles -104 Deborah -104, U" 1}2 Alberg1l.. Sandr:a 13'. 164. 62. SO, m Alberga, Sheila -128. 129. 88, 13'. l}4, 09.91,132 Akniris, Shen Lynn -120 Akuius, Jr ,John -104 A lger. David 116, 120 AlgC'(. Pmic 88 AlgC'f. Vi c kIe 118 A llen, Briln 88, 123, 140 A ll en Lonme 119 A llen, Willilm 116, 120 Al onis, JlIY 62, 23 Amason, JlImes 120 Amburn, Bud dy An de r sen, ClIrl-118, 127 Anderson,Shllwn -114 An dree, Michllel An d ree, Willilln -104 Amo n, l'ohnha 12S, 129,88, 1J2 ApocllCl1, Cyn rhill -114 Apoclm, GIl -96, 12S. 122 ApoclllCll, Ml chllel 88, 124. 140 Aponte. Julio -161 Aponte. Stephen -96. 129.47, )).)6 Arblugh. Suun -lot Au sti n A lm llnubll 6. 62, SO Au stin. Donliid -lot A ustin, John 1I6, 120 Austin PmlCia 62, S) A ustin. Paul 1I 9 A ustin. Roben 113, 116 A us t in. Roben 112, 116 A ustin, Susln 119 A uStin Jr . Donlld F lttorOSI, M June 48, I H Fite. Ronlld S -60, 43. 91 Fite D -37 F oreign L:mgullges 40, 41 GlInsen. Wi!lilm J -H. )2 Gegg, An ne D -12S, 129.40 Gregg. Eugene T -)3 Griffiths, JlIcinlll E -32 Grubbs, RlIndll ll H -44 Guidance-B Hmis.Joln F -H ieronymus, Pliul J -HollowllY, Jesse C. 43 Home E conomics 42 H o ward. T clmll I. -130, IJI, 40. 41 H o well, R oy E -H offmlln (Coach) -I". 147 Indumilll ArtS 43 Jlcobs. Ronald D -)3 PlIul). -31 Johnson.-Cbre W -60, 139.37 Kmght, Carol J -K oziol. Edwin M 36 Lasslb. Ronald L 60. 43 lc\m(Or)-32 34 L lllon, Douglu 8 168, 4S, 1)6 l\llI son, Emma L. -)0 Mm. JUlin M -)) l'-1lilhemltlCs-44,4) Muzoni. Bernard -4) McCullough, R obert E -127.)3 M c N lIughlon. ElizlIbeth 42 M o wery R obert L -B Murphy. A lejandro D -Music-46,47 Normlln,Jlmes O -99,1)1 OfficeSllff-32 Pllumbo, Luke C. -33 Pllumbo, Luke T )1 PfllU, S -3) Student Jndex Au stin. Elaine 12S Autry Deble-III Blitel, 81tbl;; 117, 120 Blitcl, PlU] 88. I)), 140, 1)6. 132 BlIker, Clrol -10.1, 148, 107 Blker. Donn1 -96 Blker, IXbbie -120 Blker.0Iane-113 BlIke r Glen -88 Blker. Pa ul 119, 116 B a k e r. Tern -62,1)2 B11mer. Klthy -II) Banks. Blrolta 88 Barger. M IChael 88. 140 B arger. Steven 116 Blmett. M arilyn 113 Baronne, Joanne -116 Barr. James -96 Barr. Peter-II) Barr. R obert 62 -88.161,26 Evel yn -10-1 BuritelluJr.John-112,116 8lSSCtt, Jelm 63, SO, 132 SlIXter. M arilyn -96 8c:11e.Mary-112 Bc:r.1e. Michlcl-I)).63 Belle. R oger lot Bttbe. Wilham -88 Behre. T homas 33, III JlIlme Bensen Christopher -lot Bert) -129.88, 140 Beunrourt lIolllrgllret Beuncourt. R osem l ry -96. 130. 102 Betch er 88 BIrd Jr. Jlmes 119, 116 B isol. Donnl -96 BJOrneby, Jan -)8.164.12).63 B Jomeb). }.hchlcl -96 Blair. }'llIr JOrie':"'" 114 B l an chard. Stlln'() Blanchlrd, Timoth)' -96 Bbnc h ette, Gerillnne 88 B lllnchcue, PlIulll 104. III BleI cher, Beth :"'1 IS. 120, 139 BleICher. DlIvid -10-4, 148 B leicher. Plul -96. 138, 100. 147. 1<8 BIe\ ins. Elizabeth -)8, 63. SO Blevins, Jeffrey -96 Bli znik, 118 Blotmer, Bl;bm -96, 12S. 5S. 12). 1)2,14) Blotmer Jr, Robert 88, 124. I)). 140,148,119 B lout. Ed\\'lrd -liS B lount. LuC)" Tinl 120. 42 Bock, Robm -96 Bomln. James Bonilla. Amlldo -l().l Boone, bnl 128, 13), 34,136,133, SO, 71, 82, 139, 23. 6}, 86. 134 Boone, Maril 128, 88, 127. 148. 139,134 Booth, R ich1td 88. 148 Botsclltno, H enry 88. 33 Boseman, Viviln 6, 63, SO Boswell, 88 Bos\\'ell, M lChlel -120 Bos\\'ell, Ste\'cn -113 Bo\\ers. uri 104 Boybnd, ChllflOlle 104, 122. III Bo)"bnd, Rln 126. 129. 88. 122, 123.10,127,139 Bndb). Robert 113 Muglrel -112 Bndbuf) lit. Willilm Jr R obert -120 Bndenburg, Janel 89. )S -lot, 120 James H -60, II". }O Ph)slol EduollOn -IS, 49 PlColi, L. -)) Rtt\es, Chulcs T 127, )1, "'9 Rlef1cohl.StellllC. -40 ROTC -)4. )). )6, )7 Science-)0.)1 Shuick. Elfl c.-}) Smith, Doroth)' H }9, 38. 80 Social Studies -)2, H Special Edu(":'lIIon -3) Jlmes E -41 Stronllch. Glendll S -60, 39 Tanner, l\llrthl 1-39 MlIfLon B -32 Wnver, Fiorclll Wells, Dl)lon N -34 Wilferd. Ugo!enl 39 Will, William -41,39 RebecCll 0 -GO, 39 Brllnnen, George Brllnnen Ill, Willillm Br idwell Ill. Arthur Br id w ell, John -113 Br id\\'ell, Plmeb -96 Brien, Jeffrey"':: 96, 163. 10} urmen -113 Bringu Jr. Edw1td -96. 129, Br oc k, bUD -lot B rock, -89, )8. 9) Br oc k, StC\en 114, 116 Brockman, R obert -lot Br o\\n, Amber -lot Br O\\'n Blllie-1I2 Bro"'n, Carlos -89, 12-1. 10. 140 B ro \\ 'n, -lot Bro\\n, Donlld -lot Bro\\n. E!ln -11),42 Br o\\'n, Jlnel -120 Bro\\n,Jonathan 120 Brown, Kathlttn -96, 13), 103 Bro\\n. M elmda -96, 129, 130. 103 Brown, Patrice -96, 1 2 Bro \\n, Terri-114.34 Budd, -104 Bu dd, I)c-slrtt-113 Bulling er, IXnlse 103 Bullinger, Kurt 113 Bund) Jr Earl -96 -liS Burolne, Anthon) -114 Sunn -96, !lS. 129, 10 Burgess, Elillbeth -lot Burgess. Kalhr,n -6-\ Bush, Kathn n -96 ButCher. leo -lot Butler, Carmen -6, 1M. 136, 6-\, "fl, S3 Butler.lnes-112 B)not, ClIrlos 119 189

PAGE 194

190 SHd, -126, 162, 163, 64, ] \.I Clbrcn, Armando -SO C:lin, -] 19 }-I Campbdl,James-II} Clre}', Deborah -]().I, ]'18, ]] I Clflisle, Catherine -12&, 89, ]26, 1,21,13-\,91 CHolI, DLane -96, ]62, 163, 13 Caroll. RLchard -]11 Cmer, Eliubeth -122, 86, 64, 4 9, 71,80 Carv.nhcn,Jcffre),-112,116 Cash, -89 Clsh Jf ,Jimmy -114 Cmfo, Helen 89 Cmfo, Raul -g.i, 86, 64, 71. 1j2 C1StfO, Rlla -120 Calien, Anste),-95 Caudill, Che,)'1 -89 Caudill. J1), -89 Chlvis, Valdez -119 Ch:lvel, Bafbara-118 CheshLfe, Ahn-l().i Cheshlf e, Debonh 89 Chddre ss, J:lmes -96 ChLldress, R:mdy -89 ChnslLln II.JO(' -104 Chnsmn, M ona -112 Chmtlln. -,H, 66 ChrlSlian, R oseml,)' -161. 1 60, 66, 26 ClCche(o, FflLnk -89. 124, 140, Ciccolo, \\?llhlm -Cimino, Elizabeth -96 Cimino, Leopold -118 Cirulli, Ann -96 C1aflmUnt,Juan-112 Clement, Caleb -140, 14}, 1 60,66. m C1ie(le,r-. lichlel-114 Clime, Ren e e -130 Coad, Fauh -162, }4, 66 Coad, P amel l -89 Cobb, AmLnta -89, 130, Coc, Debfa -Coc, L isbel -Coffin, Gefald -96, 148, 107 Coffin, Mafcia-114 Cole, Fred 66 Cole, R obe m-89, 91 Coleman, -130 Coleman. Che!)'1 89, '2 C ollms, Gary -66 Colhns III,Jlmes -1 02 Collins. John -120 Collins. hhrk -89 Collins. Mlchlel -114 Collins Jr, \'(falter -120, n Colpc-, K a thle en 96 Colpc-, PlIrLcia-113 Colon, Lourdes -%, I B Colon, Sonia -89 Coo k e. I.a\era -97 Cooper. Greg -11' Cooper, Paul Coronldo, ClrlOS -116 Coronldo, Gus lav o -120 COUIS, Cui -119 Couts. Clifford COutS,Susan-78 COUIS, \'(fll ne -89 Cox, Chnsto p hcr -123 Cox, Jelnnme -128, 129, 130, 13}, 136,139,67,134 Cronln, \X/Llllam 112 Crouch, A nne -Crouch, lII:HLan -102 Cruz, George -103, 156 Jr, J oh n -116, 120 Cummmgs, I\' el(e 129,89, 130, 10, 1)2 Cummings, Lc-Iand -97 Cummmgs, \'(flher -II' Cummings, \'(flnd l -97 Currier, K aren 89, 9], 144, 34, Currief, R obert -116 Dade y ,\'(fa)'ne-II' Din, DH'Ld ] 6] 011)', Darlene -158, Damiani, Guy -97 Dance r Laveda-105,122, 130 Dancer, Sheila 90 DancerJr, Do),Ie-113 Dandridg e, Dev o n), -114 Daniel, Emilie 90, 146 Daniel, emick 113.116 Daniclsen,ChcfL -117.119, 118 Danielsen, Kathie 97, 122. Da rcy, Joan Darcy, Michelle-IO' Davil l,r-. hrk-I05 Dal ison, J ohn -120 Day, J ohn 90, 40, 143 Day, R obert 1 14, 116 Deaton, Donna -114 Deaton J r .. William 90, 124, 140, 1 1 DealOn, Ted -105 Deboer, K aren -120 Deboer, Theod ore I U De Jesus, George -! 1 9, 116 De Jes u s R uperto -}5 De Jesus Jr., R uperto Del B u slO, l racema -105 Denis, M lrc 97 De R1PS, Bmn 97, 129 De R aps, K:lIhlee n -118, 139, 67,134,7 1 DeVluh. P micia -120,4 2 DeVluh, Mic hac! -114 DeVaul! II. Raym ond -Dexter. -117 Dexler. J ames -112, 116 Dexter. Michael-122, 1 }8, 7,133, 164.168, U6, 71,156,134,147,82 B 81, 86, 67 Din, David -160 Din, Richard -119 DLn, -105 Din J r Pedro -67 Dillin,James-115 Dingm an, H enry 103 Dockery, MLchac! -116 Dohle Cra L g -116. 120 Dohle Jane-97,12"I53 Dohle, J ohn 97,125, 107 Dohle, Judy 97, 12', 99, Dominguez, R osHl -97.58 Dowel!, H 3r!) -97 Dowell, Ric hard II Du s on, Elaine -103 Edmondson, Nanc}' -128, ]29,90, 122, 125,45,91,76,58 E dwards, Tilda -114 Egger. Ilrenda 90. 130, 6, I} I 9 4 E vangebs, Sue -103 Endlr:l. R oberto -9' E nder, J osep h 97, 132 Ender, Ralph 13',78, 132 E scobIdo. Lawrence -116 R obert Evans, Cheryl -113 Evans Davld -119 Evl ns, MLchaei -122 F arnsworth. Al!en-78 F arnsw o rth. Davld-114 F arrmgt o n, Klthryn 97. 122. 138 F auber. Albert -119 F auber. J ames -I!6 F auber. KarenI05 K ;uhleen -97 F eeley,James-11 9 F erguson, Cmd y -112 F erguson, Dan Lei F erguson, Edna 97, 130 F erguson, Trina -10'. 130 F ernlndez. R obert -114 Ferns, Alic e -120 Ferns,Gary-120 F err e l, Clifford 90 F erris. E5teliI3-97, 145 Finnemln, Thom a s -10' F l ores, Lori -119, 118 F lores, \'(fend y I 164, 142, 86, 67, 71,83,80 F luharty,Carol -112 F Juhl r t)', Mary-119 Fryer, Geo r ge 1 1 Fryer R ichmond F ontanez, Mari:l -90, 130, 132 F on t anez, Pedro -97 F ord, R obert 97, 163 F orsg r en, Lc-Ster -113 F ors)' th. Slel 'en -105 F orsyth Jr.. R onald 97, 16} F os h ee, Andrew 90 124. 1 62, 144. 140 F oshee, D enise -11}, II. 80. 71,22, 164. 10, 11,82.55, 8 4, 78. IJ4 F ugleberg. S t ephan 90 140 F unde r burk, J oh n 68, 8 3 1&) F urr. Li5a-97 Gab r iel, Clifford -105 Gabriel, T h omas -113 116 Ga r cia, L inda -112 G arner M ardelle 90, 10}, DO G a rner. Paul-120 Ger c i c h, C:llherine -58. 68, SO, 160, 1 6 1 Gercich, Nina 58,97 Gcwin, Jimm), 90, 127 Gewin, R ebecca -10' Gibson, B rendl -36, 68 Gibson, Lc-slie-112 Gibson, Mark-97 Gilbert, Susan -117 118 Gillespie. Russel! -116 118 G illespie, W illiam 90, 129 Godinez, Violanda -Gocberru s Cornelius -97. 128. 129, m G og uen, Greg ory 90, 122, D2 G og uen, L y nne -9' Golden, Edward -97 Golden, Sharon 68 Goldman, H enry -97 Goldman. Peter -97 Gonier, Dlvi d -116. 120 G onier. P:Ilf1ce 97, lO}, ]29 Gonzalez, Ann 90, 9', 22, 128 G onzalez, ESlher -97 G o nzalez, F r.lncisco -155 Gonlllez, J osefa -116, 118.42 Gonzalez, J uan -Gonzalez, Mam -105. UO G o nzalez, Olga 97, 130. I } I G ood. Glom -119 Goodwin, Blrblra -148, III G ood w m, Brenda -114 G os ney. De bra -123, DO, 98, l}1. 9' G osn ey, D L ane -130 Gosney, Jcffery-144 G oss Rand) 120 GOII, Roy -98 Goulet, Karen-105 G ou let, Stephen -23, 68 Gr l ham. Donna -4 9 Green,Danic!-105 Green, M auhew Green, Zan -90 Gregg, Gad -112 Gregg, !.aura 1l4 G r egg, L )'nn -91 Gregg, M arian 58,91 Gregg, Nancy 98, 145 Gregory, Clarissa -Gregory, K elvin -120 Grier, B arbara-91 Grist, Gregory -105 Gris l R onald 120 Gsell, R aymond 98, 91 Gue rr ero, Carlos -119 Grerrero, Mari:l 1I1. 130 Guil f oyle, Lorraine Guil f oyle, \'(falte r-IU Gutie rrez, P atri ci:l -68 H ames, M e llnie-118 H amillOn, F r:lnciseo -H ammond, Edwin -91 H ammond, H ubert -116 H anly, r-.hrk I23,91 .132 H annah. John -68 H arden, Debra -116 H arden, Karen -105, DO H armon A llen -126, US, 139, 86, 69,134 H arr is. Jose H artshorn K imberl) -10' H artshor n R obin -130 Hauk e, D iane -122. 126, U" 134, 127,81. 69, 71, 80. 132 Hluk e Palricia-128. 129 130, U5. 134.91,7,132 H ayden. M ichael-98, 1 3 H eady, Brian -105 H eady, Paul 69 Heath.Cynthia-I05 H elme r ichs, Susan -98 H ernandez, E\'elyn -H ernandez, lris-l06 H ernandez, Melinda-120 H ernandez, 115,116 H eres, I saac -10, 69, 80,132 H erring, Anne -106 H erring, J oseph -91 H erring, r-.hrk 164,69 H err i ng, Ste p hen -116 H ess.GJc n 114.116 Hess, K a t hleen I29,145.91 H ess, L inda -120, 129, 98, Hier o n y mus, Che,)'1 -122, 106, 148, 1 1 1,107

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H iggins, Barbra -II) H ighley, F rederick -70 H ill II, Kenneth 127, )0, 91 H ill Pmicia )9. 95 H ill. She rry -116 H oagland. Richard -113 H offman, Jeffry -1 1 9, 106 H offman, M elody -106 H ogabo am, Doris -114 H olloway. K ip -113 H o lt, H arry -106 H one r baum. toluk H opkins Paul -112 H om, Nancy -129, 130,98 H ousley. Kay-II] H udgins. Ruth-1I4 Huff, 98. 10], I -106 William -124. 1)4. 140, 14].1)6,91 H ughes, -119 H ughes, Deborah -II'. 118 H ughes J r Bobby H umphrqos, -130. 106 H unnicu t Yohnda -113 Hunter Bruce-1I8 H urlbut, Dennis 98 H urlbut. H usband. Pamela -106 H usband. Priscilh -112 H uson. Nancy 70 H ust('r, H arold 98 Illies, StephanIe 6, 13', 22, 70, 79. IJ2 lIund.Gury-1I9 !lund, June -129. 130. 92 Ir ion, Enc 12] Irion, kif-147, 70 Irizury, Angel -106 Ja c k son. Bruce-112 Ja ckson, -106 Jackson, Debra Jackson. 98 R aymond -III .. Debrah 98 J a k e tic,l\.brguet-114.118 Janosik.Jan Jan osi k JO)'ce -106 Rell-112 Jeffries, Doughs -122.6,92,147,9' Jeffries, Michllel -106, 1'4. I". 147 Jeffries Jr. Donald -113 Jimenez, Jenn y -130, 106 Jimenez. WIlliam -106 Johnson. -119 J ohnson. Jose -98,147 J oh n son, R obe n -70, 4} J ohns t on, R oge r -9' J on es. Jame s -106 J ones, K aren 1 06 Jordi. Paulette -128, 129, 130. 92, '" K udonskl. S(C\'('n -114 K atsumolO. Janet -113 N orine -112 -106 Kelly III Daniel-120 Ke rn. Sherry -122. 70. 79, 1'2 Ke rn 111, William -119 K ('ssler. M ichele 98. \02. 10] Kicnr.Ie, Marguel 11'. 117 Kilm er Paul 98 K inK)' Jr., Forest -120 J oh n -120 Kiyon:lgll. Vicky -115 K hsovsky, Anroni:l -71 Knauss, D:lnid 92 K nauss, Frtderick-148. 71 KononCTI. Clifford K ononen. M ich:ld K raus. K athe r ine -128. 122. 1'9, 144.92,64 MUS, Katie 98 K rtdell, Marian )8, 12', 14', 49, 91,92 K rtdell, Thomas K resge, Cheryl -106 Kre sge, Richard Laboy, Juan -120 La Pom, Jr. D -II] laR oche, Angeline laR oche. David u R oche, l\.!:lt)" -1 1 2 uRoche, M:lXine -9' uRoche. Ne:ll -71 usher, Chnnian 98, 148 uuriu('n,Ann-128.71 kDou;ll:, Wil1i:lm -140, 148, 9' Ltt, Da\'id -106 Ltt, Jod -9) Ltt, John 98 Ltt, Roben 1 1 6 Ltt, Victor -106, 13], 107 lindo. R odrigo -122. 1&1, 1,17,86, 72.8], SO, 1]2 loibl, Paul -119 lolzeaull, Christin:l -Il8. 92. 10, 148,27 loizeaull,J:lnna-117, 134, 118, 120 loizeaull, Llnda-112 1.olzeaull, ScOt 98, 148 1.o\' e, Brian 98 loyd, Ann -106 loyd, Patricia-II] LUC1lS, Laura -106 LUC1l5, P:lul -120 L uger, R och.ell-II) Luna, Arm:lndo -119 LunaJr, louis l und, Shelley -128,34,12',86.160, 161,72,49, SO L ym:ln, Hil:l 164,54, 1 60, 72, 27, ,. L yman, M ou nyen 98, '8 Lyons, Ricky-112 l)ons. Tony -106, '6 M aesills, u\lltence 98 M ans, Don:lld 92, 1'6 M arohl. KIm -106 M arsh, Edythe 98, I]', 149, 148, IOJ Mush, E s ther-UO, III l\.hnin, J ohn -122, 72, 79,)6 Maninel,Jaime-72 M ason. DcshCli -106 M:lX ... ell. Dennis 164,84, 72, 79. SO,71 l\.hx ... ell, Elena 6, 100 Mar. Sandra 106. 107 May ,Vlckl-lt) tola)oni. Pusha -114 Mayanl. Sheib -I}O. 100 M :lnn,Bri:ln-ll',117 M cC:lnn, M ichael -122, 12], 138, 20. '2,127,9',92,)0 M cClinn. Sharon -114 M cCarnck. Jam('s -120 McCull ough, SUS:ln -106 M cDonnell, M ichael -116 McGilberry 12], '8.92 M c Kenney Mark -100 M c K ow n K:lfen -1I},]2 M cilwain, P:lOS -114 Mcl.:ain. Judy -126, 162, 16]. 164, 71, 134, 8'. 72 M cLean. Sarah -72 M cNaughton. R obert -122, 148, lOS M('({ina,Grorge-II', 116 -138. 1'7, 20, lB. n, 140. 14], 22, 86, 160, 1'6 Meeker D 1]0, 100, 101,99 Meeker III, John 92 M endenhall, Linda -10, 100 Mendenhall Susan 15], 12', 14'. 2],1)2,148,86, n Mendon, Susan -112 M enges, Judith -100 M erric k Kar('n -lOS Merrick, Linda -100, 27 M etivier. John -lOS M etivier,Susan Kathertne -tl2 Mib,Glcnda-114 M illet, Peggy -100 M iller, Phillip -108 M itie r,Shyla-92, M illigan, Kathryn -'8, 7], 80 Mills,Anne-11) Mil1s,tohry-112 Minehan. DanIel M ineh:ln, Michad 92, 108, 1}2 t-line David-II] Mine,K:lron-112 Mine,D:lle-92 Mize.Janet-118 M oalS, R obert -II] M oebus, Julie -II} Moebu s. P atric i a -108 M ohlman J -100 M on, Nayn -11} M oncivais, M:lfi:l M oncivais, M mcel:l -112, 116 M oncivais Jr John -114 M onclova. Irma -138, 130, 92, 95 M ondO\ ':l, P('({ro -108 M ontenegro. Alelda -7}, 80 M oody, Barban -100 M oody, Moochler, -112 M oore, G:lry -120 M oore, Glynn -116, 120 M oore, Jane -108 M oore, t-hurte -119 M orrell, Edward -110 M orrell ll,Glen M orret!, Kimberly -112 Patncia 114 M o wery. Stephanie 114 M unoz, Cristobal -lOS M unoz. M anuel -100 Mun oz. Rosa -108, I}O Munor., SusIe II) M urphey. Ch:lfies -II] M urphy. K :lthleen -II' M urphy, Willillm 7]. SO, 86 MU$5('r.James-112 MUS5('r II. John 92 140 N:lirn,uurt('-]] Newbury. PatriCia -II' Ne)" Renee-112 Nicholson. Roben -113 kslie -11' Nie\'('s,Aiexl5-1l4,1I6 'ordmom, Robert -129, 100 N ormandia, Ada -120 Normandill AielllS 18 Norm:lndia, I van -lOS Norton III Barney -120 Norv:ll, Andrew -113 Norval, Anne -lOS Noml, Mary -128, 129. '8,132,10, 92.91, II, O'Donndl. Ann -115 O'Donnell, Thom:lS -108 Ol!\ arez, Glona -112 Oh\'en, Mym -130, 100 Oh\'('n Jr, Angel -120 OI5('n, Be\'edy 12], I}O, I}I, 92, 127,148.153 Cheryl -148, 108 Olscn, Don -14, 140 O'Ne:ll, Samuel -108 Orrego, Michael -105 Orrego, Willi:lm -108 Omz. Ada I}O, loll, 100 Omr. Alvarez. Noeli:l-130, 131. 100 Onlz Alvarez, W:lnd:l -130, lOS Osborn, MlC'h:lel -119, 127 Oster. Roben -116, 118 Oster.St:lniey-92 Omea, Vian:l -'8, 100 O\' erstreet, Tern -129, I}O, 13', '8, 100 O ... en, Vaieri(' -118. 120 P:lcheco, AndrCll -120 P:lcheco, Peler -109. 127 P1dro, Jorge -108 P:line, P:ltrici:l -128, 130.92,127,91 Palmer, Louisc-92 P:llmer, l\.hryann -108 Eliubeth 92, 100 Park('r J:lcqueline -128, 129, 12], 1]0,91,96, IH, 1}2 Parker M ark 92, 9' Parker, ScOIl 114,116 P:lrker, Anthony -116, 120 P:lfsons, Wilham -lOS Dcbonh 128. 129, 126, 13', 92, 1}9, 1}4. 132 Panon, Neil -1'9. ]40, 142, 7]. 26, 14].8',161, 160, Paulson, Jane -161. 160. 7], 49. SO P:lulson, Jill -119 Penh:l, Paul -100 Perer.. Rosa -100 Perret, Andre -118 Perret,Cathenn('-II).11 1 Perrett.Ch:lfies l\.hrk-1I2 Phares, Richard -120 Phillips. Robetl -128. 1'9, 1'7 lB. 27.136,71,140.14],74,134,160. 6', 82, 86 Phillips, Toby -140, "4 PhillIps, Warrc:n -128, 100, 140 PhIllip s Jr, -120 PIerpoint, -118 Pino, t-lano -I I'. 116. I P Polile, Sanh -119 P orbcs -14 Porbes Jr, Charles -108 POrtlC!, Ingrid "4. 80 Price, Carohne -116 Pmham, RobIn -9] Mark -116 Pup..ls, l\.ladeleine -112 Pursl('}' Mary-)8.I}l 19'

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,.2 Pllf.ln. Th)ma, '<),1\9,1('(,1\1 Qc1C'Cn. Ikm 1(\) Ramlrel, \Ilnl II, Rlmlrel. Rene I' Ramlrel, Robert 11\ Rlmm. Bonnie WI RJmo,. RlI mond RlmoS. L!ll Ronm \01, Re(lo, 9.\ Re':lo.leshe-ll-l RMll,l:l, Rill I(lto; Reed. Cumen 9.' Reed. Dlnm ReC'd. Hclenl Reid. J Olnne -101 Relbmder. Dlmcl-II'j Relfsnlder. Donnl -II'. liS Reles, I .ollrdes -9.\ Re\Cs, Orbndo -lOS. 16'" Rile, /'.hrlene -122, 12'), 9.' RllhlrJson, Albn -101 Rl(hudson. Anne -11,\ Richudson,Chfl5-"''') RIChmond. /'.hr. -II' Richmond, ROilph -IIO,ll "',95.1'j6 Ridge. /'.hch:l.el -115. 116 Ridge. Nln" -12S, 130, IH. 101, 99,IB Rld,!;e, Sllsln -93 Rlggs. Sllun -119 RlsIn,hCT. Pltrilll '" Sln.hez. Peler IV') Slnthel.:->JndrJ l().1 Slnthel. TC'tn 101 Slnthel.Jr. Plulo 101 Slndr()(kJr, Allred -11"'1. li6.11b. 120 SlnUlgo. Dolores 129. 10.9") Slnlllgo.JlnC'1 -119 Slnlllgo.Juln -1Cl') SOimilgo Jr. \X',lham -H. I()l) Glsplr -101 Schlub, R,(huJ -11<1 Schaub, Vu: kle -101 Scheibe. Glry -93 Scheibe, George -78, I 80 Schill, KarC'n-13S, 7'j Schloredl. Dl'lne -101 SchIJ.lI1dl. ChC'trI II ScOIl. AmoOlo -112 ScOll. DlI1o-IIS ScOll. Fnnk-93 ScOIf. KC'\1I1 ScOll. M lchad -93 ScOll. T heodore -101,47 ScollJr.Johnnl -115 Scng, A rthur 93, 1'10 Shaf(C'r, HIg.mI1-93 Shlf(C'r, )lmes 9.' Sh:l.nnon. )C'rl) -109 Clo\C'r -3-1. liS. 120 Shok John 1 1 1 Shobe. 'SlephOin 93. 127 Shot!. )od}' -113 Shum, Nli,Yuen -'jl, 80 Sills. leslie -liS SIlls. R onnie -93 SImmons, Elll1belh -109 Simmons, Judllh 93. 149. 118 Simmons, Pedr o -101, 1'j6 Simms. Karl -116 SImms. M lChld -109 Simms. VaknC' -93 S i mms Jr. AI(onso -101 Slmp kll1s. Ihrry -120 S,mp kll1s. Bmn -11<1 Skrlblc. LukC' -120 Smllh. Amelll-113 Smllh. Che!)'l -113 Smuh. C)ndlll -130, 110 Smllh, Elll .lbclh-II,I Smllh. Jean -1')7, 12'), 93, Smllh.Joscph -101, loiS Smllh. -100. 109 Smllh. M ichael -119 Smllh. SI-mon -14S. 9") Smllh,She!)I-117.119 Smllh. Y"onne -112 SOlder, Elmbelh 116,13 SOIdC'r,)lmC's-118 Snider, MllhOid 12-1.95. 127, 1010. 147,1:>6 Snider, PllrlCil 1 02, 153 SOIdcr. ThomlS -120 Solbs. Edwml -II Souder, Jlnle -1')8. 1")9 Soulhe rlln d. ReS,';le -91 Spagm. /'.Imll -9-1. 110 Spagnl, Mu:hlel -12-1. IP. ?I. 110 Spangler. /'.hrk -I()l), 118 Spangkr Ir Jame} ... ") Spllel. /'.hl'\ -102 Spooner. -113, 116 Srrll1ger,)a(k,e-12S.7'j Sumper. Llndl-112 DcnOlS-113 Slerhens.John -120 KaLlH) n -UO. 94, I H Slern. Robert -109 SIC' ens. Dougbs -13'), 76, bOo III SIIC'bml, AiLce -109 Stone, Cbrl -120 Stone Jr. ROilph -119 Stroop III, Ed9.Olrd-11' 1 Slrube, Rhond a -130. 109 St),les,Suun -119.IIS SU:l.rel. Lour{\cs Summerlll1. A nna 116.42 SWlll1. Nola -119 SW1111. PetC'r -124,901, 140. 143 S .... ank. Cblence S9.lnk Joe -109 S .... lnstrOm. Sunn -109 S .... lsher,Lulnne-l12 Tdlefscn, Sonll -116, liS Terwilliger. C1lhe n nc -9-1 T erwillige r Dor olhy -5S. 94. 10 Tel"es, D:lvld-7S T e les. E hubl-9-l T eves. KOImlkl -109 T eles. PUUIOl -95 T homl5. E h8 0 -155,76,56 Thomu. L.oiSl -12S. 129, US. 130. 98,135.94 T homas. Soml -119 T homas. YI"onne -122. 13S, 130. 102,41 T hompson. DaVid IIj TIptOn. Vick I -109. III T om. Vlelh Tomlll1. Donald -liS Tomlm. Dons -112 T omlmson. )Iollh -12S. 122. I iO. 101,131 Toro, Angd -119. 116 T o ro, Jose -102 T o ro, f-.hm -130. 102 T orres ..... ngd T or r es. D3maflS -130 T o rr es. Toni -103 T o .... nsend. I-h rry -12S. 124.94,91. 140.161 Tschuml. Roben -9-1 W illiam -liS T9."C'cdy. -109 MaflO -I t 2 Ubben. Rlmon U re}'. M lchC'k V a r del. Lc9. l S -162, 164. I }6. 76 ValcnCil. Jose--76 V alcnllne. Damel -76, 79 Vaknllne. Jlmes Vaknllnc. Pllf!(Il-li').I17 Vampnnc. Vampnnc. Sylvia -130. 159, D, 1'14. 76 Vlm p rmc. Wilhlm VOin \ '\Ioude n berg. !'fIlS VOisquel, ROifael-120 Vaughl. Plul".l. Vegl. Carmen Vegl SolO. JoSe' II Verruno. /'.Ilmnnc -5S, 102.99 VCSl. Lmdl-77 VeSl. Bill-116 Vesl. Marthl -102 Vesljr,WllhOlm-II'j Vldro. R".I.monlll 130 Vldh. Tom -114 Vlcr:l.Jr.Ju:l.n-120 Villar.:-"hm VOlghl S)'IIIOI. -lIS VrC), f-.hke-119 Waln.o, Ehllbelh -128, 102, \015, 99, \'('almO)r, FrcdCf1c k \'( 'all emus, Thomls-77 Walllne. T('r!)-77 Ware, A mho n)' -112 Wa r e, LUlnn-102,1'IS. 27 W atson,Cyn thla-IIS W ebb. Mum)' -112 W elglfl. Joseph-113 W elgl n K alhC'flnC' Welg:l.rl. /'.h rglrel -114 W elch. D lV.d Wdch. RogC'f -112 WelchJr.Chfford Well)', K tmberly -119 W ertz. Clrol ,S, 9-1 Wesley. WlhC'r W es!. Gu),-119 W est, W".I.)'ne -168 K aren I3S, 77 W heeler J r.ROI) -114 Whipple. /'.brgOiret Whipple. P eggy -119 W h.pple. VICkie -130 Whlte,Nancy-114 WlCk A ndre""-113 W techert. J oseph W ilder. T homas -113 \X'ilk ins. P hlhp -11'. 116. liS WIII.Noreen-11 3 W,lliams, A urclu -128. 129. 130. 125, 14',94.49. J'j2 ChC'l'\l-112 W illl:l.ms. MtchOlcl -119 WilJ.ford.Nlncy-II'1 WillIS. BonnlC' -120 WIllIS. Susan-130, 102 Wilm onl, A lberto -113. 116 W ilmon t t>brgltltl -130 W ilmont, R obert 1 14, 116 W .lson. J anle W,lson. Rtch-II-l Wlrtl.Jenn), -6,135. 77, 13 80 \ '\Illhro",". E\d)n-112 W ood. Dcnl1ls W ood. /'.hchOlcl -94 W oodcoc k -113 W oods. DaVid -! 14 W oods. Lmdl -102 \'\:'onhern,Ann -94 Yern. B:l.rban -115,. H Young. /'.brg".l.nn -112 Young. R oberto II:> Zach!) Eunice -114 Zachry, SUS".I.nn -129. 1 '1', 94. 10 132 Z:l.ch!)Jr. Ralph -103 Zlm".l.rnpa. /'.hrgOiflu -112 ZOI\,lnsk)'. PnSCllla-77 ZOIPS, M:l.fI:I. ZnlS, -9-i Zl)lS. /'.h nsol -94 z.c.bcdC'. Alegr e

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Digitized by the Internet Archive in 2010 with funding from University of Florida, George A. Smathers Libraries http://www.archive.org/details/caribbean1971cris

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. ., . ... .. ., ... .. 6 . enribbenlt J 97 J Cristobal HigH SCHool Coco Solo Callal ZOlle V(Jlume 54 ... : .; .: __ .i . -

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?:able of eontents Vedicotion. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 In/orJIfol ................. ............ 6 'loflnol ............................. 28 'locllltll ond ellrriclllllltf ................. 30 elnsses . ....................... 60 Orgonizations . . . . . . . . . . . 122 Sports ........................... 140 Special.,Activities ............... ..... 158 &iitor' s Poge ........................ 169 <::iger Eoosters . . . . . . . . . . . 1 70 .,AdvertisellfCI1ts . . . . . . . . . . . 1 73 JnticK ............................. 18 7 In Keeping Witlt <::lte .Modem <::rend <::oward (lreoter 'llcKibilitll In VeorbooK Orgonizotioll. <::lte e.HS .,Amlllol Sto// Js Jntrodllcing.,An tntircllllVew .,And Vi//erCJft 'lorIIfOt In <::lte 197J eoribbeon. Deporting'lroln <::lte <::raditionol eoncept 0/ Seporate Sections. toclt Jntrodllced EII.,A Vivision Poge. On toclt 'locet 0/ <::lte Scltool1:.i/e; <::lte VeorbooK Js Vivided JltfO Onlll <::wo .Moin Sections. 'lorlIfol.,And Jnformol .,Appeoring In <::lte 'lormol .Holf .,Arc: .,Administration .,Altd 'locllltll. eloss Pictllres. Orgoltizatiolt Pictllres. <::eoll1 Pltotos. Qlleens .,And ekeerlenders .,Advcrtisilfg .,Altd JlfdeK. <::ltis Sectiolf eontoilts.,A1I <::lte'lorllfolitil RClJllired O/.,A (lood VeorbooK. In <::lte tKciting In/orlIfol Section. We .Have .,Attempted <::0 PresCJft.,An UlfinterfIIpted eondid Storll 0/ Scltool1:.i/e, JIISt.,AS VOII tKperiCJfced Jt.

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i)edicatioll Mrs. Adall1arll Srig/tt

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VllidnHce eOIlHse/or Retires A/ter 36 Venrs At eJls The CHS annual staff wishes co dedi cate th e 1971 Car ibbean to Mrs Adamary And erson Bright, in recog nitio n and appreciation of her man ) years of devoted service to the students of Cristobal High School. Mrs. Bright was born in Jacksonville, Flo rida She attended sch oo l in HoustOn, Texas, during her early years, bur rerurned to Jacksonville to complete her sec o ndary education a t Duzal High School. She received her A B in Educati o n a t Flor ida State Colle ge for Women in T allahassee, and completed her graduate work for a degree in histOry a t the University of Ann Ar bo r in Mi chigan After te aching a t Jack so n v ill e Jun-Kathi e D a niel se n s milin g l y r ece ive s a ss i stance fro m Mrs Bright in planning h e r college ca reer. i or High S c hool for a s hoft time s he came to the Canal Zone in 193 5 Since that time she has served capabl y a n d well in man y position s at C ristobal Hi g h School. Among th es e are : a teacher of seventh and eighth grade Englis h soc i a l s c ience vocational guidance, social s tudies, girls adviso r and the position a s a Guidan c e C ounselo r which s h e has held from 1 to the presenc. Durin g her many years it( CHS, Mrs. Bright received a number of Outstanding Servic e Awar d s for her d i stinguished service to the Canal Zone Schools Di v i sion. In addition to teaching and counseling Mrs. Bright also sponsored a number of school activ i t ies and o r ganizations such as the Nat i onal H onor Society It was Mrs Bright who originated the Zephyr and the Caribe Club She is truly an outstandin g organizer ; effici ent, and hard-working. Mrs. Bright has d one a great d eal of traveling during her years at CHS, visiting many countrie s in bmh Central and South Americ a a s well a s in Europe. Both faculty and srudems are saddened b y the journe y Mrs. Brig ht is abom to make a s she r etires from th e faculry of C H S H er guidan c e will be long remembered by t he co untless srudents whos e educatio n s and careers she helped pl a n Mrs Brigh t advises Shy l a Miller o n h e r sch edule for next year.

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v4 JVew Venr J!egilfs. Elena tvbxwell and Brenda E gger ... Stephanie !lILes. Alm:mubia Vjvi:m .Jcnm \,{/ini', :lOd Ctrmcn B utleL J effries, t-.lr. Johnson. ;md Nancy Edmon!l on

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Mr. H ieronymus (S.A sponsor) and t-.ti chad De xter (S. A president). Debbie t-.tceker The halls of C H S were, mass of con fusion on September 1, 1970, as hun dr eds of students co n g r egated around the bulletin boards o n which homeroom number s were posted. Others lingered to cha t with old friends o r to make new acquaintan ces; s ummerrim e experiences were s h a r ed a nd compared. The perenni. al excitement of th e !!fir s t day of sch oo l was in th e air This e nthu s i asm per s i s t ed throug hout th e orie ntati o n assembly, in whi ch srude nt s wer e welcomed to CHS, new teachers introduced, and th e new Srudent A ssociation office r s ins t alled. H oweve r with the ringing of (hat first bell, order began to emerge as srudents fell back into th e familiar routine of sch ool life. An Other school year had begun.

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The deserted halls are c luiet :l soft breeze whispe r s through the empty corr i dors there is no indication n o w of the activities and incidents which the coming day may bring.

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Suddenly, the st i llness i s sh attered by th e s l amming of a l oc ker door the sounds of shuffling footsteps. shouted I I r,om'."";,,n, and noisy greetings are once more A new day has the magic of [he morning is

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10 'Cite Yell RiNgs, Seats fire fissllmed. Ann Terwillige r Dol o res S antia go, I v c u e Cummings, Carlo, B ro w n, Sus:t nn Za c h -ery. Sus:tn B urge. Chris lin:t Loi 7eaux. R i l:t Bo y land Issa c H e r es

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)10fllillU /(,outille /(,esuJlfes xnior Hi gh Band 11

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" Upon entering the classroom, a srudent assumes m o r e than a seat he assumes all the privileges and r espo nsibilities which accompany his position in this place of learning -the sch ool. Havin g brought tOgethe r the teachers and the t a u gh t the school ha s fullfilled itS fun ctio n what follows is dete rmin ed by these individu als Often, it seems, minds are more eager a n d alert as the day begin s and the opporrunities afforded by th e morning hours s h ould nOt be missed T o bring to each srudent s uccess a t last -this is the goal o f every m orning class. "Parches" Brown r.. like H a yden

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14 l\l ore complaints were he ard con cerning rhe l unch hour than pe rh aps any mher face l of school lif e. Lun c h was se r ved i n four shifts: [hose o n the early shift complained thar it was (00 early to ear and those on the bte s hift com plain ed that it was (00 Iare_ Once in rh e cafeteria, however. n o one seemed to have any real trouble eating_ The lunch hour provided a brief r espi t e from classes which was w e l comed b y alL J uniors :tnd seniors took advantage of th eir openlun c h privi lege to "eat out" on :1ltern:He days. I n s pite of this, and the man) meetings schedu l ed during the lunch hour, the cafete ria was a lw ays filled w ith hun gry, noisy students; eating, c harrin g with friends o r doing a lirr\e b s t min ute s tudying T hose wishing to l eave the cafeteria e arly, spe nt their lun c h hour in the pleasant s urroun di n gs o f the st ud ent lounge l oc at ed d i rectly ben ea th the caf ete ria In spi te o f th e frequent complaints, mOSt s tud ents found the l unch hour o n e of th e m os t relaxin g and enjoya ble periods of Ihe school day. After a satisfying lunch, stude nt s head to th e s tu dent's l ounge. Senior + Open lunch + Car = H appy H eart. Raymond R obertso n 'I'll have a chili dog and please include the hot dog!"

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Lunchtime is a good time to make friends IS

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,. Studelfts elfjolf COIlf/orts 0/ Cafeteria and a lowered, insulated ceiling gave th e cafeteria a new look of elegance In cluded among the comments of s tudent:; were s u c h remarks as .. "Man if's gOt class!" . .. "It' s like eating in a fancy rest aurar .. "Very Quiet and

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.. enjoy the beaU[ies of the "gre : u oU[doors" 17

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18 Ref r eshed from a relaxing l u n ch hour srudents rerurned a t 1 1 :30 to re sume thei r regular routine Each after noon includ ed duee hour s of classes with th e exception of senior s with 'ixlh-period rud y hall who were per mitted to leave ea rly For so me, rh e enthusiasm c haracreri st i c of the mornin g h o ur s appeared to wave; while others see med to have awak ened at lea st. All h o w eve r evidenced an in c rea sed res tle ss ne ss a s the hou r approached 2:15 and Ihe ringing of Ihe final bell.

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'9

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20 rigers :Display 8ager 811tHusiasm lor Afterl1ool1 Activities J ose M edi n a and M i k e M cCann

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2,

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22 With the ring i n g of th e final b ell at 2:1 5, man y s tudent s ru s h eagerly to rhe waiting bu ses chinkin g only -<1Fr ee! at last!" Others also hurry anxious to begin the ex t r a-curricular acciviti es which play s u c h an import ant rol e in r he life of a s rudem Enjoy in g th e compa n y of th ose who s hare s imilar ince r ests; whether it b e an adv anced m a th or foreign lan g uage class, sports, drill t ea m, j o urnali s m o r dramatics, it i s a ple as ant and profitab l e way [Q spe nd an aft e rnoon Stephanie lilie s :lOd DeOise F oshee J ean Smith a nd J ose M edina

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Lana Boone Jay Alonis, M ichael Dex t er. S[ep h en GOUIeL Susan M endenh all 23

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l. 24 The setti n g of th e s un brought a c ha nge in the appeara n ce of bot h t h e sc h oo l and the s tud ents. With th e coming of darkn ess, another of th e man y facets of C H S w as revealed. -The eve nin g activities. This was th e tim e for bonfires and football games; sw i m me ets and track m eets; h ours of pra ct ice a n d r evie w s for ROTC cadets

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25

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TEE N CLUB DANCES Ned Pauon R osemary Christian, Wall), R u sso n . . AND FORMAL S Jimmy Barraza 2.

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Hila L y m 3 n Robert Phillips C ONCERT S : P ractice for the cast an d c rew of various p l ays : Dramati c Productio n s . . all those activities w i t h out w hi ch sc h ool life would be guite incom ple te.

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I ( ;' 18 .A Place Of Ceofllil1g ls ro Ceofll. .Al1d Vel 'lrOII1 'Doli ro 'Doli ll.Also Becollfes .A Place ro ,Cive, .A Bridge rltot SPOI1S rite (lop Of .Age .Al1d Bril1gs rogetlter rite reoclters .Al1d rite rOllgltt. rite JlllIl10lt ,Mil1d ,MIISt Reoclt 111 lIs OWlt :Directiol1 roword lIs OWI1 (looL .Alol1g rite Potlt Of Ci/e Ol1e ,MOil ,Meet .A JlllI1dred 'loes -Or.A rltollSOl1d 'lriends

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30 Administration J AME S H PFAU Criscob:J1 High School Princip:J1 T o the Yearbook Staff: "Thanks for the J\'lemories" i s th e title of a so n g {hat was popular some years ago. A s we record in this book the events of the 1970-71 school year at Cristobal Hi g h School we can s ure l y say with g r at itud e and evcn a bit of pride, "thanks ( o r the mem o ries." You wh o have s t udied har d and have g i ven of )Iourselves to sc hool activ iti es have s hown by your Tiger spir it that the busiest people are also th e happiest people. Bes t wishes to all of you as yo u continue you r educa tion here or e lsewhere. Although your highes t commitment may well be to academic ex cellence, you would not be wise (Q pursue schola r ship at th e expense o f the development of an honorable character, physica l well.being. o r a pleasant personality. I t i s hoped that the discipline of commitment to t h ese gualities will earn you a ha ppy freedom of spir i t and a sense of accompli shmem. Ma)' you continue ro mark each milesrone with s:uis faction and happy memories. James H pfau Prin cipa l ''I'm a firm bel i eve r in Ih e 'Tigers'!"

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PAUL J. JEFF R I E S B A., Col o"do Sta t e College ; M A., C o l o r a d o S t a t e C o l lege ; Graduate W o rk Univ. Sou th e rn Cali f o rni a Ca lif. \X/es tcrn U n iver s ity "See k a pr o f ess i on or oc cupati o n th a t i s c hall e n ging a n d enjo y able Smil e a nd be h a pp y." SUP ER I N TENDENT S S T AFF, U.S. S C HOOLS: M e R oss Anderson, Superviso r P hysical Education and Ath letics, U.S. Schools; Dr. K e n n e th Lake D i r e c t o r o f Curri cu l um ; Mr. S t ewart B rown. Supervisor, swimming poo l s and s:lfCt)'; Dr Charles Latimer, Deputy Superimc'ndem of Sch oo l s; Mr J am es Coo k S u perv i so r of instrunion. U.S. Secondary Sthools; }Ol r George \ Xlillingham, Supervisor of I nstruction. U.S. Secondary Schools ; M r F A Castles, S uperintendent of Schools (Sftltfd). Mr. Vernon Caruria. Supervisor of I nstruction. U.S. Elementary Schools; D r V ictor H err Supervi so r of Mu sic, U.S. Sch ools; Dr J ames \'(/olf, Coordinator. Special Education ; M r David Speir, Assistant Superintend ent U .S. Seco ndary School ; Mrs. S hirl ey l\bkibbin, Supervisor of Instruction. U S Sch ools; Mrs. Frances Sampsell. A ssi)tant Superintendent U.S. Elem e nt ary Schoo l s: M r Zande r Krowi tz. A dministr:nive Assistant; Mr. Robert D a h lsrom. Supen' iso r Education Data Processing. 31

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32 Office Staff The lompt'rcnr of the C H S offile s!.Iff h,ndled "II genera l clerical work for the administ rati o n and faculty. I ncluded amo n g their dut i es wcre official co rr es ponden ce and paper work They were :1lso in cha rge of opera tin g office ma c hine s and rhe incercolll syst e m and answe rin g th e teleph o n e. They main tained the record a n d file s of eac h s tu dent, mailed report car ds and sent and received transcripts eliJlic The clini c was an importa nt prov i s i on f o r the h e alth and safer), of Cristobal H igh School stuclents. The cli n ic was s taffed w i th trained nurses who provided emergency fir s t aid; :lnd per f o rmed certain r o utine c he c k s o n eac h stude nt. Th e clinic was a lso :1 pbce for s rud encs to rcst when unwell :lI1cl for the storage of each s rudent s' per manent h ea lth r ecords. The clini c a l so spo n sored rubcrcu l os i s and c he s t X rays for srude nt s in certain g r ades Dr. Levin the Publi c He,lth Offi ce r for the Atlantic Side, vis i ted the school almost every morn i ng Dr. C h eve lle rhe school phy sic ian for the Cana l Zone Schools, was :1v:1ilable evcry Wednesday. MRS IUI.EN. MRS TAYI.OR, fl-HSS GRIFF I T H S DR LEVI N, KARE N M cKOWN. MRS IlLANC HE n 'E. thiS will (00 1 }OUT fever bit"

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Vllidolfce Mrs. Bright, Lauric Nairn Y o ur appointment i s at 11:00 on Frida y." ADA MARY BR I G H T Counselo r B A F lorida Slate Unlv. M A Un., of 1I.l ichigan. "Lik v,'ill ne\'rr be dull Mr M owery, T homas Belue William San tiago, H enry Borselliono "You bolb want [0 go co K ings Point?" Guidance is the process of helping persons make th e best possible de cis i o n s concerning their lives, and aidi n g r hem in so lving their problems. Ir include s helpin g s rudcnrs c h oose the p roper courses to take in school and aid i ng them in deciding wha r careers to follow afte r their education is co m pleted Such decisions re9uire that a person have full and co rre c t kn o\vl edge abou t himself and his world The guida n ce counselors at Crisrobal Hi g h Schoo l aim ro provid e s rudents with informati on so rhat the)' rna)' make rhe beSt possible decisions in life. The (Wo principal methods used for this are counseling, a nd testing. Counseling consis t s chiefly of discussions berween a srudenr and his coun-selo r concerning his interests. apti-if )'Ou will continue t o learn .. ROBERT MOWERY Counselor; B Sand M 5, I ndiana Slalr Um\' ''Ta kr of thr oppommltLes in high school" LUKE C PALU MBO Allendancc: Counselor. B,S, Ed. W Musouri Sme "Theft' is no SUbSIJtufr for v,'ork to be: and successful .. rudes and special problems. Testing useful informati on. Other important is an important guidance t ool. Apti guidance t ools are books pamphlets. rude. pe rsonalit) .. a nd intelligence and films used t o help srudents decide tests provide counselors with much on cou r ses of stud), and furn r e careers. 33

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3 4 ibrar!l The libra ry. with its V:l s t collectio n of books was a familiar stoppin g place for C H S stude ntS. Through ou t the y ear, they used the library and its many resources. The quiet, academic atmosphere made it the perfect place for studying and peaceful solitude found there provided an excellent background for the reading of books. StudentS m a de good lise of th e library during homeroo m and studyh:tlls; checking out books for reports, u sing r eference books, or s impl y b rowsi ng through the library' s collect i on of paperback s and magazines. Me Wells, th e sch ool libr ar ian "Peace a t last!" was always available f o r students who needed help in locating a certain book or in makin g a spec ial r e p ort. There were a l so at least two girls serving as library assistants each period. The y helped stude nt s use the card cata l og and c he c k out books. DA YTON N WELLS -B .S. Univmiry of Idaho, M Ed, Uni\'crsit}' of Oregon Read 1 0 help you lxcomc Whlt you want (0 be" F aith Coad, Patricia Christian, Janna Loizeaux, Terra Brown, Lana Boone. C l ove r Shobe, B:l.rbara Yerxa, Jeanne Calkins. Libr3ry Assi stants.

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GRACE S. PFAU -85., City SllIe College; M A Uni versity of "If t2lemed, C1' people C1n their dissausconcern WLth poSItL"e, concwed thc:y should Ix t o correct the ills they so nghtly de plore ." Special 8ducatioN Duke Collins and De J esus Ruperto help l\:lrs. pfau (orren papers. EARL C. SHARICK-EduC1-tion; 8A., M S . I llinoiS "Work hata St:lY in school ., The Special Education department was added {Q th e CHS curriculum in 1 960. I n Special Education, srudents received extra h elp in their academic srudies, learned crafts, and learned the perspectives of human relationships and civic responsibilities. The r emedial reading program pro-R eading holds the interest of the R emedial Reading class. vided special instruction {Q improv e reading skills and helped assure a sru dent of success in keeping with his abiliry. Seemingl y average srude nt s impro ved rhe 9ualiry of their reading skills with the help of the Special Education D epartment. Mr. Sharick helps his class drill in math with flash cards. 3S

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36 Art EDWI N M KOZIOL A n ; B A M i c hig:1n S t ... Univ F ind o ut w t m yo ur r cs pon sibililic-s and pre p are t o mttt them i n o rder 10 glin co ntrol o f your l ife as f:lpidly ;1nd compictel y as poss ible A n i sts w:J.i ting f o r a n in s pirat io n Brenda Gibson. W i th :I. s weep o f th e bru s h a mas t e rpiece i s crc ued. Class P o rtr ait I n c r e ati v e arts, a s t ud ent l e arn s to express himself rhr ough diffe r enr m e d i a With thi s in mind, th e f o l lowin g c ourses we r e tau g ht at CHS this y e ar. Arc 7 an introduct i o n to drawing, painrin g, lettering, ceramics, c r a f ts, co v e rin g te chniques, a nd the u s e of tool s with emphas i s pla ce d 011 d e ve l o pin g s kills, imag in a ti o n and art judgement. Art 8, a r e in f o r cemenr o f kn o wled g e g ain e d in Art 7 wirh g r e at e r emph a s i s p l a c ed o n th e basic elements of de s i gn. Art I a ba s i c be ginning an cou r se for all s rud e m grade s 9-1 2 wh i c h emphas ized the development o f drawin g s k ill a nd rhe s t ud y of d es i g n co n cepts It inv o l ved drawing, paintin g l e n e rin g po s t ermakin g a n d a v ari e t y o f cr a f ts. An II, an advance d art course f o r all s rud e m s gra de s 10-12. I t inv o l ve d a n appr eciatio n and a d eeper in v e s ti g ati o n o f des i g n a nd co l o r theor y with emphasis placed o n indi v idual o r g an i z ati o n and the c arryin g o ut of a n p r oje cts. The s tud e nt had a n o p po r t un i t y to d evelo p s kill s in th e a r e a of his c hoi ce, An I I I w h i c h included apprec i atio n and adv anced c r ea t i v e w o rk

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SlIsiNCSS tdllcatioN Would you believe [he clas s average i s 85 wpm ? \'Qould you believe 3 5 wpm wilh 3 err o rs? The Business Educatio n depanment offe r ed an excellent s ele ction of cour ses for th e s tud ent planning it care e r in busine ss, as well as for the co l lege-bound srude nts. The s kill s and knowledge t aug ht b y thi s department will be usefu l regard less of th e srudent 's future occ upati o n G e neral Bu siness gave th e s tudent s a bas i c under s tandin g of bus i n ess practices useful in daily l iving T yping I gave srudents an o pportuniry to develop speed and accuracy o n a typewriter. They wer e taught to rype l et r c r s, tabulat ed reports manuscripts and business forms. Typing 11 was a cont inu ation of T yping I with e m phasis on co n sta nt practice for increased speed and accuracy Senio r s takin g Short h and l earned to read, write and take dictation Another cou rse o ffer ed o nly to s eniors was Bookkeeping I n thi s cou rse, s tudents learned the fundamenta l s of sing l e and double-entty boo kke eping and were g iven pra ct ical p roblems for t h e applicati o n of th ese skills. George :;and J ohn find girls more inter e s tin g than bookkeep i ng. DLANE FITE T y pin g I II, Soc 7; B.S., E U I U t.1r s Fll c nC'w In Plnlml, C's pe cillly Ihc tropic a l cr She i s o nginaJl) from TcXls. I lUghl It &WIC' Jr. High i n I rving hobblC's WllC'r ski i ng bolling, :lnd fishmg ld vicC' 1 0 srudents) "ac-Ind l v i du:lls" CLARE W JOHNSON -S honh:md. Boo kkcc p i ng. Busi nC'ss; B S. ikm idJI M Ed, Wlshlnglon S lltC' Col lC'gC' Dunng h i s first )'nr al C HS. M r J o hn son WlS lind hnd of EduCllion Dcfrom his :is Inch er WlIS born In lind t:lught for )nrs I n cluding being principal al A dna High School I n W ash i ngton rnio)s fishing. bo"llolln8. and srubl d I ving His is, "Spend more good t hings l boul and kss lI)'lng 10 This is alm os t as bad as L a tin." 37

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38 8lffJlis/t Engli sh, an extensively wide field, was one of the largest departments :H CHS. It was a required subjeCt for all students, since the abilir} to und e r stand and [0 use well his native language deemed necessary for a student's success in any endeavor. Regular English classes included th e study of grammar, composition, and literature. I n addition to these regular cou r ses; the Engli s h depart ment also included journallsm, speech and drama, and remedial reading I n journalism the s tud ent l earned to write in newspaper form and received much practical experience. Speech and drama was a course which taught the srudenrs the art of ora l expres sion. Besides this, the CQurse required a great deal of research work. Remedial reading provided students who required ext r a help an opportunity to improv e their r eading ability Books read in the various classes include ; Jobllny Tremain, Greal E.,1Jfr+ laliom, A Tale of Two CilieJ, The HOllse of Seven GablN, The Red Badge of Courage, WUlhering Heigh", lArd Jim, and The Moomlollf. Mrs. Smith "My goodness1 \'{! hat arc the Senior s coming to!" H ERBIT 0 C HESHIRE English ; BS, University ofT:amp;l lB, DOBBINS E nglis h II J ou r n:alism, BS, University of Virgini:a, M Ed. Unl\, o f Vlrglnl:a HAM LET: /l.Ct I, $c III -Polonius to Laertes" J /l.NE ELF E R S English III Speech and Dr:ama. B S. Univtrslty of WIS' consln "ChooS(' rhoS(' go:als most 1m port:an! to you and be persever:ln! In achie\'ing them Don't be relUCtant to serve others and the commul)lty Don't be afraid to gIve of yourself /l.im high, prepare painstakingly; serve, :and work"

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L OU I S J. FAlTOROS I Englis h III : B.S., M Ed, '"No tynnny is int olcnble th: m Ih:ll of sdf.rightrous or over' u:llous phihnthropisl The world nn be slroy(d by tOO much h:llred o r 1 00 much love, bUI the latter IS more dlnger. ous iJuS( it is mOr( insidIous" DOR O T H Y H S MIT H Engli sh 12; GLENDA STRONAC H English :lnd B.S., Ohio Northern U ., Mil., Den\'er Mu sic; B r.,' l us.Ed, B A Tnnity U. Univeuity Mrs Stron:leh IS from Tens :lnd t:lught in Curundu before coming t o C H S She enjo)s olog) :lnd spons "To thy own :;elf be t!\lC," MART HA T ANNER -English, A B U N.C. fO Ihc vet) fullest -enjoy'" TONI WILFERO -English BS, Flor id1S11-!e .. 'lhcS( .. III be lnolh ef period Ihal I .. ,11 add as one I\'c I,\ed through" Mrs. Elfers. That was some class M e Dobbins Of I deserve this rest." I h ope 1 don't for get t he idea of that pIa) before class is OUt .. REBECCA WILLIAM S Gcognph) '. Engluh 8 and 9, BA Collese Mrs W illi a ms' home SUIC u "fest VLrgLnil She hlS U'l\ded through mln) Slal(5 1nd (11/0) 5 readLng lnd s .... 'mmmg "US( )'OUf think' lUten' md'" 3.

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40 loreigl1 ,Cnl1gl/nges "Welcome to the camp. ANNE D GEGG -FTC"{h bun, SA. CornC'1I Um\,cr Sl1\. M S In EduClllon, Cornell UnL\ ..enn 10 do thmgs on umt' M a k e POSI1l\ C (OOlnbutlons f O KhooJ and lour communi q'" TELMA J I t OWARD Spanish. BUSiness Il A, H um("r College, M A H unlcr College "Be and rcspcHfuJ Ulllcns III your communmcs and St'l F,ood exam ples of mouls (0 lour lounftcr .. STELLA RIEFKOHL Spanish. French, B A NC' ..... Y ork Un!\ A Columbll UnI\ N Y "NC'H' r f O look bac k InIO thc raSI -alWl)S ( 0 f1(t' cach dl)' a s 11 come's ... mhom 1 th o u'!h! o f th e fur"' .. When will the}' ever learn ? I s It third d ecle n s i o n anlls:ltivc. ma scu line. plural. or com p : u : lti\' e? rm mixed lip

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JAMES E S TE ARNS Span i sh II, Ill IV, R ussian II. B S Ed. t.1 A. Univcrsity of Flo rida. "Spend morc limc on thc subjcCls that afC h ard for )'ou than on your favor itcs .. W ILLIAM L. WILL Spanish 7 and 8, English 9; as Econ. Xavier Univ.; M Ed. Univ of Florida t..-Ir. Will isa nativc I sthmian H c taught in Flo rida beforc coming 10 CHS His hobbics leC golfing, swim ming, tcam sportS and fC'"lding. Lifc is short, so be satisfied in wh a t you arc doing T oni T homas "It's right i sn't i t?" How can I concentrate on H ablar" when I' m thinking of HIM?" T he fore ign langu age deparrment a t C H S was a wide and interesting one. I ts aim was to increase a student's understanding of the hi s t ory a n d cultu r e as well as the language of coumr ies other than his own. I n order ro ful fill th i s aim, C H S offered co ur ses in th r ee modern language s; F r ench, Spanish, and Russ ian T hree years of eac h language we r e offer ed, students bein g placed in the level ap propriate to their development I n ad dition, a second ),ear course in Latin was offered_ I n all l anguage courses, s peaking wr i t i ng, reading and under s tandin g of the language were s tr essed. The A udioL ingual Method A L M was a n ew s),stem used ro tea c h Spani s h and R ussian. T his system invo l ved inten sive o ral p ractice in the l anguage lab o r atory. M rs. H oward. I 'm no model!"' 41

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.2 }lome 8col1omics ELIZABET H t.kNAUGHTON H ome' Econom ics, B.S, ShI t College "Whlt you do (or don' t do ) todlY )'OUf future" Josefa Gonzalez and Anna S u m m erli n "You're off:ln inch'" The homemaking p r ogram placed emphasi s on three areas: foods and nutriti on, clothing se l ection and co n strunion, and famil y living. It was rhe aim of the depa rtm ent to provide girls w i th knowledge helpful for their future s a s hom ema ker s Junior hi g h hom e eco n omics srudents learn ed th e bas ics o f sewing by m aking s impl e h ouse h old articles and garment s They were also raught the bas ics of cooking which included the p r eparation and serving of formal and inf or mal meals. Senior high s rudents were o ff ere d one seme s te r of sewing which in cluded personal grooming, the plan nin g and consm.ICt i on of clo thing, and a study of persona l and family r elacions hips, I n the seco nd semester 's cooking classes s tudents were taught the fundamentals o f nurr i tio n rhe use of r ecipes, mea l p lan n ing, marketing, and various method s of preserving food. T ina B ocanegra, Pal D e Vaule, Elis a Brown "Do we have 10 s tand in line to hel p ?" "Coo kie s "Ie's messy bUI it's fun!"

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RONALD FITE -t.kchlniCllI Dnwing. 8 .S. E:ut MS. E:lSI Umv Mr home StOlle is is Junior Clus sponsor He enlOYs the C:lnal lnd his :Ire skiing :md huming The In d ustri a l Art s department at CHS auempred to p rovide pupils with in s ight int o their own int e r ests; to develop their abiliries co work with their hand s and with t ools, and to sharpen their intere s t in crea tiv e crafts The In dustr ial Arcs department offered f o ur g roup s "f cou r ses; Mechanical Drawing ; W ood Working, Metal Shop and Plastics. Mechanical Drawin g I ( aught Students to visualize h ow an object is put together Nearness, cor re ct lin es, m ea surement and f ollowing instructions were s tre ssed. Me c h anical Drawi n g II was a co ntinu atio n of thi s course for student s plannin g to continue their educati o n in thi s field. Woodworking student s learned about tools, joints shop safety, and the operation of power tools. They used their knowl edge to carry o ut proj ects. M eta l Shop I taught th e bas i c s kill s of bench work for ging, wel ding, s h eetmera l and mac hine ope rati o n Pla s tics s tu dents learn ed the properties of plastics and how to shape (h em into useful objects. JESSE C H OLLOWAY Shop. M So. Okhhoml Sme Colkge bcSI you ClIn." J Hillstrial Arts RONALD lA.SSIlJ!. Shop; BS, Los Angeles, Calif, lie.. Sorbonne Mr usslb IS :l name C:lliforniln and hls tOIught In Sln Fnncisco, Engbnd, Turkey. Phililpmes, lnd Fnnce HIS hobb)' is bolting HIS ad\icc to "They didn't tell me :about Ihu when 1 filled out my c1:ass selection shec:t," grumbles Robert Johnson. 43

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44 Mathelllatics RIC Ht\RD \'(1 BOC K Algebn II. Anll}SIS. Calrulus, B A Unl\ of N A, Um\ of H ouston "Don', be:: U1\IlI" I n this modern age. as well as in th e past, m:Hh cmar i cs r e main s a basic pan of everyone"s l ife The C H S m ath depa nment offe r ed all t h e m :1(h co urses requi r e d for s u ccess i n co lle ge a s well as i n ( h e s melcnr s' daily lives. F i ve m a th cour ses offe r ed w c r c to b e t a k en i n orde r as e a c h wa s a prerequis i te o f th e subse q ue nt onc. T hese co urses were A lgeb r a I G eo m etry, Algebra II, I ncroductio n 10 Ana l ),sis, and Calcu l us Gener:li M a th : tn d I ntrodu c tion to Algebra were also offer ed for sruclcIHs n o t majori n g i n m:1(h. General rvlath captu r ed the ele menr3ry for m s of m:uhe m : ui cs. I t pushed the sr-uelcms to h:wc a mathematical background A lgebra I. the fir st ste p u p th e bdde r to higher m : l.them:l.tics, caugh t th e princ i ple s of mathematics. W ord mastery of t h e language of n u t h e m a t i cs was anained in t his course. Geometry dealt with the art of drawing. Proving theorems was a major part of geometry. T he srudents l earned how to deal with s pace fig ures. Algebra I was also reviewed for the students. Algebra II taugh, ,he princip l es of factoring, polynomial s, lo g arithms, and basi( trigonometry. The pau e rn of reasoning was also le3rned in thi s course LAWR ENCE A CO WLEY I. Gcom(,11) BA, Trlnlt)' Unl' A SoulhCl5t('rn SlllC' "LI\,(' MC' \'OU fS('lf" Introduction [0 A nalys i s went d ee p e r intO tr igonometry. Linea r a n d
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ROY HOWELL -IB, Gen enl A ; B S Shippensburg 51. College ; M S Sme Univ "Accepl prop!c on the of their n o t their Nancy Edmondson. I give up I 've had it." CAROL J. KNI G H T -Life Scien c e 7, 7 8; 85. Auburn Umv much as you possibl) BERN A R D R MAZZONI -8, A lgebn I ; B S Valley C ollege, M A Penn Sute Univ E v should be good t o morrow is bener Calculus proves [Q be a c hallenging class. H ey, class isn't dismissed yet 4'

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46 Music EDWARD R C ARWITHEN -B Fmc Am, Umv Florida, 1'.1 Am. Eutman Sl:hooJ of MUSIC Th e f o llowin g courses were offered thi s year in Music. Mus i c 7 and 8; the exploration of all kind s o f music and mus i c skills with emphasis placed o n mus i c fundamental s as a s tep to the enjoyment of music. Beginning 1 04 s trument a J las; a spcciali7ed class for s rudent s desiring to learn the basic tec hnique s of a band o r an orc hestral ins trum ent. It is open to all grades but it is r ecommended that a !)tudcnt wishing to participate in advanced music classes begin the :;rudy of inS trum ents in seventh grade. Educttional values s tressed are: reading of musical n o tati o n development of good lOne and the ability to express o neself with confidence on a musical instrument. Also stressed arc pride in personal achievement, concern for group results, and the di,cipline of concemrating on details to build con fidence and ability. Int ermediate I n strumemal Class; a :,peciali1cd class for srudems having h ad one o r tWO semes t e r s of work in begi nnin g in strumemal class This class is open to all grades. It provides chance for srudems to work with sympho n ic music of easy to medium difficulry T he educational values stressed are: co ntinuin g exploration of musical ex pression, buil ding of conrlde nce in personal ab iliti es, and striving t o do one's best. Senior B and IS a special ized class for s t udents with at least one year or th e equivalent of begin ning or intermediate instrumental The B and relaxing before class begms. class. This is an acr ivit y g r o up It serves the sch oo l by providing music f o r assemblies, football games, pep assemblies, and o ther occlsio ns. C oncerts are planne d to expose the S tu dent to the classical a nd modern mu s ical world. Srudems a r e encouraged t o participate in musical groups of all kinds. These includ e college, eommu niry and jazz groups. Value s s tre ssed are ; self discipline, appreciation and coleration o f new sounds and mu s ical experience, and expl o rati o n o f the s rudent's ab ilitie s in mu s ic. The musi c program also provide s co ur ses in 7th and 8th grade c h orus and sen ior c h orus where s rudent s learn h ow to s ing a nd r ead mu s ic. The Girl s' Ch o rus performing at the Chnstmas Concert. Ted $cO[[ and Steve Aponte perf orm at the elementary sch ool. R onald "JUSt six more measures t o go" Fl'JltJ A nn U Unfltn K s!hy L M J M emknhln IXshto Ann Chme..nJOn SUfMcCuliouSh ... l Wfllfy A locfSllebrm K>Lhy 8.1m(1 j,mColl,nl Thom.s Ikh.e Alf.'ICokmln jton(lftHfrn.n. 11(1, Suun R,dS( V.mpronf &UCJ.,mll/J T ony 8m Mud(u(G'.nfl SDfS ..... Lobby P,1KI III/DSu j,mCh,Id'fll K'n:n M ernck Rot' Gou EdrhfMmh jo.nnfRf.d Tm",s;'x RobonPmh.m T!'d ScOIl Pf LerS.nchf' F"",d,Um. Bonn.(W,IIoJ R,u Boyllnd W,llotS.nu,so & .. 1"., jJmn Bk,cllc. M lkfBIOInc:by j.mtJJonfl BmnLo'f J"mmy!iuffmln MEMBERS OF THE BAND TnJm/N' Sll:'fAponlf ChfrylOIKn R onPllx. Ed Golo:kn j.m V.knunf Drumm ond M cN lughL on Cn,s RobcnlOn A llfn R ,chudJOn Chqun R"'fl"1 T,m Blanch.rd R.y jxhon Tl'{I1fIhtiRI PluIBl f ,(hff B,llyG.klp'( lk_ulyOlxn Nlnc:yGn:U W .yneWtl! Gcor,!!:t R"tn FrOllV .nWoondfnbc:s Bobby H uShft T ., Don OIKn D,moJn. ... Gn:UGnll D.n VJlfnunf GUp U S.yOf M,kfW.lh.ml Robfn Ffrn.ndel john Alfunu 4 7

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48 Physical edllcatioN BARBARA L C AMPBELL Ph),si GIl 13 S Ed. Bil e k Hills College; Graduate Crcdlt, \Xlash Smc Unl\ Central \'.;':l.sh SWC" Col Iegc I3H$T "Be tjlnck to but If you do -hav( :I. solution !O gowuh thCCrltlClSm l JOAN F HARRI S Physinl Edu (ltion, A B Canal Zone)r CoHege. B.S, Blrry Coliege, M A New Y or k UnivcrsHY "Don't see k an CSClPC from lhe pressures ;l.Ccompln}lng your you th through cheap !hnils 11m could ruin }our whole life You can'! :l.fford to th row aWJ) your )oung ),cars The dock can'! be s lopped o r t1.Jrncd back" DOUG LITTON -Ph)' Ed. Master' s MLss SUIC Unl\crSLty. Keep (r;ll nlng rule s 2nd alwAp beat 13.11 bol lnd C o llege LOUI S D EDEAUX Physical Education. B S .. O k lah oma A&M Col lege. M S. Okhhoma Statt' UnlY "Find out wh :.u you (:l.n do Ix-St 3S e3r1)' l S poSSIble, then t3ke pode In } 'o ursclf 1113t }'our dOing It as w ell as you can" JUNE FATTOROS I Phy sicll Educlt ion, B .S., Southeastern lao Uni .... ; M A., Uni... Southern /'.-fiss "t.hnJf(: enough in de\'eloping inter nal discipline t o grldullly repbce the externll discipline s required dunng c hildhood:' G y m can be relaxin g! G y m can be hard w ork!"

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-Marian Kre dell, Carol R oss, D onna G r aham, Shelley Lun d, Jane Paulson, Be[h Caner. The Aurelia Willi:l.ms Supergirl \'(Iillie is :I.{ it again! PURPLE PASSION p r esenting the i r famous aCt. The importance of physical as well a s menta l development in achi eving success in a highl y complex society was stressed by the physical education department. I t s a im s we r e to teach good sports man s hip a n d a sense of fair play, to discipline the m ind, and to educate students in leisure time acriviries which can be car ried int o adulthood. The department strove {Q g i ve each studenr, regardless of hi s s tag e of development a chance to develop his s kills, his a nirucle, and hi s ph ysique. Dur ing the year 1970-7l, Cristobal H igh School's girls' phys i cal educa [ i o n cla sses parti c ip a t ed in basketball volleyball, rumb ling, (r ack, tennis, and v a r ious other sports. The boys' ph ysica l education classes part i cipated in football, baseball, basketball, sw im ming weightlifting, and track. Through these activities as well as int r amural and var sity spoqs, the de partment succeeded in achieving i t s goals. I thought speedball was bad but hockey beatS them all." "Keep you r hands on \ 'our hips so you r pams won', fall down." 49

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s o Science PAUL HIERONYMUS Chemistry, BS, Em Ccntr:tl Smc College, N S, Universiry of hOffili H lI\'C an Op<'n mind -',md thcnus.eit" C H S boasted a wide-ranging science cu rri culum. The srude nt who followed this program can be assured of a solid foundation in scicmific knowledge. Th e courses offered were Lif e Science, Earth Science, I ntroductory P hysic, I Science, Biology, Chemisery, and Phys ics. The seventh-grade L ife Science course taught the bas i s of life and rh e srudent's role in the realm of living things. Earth Science, offered co Michael McCann Kenneth Hill. "Now this will make me healthy. wealthy, and wise eighth.graders, was an interesting study of the s trucrur e and function of the world and its surrounding e n v i ronment. Introdu ctory Ph ysical Sci ence was a preliminary laborarory course. Students were t:lllght the pro cedures of scientific research and dis covery. Biol ogy offered a change from the world of physiClI actions and r eactions. This course was highlight ed by three dissections during the year. A basic course in Chemistry ac-. quainted students w it h methods of sc ientifi c thinking and p roblem solv ing. Emphasis was placed on pe r form ing laboracory experiments and reach ing logical conclusions. Physi cs, the scie n ce of measurement, dealt primar ily w ith p r acr i cal ap pli cations o f sc i ence in daily life Vecto r a nalysis and other physical aspec t s of science were the major concepts s t udie d in thi s cou r se. Mad s cienrists at work Et.IMA LOU ISE M ASON -Life Science 7; A B Randolph. Macon Woman's C o llege, M A . Colglte Univefsity '[n orde r fOf students to k.un they must be a c tlvc partici pam which rC
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LUKE T PALUMBO I mroduCtG-1')' Physial BS, M issoun M Ed, Umv of Flonda, "Thtngs could 1x: "lkware of thi s plam!" C HARLES T REEVES Physics, Eanh Eduauon, BS, B A, M A Arizona "To Ihyself 1x: hon and think rou aCt The formula for problem No.2 is not on the clock! JAMES 0 NORMAN Biology; B S . Michigan Univ. M A Smc Un iv, "L\c, lo\'c and be happy for mmorrow \Io'C "Smile 2!ld a NaiYuen Shum "I thmk the one I just cut up is the one I needed." 51

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Social Sciences ROBERT BERGER -Soc Studies. 8 A Midl lgan Sine u., II C Grand R apLds J C. "Gel {he moSI y o u an and II)' 1 0 m a ke tt m w o rld o f o urs :I phc c In whLc h 1 0 hve The purpose of rhe social scie n ce courses offe r ed :11 C H S was to help srudems learn about their world; its past, i r s present. and its relation c o them -both now and in the furure The aim of the social studies in structo r was to aid the s tudent in learning to view hisrory in :l objective and unbiased manner, and to give him a broader approach to suc h problems as national and international relations Social S c ience cours e s of fered at CHS included Geography, World H istory U.S Hi s tory and Cheryl Coleman, Mrs. Co ndon f\l ich:ae l "Now w h o i s o n Ihe pro side and 1,101.0 I" on [h(' con s i de;" MARY CONDON W orld His!., U S H is!. ; B S . N onher n Mic higan College "Be sincc r c about c\'erythlng )'ou do. particularly about g emng education Ameri ca n I n stitutions. Geography dealt with t h e srudy of maps) climates, a nd (h e physical fearures of various countri es World H is tOry was th e s tud y of the different na tions' pasts and their relationships to one another. U.S. History prov i ded the s rudent with knowledge of our nation 5 pas t and its accomplis h ments and led him to a bener und e r standing of our nation Ameri can In stirutio n s taught the srude nt about the work ings of government and the b asic WILLIAM J. GANSEN Am:onnn In s tituti o n s Social Studie s 8; M A UnI\'CfSlty o f MIChigan MAT E . P\Jrdue Unlv TtCll others as yo u 9-'QUld llkc t o be tr(';ltC'
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EUGENE T. G R EGG U S History. A .A. C.Z Collegt'. I} A. Color:u:lo Sme M A. Um\ of Colondo "Strive t o become rich" ROANALD JACOBS W orld Ge ognphy; Bachelors. Southeastern Sute College, M uters, NortheUlern Sme College Make the beSt of ..... hal ever s iruati on you are faced wuh Long liv e dem ocracy! ROBERT McCULLOUGH -Social Srudies; B S. S I Cloud Smc College; M A Unl \ of Nonhcrn Colondo "Sckind 1 0 animals" Mr Thi s is an example o f a good screen '3

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1(0 r e Suilds Melt "E" C ompany F Company 54 Jlelps Students The R ese rve Offi c e r s Training C o r p s at C H S was e s tabl i s h ed to h e lp pre p a r e hi g h s c hool s t u de nt s f o r f u ture career s in th e Armed F o rces, and f o r ROTC in colleg e s h ould they dec i d e to rake ii:. I t s chie f aim w a s to h e l p students a c h i eve the m a turity necessary to becom e officer s a n d l eader s o f m e n This y ear th e ROTC was h eade d b y CPT J uan F Mara wh o was assiSte d by S F S Murph y SFC Picoli, and SSG Alford. The ROTC unit a t CristObal cons i s t e d o f E C ompa n y U F C ompa ny, C o l o r Guard Drill T eam, Rifle Team, and the Banaiio n Staff. The Staff thi s ye ar includ e d Bat talion C ommande r Majo r J ohn M a r tin ; Battali o n s s pon s or i lt. Hila L y man ; Sl, 2 Lt. D o nald B y r d ; 52, 2 L t Daniel Valentin e; 53, 2 Lt. J aime Damz a ; and 54, 2Lt. Lewi s Valdez. The Drill Team was co m manded b y 1 Lt. Eligi o T h omas, and s po n s ored by i l L Jean Smith HE" C ompany was c ommanded b y 1 Lr. Denni s M axwell and s po n s ored b y 1 Lt. J a cki e Spri n g er F Company was c o mma n d e d b y 1 Lt. I saac H ere s and s ponsor e d b y 1 Lt. Denis e Foshe e. R ev iews wer e p r ese nt e d b y the ROT C eac h nine we e k s during rhe schoo l year. A large and important rev iew was Field Night h eld on March 27th Among th e rype s of co mperi tio n included were: p e rsonal, sCjuad, plaroo n company and m os t excitin g o f all, Drill Team competiti o n Another exciting c ompe ririo n of the sch oo l year was the Brigade Review. In order to make c omp etitio n fair, the Brig a d e R ev i e w and Fie l d Night ar e held o n rhe Adami c and Pac ific sides o n alternate years.

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Eecome Officers Alld Ceaders CAPTA I N MATA ROT C; B A. College "Accomplish what you out 1 0 do 11 all COSI with WhlIC \ "Cr resourccs lIyailable" SFC ROTC. "Don'1 make the umc mi S llk(' twice Do LI right the first lime and )'OU won'l have to do it av-in" SFC PICOU ROTC. ROTC cadets and sponso r s attend Jungle Operations Training Centcr SSG ALFORD ROTC Steve Aponte it l oo k like a very long dr o p to m e -a rC" )'OU JUrf I need a para c hute?" 55

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ROTC C o l o r GlIard M 3jor J ohn I L L H i l a L yman. I L l. Eligio Thom3s. S(C\' C A ponte Gcorge Ri\' e r3, Tony Lyons, s

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rite ,Cigltter Side Of Rore ,Cife Cadets steal a moment of relaxati o n during tcn grueling day s at leader ship school. "So I hlJ is what th ey teac h at leade r ship schoo!." "F" C o mpan), Comm:l.nder I saac H e r es "dr ops for [en with a smile 57

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,. virts' ZJrill ream Wilts Veteralt's ZJay Parnde I Robcm Colc 2 L ynn Gregg (o-commander ) 3 Nance Edmvndson bdcr) LInda Br()(k Plme HlUkc (, Kllh\ 7 VlanaOsuca Ann Tcrwdl',l::cr 9 Ann 10. II Kllhy P ur sley 1 2 Mamn Kr edcll (S
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Patty Hill and Tita Cobb (jllmes D espite overwhelming odds against them, the majorettes Patry H ill and Tit Cobb, presented a fine performan ce on the last Juni or Varsi t y game. They carried on their tradition by performing at the basketball games. To be a majorette, one must be willing to devore intensive hours of practice over the summer, and almOst regular practice after school when school begins. Tryouts Wete held during the month of A pti!. 5.

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60 NE\'( { TEACH ERS L:tssib. l\l r J o hnson. l\lrs. \ Xlilliams. M e Fitc. Mrs. Stronac h Cristobal H igh Sch oo l t eac her s began th e 1970 1 school year o n Au guSt 31. On thi s d : H e. th e f:lculry : H t ended a specia l meetin g at whic h school policy and plans for th e com ing year were d i scussed. f\lr. Spe ir assista nt Supervisor of U.S. Seco nd a r y Schools and Mr. Cook Supervisor of I nstruction, U S Seco n dary Sch ools attended and were introduced to th e faculry. F ollowing s pee c he s by Ir. P fau, J effries. and Mr Spei r ; co f fee was se rved to the new teac h e r s in the home econom i (s room. eJiS eommelfces Vear With 'live New reachers We mus t be prcpared, for a n t w sch ool yea r begins Mr. Pfau ( p rin c i pa l of C H S ) givcs b s t miOlll c :tdvice and information t o the rCSt of the bcuity.

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earibe eltlb Sponsors etllttlral 8xcitange Program Wi/it eolon Jligit Scitools I knew I s h ould have brought my lun c h !" Mrs. F auorosi won '{ let us o n the gym floor in our oxfords." I n order to p rovide srudents (rom a P anamanian sch oo l with an oppo r tunity to o bserve the workings of the U.S. schoo l sySte m the members of the Caribe Club invited the s rud e m s of St. M ary'S and St. J oseph s acade mies in Colon [Q visit C HS. On rh e morning of D ecember 9th, the entire se nior class of Sf. Mary S Ac ade m y and a number of s rudents from St. J o seph arrived b y bus. Each g irl was assig ned {Q a member of rhe Caribe Club and whom th ey accompanied to class. They had o r iginally planned to leave at noon but refres h ed by a lunch provided by the Caribe Club, they ancnded afternoon cla sses as well. B orh P anaman ian and American srudents agree that they had profited from this c ultural exchange. "You 'r e kidding I'm glad I came so I Cln catch up on the n e w s," 61

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Seniors Atonls Alm1nubil C. AUSlLn .2 SAND R A A L IlERGA june 26, 19H Colon. Republl, of PJnJml Entering CI-IS in the !)c(Qnd of her JUnior S:mdr:t cluickl\' beume :10 JUI\"(' member of her d:bs_ Sht served as tre.15uft'r of the L:tnguage Lab Club :md SCUell!) of the Sp:lnish Club. S:mdr:l grJdu:l.tcd in J:l1lu:try 1971, :md left for R iver s ide Cit)' College where she pbns TO major in business. JA Y A LONI S jomuny 195 J A neon. (:tnll Zone Jay has attended Caml Zone school s for twelve }Clrs. six of these were at C HS. I n his senior \'car, JIY was :l member of t h e (:trioc Club lnd the v:If::.iry (r:'ick (('Jill. H e pbn::. to ::.tudy eng i neering :lOd computer science at L ouisi:!na P o l ) (etlmie I nstItute :lfter graduation. AUST I N OClo/xr 13, 1 952 Colon, R epublic of P :lOamJ Aim:! came to C H S in her junior vtar, having previousl)' attended St. Joseph' s in Coton She was a member of the Spanish Club, a n d participated in votleyb:dJ intramur.ds Alm:1 pbns to :Htcnd Canal Zone College .md nujor in medi cal technology PATR I CIA AUSTIN December 13. 1 952 Colon. Republic of Pan:tma At hletics have occupied much of PltSr's tlme in high school. She was a member of the ba s ketball and volleyb.dl te:lms in her fre shman ye:u :md c:lpt:lin of bOth in her sopho more year when she a l so participated in tennis I n her junior ye:lr she lett e r ed i n three spons :md also served as presidcnt of t h e Gi\/ \ and co-ca p tain of t he P owder P u ff speed b all t eam P atsy pbns t o attend CZC :md Imjor in physical educa tion TERR I L Y N BAKE R N(Juwlbtr 6, 1952 A nchorage, T his was Terri's first ye:l.r:lt C H S She p :mllip:lted in varsi ty volleyball. H er future pbns inllude studies :tt (he t y o f Arkan sas. R OBERT EARL BARR M a rch 18, 1 952 Charles ton, South Carolim R obert h:ls attended CUl:!.1 Zone schools :1.11 his hfe. SIX years at CHS. H e pbns [0 become a policeman .,. Robtn E. Barr

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Mi chael Fr:ancis Bole JEAN LYNN BASSETT Jun 9, 19)3 Jeannie has attended C.Z. schools for ten years. five of these at CHS. Durin g her high school )ears, she was a member of [he Spanish Club. (he swimming [earn, and the Girl s' Chorus. Her future plans include attending the Col lege of Bible in California, hopefully on a music schola r ship. MICHAEL FRANCIS BEALE July 16, 1953 St. Petersburg Florida Mike came to Cristobal H igh School in the second se mester of hi s sophomore ycar. H e was a member of the var sity basketball team I n his senio r year he was elected H omecoming "king". Mike plans to attend co llege in the United States. JA TERI BJOR.NEBY Ap'" 26, 1953 Br emerton, \Xlashington Jan has been an anive member of the class of 71. She was a member of [he Girls' Drill team for three years, and served as commande r in her senior yea r She was an S.A. a h erna t e in her freshman year. As a junior. she was a memo ber of the French Club and class treasurer. I n her senior year, she served as secretary of the GAA and as a member of t he Senior Privilege Committee. Spons have occupied much of Jan's time. She participated in speedball, vo lle y ball, tennis, band .. basketball intramurals, and was a memo ber of rhe varsity volleyball and tennis teams. J:m plans (Q attend college in the U.S. ELIZABETH BLE V I NS January 2, 1952 Colon R epublic of P anama Ellie has attended C r istobal H igh School throughout her high school career. She participated in intramural speedball du r ing her freshman and sophomore yea r s. and in basketball and volleyball during all four years. A s a sen ior, she wa s a member of the Girls' Drill Team. Her future plan s include study to become either an airline stewardess or a veterinarian. LA A GA YE BOONE July 10, 1953 A bingdon, Virginia Lana ha s been an active member of th e senior class at C H S She was a member of the Caribe Club, and served as tr easure r of the L anguage Lab Club in her senior year. She was a member of the yearbook staff for three yea rs, :md as a senior, served as copy editor. In her junior year, she became a member of the Nati onal Honor Society, and was e1cned president. As a freshman. she received an OUi stand ing Student Award, and in her junior year. an award for ex cellence in the Ru ssian lan guage. As a junior, she panici. pated in (he SF SST Program at Loyola University. In her senior year, she was a member of the Senior Class Ad visory Council and Board of DireCt ors. and ser\'ed as secre laf)' of the Student Advi sory Committee. Lana's future plans include majoring in computer science at Loyola Uni versity in ew Orleans where she received a fouryear schobrship. VIVIAN V ICTORIA BOSEMA February' }), 1948 Colon. Republic of Pan3ma Vivian has attended C H S for each of her four years in high school. H e r future plans include (he possibilir)' of a modeling career. Senior H omecoming King" Mike Beale is escorted on royal walk around the gym. Vivian Victoria 63

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K athryn Rach d Burgess Donald Pmick i:.lizabcth Plult"lIe C;lftt"r 64 KATIIRYN RACIIEL B U RGESS ALmh I(), }CJ53 Y okoh;lrn;l, ),\!);1n K.ull\ h.IS :mended CHS lhrou,gholJl hcr high s(hoo! career, :tnd Ius been .1 nH.:mlx'r of (he Girl s' Glee Club for four \ors, lnd the Girb' Drill TC:l.1l1 for two. Aft e r gndu. :tlion. K.HIl\ phn" co .Htc:nd a CoJlc.:ge of An s :lnd r-,. I usic in preparatlon for .1 rllu,>iul ("reer LUI S A B U TLER NOlcfllbll' 12, 1 952 C olon, R epuhlic of P ,IO lml Carm('n hlS been :l p:lrticipam in many o rganiz:uions and clubs during her vcu) at C!-IS She as sCHellry tr easurer of the C:lrihe :md Nurses's Aide Clubs, H iSlOr i:l.1l of (h e F rench Club, Vile Pr esident of the L : tngu:l.ge Lab Club, and tr e a sure r of {he She :Ibo served on variou s mmminces :l1ld the Senior CI.ISS Bo: mi of D ire(corso I n her senio r yC.lf. s he W:l$ ('!cucd to (he National H ono r Society. C:lrmt:n p!:ans to enter Bury College in Miami :lI1d study com puter science. DONALD PATR I CK BYR D June 6 [952 Balbo:l, Can:ll Z o n e Donald has :J.ttt:nded C:1I1:11 Zone school s all his life T hroughout h i s high school reus, he h:ls been intere s ted i n dralll:ltics, p!:aying l e ldin g role s in stv ('ral T he spi: m produCtio ns, :lI1d servin g a!> [f('.Is urer of the The s p i:ln Societ)' in his senior yel.r. I n the s ummer of 1970, he :mended :1. slimmer institute in dr:lr11:1.. D on:1.ld p!:ans to attend C:l!l:ll Zone College for a ),e.lr, :lnd then tr:ln!>fer to t he U S Raul Eduudo CaStro ARM AN D O C A BRER A A pn1 16 1953 S:1.murc e, P eu n o Rico "Cu bby" Cle m em. K a th y Kraus. "Sen i o r s J U S t n a tur:lliy have be:lutiful legs." Thi s W:lS Arm:lndo' s firs t yelr:1.t C H S H e previously :1.t tended A ntilees H i g h Sch ool I n P uert o R i co where he par ticipated in varsity lr:Ick. H i s future plan s include the study of accounting :lnd busines s admini s tration at the Univer siTY of P uerto Rico. ELIZABETH PAULETTE C ART E R A'l ard ) J 1953 G:l.rtersville, Georgi:l B eth came to C!-IS from Georgi:1 where she was :1.nive in :l.thletics :lnd other 5(hool :lltiviries. She participa ted in soccer. softb:1.11. b : ldminton. :lnd :lrchery intr:lI1HlT:lls, and W:1.S co-e lpt:lin of the v:lrsiry socce r :lnd softball teams She was :llso a cheerle:ldeT. a m e mber of the F H A vice.presi dent of the FT/ \ secret:lrv of the Deb:lle Club. :lnd a mem ber of the ye:trbook ;11)(\ newsp:lper s l :lffs. She was vicepre s ident of her f r eshrll:ln (lass, and secretary of her sopho more (!:ass. This yelr she wa5 :l membt:r of the Senior Cbss Advisor y Coun cil :lncl BO:1.rd of D irectors. Beth plans t o study ps),chology. p b nning :I ( :lreer in social work or per hap s teac hing RAU L E DUARDO CAST R O Jul), 20 1953 Colon, R epublic of P.I11:lrn:l Raul has p:lni c ip:lted in man)' club!> during h i s five ye:1.rs :It C HS. H e W:l.!> :l member of the C:lribe Club. the Frenc h Club the yearbook st:J.ff. :lIld served :l!> pre s ident of (he Art : tnd Spani s h Clubs :lnd vicc-prt:s ident of the LangU:lge Lab Club Raul served on Ihe committee for the Jr.Sr. P rom. and a s :l. membe r of the Seni or Cbss Advisory Council and Board of D irectors. I bul pbns 10 :l((cnd Amher s t College in !Vbssa c huse((s and take a liberal :l.ns course

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flass Officers exempli/I! ((Senior Spirit" CLASS SPONSO R t>.lr. Louis F:morosi SEN I OR CLASS OFFICERS: Kath y D c Raps, V ice President; Robert Phillips President; Judy M c L ain. Sec r etar),; and Carmen Buder. Treasurer. The 1 970-7 1 school year was o n e of innovation for C H S seniors. Under the leader ship of capable class officers, and with the expert guidance of their s p o nsor Mr. Fauorosi the sen ior class set out to do g reat things The first projecr was [0 secure a n open lunch. A commi ace was es r ab lished to prepare and s ubmit for approval a list of reguiarions, and the privilege was g ramed. I n order to provide a sounding boar d for the com plaints and suggestions of senio rs, the A dvisory Council, consisting of twenty representative seniors was esrablished. Another new group was the Senio r Board of Directors, made up of representatives e lected by sru dems in {he senio r class. Ba{h groups worked hard to make {he year a successful o ne. Amo n g {he special activi{ies of {he year were a t rip CO the other side to visit Cana l Zone College. the Senior Banquet, and the Juni o r-Senior Prom. Schoo l events of special s i gnificance to seniors were the Jamboree where Wendy Flores reigned as 9ueen, the homecoming game victory a n d the dance which followed with R osemary Chris{ian as quee n a n d the Christmas formal at whic h the H all of Fame winne r s were announced. It was a year which included {hose o nce in a lifetime events which ate so much a part of being a senior; selecting invita{ions and cards, senior s kip day, baccalaureate, and of course, g raduation. AltOgether, it was a great yea r one which the Class of 7 1 will never forger. 6,

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Caleb Clement Jr 66 PATTY ANN CHRISTIAN jUlle 26 Bluefield. \V'nl Vlrgini:t P:tlf) wa' a member of Ihe Pep Club ;It hn .sthool 11) Vir gima before wmlng to CHS She a mt'mber of tht: \'t'lr book ')I:tft here. :tnd In her SC1110r sened as publtw\ ch:tirm:tn of Ihe The.spian plays, Pam plans 10 return 10 VIr ginia :tfler gradu:tlion, and enroll In a beaumian S<.hool. ROSHIARY C HRISTIAN Or/ober J. 19J3 Coronad o, California R osem:lry ha s :lIIended CrislOb: d H igh School for threc years She p : lrti cip:ued in I'll' League b:l.skctball in her sop homore year, and the Girls' D rill Te:ttn in her senior ye:tr A s :t senio r she wa s seleCied F l int, rvlichigan Faith entcred C H S in th e second semestcr of her junio r year. She was :I junior varsif) cheerle:tder at her former )( hool in M ichigan After grndu:t tion. F:tith plans to Ixx 'ome l travel agent. FRE DERI K COLE Aprd /3. /9J3 B albo:t, Can:ll Zone ROTC Ius occupied mu c h of F red's time in high school. H e was a membe r of the Boys' Drill TeJm. : md as :t senior, a member of Bat:tlli o n Staff. H e WlS :llso a member of the Na tional Honor Society :lOd Ihe Senior Class Board of Direuors. Fred's future p!:lns include mending wllege. GARY LEE COLLINS NOl'('fllber 13, H amplOn, Virgini:1 Gary w:ts president of his freshman c b ss :11 C H S H e w:ts a membe r of the "2'" Club in his freshm:tn and sophomore reus. Gary participated in intramural and varsit), b:lsketb:lll during III fOllr ),e:tr s in high SdlOO I H e w:ts :1 member of the Sfudem Advisory Committee and the Int c r -.school Code Commillee. [n his senior ),ear, he was initi:ttcd into th e ation:ll Honor Society G:tr}' pbns to :ttttnd C:tse I nstitute of Technology 10 Cleveland. Ohio. elass Visits Zone Frcxkric k Cole ,..------.... Gary Ltt Collms

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Of )71 eOlfol eollege JEA NETTE RMI ONA cox AlIguJl3/,19)2 M anagua, Nicaragua J eanncnc was a member of the French Club for four years She was a member of the urscs' Aides Club. lnd served 35 secretary for [;\'o years. She was also aClive in Pink Girls. J eannette worked on the year book during each of her four years i n high school, :md in her senior year, served as editor. Jeannenc was a member of the National Honor Society and served as secretary She was also a member of the Student Ad visory Commiuce and the Philosophian Society Jeannette pl ans to attend Canal Zone College and bter the Univers i ty o f Florida studying for a career in medicine She also plans to scudy Spanish during the summer, before attending CZC, i n Mexico or Spain. KATHL E E N ANN E DERAPS JUlle 25, 1953 A ncon. Canal Zone Kathy was a member of the Carib<: Club for three }'ears, and was a mamocr of the advertising staff for the yearbook in h e r senio r year K athy p:mic i p:ued in volleyball and speedball int ramu r als and was a memocr of the junior Powder Puff t eam She worked on many committees. and was \ ice-presi dent of the senior class. Kathy plans to :mend college in San Anton io, T exas whe r e she will oblain her B achelor of Science degree for her career as :l regisl(. red nurse MICHAE L E D WARD DEXTER July I, 19)3 F ort Benning. Georgia M i ke came to C H S in his junio r year. and rlpidly became an anive member of the class of 71. I n his senior year. he was p resident of the C H S Student Association M ike continued his pa rt i cipation in athletics at C HS. playing on the varsity tenn i s an d baseball t eams. M i ke was a member of the Caribc Club, the "C" Club, and the ational Honor Society pbns to scud)' engineering :11 \ Xlilliam and M ary or the University of New?l. le xico. PEDR O J UAN DIAZ Ftbruury 26. 1952 San J uan, Puerto R ico Pedro attended C H S for three years H e was a R O T C pht oon leader, and a memocr of the Boys' Drill team. Pedro phns t o enl i s t in the Army's Spec ial Forces. and Ranger train ing, and 10 attend Officer Candidate hool. WEND Y M ARIE FLORES NOl/lmber 1, 1953 Leesville. Louisiana \Xlendy was the 1970 Jamboree Queen. She was a member of the Girls' Drill team in her sophomore year \'(fend) was a member of the Senior Advisory and Jr..Sr. Prom Commiuees. S h e plans to attend C.Z.c. for two years. and then transfer to t h e United States DEN ISE A ETTE FOSHEE February 24, 1953 New Orleans, Louisiana Denise was :I. cheerleader and an ROTC sponsor in her sen i o r ye:u She lettered in tehnis in eleventh grade Denise was v i ce-president of the CJribe Club, and :1 member of the Frenc h Club and the :uional Honor Society Denise plans to m end college :md earn a teaching degree Denise Anncllc Foshee 6'

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John B Funderburk Cath er ine Ann Gercich S tephen Armand Goulet Patricia Gurierrez J ohn M Ichael Ha nnah Allen Scon H : Hmon .s JOHN B FUNDERB URK jalluary 3. 1953 Tucson. Ar izon:l John p:milip:l.tcd in v.lf!litV tr:lck :md footb all during hi!l four years at C H S Hc scned on the J amboree P :my Committce. John pbns to become either a machinist or a diesel melhani( afte r g raud atio n CATHERINE ANN GERCIC H j(WUfl1) /. 1 953 L y nnw ood, California Cath y ha s C H S for tour yeus. She participated in volleyball intramural s during h e r freshman :lnd sophomore years A s a senior, she was a tvlember of the Girls' Drill Team. Cathy also served o n the Jr.Sr. Prom Committee. H er plans include s tudy at a college in Cali fomia or F lorida BRENDA LEE GIBSON December 6. 1 953 Fon Bragg, Nonh Carolina B renda entered C H S at the beginning o f her sopho more ye ar Sh p articipated in swimming. t e nni s, ba s ketball. and volleyball incflml r als, and wa s a member o f the var s it y tenni s team Afte r gr:tdu:niol Br enda would like 10 :tuend :t j uni o r collcge, travel extensively, an p ursue a c arcer in hairdr essing and an. S H A RON LOU ISE GOLD EN Ap,;/I) 19)3 Anniston. Alab :tma Sharon was a member o f the C H S senior b:tnd for fivc ycars, playing the flute She offic i:tted :tt varsity b:tsketball games in her freshma n year After g raduation. s he pbns 10 attend a :I nurs ing sc h ool in M iam i Florida S TEPHE N ARMAND GOULET September 22. 1 952 $omen' ill e, tvl:issac hu se u s Stephen entered C H S at thc beginning o f hi s senior year. At hi s for 1 mer high school he W;lS a m e mber of the A F.S .. the Ches s Club. the Math L eague, and the Science Club. :md received an award for being the be S t chemis try s tudent in the iunior class. H e :tlso panicip:ued in varsity track :md football. Stephe n phns a c arcer as a math tea c her. PATRI C I A GUTIERREZ J uly 20, 19)2 Fayenev i lle, North Carolim P at has mended C H S f o r eac h of her four year s in high school. She w:ts a member of the Dram:t Club :lnd :lss i s ted with v:trious Thespi:1O productions. Pat plan s to bc co me :t woman jockey. JOHN MI C HAEL HANNAH june 26 1 953 Waynesville. Nonh Carolin:t John enjoys motOrc ycl in g. H e was aCtive in ROTC during hi s fresh man and sop h o m ore rc:tr s H e se rved as a c heerle:tder in the P owder Puff game, and a s : 1 member of the Junboree Pany C ommittee. J ohn p lans a career in a eron:tLlliC:l.1 engineering ALL EN SCOTT HARMON Septembe r 23. 1952 A nnapoli s Maryhnd I i I A n i s one of Allen' s major intere s ts. H e w:ts :t member of the Art Club for twO rears, serving a s prc s idc nt in hi s junio r ye:tr. H e was also I an editOr of the new s paper and the yearbook in his senio r year Allen wa s also :tCtive in the French Club and Drama Club. I-Ie p :mic ipated in several plays, and became a Thespi: ln in hi s senior year Allen won the "Voice of D emocracy" COntCS t at CHS in hi s junior year. H e plans to attend the U.S. l\' l arine A c adcmy. or Ch:tpm:tn F loating Cam pu s in Californi:l H e would like t o become an architect or a com mer cial:trti st.

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earibbealf eollege elub ..Hosts ((Selfior Night Ad i'I !':::;"-r M1fk Stephen H erring DIANE FRANCES HAUK E AugJI2!,19.5 / Colon, R epublic of Panama Dian e has been an active member of many clubs and organizations at C HS. She was a member of the French Club, the Spanish Club. the Phil osoph ian Society, the Nurse s Aides. the Y earbook staff, and the Senior Board of Dir eCtors; serving as an officer in several of the clubs She also served on the Cafeteria. Senior Advisory. and various dance committees. Diane phns co pursue a course in business administration. with plans for a career as an executive secretary. PAUL HERBERT HEADY March 6,1953 Olney, Illin ois P aul attended C H S for only twO years. At his former high school in Salem Illin ois, he was a member of the Spanish and Pep Clubs, and the varsiry tra ck team. He participated in the ROTC program at CHS. P aul plans t o major in Publi c ArtS in college with a job in a radio or televi sion studio in mind ISAAC HERES januaT) 4, 1953 Puerto Armucll cs. Chiri
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10 ROBERT R U DOLPH JOHNSON j (wllal) 8, 1 953 t",l innesota Eric Irion Senior elass 8lects FREDERIC K JOH N HIGHLEY October 1 9, 1 953 Colon. R epublic of P:1l13m:l Fred h:ts mcnded Caml Zone schoo l s all his life. including s i x year s at C H S H e participated in football intr:1murab NANCY HUSON /\-Ia)' I. 1 953 C olon R e publi c of Pan:tm:t Nanc}, was in Nurses Aides for thrc e ),c:trs and was a Pink Girl for rwo yeus She W:lS homer oo m representativ e in her sophomore year. She p:tni cipatc:d in volleyb:tll intramural s and in the P o w der Puff Speedball G :lIl1C N:1ncy pbns t o :1ttend Brigh:1m Y oung University. S T EPHANIE BRIGIDA ILUE S Ortobel' 2 1 953 C o l o n R epublic o f Panam a Stephie was in the Sp:1nis h Club. L :tnguage Lab Club :lnd the Girls' Glee Club She t oo k p art in v o lle y b:tl! and s peedball intramurals. Stc phie plan s to go t o colle ge :tnd become an occup:1tio n:ti therapist. ERIC T H OMAS IRION July 27. 195J Ocean side, Californi:1 Eric mended C H S for five YC:lrs. H e p articipated in b:ts k etb:lll intra mural s in his sopho m ore year. Eric pbns t o go to college. R obert has been at C H S for thre e y elrs H e plans to tr:tvel :tfter gr:tdu:ttion SHERRY ANN KERN Jul) 19. 1953 M obile, A Iabam:t Sherry W:lS in the C:tnbe Club :lnd w:ts :tn S .i\. repre sent:ttivc:. She partlcip:tt;:d in Vollc:yb:lll :lnd W:lS o n the Drill T eam. Sherry plans 10 attend C.Z.c.. then go to the State!i to :1 deg ree in d:tt:t process i ng R o lx-n R ud o lph Johnson She-rry Ann K ern

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Hoard Of Directors NEA L A laROC H E AlIguJ/28, 19)2 England EusenC' Kmuss A TO I A KLASOVSKY March 12, 1953 C r istObal, Canal Zone Toni was on the Srudent Advisory Committee and the Board of Di rectors. She pbns to :mend a junior college in Florida and mljor in humanities FRED E R ICK EUGENE KNAUSS Oc/obt, IJ, 19)2 Nash ville, Tennessee Fred was on the Swim Team and earned his letter I-Ie plans to join the Army and become a helicopter pilot. H e want s c o go to Vietnam Neal at t ended C H S (or only one year H e plans to become an art t eacher. ANN MARIE L AU R I T Z E N AI"y 24, 19>3 Balt i more. Marybnd Ann t>.larie was in the C:uibe Club and the B :md. She plans to auend college and mljor in B iology and Oceanograph)'_ SENI O R BOARD OF D I RECTO R S Fron' CO/lll11n: D iane H:lUke, Carmen Butler. M ike D exter, J udy Mc L ain. emll'r Co/limn: Robert Phillip s, \'V'end)' Flo r es. Raul Cas tr o, Ka[hy D e R :tps. Bllrk Co/ullin: Lana Boone. Be[h Carter. Dt-nnis Denise Foshee 11

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Rodng o Lmdo Shc]!cy Madison Lunu P John Hmky r.h rlln IXnni s P Jul t.hxwcll Jud y Ann Louuc fl.1( I .cJ n RODRIGO LINDO April 25 195) Pam,rna Cit), Republi c of P an:arn:a "Rod wa s a member o f th e Sp am s h Club f o r four \e:ar!) and was secretary-tr eas ur e r in hi s sophomon : \ e l r H e worked on se \'Cr:a1 commit tee s Rod plan s t o :m e n d l:ollege SHELLEY LUND JUlie 1 0,1953 Buffalo N e w Y ork S h e lle y W,I S a c hcerk::ad e r for tw O )car') a n d p : lrtlllJm e d in ba s kctb:all and v oJlcyb:a11. She Wh a m e mber o f the G A .A a nd th e C :arib e Club Shell ey plan s to :mend colleg e in N e w Y ork : tnd bewm e : m E n glis h tea c her. HILA p LnlAN O r tober 1 4 1953 Br emert o n, W:as hin glOll I l ila l e!Ccred in swimming in bo d h e r sopho m o r e :and fres hman year s Sh e w:as secre tar y of the j un io r cia ':'. H i b was o n th e Giri" s D rill T eam, :and was Drill Team an d Batt alio n s p o nsor H ila p lan:, t o a ttend Secretari:al School. JOHN HARTLEY MARTI M ( lr r b 1 4 1 953 P anama Cit )'. R epubli c o f P :IO:U1U John w:as pre s ident o f th e j uni o r c bs:,. H e wa s ROTC B:m:alio n and D rill T eam C omm:ander. H e pbyed intr:amural ba s k e tb:dl ( o r four ye:ar s J o hn pbns t o :attend :a ACld e m y o r j o in the Armed F o rces. JAIME MARTINEZ AugllJt 5. 1 952 Colon. R e publi c o ( P:an:ama J :aime wa s :aCliv{' in R O T C a n d o n the fir s t Drill Team t o com pete in the Sr:ues. H e pbn.') t o jom the / \ rm y as:tn office r :tfl e r co llege. DE N I S PAUL MAXWELL April 1 9, 195) ew York City N e w Y o rk D enni s w:as vice pre s i dent o ( hi s .')opho m o r e cia:,:,. I Ie wa s in ROTC four year s :tnd w:ts '"E'" C o mpan y C ommande r Denni s plan s to s tud)' architectur e :at the Univer sity o f F l o rida JUDY ANN M c L A I N April 27 195) C o lon R epubli c o f Pln:trn a J ud y W:1 S in Nurs e s Aid es an d the Thes pi a n Sexi e !\', :md was presi dent o ( both in her senio r yelr. Jlld), w o n -.e\'e r al a ct in g aW: lrd s :and had pans in sc veral play s She pbm t o att e nd colleg e SARAH LOUISE M c LEA December 9. 1 952 Cri s t o b : d. Canal Zone S:ally pla y ed ba sketb.1l1 a n d v ol1cyb:a11. S he w orked o n th e Junior Pr i v ilege Committee :tnd th e Scnio r A dv isor y Coun cil S :tll y p!:ans to travel in Eur o p e :ther g radll :Hio n

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J OSE JAI ME MEDINA March 29. 1953 San J ose, California This was j ose's first yea r at C HS. H e was :l.n S.A. representative, a member of the Trad e wind and Caribbean Staffs. and a ROTC platoon leader. H e W3S also a member of the varsity football, baseball, and bas k e t ball tcams. SUSAN WARD MENDENHALL Detelllbir 23, 19.52 Springfield, Ohio Susan has attended CHS for only twO years. She was very active in athletics and other school functions in the U.S. :J.nd cont inued her in tcrest at C HS. She particip:lIcd in varsity and intramural swimming. tennis, basketball, and vollcyh:i1I, and was a member of the GAA. Susan plans co attend lvt iami Universiry in Oxford. Ohio. majoring in physical education. KATHRYN MARIE MILLIGAN A p ,i/ 23, 1953 Bozeman M ontana K athy was a member of the Nurses' Aide s Club, and of the Pink Girls. She served as a s rudem assistant. Kath y pla}'ed volle}'ball in her freshman },ear. She also se rved on various decorating and publicity committees for pla}'s and dances. In her senior year, she was elected Carnival Queen. K athy plans to attend Canal Zone College or [vloma na State University, majoring in eIemem:lry education. After college, she plans co attend airline stewardess school. ALEIDA MONTENEGRO February' 14, 1953 Colon, R epublic of Panam3 M onty" attended C H S for rv.'o years. She was a memocr of the Spani s h Club and p:micipated in volleyball and basketball imramur:lb. Monry pl3ns to attend college and pu r sue a career as a computer pro grammer. W I LLIAM A. MURPHY July 7, 1 953 Fa}'etteville, N o rth Carolin3 Murph" attended C H S for rwo years. He participated in basketball imra mu r als and varsity basketball and football. H e was active in ROTC, and a memocr of the Boys' Drill T eam. H e was selected out s tandin g Ivll for the fourth nine weeks. H e was also a member of the senior privilege committee. "Murph" plans to specialize in electronics in college. DON ALME O L SEN Jun, 6. 1953 \Xfhit efish, r ... tomana D on was active in th e sportS program : H CHS, participating in varsi t y football and sw immin g and football imramurals. Don plans to at tend Canal Zone College. :lnd perhaps transfer to an oceanographic school. NEI L CLiFFTON PATTO, February 7, 1952 Colon, R epublic of Panam a Neil was one of C H S s most outst:lnding athletes. H e participated III var sity baseball. track. and football. and leuered every year. He was selected most valuable player of the 1969-70 school year, :lnd also made th e All Zone F ootball Team Neil plans to become an avi:lcor or:l den tist. JANE MARY PAULSON Ap,;1 10. 1953 An con. Caml Zone J ane participated in volleyball. basketball, and speedball lmramurais She worked on committees for the Sadie Hawkins Da) Dance and the Jr.-Sr. Prom Jane plans to :mend secretlrial school. 73

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74 Rolxrt R:mdolph Phillips Toby Ray Phillip s J osephme Muie P orlxs I ngrid Ponier = ROBERT R ,INDOLPH PHILLIPS MtJrch 16. f953 M ontgomery. Abbama Roben has been in CI-IS for threc years. and in thi s time. had be come president of the Carib<: Club. Vi(c Pr csident of the N HS. a "C" Club memlx:r. Pr esiden t of the Senior CIaS!!. :l!ld ROTC B attalio n E x ecutive Offi cer. H e lettered in footballtwia. and tv.' ice in baseball. H e also attended t h e Univcr::.ity of F lorida for a N S F program. and attend ed th e Naval Po st.graduate Sch ool at IVl onetre)'. California Robert Pbns 10 study pre-law :md th e n go on 10 L:iw School. TOBY KAY PHILLI P S December 7 19.53 Burgaw. N o rth Carolina This 11:I.s be en T oby's first yea r in C H S :lnd h e ha s lettered twice in cr3ck. H i s future plan is 10 be co m e:1 111:1.rine biologist. JOSE P H INE MARIE PORSES Jmlt' ff, 19.53 N e w Orleans, Louisiam J osie h:1s :mendrd Can:11 Zone Schools for rwo years. After gradua. tio n, s h e plans 10 get a job and plan s on goi n g ahead with her mu sical education in p i ano and c h orus. INGRI D POR T IER September 28. 1953 D jakarra. I ndone sia I ngrid ha s attended CHS all through her hig h school years She was assistant stage manager in th e pb}'. B ell. Book. and Candle and T he B lack Fbmingo." She plans 10 go to th e States and get a job. "Actually. it "'::'1S worth breaking my leg just 10 be able 10 put my feet up in Mr. B oc k' s c b ss ." comments senior. \ '(fall y Ru sson.

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D : mn y RlI)' R obi n so n Picture Not Available James H.Sp:mgkr Ne s t o r J o h n R odriguez Ja cqueline Faith Springe r CHRI S BAI L E Y R I C H ARDSO December 26. 1952 Seaule, \ '(/ashingcon C h ris panicipattd in varsity and intramural volleyball during her three years at C HS. She received a "Driver of the year" award for the year '69-'70. In her senior year, she was sponsor of"E" company. Chris was married and plans to continue her education. JA SMIN A NNA RIVERA October 31. 1953 C ham, Germany J asmin was a member of the French Club at CHS Following gradua t ion, she plans to attend college, major in languages, and then travel. DANNY RA Y R OBINSON April 20, 1953 CovingtOn, K entucky D a nn y was a member of the T radewind Staff, the Caribbean Spons P arachute Club, t h e Civics Club, the D rama Club. and the cho i r H e played b:lsk etball in his sophomore year. D anny plans to attend college i n Texas, K entuc ky, or North Car olina. N E S TOR J O H N R O DRI GUEZ September lB. 1953 S ancurce, P uertO R ico NestOr has attended C H S for twO and a half years. H e plans to stud) mu s i c and architecture afte r graduation. KARE N LYNN SCHILL A p ril 25. 1953 Galion, O hio T his was K aren's first )'ear at C H S She was a member of the Span. i s h Club, the G.A. A., and t he newspaper staff. I n ber senior year she w as editor of the second page (editor ial page) of the Tradewind. She a l so phyed t ennis in her freshm:ln and senior rears. Karen plans to major in medical technology at Canal Zone College. NAI Y UEN S H U M September 17, 1953 M acau. China Nai Y uen has attended C H S for ("\\'0 rears. H e hopes to become a c h emis t H S P A G LER March lB. 1953 San P edro. California T h i s was j im's first year at Crist0bal H igh School. H e panicipated in intramur:ll and varsi t y track at his former school. After graduation. J i m plans to become an aUiomobilc mechanic. JAC QUELINE FAI T H SPRII GER De(ember B. 1953 F e Eustis. Virginia J:lCkie was a membe r of the Caribe Club. She marched with the G irls' Drill T eam. and in her Senior )'e3r. was the sponsor of"E" com p a n)'. Jac kie plans to become an x-ray technician 75

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Douglas Roben StCVrM Eligio Prrnanclo Thoma, kwl5 F.dwnd Valdu JOK F Vakncla 7. D OUGLAS ROBER T S TEVENS Aprtf 11, 19J3 Panlilma Cit}, Republic of Panama D oug was a member of [he panish, and, L anguage Lab C lubs. I n his seni or year. he served as h l stomn of the fir s t 2nd vice.prcsident of the: latter H e letlered In blilscball In both h i s lunior and senior years Doug pl20S [0. attend col lege In Texas. m:ljonng m lang.u2ges and histOry with plans for 2 career In the d,plom:wc corps ELlG I O PERNA DO T HOMAS j anuary 7, 19'1 Panama ity. Republic of PanamJ Eligio was :KtlVe In ROT al C H and in his senior year, was commander of the boys' Drill Team H e .liso par. ticipated In junior varsity EllglO plans [0 JOin the army, ':Ind perhaps later attend college LEWI E DWARD VALDEZ NOt,t,,,ber 19, 1953 Phtladelplua, Pcnn'ylv3n1a ROT lilnd dramatl" have (x: cupled mu(h of Lewis' time In hIgh s(hool H e auendcd Leadership School :lncl pankipa tccl in Thespian produwons H c played football In junior leJr: and wa\ also elected to the National Honor SOCIety. L ewI' pi am. to attend college. lilnd perhaps later Join the army JOSE P VALENCIA jlllltH,19H :1.0 JU,1O, Puerto Rlw Joe wa\ l member of the V;lr,lty baseball, track. and swimming u::lIm lie was :Ilso ,I(IIVC in R O TC, marching on the Boys' Dnll TeJm, :md m hiS '!cnlor } 'e,lr. as execull\ c omu; r o( "F" amp.In}'.Joe plans to Jttend Brooklyn Colle!!:e 10 ew York D ANIE L PAUL VALENT I E Ocl""r n, 19J1 Delron. t-.\Khig.m O.mll)' was the )urbook photogr:lpher for four }ears H e W.lll .1 homeroom :lhcrnate In nmth and temh grades, :md m hIS Junior )C.If. trea'!urer of thc SA H e wa'i aha .lCti,' c m ROT pLms to attend college, jOin thl" Air Forte, and pursue a career in the fidd of avia tlon. SYLVI A AN NOltmbu 1,191; New Orleanll, l..oul,i,lna S)'lvi;! W.15 .1 member of Ihe Aldell Club and sened a\ for one \I:,lf She pl.i)'l-d in the C H S b:md for four :md \\.1'i .1 member of the Tr.ldewmd Sllff She M"ned on ,mou') o.1O(e and was a vustt, (hetrle.ukr In her senior ,e.lf Svh'la pllm [0 major i n law at L.SU. the H omecoming Pa-Ll DA ALlCE VEST Nott'"mbfr 6. 19.52 Ft. Clayton, C:lnal Zone KENNET H WALLENIUS Aprtl n 19J2 HelSinki. Finbnd TERR Y LEE WAI.Ll N E NOft'mbfr 22, 19'3 F ort M cClellan. Alabama Terry participated In swimming and water polo, H e was active in ROTC, a member o( t h e Color Gu,lf(\ in his jun ior year, and of the Boys' Drill T elm in his year Terry plans to :mend college In Calt(ornla. majoring in ar chitecrural engineering KAREN WESTERBER G A ugwi U, 19.53 F lint, M ichigan D uring her high school ),elrs. all of them .It C HS. Karen was a member of the Canbe Club. the \wim tcam, the Girls' Chorus, and the Tradewind Staff I \fler g radua. tion, she p lans to study computer progr ammmg )E Y D E L MIL A G R O W I R TZ Marc" 18. 19J1 San J ose, Costa Rica J enny was a member of the Spanish Club, ,lOd served as treasure r during her JUnior and senior ycars She par mi. paled In varsity volleyball durmg her freshman ,md sop ho more years. J enny plans to become a nurse. PRICILLA ANN ZAVINSK Y j anuary 22,19.53 T errell, Texas This was Penny's" first year at C H S She was a memo ber of the Nurses' Aides Club, I n her junior year. she reo ceived a $25 savings bond (or her bookkeeping Penny plans to attend Fayetteville Beaury College 1 Pncllb A nn Zavlnsky 77

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78 laces WitHout lacts Akxis N orm:mdil Scheibe Teves Alld lacts WitHout laces MICHAEL R ANDREE )u1Ie;, 1953 Annapolis, .IDAVID RAY MOND DIAZ Sept f mber 9. 1953 B a lt imore. t-.la r y lan d Da vid played var s it y football during hi!> juni o r year ,It .C H S : md hel p e d phn the J:l.Il1borec p : my. H e phns t o :tttend technICal s(hool afte r gradua t io n DANI EL WES LEY FERGUSON ) lIl1f26. 1951 t-.lacon, G eorgia RICHARD ALLE N KRESGE October 9. 1953 Ancon, Canal Zone R icky plans to a tt e n d tr a de school a ft e r grad u:tti o n THOMAS ADDISON P URSLEY jul y 9 1 952 Suffern, New York Tom was active in SPOrtS during hi s hi g h sc hool years, particip at in g in intramur: d football and wre s tlin g, and pla ying on the varsity football ( c am H e wa s : 1 member o f the t C Club, :md in hi s senio r year, served a s se cr etary. H e W : I S :lIs o : 1 member of the Math Club and th e RiOe Team. and was a c tive in ROTC. T o m pla n s to attend the United St:Hes M ilitary A cadem)' at \X' e s l P o int New York. DANNY DALE TWEEDY December 23, 1 952 Vieten ille California D ann y was a h o m e room rcpre se nt:ltivc in hi s sopho more ye:lr H e pl: m s t o enter an :tpprenti c e ship program in T u cson, Arizona, plannin g a caree r a s a c arpenter. M AR I A DE LOS ANGELES ZAYAS j f Ulllflry 4 1 952 Ma),ag uez, PuertO R ico M ar i a was a member o f the Sp :l.I1is h and Pep Clubs. She phns t o be co me a psych o lo g i s t

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SCI/ior gores Visplo!! .Malt!! .Moods . S[cphanie l ilies John Martin, Dennis f..hxwell ,.

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80 {'aJlfera {'aptures Brief (jlillfps(s 01 SClfior Die ... PARADES Ellie Blevins. Jane Paulson. Rod Lindo. Shell) Lund. Carni":l.1 Queen Kathy M illigan. Denise Foshee. Denms lI.l:nt.well. Cath, Gcrcich, \'
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J II/roil/cillg . Jloll Of lame -eloss Of j71 . );ir. and );iiss eJis ,Michael 'Dexter 'Diane Jla/lke .,

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Most J Iftelleetllol Robert PItiI/ips Calla /1oolle Most ikelU Z'o SlIeeeed .Micltael 'Dexter 'Dellise Josltee .,

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nest ,CooKing Jlllldcrbllrk Wmdl/ J/orcs nest :Dressed Camlclt EII//er Rodrigo ,Ciltdo 83

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84 Sest Voncers Com/cit Siltier ROlli Costro lriendliest .Hilo ,c!J1I101t 'j)cltltis .,Moxwell 'j)misc 'Jos/tcc

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Most Athletic Pats!! Allstin }ki! Patton Most /Jlld!! McCain :Donald H!!rd as

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86 Also Presenting Up ---IJI Row: R obert Phillip s Mr. C HS, Mo s t Likel y T o Succeed; Shelly Lund Miss C H S 2 nd Row: Mi ch ael Dexte r -Mos t I ntel l ectual ; L ana Boone M ost Lik ely T o Succeed 3rd RQllJ: Raul C:lsno -BeSt Dresse d : Wendy Flores B es t D ressed 4tb Row: \'(I illiam Murph y -Wittiest, Bes t D ance r B e th Cmcr -Best Dan cer. 51b Row: J ose Me dina B est P erso nality ; Sus:m Mcnd : mhall M os t Athletic. 6,11 Row: Alle n H armon -T alentcd; R odrigo L indo -BeS t Look ing And /Vot Pictured. Wittiest Patricia (jlltierrez .Mark Jlerrillg nest Persoltolity /lall I!jorneb!f :Dellllis .Maxwell /(lIltlterS-lIp: Sandr a Alberg:t -r-,' Iost lncellecfll31 R osemary Christian -Bes t Looking T oni K bsovsky B es t Dresse d. Mos t T : d c nted S h erry K ern \ x/i{tie s t "Cubby" Clement M os t Athleti c Hib L y man -Iks l P e rsonaliry

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.A til11e iff tlte life 0/ eaclt IJirl affd bO!l .A til11e 0/ sorrow, affd !let 0/ jO!l; (jrntillatioff realizatioff briffIJS 0/ tlte effd o/l11aff!l tltifflJs elnsses, daffces. /ootball IJal11es will be ffO 1110re, (;lte l11aIJic 0/ tlte ltiIJIt scltool !lear is 0 Jer (;1t01l1J1t SOllfe Ilfa!l cOffsider all tltifflJS dOffe, (;lte!l SOOff will /cam Cife's jllst beIJllff 87

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JUNiors Sheila \l"PlWt' Brian l\hnh:l Michael Alberg;l Alger Allen Amon Apochu PJ.ul ('kn 93rbaf.1 l\ f idl,lel Jaunt B,lIIei ttlkcr B.mb Barger B:UClt;l \Villi.lm Frank Barbar.1 G e n,mne R obert Bdx: Bern Betcher B ].I!l(hc.:ltc 1310ernef Jr. t\LlrLl Rldurd H enr" Debra RLI,l Boone Booth Bor
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Jancl Linda Carios Catherine Man Brandenbur g Brock Brown Carli sle Cash H dcn Chef) I J" De bora h Rand, CI:MO Caudill Caudill Cheshire Frank Pamela v"mint l Roberta VChml Cilchc[co COld C o bb C ole Cokman t-.hrk Sonia \'(Ia\ne h c n c Klrcn C o llim Colo n C outS C ummings Curner .9

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90 Sheli:t D;l.I1(cr Brend:t Egger i\\ :mlcm: G.lfnc:r Gn.:gon G oguen E milie D :tniel vCliffo,d F e rrel! )unn1\' Gcwln Ann Gon/Jlel J ohn D:t)' M:tri:t F onta nez William Gille s pic Z :ln Green \X1illi:tm N:tncy De:tcon )r. E dmonson A ndre w F oshee Steph:tn F uglebe'g Nadia R o bles, ''The feminine mys tique ; H w ork!"

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CLASS OFFICERS: Harry Townsend (Vice-President), Cathy Carlisle (president), P a trici a Paine (Treas u rer), J a ckie Parker (Secr e tary) Class A ssembly They were a l so respon sible for the annual Junior -Senior CLASS S PO NSOR MR. F ITE Prom h o n oring the grad u ating Seniors. The class of '72 was th e largest a n d one of t h e mOst active and spirited classes of Crist obal H igh School. T hrough the efforts of class officers the J uniors obtai ned an open lunch o n Tue sdays a n d Thursdays o f eac h week. Anothe r highlight of the y ear was the selection of the class ring whic h was roun d with a gold stOne. T he J uniors will long r emember PSAT and NMSQT which are among the many tests they took in preparation for colle ge. The girls in the Juni o r Class o rganized and p resented a fashion show whic h demonstrated the do's and don t s of pants wear. Juniors also p l anned and presented a Junior Carol Ross, Marian Kredell, J a ckie P arke r L ynn G r egg, Sheila Alberga, Cathy Carlisle, Mary N orval, Titi Cole, Karen C urrie r N a ncy E d m o ndson. The do's and don'ts of dress wear. M:.tri:.tn Grt'gg P:.ttrici:.t H:.tuke B:.trb:.tfl1 Grier Joseph Herring R:.ty mond Gsell K:.tlhJeen Hess Edwin H:.tmmond Kenneth Hill JJ Muk H:.tnly Willi:.tmHuffman 9,

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92 J une lIund Kr:aus t-.II.G i lberr y J :ackson f\1:arian Kredell J ohn t-.tecker D ouglass J cffries Loizeaux Sh y l a t-.f il!cr Paulette J ordi Donald Ivbn s i'.fineh:m Daniel Knau ss M ichael M cCann D:a!c Mitte !lllltiors (jroNted OpeN 'cliNch (;wice A Week Irma Patri cia Pain t John t-.l u ss e r II Loui s e P:llmer M ary Non'al R onald P alser Be' cd), Olsen M arc Park er Stanley Ostcr D ebo rah Pat e

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Robin Pritham Marlene Rice Deborah Rowley Michael Scott R onn i e Sills Raymond Ramos Susan Ridge Jose Recio Randy Robinson Carmen Reed adia Robles Lourdes Rc)'es Carol Ross elass Of J72 Pkks Vel/ow Stolte lor /(iltU J oseph R omeski Arthur Serig Judith Simmons Juan Sanchez Higini:t Shaffer Valarie Simms G3'J 'Sheii>< v1ames Sh:tfli:.{" Jean Smith Frank SCO([ vSu:phen Shobe Michael Snider 93

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!>.tichaeJ W ood 9. /Juniors Visplay rlteir ralents At /Junior floss Assembly M attia Spagna Dorothy Terwilliger Carol Wertz Ann Worthen Aurelia \ '(Iilliams Sus: m n Zachry The o n e a n d o nly, Bre nd a Egger! Maribel Z ayas Marisol Z ayas

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Ernes t Ab r es h M ichael M cCann S ha r on Smith A ns tey Catlen I rma M onclova P uuloa Teves J ean Smith. \ '\fho's on a diet ? Not P;(/ured: L ynne Goguen, J uan Gon zalez Debra Gosney, P atricia H ill, R oge r J ohnston, M axine b R ache Will i am Le Doux, J oel L ee, Paul R hoads, Ralph Richmond, D olo r es Santiago llteC(Jllfers Doug las J eff ries. I m standing like this be cause there 's n o baJJ." L inda B rock Ann Gonzalez, M ary Norval. T HREE FOR THE ROAD. .s

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SophoJl1ores Nilk. l(h (;11 S t ep h e n D o n n:! v.J:tmc!I t-.I:lril)'n A d.lIn, A pocbl.l A pontt: [ h k er I hrf Bax t e r R m(.'m.u. Donn,. t-.t llh:t c l P.101 v:Jeff'l IXLlnlOlIrl Bl,ot B b r H .hud B levin s 13.1rh.lr.l vRohm /P.lln Jdlrc\ E d\\.lrd Kath leen BJ(.x:mc.:r HIlt\..; B rid,\( :11 B ru: m B nng:t s J r Br ow n j\khnd. l \. P.ltrll(' K:lrl K H h n n "\/'Di:lI1c B ro w n B ro w n Bumh B u r ge Bu::.h Cafol! Junc L u l u V'/\ nn ../GCL lld L o urdc, 'V'K:tt hlcc n Childro, CiminO Grulh C o llin Co l on Coil'"

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/Lavera v"Leland vWanda v'Guy Kathie I>.t3rc Cooke Cummings Cummings Damiani Danielsen D enis Brian Jane J ohn ./Judr Rosita H ar!,) Deraps Dohle D ohJe Doh Ie D ominguez Dowell v-)oseph Kath!,)' o ..,.,Kathleen Edn:l Esteiit3 Pedr o Ender F :ming ton Fauber Ferguson Ferris FOnl3neZ Robert Ron31d Lisa VNin3 l\hrk Cornelius Ford Forsyth Jr. FUff Gercich Gibson Goeberrus Edward V1-ienry vPeter VPatrice Esther Olga Golden Goldmann Goldm3nn Gonier GonZlle z Gonz31ez '7

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\/Dthr'l VROI / R o\ T o m th e T IGER' G{)',nn Got( (,regg G,:,el\ 1.1mb V'\J,In<\ Vl.lOch Dennis I lorn llull H urlbut Ixbor,lh ./}I\C: l\l u .. hck /Paul j,lhul John ... on Kn,kr Kilmer John &ot Kr,Il!'" Lasher Ixc: LoizClU X \/,Bn,1O ../l\!ounn:n v Llwrcme /Edlthe !.O\(: L\mJn l\l.le,u, l\b rsh 9,

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SOpH0ll10re 'lIon! lit Jioll1ecoll1iltg Pnrade CLASS OFFICERS. Beth Wamio ("ice president), Nancy Ridge (president). Debbie Meeker (Sec.-Treasurer) Thi s year's sopho m o r e class was outstanding -both a s a group and as individuals. Scort Loizeaux and P aul Bleicher received Hig h H o nors during the first semester Th e sophomore class was active borh in special class acrivirics and sch ool events as a whole. They o rganized a float for the H omecoming Game P arade, c h oosing D ebbie Meeker and Jan Jan osik as th e ir r epresenratives. In cooperation with the Freshman class, the sopho m ores sponsored rhf Freshman-So phomore dance o n February thirteenth Ted Scott and Barbara Bloemer becam e kin g and queen for the evening. Another sophomo r e warch) of mention is Edythe Marsh -winner of rhe lONon -Fre nch Student" contest spon sored by the Fren ch C l ub du r ing the Fren c h Week The enthusiastic sophomore offi cers planned seve r a l exciting events for the spring. Marri:mne Verruno Proud \'(Iinner of" obel Art Award" Judy Dohlc Practic ing f o r (he future

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Kathryn Smith. M axis forever!" Paul Peraha Warren P hillip s Ros a P e r ez Bett y Q uee n v Elena N b xwell Sheila M ayan i J udith M enges linda M e rri c k /Barbara M oody Manuel M unoz Viana O stre:a T erri Overs tree t l"-_ " .' ..... i -::P; P aul Bleic her trie s his lund at ( y pin g. M ark M cKenney vDebr a M eeke r vPeg,gy Mdler J ack M o hlman R obert Nordstom M yna Olivera vPete r P:lCheco E lizabeth P alser t ".

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Debr a M ee k e r "You can't s a y s h e was n t warn e d Elsa Sanchez Vic kie Schaub Theodore ScOtt Al Simms Paul Sanchez Jr Diane Schloredt Pedro Simmons v.Joseph Smith 101

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102 SophoJl1ore elnss eonsists 0/ J 4 J Students James Collins An example of utmost con<.cntratlon \. Toro 0-laria Toro Elinbeth \'{/aimo Luann Ware M,man Crou,h. "\,'ho 'an I'm un{omtort ahlc" V1-larilnne Verruno v1\1artha Vest Sus:!n Willis vLinda \'(100d<; O'i('man iktanlOurt. "I d;lr(." \,UU'" P :mic i a Snider Yvonne Thomas Mary Spivey Judith Tomlinson Mi chele Kessler. I f I could onl) understand thts!"

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,Cntec(JJI1ers J eff Brien Bullinger Melinda Bro wn I/George Cruz OT P I CTURED J uan Buen v\'Villiam Branner III Carl C outs fo.lari: m Cr o u c h R o bin Hansho rn Jan Janosik vAngelinc LaRoc h e Ang el T o rre s v-Damari s T orres H enr) D ingm a n V"Toni T o rres Elaine D usin R alph Za(han Edyth e Marsh Kath y Br o wn, Mi c h e l e Kessler. "Come n o w it can' t Ix tha t bor i n g .. M ar de n e Garner, Patrice Gonier. "Are you [wo through (he rulips 19ain'? .. 103

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lres/tmeJl Ch:J.rles Dtborlh J ohn \'\f i I li:l.1ll Sus:J.n v6on,ld Alocrg,l Alberg' Alcx:l.ilis A ndree Ar baugh Au!>(in Carol helm R odger Chri:Hopher P:l.Ub D:l.\'id Baker B:lff.ll,l Beak Bensen Bbnchcltc B leicher Arnald o Carl Clndottt.' George vPamcb vGur:t B onill:! B ower' BO\l.md Br:l.nnen Bridw ell Brcx.k Robert Ambtr vDebr., D onJld Debr:! vElizabelh Brockm:m Urown Bro wn Brown Budd Burges!> ./ Leo ;-"Ilr. je;lOne Debor:lh A 1 :111 V'Joe Butcher B\rd C:llbn-. Carey Chc::.hire Chfl!>ti:m 10'

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\X/illi:l.m R enee Dtbrn Alexis James A nne Ciecolo Clicue Cae Colcm:J.n Crouch b\ocda l>.lichellc 0 lark Ted Vfracema R:nmond D ancer Darn D avila D eaton D el Bus(O Dt Vault R:l.mon K a r en t/frina Thom:l.s Ste\en Clifford Din F auber F erguson Finneman For:.)th Gabriel R ebecca Ma ria B Jrbu:l. vK:ucn D aniel Cbri:.:.:t G e w in Gonnl0 Good win Goulet Green Gn:g,or. Grego!) K:l.ran Kimbcrh B rian Cynthia G ris t H amilton H :trden H artshorn Head} Heath lOS

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Iris H crn:mdcz Anne H erring !vbr cia H umphreyiJ>iimela Husb and L eif I rion \./'1enny Jimcne7 William Jimenez 0lmes J o nes K:l.ren J ones Sandra K aufer Cheryl Kre sge D;I\'id Let.' Victor L ee Ann L oyd Laura Lu(as LYons K im f..brohl 106 M elody H offman H ol l Bruce Jackson VO)' ce J anosik J ame s Huffman 0'f ichaeJ Jeffrie s Eager Fre s hmen impossible 10 hold s till Des hea Mason S:mdra f..l:!y ifusan Mccullough

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March 25 Speedball vame vives lreshmeN ChaNce Z'o Show Class Spirit Cherri Hieronymus (se cretary-treasurer). Victor Lee (pres ident), Cuol Baker (vice president) The f reshman class this year panicipated in (he Homecoming parade, the Freshman-Sophomore Braw l the Fresh-Sopb Speedball Game and the Fr esh-Soph D ance. The Freshman Queen, Laura Br oc k H er escort was Phil Miller R eigning at the dance was Princess Carol Baker and Prince Fred Wanio The Speedball game was held on M arch 25. The Freshman girls played the Sophomore girls, and half time emerrainment was provided by the Cheerl eaders. "Be sure you get all the crumbs ofr" I f you ask me, I think you rn'o ha\'c it all wrong'" John Dohk Gerald Coffin. "\'(Ii11 ),ou StOp goofing off and ge t t o work?"' Sand), May "This is really groovy1" 107

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108 .....<'\n ... N."'.; o. .. ,IOI,..n i/'Iv .... Norm.fI
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o.bonh lobm_ T""ylobon_ I.-f!IIrulobln Sho"l l.....w Arth ... .. s.I'ICh<. I though t all I ndian s were on reservati ons these d:l.Ys!' ltobortS<= AItr.Suft>na Ithoncl.Suuboo pSwanl 51..."5 ..... .......,.,, I..--DondTIl< K ..... It!T ..... V"koTiP">" V An> Ubbm 109

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em",," v ",. ) .tnC',V, !c"u n R "'>on".V,dro r "" WO\>Ckn\x,s W .. "" I reall y h o pe it w o rks." P:l.Ula Vaught, R enee Cliette. "Let's see, :l. few boiling thips, or W;IS it Slit V'1',ul,V'" 8ht y"'If" .... n.IXI ,sm Debbie Carey, C h errie H ieronymus. Ci n derella never had it so good D ebbie Carey "It better evapo r a t e i n time." W,II.,W lcy

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,ClltecoHlers NOT PICTURED: R a),mond A bele. Randy Amburn Carl Bowers. Earl Bundy, Elizabeth Cimi no, Michael Evans, Ester Gonzalez Lorraine Guilfoyle. Mark H onerbaum Bobby H ughes, R onald Hurlburt Debbie Carey, Cherrie H ieronymus "We are IS going on 21?" Charl otte Boyland. I JUSt hope that bllloon can take u In Vic k y Tipton H ow did I ever get stuck in thi s rut?"' '"

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Sevel1th /Illd Eighth (Jroders /Ire Froll! Rou: R o lX'f[ Au"cin. I..lwrentc f'..l oo(h1e r R oger \X/elLh, \Xfilli:H11 Cronan. J cffrc\' ClfWichcll. R itky t\l:trio Ubben Oili e r Row: 1\1.lr(cl.1 i'[OI1(!\.ll', f'..1,lrg.lfltJ Z.lmJrrip:I. Norcc n K.Lukr. l.ind.1 I .oi/callx. K.lfon j\l ictt'. D on" T omlin. E ileen i\1.lry ;\,liI15. SUS:l.11 i\lt:ndo/,\ nul' Ro//': Chcn J J:l.1ll0 D ex t cr. P .llnU,1 S.lIllht'l. J o hn l3.lrrIlC.1lI Jf. i\l ug.lrI : t Bmlbury. Amho n y \'<'uc. JU:1n Cbr,ullunc. i\l.Irg.lrlt,1 Young Fr'II1' RIIIl. I\l urr,l\ w rchh .IJmt:" i\l u'''I:r. t-.I.uk Peru,,'>(.', R n J.IIN:n. P.1lI1 I l opbn ... , \monic StOIC. \ ngcl I riz. lrr y emllr R O il': G :lil Gregg. B il he Bro\\n. Kunlx:rl\ i\lorrc.:ll. !<.I on.l Chri,u,m. I h:ncc N,I\. ;-'1.1[", 1 0 l:k:.dc:. K .lIhennc i\!eH.'f B.ut Clro l FIlIh :lrH, Gloria OJi,,;tro. Lind:!. 111(: .... Butkr, Y,onnt: "'mlth. ,\l.lddin<: Pup]...., I.mel.1 Sump<: r LtltlXh( PrlM-tib Hll .... b,md, Evcl\n \,\/ith row, "'!Ltd.1 B r.lnnon. l.u.lIlnt: .... ht:r

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Overwhelmed With 7:iger Spirit Frollt Row: D oyle Dancer Jr., Andrew \X'ick, P atrick O aniel. ) ooy Shon. J ohn Bridwell, Andrew N orval. Albn Rodriguez. unler Row: Y olanda HunnicU[, N oreen Will, D esiree Budd,j:mcc K a t sumoto. Donn:!. R eifsnyder, j ulie t-.l oebus. Btlrk Row: R oben Ramirez. Steven Boswell, Leste r For sgren, D L a P o n a Jr., R obert Austin D :tvid Mitte J oseph W e i c h ert, Anth o n y Spooner, Kurt Bullin ger. From Row: D On:lld J effries Jr.. Thomas Gabriel. R i c hard H oagland. R obert Nicholson. Alberto \ X/ilmont. \X'alt er Guilfo yle, Thomas \'(filder, R obert f..lo:tts. James C:lmpocll. Cnller R o u': Cher y l Evans. P :uric i a Celpe. Marilyn Barnett. Carmen Bring as. Nlrra r-. l on. Kay Hou slev, Kim berl)' \ '(Ioodcock. P:micia Loyd, K ip H ollow:!)" 8 f lck R ow: R obert Bradby. Charles l\l urphey, Diane Ruoff. t-.lari:!. R:!.mirez, Anne Richardson, K aren t-.kK o wn. Ameli:!. Smith. L is:tndra R uiz D iane B:!.ker. D ennis Stephens. Theodore De Boor. 113

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"For-r-rr-e!" Fml Rou': Steven Brock R obert D:ty, ch:lel D e V:l.Uh_ Bry:m Simpkins, E dward Stroop, Collins. R icky \X/ilson. Second Row: D onn3 Deaton. Shawn Ander so n Elizabe{h Smith. PUShp3 Ma yani. Ruth H udgins, Brenda G oodwin. M3rgarC{ \Xleigan. M 3 r g :lr e t J 3ke tic. M arcia Coffin TJ)lrd Roll': Paris Mcilwain. Nancy \Xlhit c, Stephanie t-.' I o w ery. Devony Dandri dge. Tilda Vi elka Tom. Sh3ron M cC:lnn Glenda t-.lik:!.. Fmt RolL': StOtt Parker, Richard S(iuub, Anthony Burbine, Glen H ess, Jimmy Cash, Leslie R ecio. Jeff G esney, M ike R omero_ Second Row: Nancy \Xliliford. L3url Gregg, P:1.t t-.l oses. D oris H og3boam, Terri Brown. fl.l:!riorie Blair. Di3n:l Ruiz. TJ)lrd ROil': M ike Cliette R obert \Xlil mont. Ra\ \Xlhe eler. John Shobe, Steve Kard onski. DJ"id Thompson. Roben F ernandez. D:nid \'{Ioods J o hn A lex Nieves, D:lvC Farnsworth. Eunite Zachry. Cind\ A pod3Gl

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!-Inl Row: P eter B arr, M ike R idge, Greg Cooper. C h eyenne R ivera. R obbie Currier, George Fryer Richard D owell. Second Row: Kath y B:llmer Violanda Godinez K athy tvl urphy. Patt y Valentine. Mar y R ichmond. Lisoct Coe, K :tthy D exter. Tl)lrd Row: Barbara Y erxa, Ann O'Oonnel, Elisa Brown. Phil ip \Xlilkins, Sue Gilbert, Vicki May. Mari o P ino, Newbury, Leslie icolaison, Cathy Perret Evelyn H ernandez. Ann M ills, Cherri Schwi n dt. First Row: R ene R amirez, R oberto Young NestO r H ern:mdez Brian t>.IcCann, George t>.fcdina, Dee Dillin, J ohnny Scott, R eggie Robin son. Stro nd Row: t>.like Orrego. Vicki Kiyon:l.g.t. Debra Hu ghes. t>.largaret Kie nzle. Susie t>.l unoz, Barbarn H iggins, \X/aher Cummings. Third Row: \ '(/a) 'ne D:liley. P atric k Mood) D:ln R eifsnyder. R ocky L uger. Eddie Sob.s. Jose VegJ. Frank Rorke, Bill Vest. Carl Ander son. 115

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"6 Fron! Row; Bill y Scott, K arl Simms. Carlos Coronado. L uke Green. Steve B arger. Mik e IVIcDonne11. Cenler Row: Ann a Summerlin J osef:, G on zales, M ary M oncivais. Caroline Price. Sherry H ill. Jo:mne B aro nn e, Soni:t T ellefsen, Eliz:tbeth Snider. Bark ROlli: Sarah R osa d o, Lawr e n c e Es cobido. H ubert H ammond, t-.lichael D oc k e ry. Clyde Adams, Steve H erring, R obert Lee. D eborah H arden. FrOll1 Row; Anth ony P arker, Angel T o r o R obert Day, R obe n O s ter. SCO([ Parker. R u ssell Gille spie. Cenler Row: J o hn A ustin R o bert Aus tin. R eggie R o bin so n K ar l S imms. T homas G abriel, Mik e R omero, G eorge D e j es us. Btlrk Row: Cheye nn e Rivera. Carlos ( o r on:tdo. Geo r ge Medina, S t eve Brock, Alfr ed Sandrock Eward M o rr ell, Mari o P ino P aul B aker Glvnn M oo re. 1 Fron! Row: M ark P ruse. Pat Daniel. Anthony Spooner. Alberto Wilmont. R o bert Currier, Glen H ess. Cenler Roll': Nestor H ern,lIldcl. J t'ffrey Carwithell. J o hn (nIl. J ames Dext e r James Fauber Craig D ohle, William Allen. Steve B arger. Alexis Nieves Bark ROlli: J ame s Bird, CIrcle Adams. R obert \,{/i1mont. Bill Vest. J o hn Barriteau. DJ.vid Alge r D ,wid G onier. Philip \X'ilkins. tvl ichacl Rid ge. S/lle Scores Victory Over void F ootball has always been an ex tremely po pu lar spOrt w i th the junio r hig h sch ool boys a t C HS. T his yea r for rhe first time t hey p l aye d regu lation 11-ma n foo t ball. I n Septem ber, over eig h ty seventh and e ighth grade boys tried our for the team. Of t h ese, fifry-six were chosen and div i ded into rwo teams the B lue and the Gold. The two tea m s pr ac t i ced on alterna t e days a n d competed against o n e a noth e r i n three games. T he fir st game ended in a cie, w i t h a score of 6-6. The Blue Tea m won the rem a i ning games with scores of 22-0 and 14-6 respective ly. Outstanding player s for the Blue T ea m wer e : George M edina ( quarte r back) G lenn Moore ( f ullback) M ar i o P ino ( end ) and lineme n Paul B a k er Alfred Sandrock, R eggie R o b in so n M i chael R omero, Carlos Co ron ado a n d Edward Morr ell. O u ts t a ndi ng p laye r s for the Gold Team we r e : A lexi s N i eves ( quarterbac k) Phili p W i l kins (fullbac k) Cra i g D o hle ( nan ker), and l i nemen J ames Bird, M ichae l R idge R obbie C u rrie r D avid A lger and Bill Vest.

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Skit Opells Natiollal ffUlliof J/OIIOf Societll Jllitiatioll On D ecembe r 1 7, five new mem ber s wer e initiated in the :Hicnal Junio r H o n o r Society. The old member s pre sented an amusing skit, explainin g the gu.li,ies of scholarship, leadership, c har acter, cit izens h ip, and service r equired for membership in thi s o r gan izatio n F ollowing the skit, a t apping" ceremony was hel d. The select ed s tudent s wefe escorted to rhe stage for the {caditio nal candlelig ht io g ce r emony. Mr. prau congr atu lated th e newly initiated e ighth g r ade r s and presenred them with p in s and certificates of member s hip A reception honoring rhe new members and their proud parent s wa s held in the home economic s room following the ceremOn)I, T he arional J unior H onor Soci e ry held its spring initiation in M arch At that tim e, seventh-g r aders were e l igibl e for members hip. M ario Pi no, l\l argaret Kien zle, Cath y P erret. Barbara Bait e!. and Sher y l Smith HAPPY MO ME T Mr. Pfau hand s out ce nifi cHcs o f member ship to (he initiates. Parent s of the relax a t th e r ece p t ion Alfred Sandr ock. C h erri Danielsen. Susan Gilben. and Bri:m M c Cann call u s the BRA I S Brian l>.fcC ann Chern Dani else n Sus:m Gil bert. J a nn a Loizeaux. Alfred Sandrock, and K ath leen Dext e r Old m embe r s w a n pat ienth to begin th e t apping ('r('mom 117

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1'. jUl1ior Jliglt :Debate Club Presel1ts Assembly The Junior H igh Deb3te Club was organized in an effon to provide S[Udents with :10 opportunit), to express their thoughts and feelings on var i ous issues. to.hny of the tOpics disclissed were based on events c urrently in the news. The spo n sor o f the club was Berger. This year rh e Deb"e Club deb3led for the different Junio r H igh home rooms. The students served a s judges of rhese debares. The club also pres ented an assembly for the e ntire J un ior H ig h student body. The judgment of thi s debate was lef t to the audio ence. Susan Gilbert, Lori F lor es. M arg:tret J a k etic, D o nna R e i fsnyder. Beth B lei c her Sheila Baran nan "Now what was 1 s:lying?" Sillillg: L ori F lores ( v i ce. president), Cheri D:J.nieisen (president ) Susan Gilbert {secretary}. Cl'I1/f r R ow; Sus an S t yles. Sheila Br: lnnan, M ar g:lret J aketic. B eth Blei c h er, Reifsnyder. J osefa Mr. Berger ( spo n so r) Back Row: Valerie Owen. Clove r Shobe, Sonj a Tel! efsen, J anna loizeaux. D ebo rah H ughes, Carl Ander s en Phili p \ '\filkins. Alfred Sand r ock. Front Row: James Snider. L eslie Sills. Nelson Sanchez, Russell Gillesp i e. E dward B lount. F ranci sco Burac. Sur s e Pie r poi nt. Center Row: M ela nie Hames. Vickie Aiger,j:mt'r Mize. Barbara Chavez. B arbara B iiznik. Sylvia V oight, Cindy \ '(fal son. Btlck Row: Andr e P err e t Leo Cimino D ina ScOtt. \'\filliam Tschumy. Don3ld T omlin. Bruc e H unter. Roben OSIer.

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Fro nt ROIu: M ichael Cain, Paul A ustin. L onnie Allen. Paul Loibl, Angel Toro, Armando Luna. R icky Diaz. Second Row: Kim \X'elty. J ackie J o h nson, Gl o ria Good. Susie R iggs. Lucy B1oum, Sheri)' Smith. Julia Robert son, Nob Swian. Soni a Thomas. Back Row: M ichael Smith, Paul Baker M ike O sborn, Jimmy B ird. Carlos Gierrero, Carlos B ymoe, Eddie I\ l orrell. Frollt Roll': Garry ll und. Michael \,(lilli3ms. George Dejesus. Jeff Hoffman. Dean Couts. Lori Flores. I.laurie !vl oore, Susan Styles Cmter Row: Charles H ughes. j\'l ichele Vre),. Jimm) F eeley. Budd) F:lUber. j:met S:mtiago. I\lar y Fluh3ny. Jill Paulson. Back Rou': Billy Kern. Jose Rodri guez, V31dez Ch3\ 'is. Susan Sarah P olire, Pegg y \,(/ hipple. Cheri D::mieisen. Cindy Runi on. R31ph Stone. O:tvid Evans, \X'esr 119

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120 FrOfll Row: Michael B os well, Anthony P arks, John Cruz, John K iyonaga, B : lrry Simpkins, Craig D o hle. Robert Br:II11lt:u. Cmll' r Row: Deborah B aker, A da Norman dia, J anna Loi ze:lux, Clo\;er Shobe. Cynthi a Smith, Sheri A 1c:x:litill. ):l ne( Br o wn BlIck Row: Davi d Gonier, John Ste ph ens. G:lry J uan L :lboy. Glynn t-.t oore. Alfr ed Sandr ock. George Br:lIln:m. P.wl G:lrner From ROtH' J o hn CollinS. Rl(k y Ph:trn,J im M cCarrick. Barney orton. D uke Collins, J ona than Br o wn. R andy Goss, L uke Skr:t b1e. Cmltr R o u: Gary F erns. T hom:ts Sni der. Yveue R odriguez. Clara Stone. Beth B leiche r Angel Oliver:l. Ra.lph Vas'luez. BlIck Row: John Austin. R ichard R :tmos, D:tn K elly K elvin Gregory, J uan V ier:t, J ack T :tte. J ames Am:l so n F orest Kin sey, Gus Co r on:ldo, John D:w i so n Frolll Row: P aul LUC:ls. Da vid Alger. J oe Phillips, R OIl:tld Gri s t. \X!'illia.m All e n een U r Row: V:tleric Owen. Patricia DeV :mh. An drea P:tch cco. Eliz:lbe th River:!., Alice F erns. Barb:!r a B:titel. Ann R utledge B(lck Row: R ita Castro. Ka ren Tahey. Tim 130 canegr:J, Bonni e \,{/ill is. Linda. H erna ndez. K aren D e Boor. Aida R odriguez

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flt/lfior Jligh Stt/delft Associatiolf Serves As Ulfi/yilfg gorce gor Stt/delfts Front Row: K athleen Dexter James D exter. Sherry Schwindt. BflCk Row: Mr. Cheshire ( spon. sor), B r ian M cCann, Surse Pierpoim Linda Garcia. Patty Valentine Pany Colpe Janet Kat sumoro, K aren Miuc, Barbara Y crxa. Debbi e Hard en. Sus:m Austin, Eunice Zachry, Patricia Sanchez. Carmen Brin gas. Nancy White. Front Row: Charles H ughes. Dee Dillian. f..hrk Perusse. Allen R odriguez. l\l ark ovak, K athy Murph),. StICk RouI : Donn:! R eifsnider. Sheib Br:mnon. l\lrs. T anner. Glenda Mib. K alh} Meyer. Jahtic. Surse Pierpoint. Anne Richardson, Ivlargaret \'(Ihipple. Ruth H udgins, Kath y Balm er. D ebbie H ughes. Barbara Yerx:t. Sherry Hill, Sherry hwindt. The Srudenr Associarion is the backbone of any school. This is true of the junior as well as the senio r high school. The CristObal J unior H igh School Student association served as a unifying force for the stu dents and afforded them an opportu nity co voice their thoughts and opinions on various issues_ Through the S_A., stude nt s were able co panicipare activel y in rh e governmenr of their school and thus aid in making it a mo r e pleasant place in which CO learn. The year 1970-71 was a highly suc cessful one for CrisrobaFs Junior High Student Assoc i ation. Continu ing from the point it stOpped laSt year it went on ro make this an active and excit i ng year. Among the aCtivities planned and carried our by rhe S A we r e th e Blue and Gold Intramural F ootball games, and various drive s and dances h eld throughout the school year. The Zephyr was the Junior High counterpan of the C H S Tradewind. The staff was composed of seventh and eighth g r ade s rudent s interested in learnin g th e fundamentals of jour nali sm while providing a valuable ser vice co their fellow students. Unde r the guidance of their sponsor, Mrs. T anner, th ese students published a paper o nce each month. Each issue contained articles concerning events and ropics of interest ro junior high students as well as an advice column cartoons, and kners to rhe ediror I2t

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122 S.A. encourages Student Partici Nancy Edmonson ( Secre tar y ) r ... liducl D ex ter (Pre s idclH). Doughs J effries (Vice-President)' p-l ich:lel ;"kCann (Trelsurer). T he Student A ssociatio n has been a n important pan of th e schoo l life at CristObal High School for man)' years. I t \Vas o r ganized in 1932 to encourage th e exc h a nge of idea s among s tud ents, to c reate frie ndlier relation s hip s among st udent s, and to increa se srudent parti c ipati o n in school act i v i ties I t s primary purpose i s to func tion as an org ani zat i o n in which Students ma y practice reali stically the bas i c principal s o f democracy and learn co handle the res pon s i bilit i es which accompany the privile ges of self-government. 5lllmg: Drummond l\Ic.N.lUghton. Judv Sherry Kern. T oni Th orn:l .... K :lthy i\likc [;":lI1s. COlh/" R oll': Di:l!1C" D :l!1cer. K : Hh y Farringwn. K.Hhv Cherri H lcronvn1u\. Ann RiLl I kwl.md. i'-1.11knc Ri((:. Utth C:mcr. Di:lne H:luke. i3rlck Row: Edward Bring.l'>, Clurlo[((." Bo\ bnd. George RI\'er:l. Rod Llnclo. Greg GogUl.:n. J ohn t-.I.trtin. G.ln Sthcilx:. Gil ApocbCl..

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potion A/ter /(iotoJ{s eampaign Michael M cCann. "Good thing s come in little packages!" Buddy Shorl.James Kunkel. Brandt Iri on. and Denise F oshee. "Are sure George \\lash ingtOn s r:med Out this Rita Boyland. J ackie Parker. H eidi Sweeney, Beverly Olsen. B ri:m Allen. and Debra Gosney_ "George. George. George of the Jungle." Each year a nominating comminee considers long and car efully 'he qualifications of various studems and then selects th ose beSt sui ted for the job as S_A_ officer cand ida,es_ These candidares then emer the exciting competi tion known as HCampaign \Xfeek." Each candidate srrivts to obtain the srudents' votes by han ging posters, coining s logans and passing ou t bur tons and tags_ The highligh' of ,h e week is the campaign assembly, dur ing which candidate s and their man agers spea k and various amusing or informative s kit s are presented On election day, s tud ents vote for the Student 'hey feel is best qualified for ,h e job, reaJizing that the election be respons ible for running CHS ,he following year is much more than a mere popularity conteSt. Chris Cox. '"I'm only doing it for a friend!" K atie Iv!cGilberr') and H anley. "This doesn't compare with a mini-bike trad'" '23

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124 J(ace lrofl1 (latult (0 Pilta Jliflltliflltts ((e" elub J Ititiatiolt SJllII1,e,: F o,ht:\:. Spagna. Car-10<, B rim n. Il.m... T own,end. Erne,[ Abrc'lh. Fr.IIlJ.. Citdltt(O. J/ C H S Tigers. "That' s H Apodaca up and d o wn Bill\ Deat o n

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(l.A.A. Composed 01 rop (fir! Athletes The Girls' Athleti c A ssociation was the female equivalent of rh e n e Club. The members were girls who demonstrated outsranding a thl e ti c ability through their p articipation in th e CHS athletic program A spiring member s were r equired to participate in all intramural spons and iencr in at l east cwo var s it y sports. I n addicion these girls had to pass a grueling initiati o n s imilar t o that of the "C" Club. Members of this club, under the dircnion of their sponsor, Mrs. H a rri s, se rved as officia l s at all intra mural games. The G.A.A. cooperated with the e Club in sponso r ing the annua l H omecoming D a n ce. This year for rh e fir st time the y also competed again st Cris r obal's m ale a thl etes in the "Olympics." Fro nt R()w: Jean Smith (trea surer), Shell), Lund (vice-president). Aurelia \'(Iilliams (presi dent), Jan B jorne b)' ( secretary). t-.l arlene Rice. Back Rou': Nancy Edmonson. J ane Dohle. R oberta Cole, Barbara Bloemer, Sue Judy Dohle. Karen Currier. and t-.larian Kr cdcll. "Up, up and away!" 12 5

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12. rlt espial1s Presel1t rW(J Olltstal1dil1g Plays SlfImg: Debbie P a t c Cath y Carlisle. Jud y rvlcL ain. Diane H:tukc. Mrs Elfers ( sponsor). Stfll/(/mg: D on:lld B yrd. Allen H ann o n The purpose and aim of the I nt e r national Thespian Soc i ety wa s the advancement and improvement of th ea tef arts in seco ndary sc hools. The C H S chapter attempted to arouse in tcrest in the dram : nic art s and g:lVC students intere s ted in drama a c han ce to work with its man y f:lett s; make up. directio n and ,Kli n g. An y high sch oo l st udent who earned t e n points wa s e l i g ible ro become a thes pian Mrs. Elfer s was the s p o n so r Thi s year th e I ntern :Hion:tl T hesp i an Sociery at C H S pr od u ced t w o plays pre se nted to t h e publi c in t he C H S aud i to r ium, o n c in November. and one in rvl:tr c h T h e f:lll dramatic pro -ducti o n wa s r he romanti c co med y -Be/l, Book. And Candle. T h e cas l in cluded vete ran actors, J udy r vlcL1 in a n d D o nald B y r d a nd new comers, Diane Carroll, L ew i s Valde z, and A n drew F oshee. T he play wa s well received by both C H S students and the general p u b lic.

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:Debate Club /!rondens Minds Steve Shobe, Mike McCann, Patrici a Paine, Mr. Gregg (sponsor) Beverly Olsen, Mic hael Snider, Jimmy Gewin, Rita Boyland, Kenneth H ill. Maria Boone. The D ebate Club was organized wirh the aim of providing students with an to express their views o n controve r sial issues of the day. Over-population the dress code, euthanasi a and mher topics provided subjects for weekl y debates. For each debate, the club members were divided into two groups, pro and can. Either the sponsor Mr. Gregg, o r one of the students served a s a judge. Each team membe r was given one minuee in which to present his arguments, then the opposing team offe red itS rebuttal. Th e highlight of the year for 'his club was the Speech F estival, in which they competed with a debating team f r o m Balboa. Salety Club encourages Salety Practices The Safety Club was formed in order co encourage safety pracrices among th e s tudentS of C HS. Mr R eeves a n d his assi stant, Mr. McCuJ l oug h aided the srudent member s in carrying out thei r aims. Among these aims w ere the organization o f monch Iy fire drills and dem onstrati ons of correct methods for putting out small fires. These fire d r ills and demonstra tions played a n important parr in keeping C H S stude n ts prepared for emergencies, nOt only at school. but also at hom e and e l sew h e re. Silling: Mr. Reeves, (safety advisor). Mr. M cCullough, (safety assistant advisor). Sianding: Carl Ander son, Mike Osborn. Diane Hauke. Peter Pacheco. Patty Valentine. 12'

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128 earibe elllb Members reaCH lo r tlftire SCHool :Day f I Front R Im. t-.1:mh:J Anton. N.IIlC\ Edmond ,on, Non.l!. P.lUi I-hukc' (histOri: lIl). R obert Phillip' (pn:'I(!c.:nt). L:Jn.l Boone. Debor.lh P:ltt', Burj..\c. j e:l1lnene Cox twIll' Roll': Ann Gon7:llo, Ann L:lUrit7cn. J:llkit P:lrk<.:r, P IUic.:UC .lordi. Sheil.l Alber g.!. Aurcil:l \X/ilI1.II11\. (hrish L oi/c:lux. C.Hln C.lrll ... !t,. B:lrb:lr:l Bloemer. P.Utl P:IlIl{'. Rlt.l 130\ !:Ind. D o lort's GeM lluk R Olf" Gil Apod.l<..l. EI:III1<: EIiZJlX'th \X/,I]n]o. COrnellll'i GoellCrru.... J oseph \X/ .lrr('n I I.lrr. Towil' send. Shdh L und. Juch J : llkl(." Spnnger, Lmd.1 i\1.1ri:"l B oone. N:llll)" Ridge The Cariloe Club (Futur e T eochers of A merica) wa!) formed for the pur pose of promoting :l be ner under standing of the tcal:hing pr ofessio n All st udents with :l "13" aver a g e were invited to join following the seco nd of th eir freshma n year. On November 18, 1970, the new mem bers \\cre initiatcd a t the Initiation B.lnguCt held .It the 13ra70s Heights Golf Club. K : lth v Kr:lUS : lIld K:"lcln w elcome on Visit ors' D;1.\. o n Ooo ber 27, I n F ebruary, ,he Caribc Club s p onso red Tea cher Appreciation Da), in hon o r of ,he facult y of C HS. Thi s was thc s ixth year (or the club co s pon so r this acrivity. Thc members also s p o n so r ed the s uc c e ssful SwdeIH T eacher's Da y o n Apri l 22. This y ear was the fir s t time that th e s tudents tau g ht classes for the enti r e da),. All agreed that thi s W:lS :t c h:tllen g ing and rewuding experience. The club :llso visited Coco Solo Elementar y School, and :l L :ltin Ameri can sc hool in Colon R epublic of Pan :lm:l. Anorher activity of the Caribe Club wa s their tutoring program. rvle mber s aid ed weaker s tudents w h o ne eded help in their s tudies. F requenti)' members took ove r e nrire cla ss periods for tca chers when subs ti rut es were nOt available

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I ',Ce eirc/e lroltfois JJ Promotes lltterest lit lroltce Dolore s Santiago, SU5ann Z3chry, Sus:tn Bur ge. and Rit a Boybnd "French is nOt that hard! Je I'aime!" "Le Circle Fr ancais" met rwice a month in order to stimulate student interest in the language history and culture of France To achieve this aim, special guest speakers or selected member s presented repon s on various 5ubjcns. The club was spo n so r ed by Mrs. Gegg. Only those students who ob tained a .. B average in Fr ench were eligible for membership. These Students were initiated at a banquet held at the Bra zos H eightS Golf Club. Each initiate was required {O recitc a poem, sing a so ng, o r perform a skit. The French Club members were inv olved in a number of imeresting activities during the ) Ica r. They spon so red Fr e n c h Week and eleCled the annual "Miss Fr ance." They also visited the famous passenger liner "The Fran ce." Front RoU': ivcuc Cummings. Sus:!.nn Zachry. !\hrtha Ant on, Cornelius. Goebe,;:us. P:lUleue Jordi. Jackie Parker. L inda He ss, Susan Burge, Jeannett e Cox 0111" Rour : N:mcy Edmondson. Patricia Hauke. !\br ... Norval. Debbi e Pate. Aureli a \,(/illi:!.ms. britz:!. Thomas. Sheila Alberga, June Ilund. Nancy H orn. R ita Boyland. Terri Oycrsrrcet. Dolores Santiago. Irll. Gegg. B.l
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130 ;Nurses Aides Impart eltristmas Spirit (:'0 People Of agarterita Fml Row: W Oniz. R Slnlbe B Olsen. A Ortiz, tv!. Olivera, R Vidro, D R obinso n. R B ct:mcoun. E F erguson. K H arde n Second Row: T F e rguson, M Garner, R H artShorn, T. Overs treet, P H :Juke, A \'\I illiams. N R idge, iv!. T hom:lS, J P :trker, P J ordi. Thml Row: Mrs. H ow. ard (Sponsor) ,JJimenez, M Gooz3lez. 1'. T o rres O GOnl:llez. M T oro. S Vamprine.J Cox. A Coleman. t\.1. \,(/ ilrnom. S Willis. D Gos ney, D G os ney J. lIunel, J. Tomlinson, ]'\'1. F ontane7. F O llr1/) R oll': I. D Dan cer. T. Cobb, N Ortiz. V \Xlhipple, R Clietc, M N H o rn. P P aine. K Stevens. T T homas. B. Egger tv!. B rown, D M ee k er. C. Smith. R Mun oz. E. N h rsh. I. r..4onclova, S. i\b.y-The Nurses' Aides Cl ub was a very popular orga n izati o n at Cristo bal H igh. Its members were g irl s int e r ested in nursing or anOth er medica l profession. The clu b e n co uraged an d s timu l ated th i s interest b y inviting guest speake rs, s howing films, and planning field trips to h ospita ls. The mOSt important field tr ip thi s year was the an nual v i s it to La Gar terita in Garun L a k e, on D ece mber 12. The purpose of t hi s tr i p was to give Christmas gifts [Q the people o n the i s land espec ially the c hildr e n The Srude nt A ssoc i ation ass i s t ed the Nurses' A i de s c lub thi s } 'e ar in co l lecting food a n d used c l o thin g for thi s purp ose. T h e p olice divisio n p rovided the club with a launch as transportati on. I n o rd e r to become a m e mber o f th e Nurses' Aide s Club, o lle mu s t be a freshman girl, wear a c ardboard nur se' c ap o n th e day o f th e init iation and say the pledge with th e Oth e r ini ti a t es during a s pe c i a l m ee t ing N E W I NITI ATE S

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Mrs. H oward, Brenda E gge r Beverly Olsen, Debra Gosney, Jacqueline Parke r Nancy Ridge. Olga Gonzalez, oelia Ortiz. The Pink Girl s h e lp ed their community greatly during the summer months. They volu ntaril y offered their services at Coco Solo H ospital. In order 10 be eligible for thi s program, each girl was re9uired to take a two-week first aid course. In additio n a o n e-wee k training period, during which the basics of hospital work were taught, was required. The girls learned how a hospital fun ctions and how to car e for p atienrs with various needs. I n order to become a full-nedged Pink Girl eac h girl had 10 work a IOta I of 125 h ou rs. I n the ho s pital the Pink Girls were casually referred to lS "Pinkies." They were expected to adhere to the commands and advice of their superiors who were registered nurses. The fun-filled summer of hard, but rewarding work was climaxed by a private g raduation ceremony a!tended by the grou p 's spo n sor Mrs. Howard, and various civicminded citizens. Pink virls Work 125 }Iotlrs Ada Ortiz resusc imes "Annie." Mr. B yrd instructs the Pink Girls on Firs t Aid. 131

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'32 Spaltish elub Participate s lit earltival Parade S eated, l s I R o w : C o rn eliu s Goebertu s J ud y T o mlin so n, J:tc k i e P:arker Jenny W irt z P :lUic n c J o rdi Jeann ie B asset M i k e M i n e hart 2 n d Row: M a rt a Ant o n S usan Za chery D o u g S t ev en s D i :mc H:l.uke, R a ul Castro, S andra A l be r g:!. P att y H :lUke. Mui3 F o ntane z Iveu e Cummin gs. Standing: Kathy P ur s ley, R od Lind o, 15:1:1.( H e r es, P:l.u\ B ait d R:llph Ender Nhry N ory:"!l, M :uk H anley, J o seph E nder, Greg Gog uen Ste p hanie l ilies, Sheila Alber g a Debbi e Palc De bbie A lber g a :lnd Sp :mis h Club s pon so r Mrs. E l f e rs. Who said th:tt Span i s h had t o be spo k e n o nl y : I.t S pani s h Cl ub mee t i n gs? The Sp anis h C l u b a t C HS w a s o r gani zed for the pur pose o f e ncouragin g Spani sh-s pe akin g srude nt s to be come acr ive in vari o u s a c ti v iti es a nd to incr e a s e their und e r s t a ndin g o f th e Latin Ameri can co untri es. M ee tings w e r e h eld tw i c e eac h m onth, a n d m a t ter s o f int e r es t co m e mber s wer e discu sse d All discussi o n s wer e co n d u ct ed i n Spani s h The officers o f th e Sp ani s h Club thi s year wer e : Raul Cas t ro Pr es i d ent; Di a ne H auke Vice-Pr eside nt ; Sandra Alb e r ga Secre t ary a nd J e nn y W i rt z Tre a s ur e r The c lub was s p o nsor e d b y Mrs. Elfer s wh o h e lp e d w ith t h e organiz a tio n o f v ari o u s act i v iti es a nd a tt e nd e d all m e etin gs.

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Student Advisory eOJl1J11ittee Provides Sounding I!oord lor Student Opinion Karen Currier, C:iHhy Carlisle, M ich2d Dexter. una Boone (recording secretary), W:111y Russon. Jeannette Cox, Roben Phillips, Nancy Ridge, and Victor Lee. "Why didn' t somdxxly tell mt the r e was a meeting coda)'?" queries Chairman J ose Medin:ll as h e and R obert Phillips hurry t o a meeting The Srudent Adv i sory Committee was o rganized at the suggestio n of Mr Pfau, wit h rhe cooperario n of Michael Dexter, President, and Other members of the Cristobal H igh School Srudent A ssociation. T he purpose of this group was to serve in a n advi sory capac iry to the principal of C H S M em bers w e r e car e full y se l ect cd in order tha t each club and o rganizatio n in the sch ool, and each class, might be repr esented. M embers served a s a sounding boa r d, bringing to the atrention of Mr. Pfau the complaints, comments, a n d suggestions o f their fellow srudents. Jose M edina served as chairman of the group, and Lana B oone acted as r eco r ding secretary Meetings were held o n the first M o nda y of each m onth. Among th e topics discussed wer e the r easons be hind school r egu lati o n s and the possi biliry of changi n g them modifica t i o n s i n the dress code, and possible changes in the athleric schedule. Members coope rated with othe r o rganizations in planning and carrying our act ivities and projects o f interest to the maj oriry of th e srude nt body. Among rhese were: a special assembl y in cooperation with [he Canal Zone Yourh Council, the Olympics" in which th e GAA and C Club partic ip ated, and the P owderpuff Speedball Game in which the Juni o r and Senior girls participated. 133

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134 Pltilosopltion Societll Is lormed A new dub at CHS this ycar, the Philosoph ian So(iery was formed b y a group of srudenrs interes t ed in intel lectual and literar y pursuits. The club's :lim was to provide students with an opporru nir y (or di scussion and exploration of the various aspects of philosophy and litCf:lfure. I t en couraged snlderrts to develop and illl-, prove t he ir ability ro express th em selves; e i t h e r through group d i sc uss ion, o r individually throug h r ea ding, c reative wriring, or poetry. Memb ership wa s o p e n to all high sc hool srudencs, but wa s limited to fifteen at any onc rime. l ntcre s rcd Students applied through r ... l r F attoros i, th e c1ub's s p o n so r o r thro ugh any rwo members. Regu lar meeting s we r e held rwice each m onth, w ith various ex tr a meetings sc h edule d for after sc h ool and on weekends T he se extra meeting s were planned for pla ces s u c h a s th e bea c h whi c h offe red an atm osphere of informal associat i on that helped the dub members to discuss freely and honestly. D ebbie Pat e, D iane Hau k e, D enise F os hee Mike D ex t er, Judy M c L ain, Shel i a Alber ga, L ana Boon e, Allen H armon (vi ce c h airman ) Jeannette Cox, D onald Byrd, R obe n P hillip!) ( chairm: m) Maria B oo ne Thomas P ur s l ey, K : lthy DeRap s Mr. F attorosi, Patti H auke eJls Offers 3 t)riversJ &11. Sessions Drivers' Trainin g wa s an ex tremely p o pu lar course among C H S sru dents. It was offered three tim es du r ing the sc hool year. Eac h sess i o n laS t ed six weeks. Me etings we r e h e ld after school in room 341 for one h o ur and forry-five minutes, M o nda y through Friday. The i n s tructor Mr, R eeves, presented lectures and film s in order to give stud ents t h e ba c k ground i n tr affic laws, safe ty, and automobile mechanics necessary to enable them to become good drivers. In addition to classroom inst r uct i o n ten hours of behind-the-whee l drivin g were required before s tudents were e l igible t o take (he road test and obtain a J i cense. Dri ver educatio n s nldcnt s bra ce them s elve s f or anOther horror m ov ie."

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SiJling on Floor: D ouglas Stevens (vice.pr esident). Silling: Raul Castro, Diane H :luke, Ralph Ender, Sheila Alberga (president) Lana Boone, Patricia Hauke Sand r a Alberg:l (trea su rer) SltUlding: Jenn y \,(/inz, K:Hhy Brown, Maritza Thomas, Stephanie l ilies, Deborah Pate, Deborah Alberga Edithe Marsh T erri Over street. Caltuuaue Cab Club ProJl1otes lltterest lit 'loreiUIt /Vatiolts Language L ab members operate the lab for th e benefit of o ther students. T he LANGUAGE LAB CLUB is an organization for rri.lingual stu dents who are skilled in the operation of th e language lab equipment. These students assisr the teacher s of th e var ious foreign languages by setting the equipment in the lab and taking con t rol of the console. Members attend bi-m o nthl y meetings held in the language laboratory. Matter s of interst are presented to the members by the officers, and lively discussions often result. The sponsor, Mr Srearns is always present to make certain that order is maintained. Several interesting field trips are scheduled during the year. Members visit passenger liners of the countries whose languages the mem bers have studied. These excursions provide the members with an opporruniry to con ver se with native speakers and to learn something about their culture. 135

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.36 J(everelld PaUlle vilest Speaker At loll Jnitiatioll Of /Vatiollal J/ollor Societu jcanncn c Cox, Michad Dext e r R o ben Phillips, L!lna B oone M oments befor e the assembly begins, old members of (he N H S relax on stage Mr,s. Valdez, Je:mneue Cox, Lewis Valdez. and Rev. Clarence Payne, admit the a rovin smdes of Interested onlookers 35 the !nutate lights his candle PP g R oben Phillips speaks o n CharaCter, onc 01 the four cardinal virrues of rhe N H S like Dexter lights the green candle of adership, symbolizing growth. Valdez, Carmen Butler, Mrs B cr. Ing r emony continues Mike Dexter Rev Payne. The candId :1[' NAT I ONAL H O OR SOCIETY MEMBERS: Firrl Row: J eannette Cox (secrcnry-ueasur. ef), Lana Boone (president), Robert Philltp s (vice-president) Second Row: Carmen Buder. D enise Foshee, Michael Dexler. TIJlrd Row: leWIS Valdez, Fred Cole Membership in the ario n a l H onor Society has become nationally recognized as one of the highest hono r s whic h may be bestOwed upon a high sc h ool stude nt. The Canal Zone Caribbean Chap.er was form ed for the purpose of providing recognition co those srudents who have excelled in all aspe ers of CristObal High S chool life. Srudents who have a minimum grade po int average of 3.00, and have demonstrated outstanding leadership, charaCter and service are e ligibl e for membership in this society. Two inidation assemblies are prese nt ed to he student body each year, o n e each semester. At the fall initiatio n only senior s may be inducted. T his year, 'he assembly was held on November 1 9th. The theme for ,he program was, "Where do we go from h ere?" and Reverend Clarence Payne from 'he Canal Zone Youth Council spo k e on 'he subjeer of young rebels. e w members announced at this time were : Sandra Alberga, Carmen B uder, Fre d Cole Gary Collins. D enise F oshee, and Lewis Valdez A, the spring initiation, nOt more than 15'* of the senio r class, and nOt more than 5 % of rhe junior class may be considered for election. '37

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131 SIIIwg : Klrl' n Sthill. Kadw Farrington, Irma lvlondov :l. i'.l:Iri t n (mana g ing editor). Kar en \'\ /cs terber g SI({IIf/lIIg: Michael McCann, jo\C r-..kdin,l. r-.ltt h:u:l D n.:ter. T oni ThoT1l:l:;,. Allen I hrmon. P.wl Bltithcr Pink I!OK vives 'Crmlewind Insight 'Co eJis This )'ear's TRADEWIND staff w o rked tow:m! faster publication and a m o r c c lHcrtaining n ews p : q xr. Work sess ion s were held after sch ool three "The .lll\wc:r to ellS probltm s r day s a week The r eporte r s, t ypis ts. a nd photographer s devOted man y hours o f th e i r o wn time to the pape,. I n order to get the emi re student body involved in mak i ng the TRADEWIND a vita l and inter esting part of our school new i deas were n ecessary. One s uch idea was T H E P INK BOX. This box served as a "catch all" for school happen ings Students wcre encouraged ( 0 drop in letter s to H ELP ( t he new ad vice colum n) l e tt ers to the editor, poems, bits of gossi p and anything the y felr might be intere s ting : md amusing for t h eir schoolma t es. Mr. D obbi n s was T RADEWIND adv i so r th i s year; i t was his second year in this position. H e devored mu c h of his time :lI1d energy to publis hin g an inr eres tin g, informative newspaper. The staff co n s i s ted of many mem bers, each with varied and v ita l tasks to perform The hours of hard work r egu ir ed for th e publication of a good paper all seemed worthwhile when th e TRADEWIND returned f rom the pr ess.

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rite e/ocK flare JIf; Sut rite VearbooK Staff WorKed Olf The yea r book staff had the c h a l lengin g r e s po n s ibility o f p r odu c in g and e ditin g t he C H S yearbook t he Caribbean. The staff con s iste d o f a group o f effic i e m s tude nt s who wo r k e d ti r e l ess l y aft e r school i n o r d e r to m eet t h e dead lin e s establ i s hed b y t he publi s hin g co m pa ny. With the guid a n ce of th ei r s po n sor Mr J o hn son a n d th e h elp o f an ambitio u s group of ph otOg r a ph ers, the Staff a c c o mpli s h ed t h e i r duty w i rh o ut un nece ssaty de lay. The s t aff intr odu c ed man y inn ova ti o n s thi s yea r One wa s a n ew sys t e m of e ditin g, w h e r e b y th e staff me m be rs, exclu di n g th e ed i to r and th e A llen H arm o n T he s ub j e ct i s marvel o us, but t he ph o t o g r aph y i s l o usy! c o p y e di w f w e r e un ass i g n ed. E ac h st a ff mem be r d i d t h e wor k w hi c h had co be d o n e, reg a r d l ess o f t h e s u bject matte r This n ew sys tem p r ove d to be very p racr i cai. AnOth e r innovatio n was an e ntirel y n e w a rrangem e nt o f th e Caribbean itsel f Al so in o rd e r ro compensat e for s h o rt age o f funds, th e s t aff spo n so r e d a numbe r o f co nt es t s to s t imulat e yea rbook sal es. A s a result, s t a f f members h ip e nl a r ged to in clude ju n i o r as w ell a s se n ior hi g h s c hool s tu de nts. This w as do n e in appreci a t i o n o f their gen e r o u s d o n atio ns and enthusias ti c sal es o f Tiger B oos t e r s ......... -M a r itza Tho m as, Jeann e H e Cox "Put it here." N o, here." Sheil a "StOP grinning and get to w ork! Mr. John so n ( s pon so r), R ita Boybnd, M :uitza Thomas, M aria Boone, A llen H armon. J eanne tt e Cox (editor), Sheila Alberga, Lana Boone (cop y editOr ) Beth Ble i ch er, Thomas P u r s l ey. K athy De mps, De b r a P : u c 139

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140 eristobal Jlig/t Sc/tool Produces Fro nl Row: P aul Bait cl, Bill Dea l o n Mik e S nider S lcph:1.1l F u gldx: r g Toby P hillips, Ralph Ric hmond F r:lOk Cicc hcno Carlos Brown, J uan Sanc hez. S('colld Row: Cale b Cltm c nt J i m Jack so n Joe R oz m esk i An d r e w F os h('(', H a rr y T o wnsend. F r a nk B e rry, \ '\farr e n P hillips Mike Bar ger, Bill L e D oux. A rthur Serig. John M i k e Spagna. T llml ROlli: N eil P a tt o n ( co-c:ap tain) J ose M edin:!., R obe n Phillips, Don Ol s e n John D:l.Y, Bri:ln A llen l\l ikc Apoci:lo . l\1 :Hti:1. Sp:lg n:l. Roben B loeme r \Xli lli :l.I11 Hu(fm:l11, Petcr S w ain, Ern es t Abresc h, Wally R usson ( cocnpl:lin) This )'c a r' s int e rsch o b sric Ch:tmpi o n Tiger s will l o n g b e r e m embe r e d as th e b es t t c am eve r to play in th e Can a l Zon e. They achieve d what n o o th e r team has a n un de f e at e d se:l so n all the way f rom th e J amboree co th e P a lm B o wl. Criscob a l' s fir s t tast e of vic to r y came i n th e J ambo r ee. I n th e fir s t quarter th e T igers d e feat e d th e Bull dogs w h en
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J(,ecord-!6reakilfg 'lootball ream E nt husias tic support (ro m fans at bonfires, st udent s at pep assemblies, and fathers at f oo tball games And ex pe n coaching. combined t o pr oduce results visible from the moment the team 141

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142 Appeared on the field . throughout the season, beginning w ith ill rhe J amboree :lnd cont inuin g riger Victory lit Paillt nowl with victOries in each of the regular season games the defeat of the AIlScars in the annual Palm Bowl

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eliJl1axes Undefeated Season the presenta t i o n o f trophies a t a special assembl y h o n oring the v ictOrious T ige r f oo tb all team Jambortt &pt. &Opt. (X, Oa (X, Pllm Bowl Nov. C H S 14 C H S22 C HSjj C H S 13 C H S 26 C H S 7 B H S 0 18 9 16 ,. IJ SCORES czc CZC B H S C"C B H S AIlScus And fin ally th e seJect i o n of seve n Ti gers for the All -Zo n e team 8 143

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144 Cheerlead ers: Power I!ehifld Lyillg : K at h y K raus and Syl via Vamprine. BtlCk Row: Cathy Carlisle, K a r e n Currier a nd Denise F os hee C H S Chee r leaders It has been said rh: u behind every successfu l man there i s a woman -certainl y this must a lso be (rue of a s u c ce ssfu l ,earn T he 19 70-7 1 schoo l year included a hiscory making football seaso n for ,he C H S Ti gers T heir vinories ccnainly gave Cri s t obal's five l o vel y you n g c heerleaders so mething co c he e r about as the y rem a ined undefe a t ed in game a fter game. Before each game h owever these ene r geric girls pra cticed for man y long hard hours perfect in g new c heers and rou t ine s to c h ee r th ei r (cam to v i ctory. T hey painted posters, planned pep a sse mblie s, sponsored comests, and di s tributed s pir i t ribbon s in an e ff o rt to inc r ease stude nt intere s t in ath l e ti c events, and sc h ool spirit in general. T hese girls, w i th their s miling faces and attractive un i f o rms, were inde e d an asset to their team a n d to th e ir sc hool. ""'/c've come to sing :1 p r : usc. :1 hearty "00 ii, d o it. :It I right!!!' chee r to r;l1se

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A-Ceaglle Yasketball ream eaptllres eltampioltsltip game Witlt Score 0/ 28-2 J Front Row: B arbara Bloemer, Roben:!. Cole, Aurelia \'(filliams (captain), Marlene Ricc. Linda Hess, Nancy Gregg. Susan Zachry (manager). &lck Row: Susan l\lendenhall, Marian Krcdcll. Jean Smith, Emilie D aniels. Beth \Xlanio. K:Hh)' Hess, Esteiit:l. F erris {manager}. CHS 3) CHS 23 CHS J3 CHS 28 "Whatsoever you a s k for you 5h311 receive." SCO RES BI-IS 33 CZC 19 CZC 22 BI-IS 21 A dripping but happy Mrs. Harris is pulled from the pool following h e r "viCiory dunk ing." At the close of the intramural baskerball season, rhose g irl s who dem onstrared rhe grea reSt s kill and ability were selected to play on the Vars ity of A-League Team. Each ream member had to be a junior o r senio r and maintain a "C" average. Thi s was a year o f innovatio n for rhe CriStobal Hi g h School Girls' Basketball tcam. I t was the first year in which a team was composed of only five girls. Also, for the first time numbers appea r ed o n rhe fro nt of rhe uniforms. The 1970-71 season commenced in September and continued until the end of O crober. The girls played reams from B alboa H igh School a nd Canal Zon e College rwice each and remained undefeated throughout the season. T o climax their s uccessful season, the girls went o n to a 28-21 v ictory in the championship game. ,4,

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t.6 ((16" ,Ceague Places 2lfd !If Sasketball Cristobal players b:l.tde (0 r egain po s session of the ball. The B-t.eague Junior Varsity Girls' Basket ball t eam was composed of freshmen, sop homor es. a nd so m e younge r less experienced juniors The procedure for selecti n g team m e mber s was the sam e as that for A League. These girls wore the same uniforms as their var s ity coun t erpa rt s, and practiced mlny long hard hours afte r school in an effort to improve their skills and teamwork. They pla yed only rwo games both against B alboa. They lost both games but some of the se girls will undoubtedly prove a n asset to next year's A L eague team because of the experience they h ave gained. Emily D a m el excc m es a free-thro w C H S tigresses "jump for joy" as anothe r basket i s made "You girls g et d ried off and go take a s h ower:'

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rennis ream eomposed Of rot/fnament Winnefs 1 st Row: R odrigo Lindo, R a l ph R ichmond, Douglas J effries, M ichael J effr i es, Paul B leic h er, and Jese J ohnson. 211d R()W: Coach Hoffman Mic hael Snide r M ichael D exter ( captain ) and Eric I r i o n Coac h H offman p rov i dos extra i nsura nce by covering ( he backcourt as P aul B leicher and Mik e S n ider p r epa r e ro receive a serve. A fter a hard day of practice, the members of the tennis team rela.'(. Members of .he CriStobal High School varsity tennis tcam were se leCled by means of a preliminary elimination rournamcnt. Those boys win n ing a sufficienr number of ma t c h es, and meeting the minimum scholastic requirements were eligib l e for the team. Practi ce sessions were held each afternoon after school from 2:45 until 4:30 at various tennis throughom the community. Tennis competition this yea r cons isred of two interscholasric marches and a triangular meet in which CrisIObal Canal Zone College, and Bal boa participated CHS6 CHSI CHS2 CHS SCORES CZC BHS BHS CZC 147

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148 lit Medlel/ Altd lreestl/Ie /(eltll/s Seated: Cheryl Hieronymus. D ebbie C lrey. Cheryl Olse n. Chrisry Loizcaux L u A nn \'(I3ft, M:tri:t Boone, E dy t he M ars h a nd Ca r o l Bak e r Sttllldmg: l si ROll': SCOtt Loi7C3.UX .Joe Smith, Gcr:tld Coffin, Fre d Knauss. Beverly Olsen l3:trb:lr:t G
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SwimmiNg ream Captllres lirst Places Edythe M a rsh ... one comes up for air. Judith Simmons ... prepares t o execute a reverse gainer. SCORES C H S B H S CZC 73 1 59 24 89 1 50 15 7 1 'h 138 I\'h 83 169 20 Later interested specl2tOrs watch from the s t ands as a graceful diver. And after the mett ... the triumphant, or perhaps only hopeful. swimmers, relax and enjoy the l ong train ride home. 149

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150 Scelfes 16eltilfd Sports Javorite rime Jor Malf!! Studelfts Dan T w eedy, D :ln Valentine, Eric Tucker Mik e Apod aca, M ike Barger. Roben Phillip s Cachy Ca rli s le Sylvia Vamprine, K atie K raus Don'( be mad, Cathy." A ben ch eye-v i ew o f the game. (lirts J relflfis Tryouts for girls tenni s WCfC h e ld in February and the seaso n fan f r om March 5 to M arch 26. Pr actice wa s held everyday afte r sc hool at v arious couns in the community. This W:1S done to give the g irl s practice o n different coures where th e ball bounced differently and rh e directio n o f the wind varied. Gen eral gualifi c ation s were dcdic:uion t o (hi s i ndiv i dual s pon self-d i sc ipline and endurance. Many hour s of h ar d pra ctic e WCfC n ecessary [Q make a good ( enni s player. The g irls' c guipmcnl wa s fur nis he d by the sc hool ex cept for (h e rackets whi c h che g irl s s upplied themse l ves. A new s co rin g sys tem was intro duced in whi c h pla y continue d unti l one g irl won six games. It chere was a 6 t i e one game called "sudd e n deach was played, rhe win n e r of wh i ch was declared the winn e r of (he match Four mat c h es were played this year. Two a g ain s t Balb oa, and tw O aga i n s t Cana l Zone College

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CJlS Co-Cltampiolt lit no/boa J(e/aus Thi s is the part of track we like beSt," sign Ernest Abresch. Frank CicchclO, and Billy De at on. ":10[ your heart OUI, Nurc),cv!" exdaims Cubby Clement. SCORES C H S B H S C H S B) B H S C H S 6) BHS 72 CZC 91.) CZC 78 CZC One week before the beginning of the track season, a meeting was called, and all interested persons asked to attend. Those willing to at tend the rwo-hour da i ly pra c tice ses sions became members of the varsity o r junior varsity tcams, depending on their ages. C H S participated in tbree i ntersc h o lastic meers th i s year. Track events at each meet included: hurdles, r elays, sprints, and distance running, Field events included : rhe shorpu t the pole vault, the discus rhrow and the long and high jumps. I n addilion {Q the regular meets, CHS also partic ipated in Ihe two-day Balboa Relays. They were co-champions wilh Balboa in this special event in which Rain Smiling Billy Dawn displ:lYs tr ophy he won :IS outstanding participant in [he Para iso Balboa Relays. bow City Panama City, and Colon teams participated. The 19707I track team was one of the beSt ever from CHS. Willie Huff ma n broke Ihe r ecord in both the dis cus throw and the shot put. Members of the record-breaking 880-yard relay t eam were: Billy Dearon Neil Pat ron, Ed Bringas and Frank Cicchwo. The outstanding runner of the season was junior Billy DeatOn His success as due to natural abiliry, dedication, hard work, and a willingne ss {Q be coached. An excellent team combined with the expert coaching of varsity coach. Robert Agge and jr. varsiry coach, R andy Grubbs, ro produce a very successfuJ tra c k season. lSI

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152 (;;I JJ And ((JjJJ ,eaglle Plauers A LEAGUE Slandmg: Sherry Kern. Manager ; Judy Dohle, S us:m M endenhall; D ebbie R owley; T eri B l k er; B:lrb:J.f:l B loemer: : m d J en n y Wirtz. KIIl'l'/il1g : A urelia \ Xlilliam s and C:Hhy Stevens. co-c apt:lins Debbie R o wley p ractices "set-ups" Jenny Wirtz, Cathy S t evens. J udy Dohle. B arba r:'! B loeme r. A u rcli:t \Xlilliarns. "Judy, {his is no time t o be doi ng jumping j:teks!"

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Attend Volleyball elinic At rh e conclusion of th e intramural vo lle y ball seaso n rhe varsity vo lleyball reams, A and B League, were seOlder, m o r e experienced girls made up rhe A League ream while girls new to the sport were placed o n rhe B League ream. The g irl s drilled and practiced evety day afrer schoo l from 2:15 until 4:30. Empha sis was placed on bump and se l drills. The achievement of power with control in all a reas of p lay was stressed. A new feature in volleyball play thi s year was the s ele ctio n of a M os t Valuabl e Player for each game. Winners for this year were: Aurelia Wil liams Susan Mendenhall, Barbara Bloemer, and Gigi Colon An olhe r first of the 197 1 vo lleyball seaso n was a clinic presented b y an AAU rated officia l Sgt. E sco bid o. M anage r s of this year's team were Stell a Ferri s a nd Sherry K ern. Mrs. FartOros i was the coach for both A and B League learns. A League players pause for a m o mcOI of prayer before the game begins B" LEAGUE Standing: Linda H ess Beverly Olsen. Patt), Snider. Linda Huff Jane Dohle. and Gigi Colo n Kneelmg: Beth \\:tainio and Titi Cole. co-captain s 1S3

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7970 Varsity And junior Varsity /6oysJ Kneeling: Dee D e L app. Wallace R usso n W illiam H uffman, Mitchell I3lanchenc, Walter Ilund, David Robertson. Sltll1dlllg: Mike J effries (asst. m:mager), Coach Dedeaux. James Kunkc:J (m:magcr). "o.K., you guys, you have to get this right!" An awkward positlon docs not prevent Dee DeL app from shooting for the b:tsket CHS 48 CHS 27 C H S 41 C H S 40 C H S 36 C H S 39 VAR S I TY SCORES B H S 51 CZC55 BHS 53 CZC 55 BHS 40 CZC 50 W illiam Huffrn:tn. H igher. \ ,{/i lly. hig h e r

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Basketball }fove Active Seasolt M e m bers o f th e Cristobal H i g h Schoo l Varsity Bask e tball t eam were sele c t e d b y th e at hletic coaches f r o m thos e boys w h o demo n s trated our standin g per f o rman ce i n intramura l s o r wh o dem o n s tr a ted unu s u al abil it y during special tryouts E a c h t eam member was r e quired {Q mcc e certain qualification s i n regard ( 0 s c h o lars hip, h e ight and speed. H e also had t o be w illin g to a tten d afternoon o r evenin g p raC[ice sessi o ns. All hig h sch oo l boys wer e elig ibl e for vars i ty, but senio r s cou l d n O t play o n t h e junior var s ity team whi c h wa s s e l ecte d in t h e sam e m anner. This year rhe Tigers comper c d in s i x ime rsch o lastic games three each aga i nst BH S a n d czc. I n addi tio n they partici pared i n numerous practice ga mes against R a i nbow C i t y H i g h S c h oo l a n d th e U S N avy. A hig hli g ht of th e year 's compet iti o n was the Can a l Zone i n vir3 r i onal T o urn a m e nt The coa c h e s this ) ca r were : C o a c h DeDeaux (Varsity) a n d C o a c h H o ff m a n (junior V ars ity) D e e D elapp was n ame d M ost V aluab l e Pla y e r S itti ng: Mike J effries {ma nager}, K!1l'flmg: Ped r o Simmons, Caleb Ciemem Carlos B r o wn, Mic hael Beale. Paul Bai!e1, Gary C ollins. S/andmg: Coach Hoffman Francis co G o nzalez, Andrew Foshee, R oben B loem e r J oseph H erring. Geor ge Scheibe. Elig i o Tho mas. Joe Herring, George Sch e ibe. Give nit t h e b all'' "Look look a t that ball go!" lSS

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1S6 7:igers P l all elose Easeball Season Sillm g If{ Row: J oe R oz me ski, R alph R i chmo nd I saac H ere s George Cruz, P edro Simmons, Mik e Snider. 2nd R ow : Ernest Abre sc h Frank Cicch e t o. J ose Medin:!, Geo rge S c heib c, P aul B aile!' Cubby Clement. SItI!/tim g: Willie Huffman. J im J:tc k so n D o ug S t eve n s Roben P hillips, Dexter, DOn:lld 1\h.ns Neil Pmo n and Coach Litton Fr:tnk CicchetO p r epare s t o hit :t h omenm. The 197 1 ba s eball seaso n wa s from J anuary 10 to Marc h 19. C H S playe d f o ur games ag:1in s r B H S and four again s t CZc. A l so, a practice game again s t th e alumni was h e l d about rwic e a month. T ryour s were held the fir s t week of t h e ba se ball seaso n The qualifications for each position wer e diffe r e nt but in general th e following qualitie s were desired: a good eye long, good, arms s kill in throwing and cat c hing, and a gui c k reaction P ractice wa s h e ld after sc h ool o r in t h e eve nin g for approximately twO hours. Aft e r th e r egu lar eig h t -game sea son, the All-Star s p l ayed th e I nt e r scholastic L ea g ue Champio ns. This yea r s b aseb all co a c h es were Mr. Litton and Mr. A gee.

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Robert Phillips. "De t ermination pays!" Titi Cole, Marlene Rice, Jean Smith, Sue M endenhall. Ready girls?" M i k e Spagna sails into the air for tv.'o points. ((e n eillb Wilts SmlJs/tilt{J VictOfY JIt 1st ((Olympic glJmes)} --......,-Mike Spagna. "No wonder the girls won this event!" An o ther first in the 1970-71 sc h ool year was the Oly mpics held in the C HS gymnasium on D ecember 23, 1 970 at 7 pm. This competition between rhe outsranding male and female athletes a t Cristobal was organi zed through the combined efforrs of the GAA and the "c" Club. The boys were di vided inco rwo te ams, the "Globe Clapper s" and the IIGungarias." The girls wer e also divided inco twO teams, the nAIl-Americans," and the u Sunnies." The evening included competition in basketball, battleball volleyball, and various relays Sophomore girls under the direcrion of Mrs. Harris refereed th e games. T he girls succeeded in capruring only e ighr poincs, and the boys scored a smashing victory wirh a total of rwenry-rwo poincs. A good tim e was had by all, participancs and spectators alike, and it is hoped that this competitio n may become an annua l event. Jose Medina, Marlene Rice, Titi Cole, Joe R osmeski. I'The victors display their prize ribbons while the defeated display good sportsmanship:' 157

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ISS 2 1 sf ANNual f/amboree Vedi J anie Souder, R oben W ill, W endy Flores. J ohn San de rs. D a rlene Daly. "So m e time s it :til seem s worthwhile!" The twenry-firs t annua l J amboree provided the kic k off for the most sue cessful football season i n Tiger history. I n Tiger Stadium on September 18, 1970, the C H S foot ball team had i t s first taste of victory in chi s tradit i onal pre-season game. T he first J amboree was held rwenry years ago. I t was first co n ceived by former C H S coach, Luk e P alumbo, as an exhibition game for the three participating teams: B HS, CZC, and CHS. Over the years, it de veloped into its present form, in which the (cam scoring the mOst poims is prescl1{cd with a trophy. Play is divided inco three 9uarrcrs -each team play i n g th e othe r twO on c e Thi s y e a r the Jambore e was d edicared to two f orme r CHS students J oh n Sand ers a n d R o bert Will. Th ese two you ng men w e r e both injure d while se r ving their co umry in Vietn a m Th e c h eerleaders, co l o r guard, the d r ill t eams, t h e football teams, and the spectato r s wer e all p art of rhe e x citeme n t which was hig hli ghted b y t h e p r esentati o n o f the J a mbor ee queens: Jani e Sou de r BHS; W endy Flo r es, C HS; a n d D arle n e Daly, CZc. The po m p and s plen do r dis played made ehe J ambo r ee a m e m o r able event as a lways, bue ie was t h e viccory of the Tigers ove r both their o ppo nents thae made it a perfect evening. I n the fir s t quarter, Cri stoba l downed B a lboa when quarterback N e i l PattOn ehrew a pas s to Willie Huffman, who ran 4 1 yards for a tOuc hdown Cubb y Cleme nt th e n kicked the extra point and the quar ter ended with a sc ore o f 7 I n the second guarter CristObal again came out on tOp whe n Neil P anon s c ored a touc hdown o n a pass interception The third and fina l qumer played b y B H S and CZC ended in a s coreless tie.

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eoted ro Vietllllm VeterllllS K 2thy Krnus, K a r en Currier, Denise F os hee. Neil P a tt on. and Sylvia Vamprine. The game's leadin g rusher eil Pmo n. who car ried {he ball 12 times for 61 vards. has his moments of apprehen s i on. JAMBOREE QUEE S : J anie Souder of B alboa, \'(fend y Flo res of Cristobal, and D arlene Dal y of Canal Zone College; at (he pre-game pep assembly w ith their esCOrts: Caleb Clement, J ose I\l edina, Neil Panon, Wallace R usson, T homas P ursley, and R obert Phill ips. \'
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Q ueen /((JseJlforll (jreets Caleb Clement. J :me Paulson, Shelley Lund. Mike Dexccr. \'(1all)' Russon, Queen Rosemary. J ose l\ ledina. Cath ) Gcreich. Neil P:mo n R obert Phillips, :md H ib Lyman. The queen :md her COllrt QUEE ROSHl tlRY Each year, followin g the H ome coming F ootball Game, a dance, ho n oring the members of the team and returning :liumni, i s h eld. This year, the dance was an exceptionally joyous occasion as it was celeb r:Hcd the day after Cristobal's third undefeated game of the season, a 26 to 8 v ictory ove r arch-rival, Balboa Hig h Sch ool. A completely transformcd cafeteria was the scene of this festive event o n Sarurday, Octobe r 3 1 1970. T he dance officially began a t 8:30 with the presentation of the court by Master of Cer emonies, Wally Russon Thi s year's qucen was the lovel y Rosemary Christian. A ccompanying her were four other attractive girls from the class of '71, especially se l ected by the members of the football rcam to p reside at this special dance. They were: Princess Cathy Gerci ch, Princess Shelley Lund. Princess Hila L y man and Princess Jane Paul so n Acting as escorts for the 9ueen and members of h e r court were: Nei l Panon and Wally Ru sso n J ose Medina, Mic hael D e xter R o bert Phillips, and Ca l e b Clement. Music for the evening was provided by "The C h eese," a r ock a n d r oll band composed of CristObal Hi g h S choo l srudentS. A large numb er of students attended the dance, spen ding much of their time at rhe refreshm ent counter whe r e they consumed cop i ous 9uantities of soft drinks and Other reo freshments. A ple:lsanr evening was enjoyed by all w h o attended. The girls' Athletic Association and the L etterman's Club, co-sponsors of this annual event, are [Q be commended b y the many h ours of hard w ork necessary to make this dance a n outstanding success.

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: r:igers At J(oll1ecoll1illg Vallce A transformed Clfereria provides an ide:ll setting for the H omecoming Dance Pr incesses, Jane P aulson, Hila Lyman, Shelley L und, and Cathy Gcrcich. and their escorts join Q ueen R osemary Christian and her escort, Neil Patton in the traditi onal "Queen's D ance." "THE CHEESE ... Jimmv Barraza, Rolic Manns David Diaz. and Julio Aponte '"

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,.2 Witches Alii WarlocKs }(a1/llt e}{S CAST: Diane C:uoll. Don:dd Byrd, Andrew Fos hee. Judy rvlcLain. Lewis Valdez The annual fall dramatic produc. tion of the C H S Int ernational Thespi an Society wa s John van Drnrcn's ro mantic comedy, Bell, Book, alld Call' die. Van Druten takes an apparently simple love s lOr)'. peoples it with some delightful modernday witches, and creates an aura magic in 3. prosaic New York apartment building. The talented you n g actors and actresses succeed in brin ging some of this magic inco the C H S auditorium on ovember 6 and 7. Audience s we r e enchanted by the story of Gillian H olroyd, a beau tiful }roun g woman with the powe r to cast spells and per form supernatural feats. She lIsed her powers to win the l ove of Shepherd Henderson, the unattached young publisher living upstai rs, but forgot one impon:tnt fan -a witch in love may l ose her powers. This is exactly what happen s (Q G ill ian and audience sympathizes with her attempt s to adJUSt (Q l ife as an ordinary morta l amid the tea s ing of he r Aunt Quee nie and her warlock brot her. All are delighted w hen Gillian finally w in s her man and th e play closes o n a happy nme. T he outstanding performa n ces in rhe demanding rol es of this play by C H S actors, three of \vhom were new come r s to the stage, received much deserved applause. Credit for the suc cessful pre s entation of chis play also goes (Q the hardworking students who de s igned and cons rrucred the set, handled publici,) make.up, lighting, programs, and props and to Mrs. EI fers. Faith Coad. Th e Finis hing T ouc h

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AuditoriulH In Rell Rook And eondle Carol! and Donald B yrd. "N o peekm g CAST Gillian H o lroyd Dian e Caroll Sheph e r d H enderso n D onald B y r d Miss H olroyd (aunt Queenie ) Judy M c Lain icky H olroyd Andrew Foshee Sidney R edlitch L ewis Valdez Pyewacke, "Sinbad" Direcror irs. Terence Elfers Stage Sue M endenhall Assi stant Manager I ngrid P ort i e r Di:mc CaroB and Donald Byrd, "Now this i s m y Grandmummy's secret brew! Judy l\IcLain and Donald B yrd. "Ooh! This c hair feels lumpy'" R obert F o r d Jeff Briam, a n d Ronnie F o r s}th. THE LIG H T CREW' '.3

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164 Jlall 0/ lame ;Named At Christmas lormal "Sha k e ie, but d o n't break it!" Lewis Valdez Judy M c Lain. and Sandra AI bcrgl. Don't the y ever StOP t:llking ? The Christmas Formal h e ld at th e Sky Room on D ecem ber 1 9, 1970 wa s rhe climax o f many we e k s of hard work f o r the members o f [he Senior Class Advi sory Council and Board o f DirectOr s wh o made up rhe commit tee s which o rganized and planned (hi s s ucce ssful dance. Swclents d:lIlce d to the music of the "What F or" amid decorati o n s on the theme "Right D o wn Santa Claus L a ne ," The pre se ntati o n of the Senio r Class H all o f Fame made thi s CVCIl( one of the mos t memorable of th e sc hool year Milhael Dexter, "Mr. C HS:' M ark H erring, John F underburk R od Lind o, Carmen Bud er, and \'(f end), Flores. Hall of Fam e Winners. Den ise F os h ee, Hila L ym: m Denni s Maxwell. Jan Bjorneby, Donald B yrd, J udy M c Lain, M ark H erring. Hall of F ame Winners.

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J Itterltoti(Jltol eltristmos; rlteme 01 eltristmos e(Jltcert The Girls' Chorus The Senior High Band Mr. FaHorosi. "The Legend o f Babushka. At 7:30 Tuesday evening, Decem ber 22nd th e Cristobal High School auditorium was the scene of rhe annual Christmas Concert. Participating in thi s traditional event were the Intermediate Band the Senior H igh Band, and the Girl s' Chorus, all under thedireCtion of Mr Edward Carwithen. Thi s year the concert had an imernational flavor; songs and musical sel ect i ons from such countries as France, Germany, Russia, and Spain were presented Mr. Louis Fattorosi, an English reacher at C HS, gave readings from the iircrarure of these countries, which aided in setting rhe mood. Th e Inte r mediate Band, composed of Junior High School srudentS, presented a number of selections which were well received by the audience. F ollowing their performance. rhe Senior H igh Band played a number of unusual and difficult selections. A highlight of the concert was the appe-arance of the Girls' Chorus. who wer e dressed in formals, adding a festive nOte to the occasion. Among those deserving mention for solo performances are; Ronald Palser, Judy M c Lain, and Jean Bassett.

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, .. J(ore endets ;tlfd Spolfsors ;tttelfd !f. O. z: e. Thoma s P ursley For seven days o n several week ends in the month of February, (he jungle surr ounding Fe Sherman became rhe t emporary uhome" of a number of students. These srudents were ROT C cadets and sponsors from Balboa and CristOba l H igh Schools who were participating in rhe ROTC program. The purpose of thi s pro g r am was co train students co move shoot, communicate, and s u s tain themselves in a jungle environme nt. The army provided eguipmc m and instructors ; participants paid for th e i r own food. The training included several hours of classroom instruction, numerous excursions to nearby F o rt Sherman t arget detection airborne training boat tr aining. river crossing, and a trip to the mock Viet Cong village located on the Fren c h Ca nal. P ar ticipant s who g r aduated (rom the cou rse were given th e tide, Honor ary Jungle Exper", This yea r' s OU{' standing graduate (rom C H S was cade r co rporal Orlando R eyes.

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'.8 naill/tiel )Iollors ()IS C ettermell T he final ath l etic event of rhe 19697 0 school year was t he annual L etter m e n 's B anquet. On thi s occasion the outstanding athlete's in all SPOrtS received recog nit i on of their abil iry and awards for the i r service to C HS. The B anquet was h eld o n May 9, 1970, at th e France Field American L egion Dinner was served and a film of the 1969 Pal m Bowl was s hown CristObal Hig h School's coac hes, Litton and Dede aux presented th e boys with letters in bas ketball baseb all, football, tcnnis, and track. Th e mo st valuab l e player in each spOrt received a trophy Among the h o n o r ed g u ests at the b anquet WCfe rhe cheerleade rs, and the g u ests which each boy brought. I t' s not o ften that athletes get a meal like thi s!" M ike D exter r eceives a letter in tennis f rom Coac h Dedeaux Ann H iron s presents Coac h Litton with a token of the team' s appr eciation. \ '\fell w e can't all win a tr o ph y!'"

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March 12, 1971 Dear Readers: Toda y is the day I and the o ther members of t he yearbook Staff have long dreamed of reaching. I t marks t h e completion of the {reo m e ndou s task of com pilin g a n d edi tin g the 1971 Caribbean. A s I heIp our sponsor, Me. J ohnson, w it h the packaging of our final shipment of copy, I recall the events, people, and places which arc recorded in chest pages. I also think of a number of individuals who assisted with the many esse m ial, bue oft e n unrecognized tasks involved in the successful pr oduct i on of a yearbook. On behalf of th e yearbook Staff, I wish to extend a s pecial thank you {Q Mrs. Condon who supervised the sale of advertisements, and (Q Mr. Gansen who dedicated much of his time to the phOtography depanment. I also wish CO thank the Taylor Publi s hin g Company Compagnani Aleman and Quelgue j e u S.A. for t heir collabo ration and the business firms for their patronage. The yearbook staff had only a limited amount of time in which to record an a l m ost unlimited number of events, bm every effort was made to make our coverage of the schoo l year as complete as possible. I sincerel y h ope that you have received a s much pleasure in readin g this book as we did in editing ir. Very trul y yours J eannette Cox Editor Sponsor ...................... Mr Johnson Busin ess Manager E ditor Cop y Editor .......... A ssistant Editors. ... Mrs. Condon ... J eannette Cox ...... Lana Boone ........ Maritza Thoma s Rita Bo y land .f\' laria Boone Margaret Jacketi c Beth Blei cher T y pi st . ........................ Sheila Alberga Ph otographers ........... Artwork Advertisements .. Danny Valentine Oebbie Pare .... Allen Harmon ....... K athy O e R aps J eannie Bassett RauJ Castro t

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170 t-.lr .. \X' B Ahrt' .. dl R.1Il1On Au.'<.:tin .lIld F.lmih A pod. ICl Famih G 10m A A ponte J ohn \X' D l3:ule\ j\l r and F lo\d B.lker j\lr,> R Blllm D ori'i 13.1n T W I 11111nes .t\lr and j\l rs. I C onnlel BJr bosa j\l r and Jack 13.,rger j\l rs, B arr j\l r and j\frs Kenn eth j\lr and D"lin.l E Ikllh j\l r and j\lrs. I) E B ell Jnd D .lUghter L E B ell j\l r :lIld Mrs 13ell.lIld R W Ikmllghoff j\l r 3nd r..l r s Ed B<.:IN:n r..l r and 130bb, Ikndt, j\lr and j\l r s E J I}cr,ger i\lr and i\lr<, A J j\!rs.J R l'k,t A Ikl.lIlwun Chn .. Ikl.lnwun j\l r lml i\l r .. J A Bl.llkow,kl, Sr j\lr lnd j\!r'l. "Alfon'>o 131,.1, D<.:nlll' Fred Bin glum t-.f r lnel't-. lr' J Blorn<.:h\ D or,l i\Jr ,mel \ \ Ir' Roi'ltn Bl,mthl'ul i\l r .lIld r..!rs Il.uold I ; Bl.lk<.: Moln Blc:nnl'fh.I''''t't t>.lr, L B IiIl11i, t>.lr .1I1d t-.! r, Rld1.lr d \X' B otk r..lr ,Ind F .I Bo<.:r r..l.m,IIXX)Il<': r-.lr .. (,<.:or,gc.: Ixx)Il(: r..lr, I kl .. c.:m.ln .1Ild F.ullIh Lourdn A Bm<:m,m ?:iger E<,(hef B onl \'<1 IkmdJ Vcnu!I Br;lIlnan r-.l r :lnd t>.lrs, J r-.l r\ Ehl,\ P Bring.l' Allt'n S .md Celia S 13ro\\ n r-.lr,> (lhm E B rown r-.l r lnd r-.lrs F ,l\ r-.I 13ro\\ n r-.l r :md \'\Ii lliarn r-.! B rown t>.l r 3nd t>.l r .. D E Bn\(.t'" r-.l r I) F B ullin.ger r-.l r ,md t-..lrs Bunnel r-.lr" R L. B linnei r-.l r 3nd 1\lrs T J Burblil e r-.l r :111<1 i\lrs I G Burn r-.fr and Mrs. t-.lich3el Burn to.f r and t>.trs. R a\ m ond G Bu,h Gloria i3uw 'cll r-.l r :lnd r-.lr!l. \"V.l R B ) rd r-.b rtin Cabllltr O M A C:lbLeCI t-.lr :tnd r-.lrs. R L. t-.lr :l.nd r-.l r!), \ V'dlilm C Calkin, E B Cal10mn lnd F amil) i\l r and 1\l r:). Cama cho Mr and c. R Cunpocll J ill' Campbell Mr :l.Ild I I I -I. (:Ire), C3pt. 3nd t-.lrs. T. H (:lrli,le r-.l r!\, H elen L. C:uroll D elia E ClrtCr j\! r E R Carwilhen M r Robnd Cas:tnO\.1 \X' T Ca,>h t>.l r and t-.l r.s Larn Cellu(I M r G F Ch:lser r-.lr. and t>.l rs, H C. H Chddress CSt>.1 lnel t>.lrs. \X/. 1-1 Childress S F C H Childress r-.l r ,lIld Joe Lou B J r r-.l r :lIld r-.lrs. E Cirulh T o n, Cixlx:1I Mr B:trbua L Cbrk I I CI"k C.l ltb C Clemcnt J oyce SGT lnd i\l r, )1111111\ D Clo\\L'r, t>.l r :lIld r-.lr, J Coflin Cok r-.lr" :lnd i\lrs Gcor,g<.: W Colcm.m .1o.1I1n Colli<:r t>.fr and r..lr" AlIkrt B Col1illl t>.lJrk Collin,> \X/,iltC:f A Col1tn .. j\l r ,mel i\lr" Colon E Comtrtord j\l r ,mel r-.l r, E. J Com pier M :lf\ Condon Mr and i\trs C onw:t) r-.l r, r..l:!ri:l t\ Corokt" r-.t r lnel i\l r s J S t>.l r lnd t>.l rs, \'X'i1I11m J-I C o x J eanne Cnes ... r-.l r ,mel j\lrs J ohn L. CroiX j\1 Currit"r A lden Cuni, DlmllOl R J Danitl s en It DeatOn W M D<.::lIo n and F amily M r and D lvid Dtmp ... C) I r and r-.l r .... D C D enis AngehLl S D eric kson j\lr and M r s H B DeV o h Mr and i\l r s Aureli o D e \'X'iH Mr :lnd F D ial Mr :lnd I\l rs. H A DOlker), L D oke H R D o mene c h t-.lr .... Done) t-.l r ... Zo n:l V Dowell D tbr: 1 Dunkm s j\t r : md r-.l r .... \X/ ill i3m E ggeb M r :lnd M rs. George E gger, J r r..l r :lnd t>.lrs. Georg e R Egolf M r and M rs. T Elf e r s F rank Endt r Ene Erne s t Leonorl E ... fObido t>.1 E s u : ... i\l r and r-.f rs. D R F all t>.t r and r-.t rs. J oe FlUell Kllh), F3ube r S F C and Mrs. J ose F ern:lndCl M rs. Dor o th y F erro Gilben R F e r ro D Finler I r and r-.l rs. R on:lld Flte Pat and Lank\ Flores t>.t r a n d r-.l r s.' Chules W F lrn t>.t r 3nd t-.l r .... R obert F o r s ythe LTC and C Foshe e I\lr . Ind r-.! r s S T. Fr:mkeJ J o hn Jnd Sue "l\f r :lnd t-.l r .... K O F ugleberg r-.l r : lnd j\l r\ R ich:lrd Gldhois Gal10glter SGT 3nd t-.l rs, G \'X'. G:lnte r t>.l r .... r-.l:iriaGarcia SSG 3nd P:lul Gariba ) E nriqu e Garzl t>.l r :lnd G eer t>.lr .lIlel R obe n Hekn J Certidl Clpt .lnd \\Irs \XI Gille",ple Gelbert Gi lmore

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Maritn Gitz Mrs. P ovide Gitz Cornelius Gocbenus Car o l O Gacrra Mr. and tvlrs. H oward Golden J eanne J. Goldman Mr. and Ivlrs. H enry Goldmann Gabri elle H Gonzalez E d G o rd o n D ebra G osney Mr. and Mrs. Gatt Capt and t>.' lrs. T homas WI. Goves 1vl r and Mrs. R andall H Grubbs Mr. and Mrs. \ '(Iilliam R Graham R oge r A Graham \XI. Grant R obert Greer G ene Gregg Mr. and Gregor) l\-Ir. and Mrs. D E Grier Miss Jacinta E Griffith s l\l rs.Grist Mr. and Mrs. J uan J. Guevara T irama H all M r and Mrs. Arnold F H ames Mr. and Mrs. Eugene E H amlin, Jr. SGT and Mrs. D H H ammond Mr. and Mrs. R obert J. Han cock Davi d R H a r burger R o nald L. H arg i s M r and Mrs. P B H arrwell, J r Di :;ne H auke r..lrs. J ames H auser T homas H ead R J. H elmericks L. H ess r..lr. and P aul Hieron)mus t>.lr and Mrs. T H H iggins l\lr and L. G H ighley !\'Ir and t>.lrs. R oy Hill Mr. and Mrll. \'(I illiam G H ill R ichard H ines Maj. and Mrll. Vernon W I H inkel Mr. and Mrs. R !\1. H irons Capt. and L. H H ixon I nsula H ogaboam 1\'l r a nd !\Irs. M H olcomb Mr. and \,(/i lfred H old Jr. Jud), ,nd Bob H olden E milia H olge r son J ames L. Homer Mr. and t>.lrs. H opkins M r C. H owa r d t>.lr and Mr s Charles Wl. H owe !\Ir. R oy H owell R F H uldtquist J r t>.l r and Mrs. Dennill R Huff J ames J. H usnik Capl. and R H utchinson Dr. and O C. I rion M r and !\Irs. R ona l d J acobs Boosters A E J akeuc Phillips James Mrs. R alph James Mr. and t>.lrs. Jaquez R ex Jarsen Mr. and Mrs. Paul J. Jeffrie s N J ensen J essick Mrs. B arbara Johnson H N Johnson I r ene A J ohnllon J oyce Johnson Mrs. Rhen Johnson Mr. and t>.lrs. \ '(Ialter Johnston E A Jones R everend J ames J ones M rs. G. E J ordan M Jo\e Charles R Kalb K aren K andrin Mr. :md !\I rs. K P Karpin ski Hi nayuki K atsumato !\I r and !\I rs. T ed K aufer I r and !\Irs. \,(/ illiam L. Keller Mrs. Bill Kendall Trifonia K endall Mrs. J R K erw i n Mrs. Sylvia K estler Ann e K ienzle DorOlh), K ing Mr. and Mrs. John M Kla sovsk) Mr. and Mrs. John K night I r and !\Irs K oziol t>.lrs. K roft J:me L1 R oche Mr. and !\I rs. J orgen Laurit7en M r and !\I rs. R D Lawrence t>.lr. and t>.l r s L. E man !\I r and !\Irs \ '(/arren E leDoux Mr. and Mrs Lentz Dr. and B K Levin !\Irs. L in:me s G. A Link Ben LinschOten M r and !\Irs. Llord M r Trivett Lloyd J anna L oizeaux L aura Loizeaux !\I arc L oizeaux !\I arcia l..oizeaux Dr. P H Loizeaux !\Irs. P H L oizeaux Spook) l..oizeaux T urpi Loizeaux t>.! r and Andre\\ Longorie !\Ir. and G W I Lopp !\Ir. and Mrs. Jack B Lo\e Jerf) Lo\e P atricia LO\ld l ichael Lubran o Re) D L ucas Mr. and Mrs. H oward Lund Mr and Mrs. Warren \XI F3bio Mabili3 t>.lr. and !\!rs. D MacElre\"( .. Mrs. Rit a Frank M adigar M L. M alo R M anns Mr. and Mrs. \'(/ E. !\I arek and Mrs. Alfred G. l\lare Mr. and Tom t>.1arsh t>.1r. and Mrs. Louis E. Maron Mrs. S. F .l\lason III JU3n l\lata Capt. and !\! rs. R obert S. t>.latJ Mr. and M cCornck and Mrs. !\lauri ce R E Capt. and !\!rs. G A !\IcDonald Capt. and Irs. Pat }'Irs. Tls hik o M cDonald P a t and Patti !\1cDonald Le Col. and Mrs. James l\1cKenm Karen Capt. and !\I rs. Arthur !\1cLean !\lrs. James t>.lcl\hd e Capt. and !\I rs. D rummond A Mc2eno J aime t>.l edina Capt. and M rs. J. Finle) Meehan l\' l r and t>.lrs. Dabne\ B !\I eeker Capt. and John \ '(/ M eeker !\1. \'(/ !\Ir. and Mrs. P3ul!\! !\!en ges H :uve), t>.l ichaci r..1r. and Mrs. Charles R !\h llcr R E I\l iller I\lr. and !\lrs. Jack !\Ir and Thomas E. Mr. and One George l\l itchelle Thomas I\l izener t>.l r and !\h zrlchi F rank M odizar !\!rll. N. G !\I oncevals Aleida M ontenegro !\I r ... V N l\lorgan Mrs J oseph t>.l orrisen !\Ir. a'1d Mrs. Roben L t>.1\"ers !\Irll. Luida Nelson Donnie Neules Jr \,(/ilbert L. Nn and Famih !\! r and Andreas Nicol;usen !\I r Nicolene !\Irs. r>.laria I ie\('s 1\13,. and Mrs. G P Noble III !\Ir. Norman !\Irs. Margarit a ormandLJ. !\! r and R E. Oberholtzer !\!rs. Ochoa R obert O'Connor 171

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172 10dn -J\l r .md :"Ir, lohn T O'l)onT1(:11 I r i-.lr .md :"Ir, Rld1.ml O'l)onnell II:"K R T Oidium "Fe Abd Oll\.m:l .... ()''-.;e.:tli j.m1o Orre.:,!-:o i-.lr .md J\lr' Oflll }olr .md j\lr, LUI, R Omt :\ Orlll P O,hornl R \X' OWU1 ]\Ir .mel l\.h H .lrl.md O\k\ i-.II" !'I.mdr.1 P .ltt' i-.l r Enr' tllK P;tp .. tn }oI l', E T P.llnc }ot r .lOti j\lr, Lukt' C P.dumh o Jr }otr .md j\lr, Luke C. P :llumho j\lr .md j\lr, l.uke T I'.llumbo l\l r .mtl j\lr, C F 1':IIHO\.1 Slf.lh P.If)..' C.T R .lOti j\lr' Roger R Pu,h' }Olr .lOti R on.lld L Pt:nmxk Col .1Ilt! ]\lr, Roberto Per.lh.1 Heder Pnu }otr :md 1\1r.. j:l111l''> PLlu l\t r .md j\lr' 'Cul A PintO Som,1 Podl,li C1l.lrh( ,md l\l lk e Poer l\l r :md l\lr' Thom,\'> Polite l\Ir ,md D ,mvln E Pope Poticr F.II111I\ J\bj .1Ilt! t-.lr, FLmk l\l P Otttl' t-.1 r :lnd t-.lr, P oulin K S Pndl.lrd t-.bj and l\lr,> R P PrOthn' Dr .lOd l\lr.. Jllme PlLj.lh Frene C:lpt .tnd A E Ralllt\ Dlfu R.lm .llho Clpt E B R.llnter t-.1.1fll'lHI R,uniro A A R.mkln t-.l r .Ind R obert R.Illkin Don.lld R.\\ lull Ed\1,.IH\ Rud lo,t: Rnlo '}otr .1Ilt! l\lr' I R niligo c.lrnll"n Rt:cd' l\lr .lOtI ]\Ir, J (j RCH,I Dr .tntl P.lul Rt:\e.:llo j\l r .lIlt! Roo In, Rldunond .mtl ;..tr' I F Rltlgl: ]\I r .mtl t-.tr, \'lI1lcnt Ridge ;"I r .lIld j\tr, Cui () RI}!.g'.Ir LT( .1Ilt! Theodore.: Ri,d1 :"1' I Don.lid Rt\er;1 ./o'l'RIH:r,1 :"Ir, Ro.Kh 1\.1r .Ind j\tr, Rolx'm 1.llk .Ind Ld Roh'on 'RO'll' Rodri.L:lIt"1 John Ruhk 't-.l r .lI1d l\lr' \'VJlh F RlI"on Vdm.1 Cil.lrlc,> t\ !'I.ln(ht:l John II S:lnlho j\l r :lnt! j\lr" John S:lnder, A l SJndr SFC and \X/dhlm SlntugO Jot :lnd SOIH.I Sdl,llk ]\I r and ]\lr,> G C. Sthel oc ]\lr" E G Shell l\lr" Sd1WH)!l l\1r.. SLOtt I nez SlOtt Gf.llleb R de $c\erJo(t C:lpt :lnd ]\Ir, H :lrold \X' Siud 111 John 5herv.'00(\ Clover 5holx' t-.lr Frld 5FC .Ind l\lr, \ 'Vdharn P Sldx:n Elh!l H Sirnpklll'i E Singh CTRCS :md l\lr,> H Orl(e P SlI"Inon, Capt lnd t-.lr,> P L. Sknbk V:ln St. lmper D l\"id St.lnin Capt and Mr!l R K St:lnln Gawn Fire SCltlon I\t r :lnc! J E Stl'am, Simiev Steek Cothre ..... B Sterling l\lr :md R R'" Stolu\ S R SlOugh Mr :lnd l\lr, J C. Smith Mr ... L u(illc l\lr and t-.lr, ]\1 Smith Ir :lnd R odolfo T Smith Lo ..... ere Stn der Dr and \X' ]\1 Snyder Doroth ) Spagn.l l\l r :lIld Ne:d F Sp:lrrow John P Sp<:.lr Ameli.l Sperling l\lr :md J\lr, John B Spl\C) Dr :lnd ]\l r, R Antonio SlIe'Ulm Capt .lI1d I\lr ... Roger H S\\ .lIn \'(/.llIl, R l\lr .md ]\Ir,> F P T.lht'\ S F C T :lUndq l\lr'>, j\l:lnon T;I\ lor ellH :lI1d Thor 13 Tcllehen Aline Tdlm,ln t-.l r Jnd ]\Ir,> \ G Terv.dlcger Ehuk.tl Te.:\l" l\lr", P.IllI.1 Thl.tll Thomp,>on Nendell Thomp,on Angel I DI.II T o rre, ]\Ir, R obcrt T out'r T\ler l\l uJoJl Tyler Ceulia Ubben Joc V:llenlla Capt and J\lrs .JOSl B J\l r :md Pett 13 J\l r :lnd Clinton W V:lllght Dell:l Vedl o .Ju:tn R Vcle7 JU:ln Ventur:l Ria E V oigh t Svlvi:l Voight J\l r and t-.l r A Vowell.lr l\ l r :lod ]\!r!l It E \X/:lggoner Mr : lnd t-.lr!!, F G \X/a 111l0 B.lfb:tr a \X/. t kOit Lawr ('nce E \X/alkt' r \'\Iall ine D r and j\t rs V \'(/ \'(/ :llters I\l r and R L. \X/ard Gnd) \\I:l(,>on C C Welglrt Mr :lnd \X/. E \'Veigk Capt and A T Welden I\l r and l\ tr!! ton Wells ]\l r :lnd Mr!!, RtCh :lrd \'(/cr(kr Btil \'(/e!!Jc) Zorro W esley K aren :tnd F amily ]\l r and Mr!l, V Westerbllrg ]\l r and M r and t-.tr!! John]\1 \X/ hite It L Whlliu A lbert and Mam \X/ibe r Dr and Wiggins Gloriell D:lvid A \X/ ild Mr, \X/ ilfred J\l r :lnd }otr!! Mr :lI1d Mr, How;tre\ \\ldl Mr and Ib}'lnond R \XliII R obert R \X/d l /\Ir :lnd l\trs J R \X/i lli:lm, SFC \,\/ibon \X/inda J\l r :lnd l\l r ... H I. \X/irtll:lll1,> len", \'
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Congratulations to the Class of 1971 From UNITED FRUIT COMPANY Box 5016 Cristobal Canal Zone Compliments of MOTTA INTERNACIONAL, S A Box 417 Colon Panama 173

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174 Compli ments of the CRISTOBAL Y.M.C.A. BARBER SHOP Compliments of the MARGARITA FLORIST "Service is our bu siness," H ours: Mon. Thru Sat 8 00 A.M.-8 00 P M We Watch -Match-Dis patch." RUPERT AND JOE B LACK Your F a .... o r ite B a rb e r s F o r Appo intments Call 3 2797 -AIR COND ITIONED-Establi s h e d in 1909 Phone 3 191b 7997 First St., Margarita C Z Box 1355 Cristobal, Canal Zone BOYD BROTHERS STEAMSHIP AGENCIES, LTD. Box 5077 Cristobal, Canal Zone Compliments of E. J BERGER ATTORNEY AT LAW Box 5081 Cristoba l Canal Zone

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Congratulations to the Class of 1971 PANAMA CANAL YACHT CLUB Box 5041 Cri stobal Canal Zon e 17,

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IT6 AVEC LES COMPLIMENTS DE CIE. GLE. TRANSATLANTIQUE FRENCH LINE Cristobal, Canal Zone \ Compliments of DR. MELCHOR SA YOC D entist Box 5006 Margarita, Canal Zone Compliments of NORTON LILLY & COMPANY, INC. STEAMSHIP AGENTS AND OPERATORS United Fruit Company Building CRISTOBAL 1837 Tel. 3 1801 1756 Balboa Port Captain Building Tel. 2 1841 1746 Complim ents of CRISTOBAL SHOESHOP 14th Street Cristobal, Canal Zone Tel. 3

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Congratulat ions to the Class of 1971 From UNITED FRUIT COMPANY Complimen t s o f TEXAS ANTILLES LIMITED Box5 0 1 6 Cristo b a l Can a l Z one YAMAHA "It's A Better Machine Compliments of The Vinc e ntian Fathers HOLY FAMilY CHURCH Margarita Canal Zone 177

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"8 Compliments of GIL MORLAND From C. B. FENTON AND CO., INC. Box 5015 Cri stobal Canal Zone

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Compliments of DELCARGO, INC. Cristobal Canal, Zone Compliment s of the TARPON C L U B Box 132 2 Cri stobal Canal Zone Congratulations to the Class of 1971 From C FERNIE AND CO. INC. Box 5042 Cri stobal Canal Zone "9

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180 Compliments of '''a'ian I.ine With the Compliments of W. ANDREWS & CO. LTD. Compliments of the COCO SOLO LIONS CLUB Courtesy of the CRISTOBAL Y.M .C.A. RESTAURANT Telephone Cristobal 3 Panama 25 I Compliments of J. J PALOMERAS FRENCH BAZAR Col o n ALMACEN SURANY, S A. P .o. Box 503 CASA BEE'S, T.le" PA 226 Tel. 7 5070 Cable : S hagw a n B T MA YANI S A Colon, Free Zone Apartado 336 Colon, R ep D e Panama

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Congratulations to the Closs of 1971 From B.P.O. ELKS LODGE #1542 Box 1542 Cristobal Canal Zone 181

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182 Compliments of CANAL ZONE CUSTOMS ASSOCIATION Box 1295 Cri stobal Canal Zone AUTHORIZED DEALER MEYERS MANX NORDSTROM e HUOS S .A. Box 1566 Colon Panama

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Compliments From the CANAL ZONE POLICE ASSOCIATION Cristobal Congratulations to the Class of 1971 From TROPICAL RADIO TELEGRAPH CO. -P-Cristobal Canal Zone PRUDENTIAL-GRACE LINES, INC. PANAMA AGENCIES CO. General Agencies Cristobal, Canal Zone 183

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18. V F W POST 100, MARGARITA, C.Z Compliment. of lIT ALL AMERICAN CABLE & RADIO INC. 8o. 5032 Cristobal, Canal Zone Compliments of BIR HAR'S BOUTIQUE Colon, Panama l' /"!f)'{! & ,J;" Compliments of BREAKERS CLUB Compliments of INTERNACIONAL DE LlCORES SA Colon, Panama INTER-AMERICAN LINES BI-Weekly-Independent Service to From New Orleans and Miami and Central America Phon e Panama 25-4933 Cristobal 3-2 528

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KN!iM ROYAL NETHERLANDS STEAMSHIP CO. Compliments of LT. G. H. MOUMBLOW MEMORIAL POST #3876 VFW INC. Cristobal Canal Zone

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, .. Congratulations to the Class of 1971 From HOSPITAL SAMARIT ANO Compliments From the MAVIS BEAUTY SHOP Colon Pan ama Congratulations to th e Class of 197 1 From MADURITO'S SA Colon, Panama Colon, Panama P o. nox ROO TELEPHONE 7.03 I I C;OI .O'. H OF I "t..L JlI! 1 '210 --------9cl. IUItI FrOllt Sireci Co l olI, H e l of Panuma WE MAKE AHIC, \l"(a:1\1E: NTS ron ALL OCCASIONS SUPPORT YOUR LOCAL YEARBOOK!

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Compliments of ELBERT S. WAID POST NO. 2 THE AMERICAN LEGION FRANCE FIELD, C z Air-C o nditi o n e d Bar Op e n 24-Hour s a Day Bingo Thur s day and Sunday Meeting s 2nd VVe dnesd ay o f Eac h Month LESLIE R THOMAS Post Commander 187

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188 CARIBBEAN SPORTS PARACHUTE CLUB Hangar 1147 Behind The High School CIA MARITIMA ITURRALDE Apdrtado 1737 Colon, Rep. d e Panama KERLEY NAUTICAL SUPPLY P .O. Bo, 4192 Miami, Flo r ida lllOI Cables : COFERB.lbo., C. Z P. O Bo, 191 B.lbo. C Z L K COFER, INC Steamship Age nts Captain of th e P o rt Bui lding Balb oa, C. Z P ost Office Building Cristobal, C Z B.lbo 2 2572 .nd 2 2998 Cristobal 3 3206 and ).1743 Courtesy of PAN AMERICAN MAIL LINE Compliments of the GATUN YACHT CLUB PUT A LITTLE LOVE IN YOUR HEART

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'laculty, Stall and eurriculuHf Jndex Admimstr2110n -30, 31 Alfo rd, R O l c -::,:; AlIcn Jo:annc-32 I\n-36 Ikrgcr. Rolxn 118, :;2 BlanchC'nc{l-. -lrs.)-32 Bock. Richard W -,14 Brighl, A daffiuy A 4:;, .B Campbell B:ubm L -48 earwilhen, Edw:ml R 46 Cheshire, Jr . Habil 0 -38 Clinic-32 Commerce -J7 Condon, Mll.ry L. -:;2 Cowley. L2wfcn cc A -4,1 Dedeaux, Louis F .-l24,I68, 1)01.,18 Dobbin s Jod B -38 E lfers, Jane K 126, 38, 132 English 38. 39 Fmorosi. Louis J. -16,. 6:;. 38. 39, 13' Abeyn. Rlymond Abrcsch Ernest -1l4 140,9:; Adlms, Clyde -',I, 1:;6. 116 A dams, E milio Adams. Ni ckilda -96 A llxrga. Charb -104 A lhl-rgl. Dcbonh -104, J}:;, UZ Alberg1l.. S,mdr.a -13:;. 164. 62. SO, m Albergl. Sheila -128. 129. 88, 13:;, 1}4, l39. 91,132 Ait.-uilis, Sheri Lynn 120 A!t.-XlIius Jr, John -104 A lger. Davi d 116, 120 Algcr. Pmlc -88 AlgC'f. Vickle-1I8 A llen. Briln -88. Ill. 140 Allen Lonnu:: 119 A lle n. W illilm 116. 120 A)onis, Jay 62. 23 A mason. Jlmes -120 A mburn, Bud dy Ander sen. Clrl-118. 127 Ander son.Shlwn -114 An dree. Michlel Andrec'. Williln -Amo n. Mlnha 128. 129.88. IJ2 Apodl0. Cynthil -114 ApodlO. Gil 96. 128.122 Apodl0. Mlchlel 88. 1 2 4, 140 Aponte. Julio -161 A ponte. Steph e n 96. 129. 4 1 )6 Ar baugh. Suun -Austi n A lmllnubll 6. 62, 80 Austin. Donlld -A ustin, John -lt6. 120 A ustin, 62. A ustin. Paul-1l9 AUSlin. Robe" 113, 116 AU5tin. Roben -tl2. 116 A uStin, Susan -119 A ustin Jr . Donald Fmorosl. /1.1. Junc 48. 153 Fite, Ronlld S 60. 43. 91 File, D -31 F oreign l.:angulges 40. 41 Gansen. Willilim J -B. Gegg. A nne D 128. 129.40 Gregg. E ugcnc T -Griffilhs,Jlcinta E -32 Grubbs. Randall H -44 Harris.JlnF.-14'.48 H ieronymus. Paul J -H ollowlY. Jesse C. -43 Homc E conomics -42 H o war d. T cl m a I. -130. IJI. 40. 41 H owell, R oy E -H offman ( Coach) -I". 147 In dustrial A m -43 J acobs. R onald D -)3 Paul). -31 Johnson.-Clare W 60, 139.37 Kmghl, Carol J -K oziol, Edwin M 36 laSSIla. Ronald L 60. 43 L::\In(Dr)-32 34 Lmon. Douglas B -168, 48, 1)6 M ason, Emma L.-,o M ala. Juan M -M azzom. Bernard -M cCullough, R obert E -127. )3 McNaughton, Elizabeth -42 M o wer y, R obert L -33 t.Iurphy, A lejandro D -Music-46.47 Norman.James D -99.151 OfliceSlaff-32 Palumbo. Luke C. -33 P alumbo. Luke T -51 P fau S -35 Student Jndex A ustin. Elaine -12S A u try Debie-l11 Bail el. Barba;; -117. 120 Bailel. Paul -88. 155. 140. 156. 132 Blke r Carol -lOj. 148. 107 Baker Donna -96 Blke r Debbie 120 Baker .0Iane-113 Blker. Glen -88 B ake r Paul 119. 116 Blker Tern-62.1'2 Balmer. Kalhy -II' Banks. -88 Bar g er. MlChliel -sa. 140 B arger. Slc"en 116 B arnell. M aril}n -113 Baronne, Joanne 116 Bur. James 96 Bur. Peter-II' B art. R obert 62 Jllme 88, 161.26 Evelyn -I().j BlIrileauJr.John-112.116 8asse !!. Je:r.n 63. SO. 132 Baxler. M arilyn -96 8elI1e,Mary-112 Bc:r.1e. Michacl-155.63 Beal e. R oger 104 Beebe. Wilham -88 Behre. T homas 33. III Jalmc Bensen ChnslOpher -Berry -129.88. 140 Beunrourt. M arg ar et Bcuncourt. R osemary -96. 130. 102 Betcher. -88 Bm:! Jr. J ames 119, 116 Blsot. Donna -96 B jorneb),Jln )S. 16-\. 63 B Jomeb). Michael 96 Blan chard. Stan'() Blanchard. Timoth)' 96 Blanc h elte. Gcmnne -sa Blanchelle. Paula -104. 111 Bleicher. eclh :"'1 IS. 120, 139 BlclChe r. David -14S Bleicher. Plul 96. 138, 100. 147. 148 BIe\'ins. Elll1beth -'8. 63. 80 Blevins.JeffrCY-96 Bliznlk. -118 Bloemer. Ba;bm 96. 128. )S. 12'. 1'2.14' Bloemcr Jr. Roben 88. 124. I". 140.148.119 Bloul. Ed""'ard -liS Blount. LuC)' Tina 120. 42 Bock. Robm -96 Boman. Jlmes Bonilla. A maldo -104 Boone. Lana 128. 13'. 34.136,133. 80,71,82. 139. 23.63.86. 134 Boonc. t.hria 128. 88. 127. 148. 139.134 Booth. Richard -sa. 148 Borsellmo. Henry 88. H Boscman. Vivian 6. 63. 80 Bos .... c1I. -88 Bos9.'cll. M lChaci 120 Boswell. Sle\'en -113 Bo9.'ers. GrI -Bo)bnd. Charlotte -122. III Boybnd. Rm 126. 129. 122. 123.10.127.139 Bndby. Robe" -113 Margaret -112 Bndbul) III. William Jr. Roben 120 Bndcnbufg. JanC't -,'S Geor,2e 104. 120 Pfau. H 60. 11'1. 30 Ph)slCal Eduollon -18.49 PICOIt, L -" Rtt\cs, Charles T -12'. 'I. "9 Rlef1cohl. C. ROTC -501. '6. ,1 Science-'0.'1 Sharick. Earl C.-3' Smilh. Doroth)' H 39. 38. 80 Social Studies -)2. 53 Special Eduollon -E -41 Slronach. Glenda S 60. 39 Tanner, M arfha 1-39 Tay l or, MlrIon B -32 Weaver. Fiorella Wells. Oa)Ion N -34 Wilferd. Ugolcna 39 Will. William 41. 39 Williams, Rcbeco 0 -GO. 39 Bflnnan.Sheib-112.118 Brannen, George Branncn Ill. William BridwelllJl. Arthur Brid .... ell, John -113 Brid""'ell. Pamcla -96 Bflen. Jeffrcy ..:: 96. 163. 103 Bnngas. Carmcn -113 Bnnglls Jr. Edward 96. 129. Br oc k.l.:aura-Io.i B rock. -89. '8. 9' Br oc k. Ste\en \14. 116 Brockman R obert -Bro",,n. Ambcr -Br o9.'n Blllie-1I2 Bro9.'n, Carlos -89. IN. 10. 140 B ro 9.n. -BI09.n Donald -Brown. ElIsa -11'.42 Bro .... n. Janel 120 Br own. Jonalhan 120 Brown. Kalhlttn -96, 13'. 103 Brown. -96. 129. 130. 103 Bro9.'n. 96. 1 2 Bro9.n. Terri-114.34 Budd, -104 Budd. De5lfCC -113 Bu llinger. Dcnlse -103 Bullinger. Kun -113 Bund) Jr. Earl -96 -liS Bumlnc. -114 Bur,2e. 96. 12S. 129. 10 Burgess. Elizabeth -Burgcss. n -64 Bush. Kathnn -96 Butcher. Leo -BUller. Carmcn -6. 1 6). 64, '11. S,\ Butler.lnes-112 B)noe. Carlos -119 ,.9

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190 BHO, Donlld -!l6, 162, 163, I().I, 64. lH Blrd.l-hr. -I().\ Clbren, Armando -SO C:lin. M I(hlel -119 Cllklns. jelnne -HH. H Campbell. james -11 C:lre}', Deborah -10.1 1'18. 111 Culi sle, Calhenne -120. 89. 126. J.l4, 21. 133,91 Cnoll. DLane -%. 162, 163, 13 Caroll. Richard-III Cmer. Elillbcth -122. 86. 64. 49, 71, SO CU\l.uhen.jeffrey-112.116 Cash -89 C ash jr jLmm y -114 CaSlto, H ele n 89 Camo. R aul -& i 86. 64. 71. 1j2 Cam o. Rlla 120 CaLi('ll, Ansle), -Caudill, C h e r yl 59 Cauddl.jl) 8 9 C havis Valdez -119 Ch l v ez. Barbara-118 Che shLre Alan -1M Cheshir e. De bonh 89 Ch d dre ss. j ames -% C h L l dr m Rand y 8 9 C h rlSmn Il.joc -I(H ChfLSlLan, M o na-112 ChtLSlLan. Plll} -3 4. 66 Chri s tian, R o scm a!,)' 1 61. 1 60 66 26 Ci het o. Frl nk -89. 124. 140 C iccolo \\?lllia m -C i min o, Elizabelh -% Cimin o, Lropold -118 Cirulli. Ann -96 Claramunl.juan-112 Clemen!, Caleb -1 1 0 143. 1 60 66.1'1 Clieue.l-l i ch:lel-114 Cliene Renee -130 Coad, Fmh 1 62. 34. 66 Coa d, P a m el a -89 Cobb. AmLma -89. 130 Coc Debra -Coc Lis bet -Co ffin, G e rlld -% 148. 107 Coffin. Mucia-114 Cok Fred 66 Cok. R obe m-89. 9 1 Coleman. AlC'xis -130 Coleman C he!,)'1 8 9, C oll inS. G ary -155.66 Colhn s III. james -1 02 Co lli ns. john -120 C ollins. l-hr k -89 Collin s MIChael -11,1 C ol lin s jr. \'('alter 120. n CoIpC'. K a t hleen -% C olpc'. P:1trLCi l -113 Col on. Lourd e s 96, 1 B Co l o n Sonia -89 Coo k e. L alera -97 Cooper. Greg -Cooper. P aul Coro n ado. ClrlOS -116 Coromdo. GUStlVO 120 COUIS. Carl -119 CoulS. Cliffo r d COuts.SuSln-78 COUIS. \'(1:11 ne -89 Cox. Chmtop her -123 Cox jelnnene -128. 129. 130. lJ3. 136. 139.67. IH Cromn \X'dham 112 Crouch, A nne -C r ouc h l-hna n -102 C ruz. Geor g e 103. 1,6 116. 1 2 0 Cumm ings, IvC'uc 1 29.89, 130. 1 0. 132 Cumming s -97 Cummmg s W l her -Cummmgs Wlndl -97 Currier. Karen -89. 91. 14-1. 34.1 2 Currier. R o ben -II'. 116 Dlde),. Diaz.D1\'id1 6 1 Dal) Darlene -158. Damiani, Gu)' -97 Dancer. Laveda105. 121. 130 Dancer. Sheila -90 Dancer jr, DoylC' -113 Dandridge. Dev ony -114 Daniel. Emilie 90. l i5. 146 Daniel, emick 113.11 6 Danielsen. Chen -117. 119 118 Danielsen. Kllhie-97.112. '.33 Da r(y.joln Darcy. M ichelle -D:lvill. M ark IO' Da"ison. john 120 D1Y, j o hn 90. 40. 143 Day. R obert 114, 116 DealOn, Donna -114 Dealon j r .. 90 124, 140. 1 1 Dea t on, Ted -105 Deboor. 120 Deboor. Theodore -113 De jesus. George 1 1 9 116 De jesus. R uperto -35 De jesus j r .. Rupwo Del BUSIO, I nceffia -105 Denis. -9 7 De Rlps. Bmn 9 7.129 De R aps. K a t hleen -128.58,65.139 67,134. 7 1 DeVlUIt. Pmicil 120.4 2 DeVluh. Michael -114 DeVault II, R aymond -Dexter. K athleen -II'.1l7 Dexter. j ames 112. 116 Dexter. M ichael -122, 138.7.133, 164. 168, 136.71, 156. IH, 147.82. B, 81. 86, 67 Din. D1\'ld -160 Din. Ric hlrd -119 DLn. Rlmo n 1 0 5 Din j r .. Pedro -67 Dillin.jlffies-115 Dingm an, H enry 103 Docke!,)' -116 Dohle. CNLg -116 120 Dohle j o hn 97, 12,. 107 Dohle judy 97. 99. DoffilnguCl. R osLIl -97. 5 8 Dow e ll, H3rr'y -97 Dowell, Rlc h lrd II Du son. Elaine 103 Edmo n dso n N a ncy 1 28, 129, 90 122.12',45.91.76. 5 8 E dwnds Tilda -114 E gger, Bre nd a 90. 1 30. 6. 1 3 1 9 4 Evangebs Sue 103 EndlN, R o bert o -End er. j ose ph 97.132 End er, Ralph -78. 132 E sco bId o Lawrence -116 E S le s R o bert Cheryl -113 Evans. Dlvld -119 Eva ns. MLchael-ln F arnsw o rth, Alle n-78 Fnnswo rth. DaVId -114 F arrmgt o n, Kathryn 97. 122. 138 F auber. Albcrt -119 F auber. j ames -116 F auber. K aren 1 0 F auber, K athleen 9 7 Feeley.jame s -119 Ferguson.Cind),-112 F erguson. D aniel F erguson. Edm -97,130 Ferguson. Trina -130 Fernlndez. Roben -114 Ferns. Ali(e -120 Ferns.Gary-120 Ferrel. Clifford 90 Ferris. Estelit3-97,145 Finnemln, ThomlS -Flores. L ori 119. 118 F lores. Wendy 1 '9. 164, 142, 86, 67. 7 1.83, SO Fluhnry.Clrol-112 F luhnt}', Mary-119 F ryer. George II F ryer. R ichmond F ontanez. l-h ril 90. 130. 132 F on t anez. Pedro -97 F ord, R obert -9 7 163 F orsgren. -113 F orsy th. Sle"en -105 Forsyth jr.. Ronlld 97, 163 F oshee, AndrC'w 90. 124. 1 6 2, 144, 1".140 F oshee. Denise -123, 11. SO. 71. 22. 164. 10. II. 82. &1, 78. il4 Fugleberg. Stephan 90. 140 F underbur k john 68, 83. 1&1 Furt. Lisa9 7 Clifford -105 Thoma s -113. 116 Garcia, Linda-liZ Glrner, M arde((e 90. 103, 130 Gercich. Cllhenne -58. 68. SO. 160. 161 Gercich. -58.97 Gcwin, jimmy 90. 127 Gcwin, Rebecca -Gibson. Brendl 36, 68 Gibson. Leslie -112 Gibson. t.hrk 9 7 Gilbert. -II'. 117 118 Gillespie. R ussell -116 118 Gillespie. Willilm 90. 129 Godinez. Viollnda -11' Gocberrus. Cornelius 9 7 128. 129 m Goguen, Gregory 90. 122. 132 Goguen, L)' nne -95 Golden. Edward 9 7 Golden. Sharon 68 Goldman. Hen!,)' 9 7 Goldman. Peler -97 Gonier, Dlvid -116. 120 G o nier. 97. 1 03. 129 G onzab, Ann 90 '8. 22. 128 E s th e r -97 Fnnc i sco -155 G onzab. j o sefa -116 118.42 j Uln -MlfLl 1 0 5 130 Gonzllez, 01,131 -97, 130. 131 Good. GlofLl -119 Goodwin. !hrbnl 1 0 5 148 III Good';l.' in. B rendl -114 G o sney. Dcbn -123. 130. 9 8. 1 31. 9' G os ney. DLlne 130 Gosney. j effery IM Goss. Rlnd) 120 GOII, Roy -98 Goulet. K aren -105 Goulet. Stephen -23. 68 Graham, Don n a -49 Green.Daniel-105 Green. M auhew Green. Zan 90 Gregg, -112 Gregg, !.aun-114 Gregg, Lynn -91 Gregg, M ariln 58.91 Gregg, Nlncy 98. Gregory. ClariSSl -Gregory. K elvin -120 Grie r Barbara-91 Grist. Gregory -105 Gris t R onald 120 Gsell, R lymond 98. 91 Gue rr ero. ClrlOS 119 Grerrero, Mlfil -111, 130 Guilfoyle. Lorraine Guilfoyle. Walter -113 GUlie rrez, P Hricil -68 H lmes,l-kllnie-118 H lmilron. Fr:lnc i seo -105 Hlmmond, Edwin -91 Hlmmond. H ubert -116 H lnly. l-hrk -IB, 91. 132 Hlnnlh. john 68 H arden. Debrl -116 H lrden, K aren 105, 130 Hlrmon. AllC'n -126. 138. 139. 86. 69,134 H lrris, jose H artshorn K imberl) -H lfIshorn. R obin 130 H:luke. D iane 122. 126. 134, 127.81. 69. 71. SO. 132 Hluk e Pmicil-128. 129 130. 135. '8,134, 91. 7.132 H ayden. 98. 1 3 H eady, B riln -10' H eady, Paul 69 Helth.CynthilIO' H elme r ichs, Susan 98 H ernlndez. E,'elyn -H C'rnlndez. lrisl06 H ernlndez. Melinda-120 H ernandez, NeslOr-115, 116 H eres. IsaaC" -10,69,156,57. SO. 132 H erring. A nne -106 H erring. joseph -91 H erring. l-hrk 164,69 H err i ng. Stephen -116 H ess. Gkn -114. 116 H ess, K a lhlcen-I29, 145.91 H ess, Lindl 120. 129.98. 145. H iero n ymus. (he!,)'1 -122. 106. 148. 1 11,107

PAGE 395

H iggins, Bubra 11) H ighley, F rederick 70 H ill II, Kenne th 127, )0, 91 H ill Pmicia )9. H ill. She rry 116 H oagland. Richard -113 H offman, jeffry -1 1 9, 106 H offman, Mdody -106 Hogabo am, Doris -114 H ollo w ay. K ip -113 H o l t, H arry 106 H onerbaum. M ark H opkins Pau l -112 Hom, Nancy 129. 130,98 H ousley. Kay-1I3 H udgins. Ruth-114 Huff, L inda 98. 103, 1)3 H uffman. james -106 H uffman, William 124. 1)4. 140, 14}, 1)6,91 H ughes, Charks 119 H ughes, IXborah -II), 118 H ughes j r Bobby H umphrqos, l\.hrcia -130. 106 H unnicu t Yolanda -113 H Unler, Bruce-1I8 H urlbut, IXnnis 98 H urlbut. R onald H usband, Pamela -106 H usband, Pri scilla -t 12 HU50n, Nancy 70 Hu ster, Hnold 98 lilies, Stephanie 6, 13), 22, 70, 79. 13' lIund.Ga.rry-1I9 !lund. june 129. 130. 92 Iri on, Eric -123 Iri on, kif147, 70 Iriurry, Angd 106 jac k 50n. Bruce-112 jack50n. lXb/mh -106 jack50n. IXbra jack50n. Donna 98 jack50n, R aymond -III jacksonjr .. james-124.92.140.n6 jaketic, IXbrah 98 j a k e t ic. Marguet-114.118 janosi k.jan janosi k jO)' c e 106 Rex -112 jeffries. Douglas -122.6,92.147,9) jeffries, M ichael 106, 1)4. I. 147 jeffri e s jr. Donald -113 Jimenez, jenny -130, 106 Jimenez. William -106 j ohnson. jacquelinC' -119 J ohn50n.jo5C -98.147 john 50n, R obe n -70, 4} j ohnston. R oger -95 j ones. james -106 j one5, Katc'n 1 06 Jordi. PaulettC' 128, 129, 130. 92, m K ardonskl. Ste\'en -114 Kauumoto. janet -113 K auf er. Norine-112 K auf(t. Sandra 106 Ke lly III Damd 120 Kern ShC'rry 122. 70, 79. 152 KC'm III William -119 K essler, M ichele 98. 102. 103 Kie nlle. M argatc' t 115. 117 Ki lm er Paul-98 K insey Jr FOtc'st 120 Ki )onaga. john -120 K iyonaga, Vicky -115 KJasovs ky, Anlonia -71 Knauss. Daniel 92 K nauss. Fmkric k 148. 71 Kononrn. Clifford K ononC'n. M ichad K raus. K athe r ine 128. 122. 1)9, 144.92,64 MUS, KatiC' -98 K rcddl, M arian )8, 125, 145. 49, 91,92 K rcdell, Thomas K tc'sge, ChC'ryl 106 K tc'sge, Rich:ml Laboy,Juan -120 La Pona, Jr., D -113 laR oche. Angdine LaRochC'. David u R oche, Mar)" -1 1 2 uRoche, Maxine 95 I.,.;aRoche, Neal -71 Lasher, Chnnian 98, 148 l.,.;auritzen,Ann-128.71 kDou;'(, William 140. 148. 95 Lee. D:tvid 106 Lee. j oel -9) Lee, john 98 Lee. Roben 116 Lee, Victor 106, 133, 107 lindo. R odrigo 122, 1&1. 1'\7,86, 72.83, SO, 132 loibl, Paul 119 Christina -92. 10, 148,27 loizeaux,janna 117,134, 118, 120 loizeaux, Linda-112 lolzeaux, ScOt -98,148 lo\' e, Brian -98 loyd, Ann -106 loyd. Patricia-113 LUC1lS, Laura 106 L ucas, Paul 120 L uger, R och.dl-II) Luna, Armando 119 Lunajr, louis Lund, Shelley -128,34,125,86.160, 1 61,72,49, SO L yman, H ila -164,84, 160, 72. 27, ,. L yman. Moun) 'en 98. )8 L yons, R icky -112 L)ons. Ton)' 106, 56 M aestas, u'Ollrence 98 M ans, Donald 92, 156 M arohl. Kim 106 M arsh, Edphe 98, 135, 149, 148, 'OJ t-' I arsh, E s th(f-00, III Manin,john 122, 72, 79,)6 Maninez,jaime-72 M a50n. IXshM. 106 Max ... ell. DenniS -164,84. 72, 79. SO,71 Mu: ... ell, Elena 6, 100 M ay, Sandra 106. 107 May .Vlcki-1I5 t-h)oni. Pusha -114 M ayani. Sheila 130. 100 1\.1 ann, Brian 115, 117 M cCann, M ichad 122, 123, 138, 20,52,127,9), 92, )0 M cCann. Sharon -114 M cCarnck, James 120 M cCullough, Sunn 106 M cDonnell, M ichael 116 M cGilberry, Kathln 123, 58,92 M c Kenney Mark 100 M c Kown Karen 113, 32 M c ilwain, Pans -114 Mclain. judy -126, 162, 163, 164. 71, 134. 85, 72 McLC'an, Sarah -72 McNaughton. R obert 122, 148, 108 M edina, George -115, 116 138. 20, IH, 13, 140 143, 22, 86. 160, Mker, D 130, 100, 101,99 Mker III. john 92 M endenhall, Linda -10, 100 MC'ndenhall Susan -U7, 125, 23,1)2,148.86.13 Mendoza,Susan-112 MC'ngC's, Judith 100 Me rric k Karen -lOS Ml"rrick, Linda 100, 27 M etivier, John -108 M etivier, Susan M t'}'er, Katherine -112 Mika,Gknda-114 M iller, Peggy 100 M i\ler, Phillip -108 M ille r,Shyia-92.5 M illigan, K athryn -58, 73, 80 Mills,Anne-11) M ills, Mary-112 Minehart, Daniel r.,' l inehart, Mi chael 92, 108, 132 Mine David-l13 M ine, Karon-112 M ine, Dale-92 Mize,janet-118 Mom, Robert -113 M oebus, julie -II} Moebus, P atricia -108 M ohlman J. -100 M on, Nayra -113 M oncivais, M aria M oncivais, Man cela 112, 116 M oncivais j r john -114 M onclova. I rma 138, 130, 92, M ondO\ a, Pedro -108 MontC'nC'gro. Alelda -7), SO M oody, Barbara 100 M oody, Patri ck -115 Moochler, LawrC'nce -112 M ooH', Gary -120 Mootc', Glynn 116, 120 M ootc', Jane -108 M ootc', Maune 119 M orrell. Edward 110 M orrell II, Glen M orrell, Kimberly -112 Patncia 114 M owery. Stephanie 114 M unoz, Cristobal -lOS M unoz. M anuel 100 M unoz. R osa 108, 130 Munoz, SusIe I U M urphy. Kathln -II) Murphy. William -7), SO, 86 -112 II, john 92 140 Nairn,uune-33 Newbury. Patncia -11 Ney, Ren-112 Nicholson. Roben -113 kslie -11' Nie\'C's, Alexl5 -114. 116 'ordstrom. Robert 129, 100 N ormandia, Ada -120 Normandia AlexIS -78 Normandia, Ivan -lOS Norton III Barney 120 Norval, Andrew -113 Norval, Anne -lOS Noml, Mary 128, 129.58,132, to, 92.91, 11, O'Donnell. Ann -O'Donnell, Thomas -108 Oh\' atc'z, Glom -112 Oh\'en, Myna 130, 100 Oh\' era jr, Angel 120 OI5("n, fk\'erly 123, no, nl, 92, 127,148.153 Cheryl 148. 108 OI5("n, Don -14, 140 O'Neal, Samud 108 Orrego, MIChael 10) Orrego, William -108 OMlZ, Ada 130, 131, 100 OMil Alvltez, Noelia 130, 131, 100 Onlz A h'atc'z, Wanda -130, lOS Osborn, Michael -119, 127 OStef. R obert 116, 118 Ostef.Stanley-92 Omea. Viana -58, 100 O\'C'fStft, Tern 129, 130, 135, 58, '00 O ... en, Valerie 118. 120 Pacheco, AndrM. 120 Pacheco, PC'lCr 109. 127 Pad r o, Jorge -108 Paine, Patricia 128, 130.92,127,91 Palmer.loui5("-92 Palmer, M aryann -108 Elizabeth 92, 100 Parker jacqueline 128, 129, 123, 130,91,96,131. 132 ParkC'r, Mark 92, 95 ParkC'r. Scon 114. 116 Parker. Anthony -116, 120 Par50ns, Wilham -lOS Pale. IXbonh 128. 129, 126, 135, 92.139, 1}4, 132 Panon, NC'i1 1)9. 140, 142, 73. 26, 143.85,161, 160, Paul50n. jane 161. 160, 7), 49. 80 Paul50n, jill 119 Peralta, Paul 100 Perel, R osa 100 Pertc't, Andtc' -lI8 Pertc't,Cathenne-II),II? Pertc'n.Charles Mark-1I2 Phares. Richard 120 Phillips, R obefl 128. 159, 157, IH. 27,136,11,140.143,74,134,160. 6), 82. 86 Phillips, Toby 140, 74 PhillIps, Warrc:n 128, 100, 140 Phillips Jr, 120 Pierpoint, -lIS Plno, Mano-115,116, II" Polile. Sarah -119 P oroes -?4 Porbes jr Charles -lOS POnle!, Ingrid "4. 80 Pnce, Carohne 116 Pritham, R obin 9} Mark -116 Pup.!!, Madeleine -112 Pursley, Mary -132 '9'

PAGE 396

,.2 PLlr.ln. ThomJ' '<>,I\9,U-<, 1\1 Ikm \(\1 RJmlre/, \!JnJ III Rlmlrel. Rene I' RJmlrel. Robert 11\ RJmu,. Bunnie 101 RlmO\. RlI mond RlmoS. RJmo\. Rllnnl WI. Re(lo.jI'<.c 9_1 Re':lo.leslle-II-1 Rcdup. Rm I(\to; RCC'd. (umen -RCC'd. RCC'd, Hc!enl -101 Relbn\der. Dmlel -Relfsn\der. Donna -11,\.118 Re\Cs. Lourdes -91 Reles. Orbndo lott. 16"'1 R ile, /'.hrle ne -112, 9_\ Rilharason, Albn -101 RI(hlrdson, Anne-I\.\ Richardson,Chm-"'I;, RIChmond, /'.hn -II R IChmond. ROIlph R idge. /'.hchael -116 Ridge. N1n" -12S. 130. 1\1. 101. 99.IB Ridge, Susan -93 Riggs. Sunn -119 RLSCh. C)thenne -108 Rllen. Chelene -II;'. 116 Rllen. E!cUbelh 120 RlIen. J1Smin -Rllen.jorge -122, 101. RIIen. jose -108 R O J ch, Carol ann -101 R obertson. JuhOl -119 R obertson. ROI.\mond -II. 101 R obinson, Alf onso -109 Robinson. DlnOl -R obinson. Dcbonh -130. 109 Robinson. Reglnlld I 116 Robin son. TonI -109 R obles. EdnOl -109 R obles, Edeen -112 R obles, NOIdil -90, 93 R odflguez. Ald1 110 R od nguez. Allln II \ R od riguez. he((e -120 R od nguez, Jo.sc -119 R odnguez. /'.Iuu -101 Rodflguel. NeslOr R odfiguCl. Pl!!\ -10 R omero. M IChlcl -III. 116 R orke. Fflnos-115 Ronao, Slrlh 116 Ross, Cnol -9-'. 19.91 R 09.-ln. Debonh -91.1'1 ROlmeskl.Joseph IV,.I!H.I'''',I)\ RUI1.DI1nJ-II-l RUll. -109 RUII, L"Jndrl -III R Ull. R umon. C}nthiOl -119 Ruoff, Dllnl-II.1 Ruoff. Re,';lna -101 Ruotf. Shel'\l-109 Ru\\()n jr \\:'llute -I 151. II!). I B, 26. 1-12. 160, ",1 Rudcd1:e. Ann 120 Anhur 109 I'I\J jUln '1\, 110 Slnlhel, Sel .... 'n II/; Pltfllil 112 Sln"hez. Peler IV') SOImhel. J().I SOImhel. Tern 101 Slmhel.Jr. Pl ulo 101 Jr, Allred -II". 116. lib. 120 SlnUl,go. Dolores -12H. 129. 10.95 Slnlllgo,Jlnel 119 SlmlJgo,Juln I()) SOInuago)r. \X',lhlm -H. 109 SOI\OC, GOIsplr -101 RIChlrd -110\ Schaub. -101 Scheibe. Glry -93 Scheibe. George I 78. 156. 80 Schill. K aren 1 38. n $chloredl. Dilne -101 Sch"'lOdl. Chem -II ScOIl, Amomo -112 ScOIl, DlOo-IIS ScOIl, Fnnk-93 ScOIl, Kelm ScOIl. /'.I"hlel-93 ScOIl, Theodore 101.4 7 ScOIl Jr Johnn} -Scng, Anhur 93, 1 Shlffer, HlgIOIJ-93 Shlffer, Jlmes -9_' Shlnnon, jerr)' -109 Cio\er -}I. liS. 120 Shok john -11' 1 S,ephan 93. 127 Shorl. jody -113 Shum, NaiYuen -)1. 80 Sills. leslie -liS Sills. R onnie -93 Simmons. EI111belh -109 Simmons. Juduh 93. 1-19. lIS Simmons. Pedr o -101. 155. SImms, Klrl -116 Simms. /'.'hc hlcl -109 Simms. Valene -93 Simms jr Alfonso -101 SImpkms,lhrry-120 Slmpkms. Bmn -114 Skrlble, Luke -120 Smuh. Amelll-ll,i Smuh. (hel')'l -I U Smuh. C)nlhu -130, 110 Smuh, Elll Jbe,h -11,1 Smuh. Jean 1)7. 93, 22 Smuh.joseph -101 loiS Smuh. -100. 109 Smllh, Mlchlel -119 Smllh, SI-mon -JoJS. Smllh,Shel')l-1I7.119 Smuh. Y\'onne -112 SOlder. Ellubelh 116.13 Smder.Jlmes-liS Snider, -IN, 127. 1010. 1,11.1)6 SOlder. PlIrI01 101.153 SOlder. ThomlS -120 Solbs. Edwlrd -115 Souder. JanI e -Southerbnd. R eSSle -9,1 Splgm, /'.hllll -9-1. 110 Splgnl, Mu.hJel -12-1, 9-1. 110 Splngler. /'.hrk 109. 118 SpJngler Ir ,Jlme} 15 Splle\. /'.111'\ -102 Spooner. Amhoo\ -113. 116 Sprlnger,jl(kle-12S.75 Sumpcr. Llndl-112 Dcnms II S,cphens.john -120 Kllhl')'n-130.9-1.151 Siern. Roben 109 Slelens. Dougbs -76, 156. &0. 1)2 Sllebnll, Alice -109 Stone, (brl 120 Stone Jr ROIlph -119 StrOOP III. F.d9.OIrd -11\ Snu!)(, Rh ond l -UO. 109 Styles.Suun -119.118 SUlre7.. Lourdes Summerim. Annl-116.012 SW11n, Noll -119 SW11O, Peter -IN, 9-4. JoJO, 143 S .... lnk. Cilrencc S ... lnk. Joe 109 S .... lnStrOm. Sunn 109 S .... lsher,Luanne-112 T ellefsen, SonlOi. -116. liS Terwilliger. Cllhenne -9-\ Terwilliger. Dormh)' -94. 10 Tel'es. DOIvld-7S Te\es. E hubl-9-l Teles. -109 Teles. Puuloa -95 Thom:u. Eligl o 155. 76, ThomlS. l..ciSl -12S. 129. 138. 1 30, 98. U5. 94 Thomas, Sonia -119 T homas, YI 'o nne -In. 13S. 130. 101. oil DJ I 'ld II,j Tipton. Vicki 109. III T om. V,elb Tomlin, DonOl.ld -liS Tomlin. Dons -III T omlinson. Jldlth I2S. 122. 1\0. 101.132 Toro, Angel 119, 116 Toro. Jose -101 Toro. /'.b m -UO, 102 T o rre s ..... ngel T orres. 130 Torres. Toni -103 Townsend, !-hrry -118. IN. 94. 91. 1010.161 Tschuml. R obert -9-1 Tschum). \'('Illilm-IIS T9.'eM),. DJnn) Ubben .... na -109 Ubben. /'.hn o -112 Ubben, Rlmon Urey. M"hele V1ldel. Lc\\'LS -162, 160\. 136,76 V11cnOl. )o.sc -76 V1lenllne. Daniel -76. 79 V1lcnllne. J lmes V1lcnllne. P11fI(ll -127 Vampnne. Ehubelh Vlmpnne. S)'hIJ -130, D, 1'14. 76 Vlmprlne. WlihOlm VOI.n \'\I oude nberg Fflls Vlsquel. R OI.fael-120 Vlughl. Paull Vega. C1rmen Vega Soto. -II) Verruno. :'hmnne -101.99 Vest. LIOOl-77 Vesl.BII1-116 Vesi. /'.bnhl -101 VestJr, Vldro. Rlmonlll 130 Vlelb. Tom -114 VlenJr.Juln-120 Villar, /'.bm VOight, S)hlOi. -118 Vrq, /'.hke-119 W1lnlO, EhlOlbelh -128. 102, 99,IB \\:'llnlo)r. Fred('f1ck \\:'lllenlus, Thom1 S -77 W1Jlme.Terl')-77 \X'are.Amhon)'-1I2 Ware. Luann-102.1'IS. 27 Webb. Mum)' -112 WelgOlrt.)oscph-113 Welgln. Kalheflne Welglrt. Mlfglrel -114 Welch. D1I td Welch. R oger -111 Welchjr.Clifford Well}', K tmberl), -119 Wetll. Carol -,S, 9-1 Weslcy. Wlher WCS(,Gu),-119 West, WOI.yne -168 Wes terberg K aren US, 77 Whee1crJr.Rl)-114 Whipple. :'brgOlret Whipple, P eggy -119 Whipple, v"kle -130 Whlte,NJncy-lIo1 Wlck,Andrew-113 Wlechert, ) oseph Wilder. Thomas -113 WilkinS. Phlilp-II). 116. liS Wlll,Noreen-113 WIlliams, A urclu -128. 129, I}C. 94. 49, 1)2 Wllhlms. Chenl-112 Willilms, MIChael -119 Williford,NJncy-IIO\ \'( illlS. Bonnie 120 WLlliS.SuS1n-130, 102 W ilmont, A lberto -113. 116 W ilmont, r-hrgOlrila 130 W ilmont, R obert -114, 116 Wilson. J anie Wilson.Rlch-II-l Wlrtl. Jenn) -6. 77, 1'2. Ij 80 \ '\Illhro"' E\cl)n -112 W ood. Dc-nOis W ood. /'.hchOl.cl -9-1 W oodcock, K imberly -113 W oods. DOIl'ld -114 W oods, Linda -102 \\:'onhern,Ann -9-4 Y erXl. Blrbln -I 3<1 Young. :'brglnlOl. -112 Young, Roben o -Zachl') EUnice -1101 Zlchry. SUSOInn 129. 101', 901. 10 132 Z lchl')Jr. Ralph -103 Zlmlrnpa. /'.hr gaflu -112 ZOI.\,lnsk)'. Pnsolla-77 ZlpS. /'.h fll Znl$. r-hnbel -9-1 Zl)lS. -94 Zcbcde Ale g r e





P rd, Dl)onild 12o, 1(2, 1(,, 1(,.
S5 (4, 1 .1
Bird, M.iar -- l
Cabrera, Arinndo soi
Cain, Mihacl -- 110
Calkmns. Itcne 1l,. i4
Campbell, James 11
Carev. Deborah ltl, 148. III
Carlisle. ( atherin -- 1 2. 89, 126,
1 1l. 21, 1 ,. 91
Caroll, Diane 96, 162. 16o. 1,
Caroll, Richard 111
Carter, Eli7abeth 1226,8, M4, 49,
'1, so
Carw~ithen, Jeffrev 112, 116
Cash. Mary 89
Cash Jr., Jimmy 114
Castro, Helen 89
Castro. Raul 135, F4, 86, 64, 71,
132
Castro, Rita 120
Catlett, Anstey 95
Caudill, Cheryl 89
Caudill. Jay 89
Chavis, Valdez 119
Chavez, Barbara 118
Cheshire, Alan 104
Cheshire. Deborah 89
Childress, James -96
Childress, Randy 89
Christian II. Joe 104
Christian, Mona -112
Christian, Patty 34, 66
Christian, Rosemary 161, 160, 66,
26
Ciccheto, Frank 89, 124. 140, 156
Ciccolo, William 105
Cimino, Elizabeth 96
Cimino, Leopold 118
Cirulli, Ann 96
Claramunt, Juan 112
Clement, Caleb 159, 155, 140, 143,
160, 66, 151
Cliette, Michael 114
Cliette. Renee 105, 130
Coad, Faith 162, 34, 66
Coad, Pamela 89
Cobb, Aminta 89, 130. 59
Coe, Debra 105
Coe, Lisbet 115
Coffin. Gerald 96, 148, 107
Coffin, Marcia 114
Cole, Fred 66
Cole, Roberta 89. 58, 157, 125, 145,
153, 91
Coleman, Alexis 105, 130
Coleman, Cheryl 89, 58, 52
Collins. Gary 155, 6,
Collins III, James 105, 102
Collins, John 120
Collins, Mark 89
Collins, Michael 114
Collins Jr, Walter 120, 35
Colpe, Kathleen 96
Colpe, Pamricia 113
Colon, Lourdes 90, s5, 155
Colon, Sonia 89
Cooke. Lavera 9'
Cooper, Greg 115
Cooper, Paul
Coronado, (arlos 11i,
Coronado, Gustavo 120
Couts, Carl 119
Couts, Clihford
Couts. Susan 78


Couts. W'a ICne '
Cox, Christopher -- 123
Cox, Jeainntte 128, 129. 130, 13,
156, 139, 6 1-,1
Cronan, William 112
Crouch. Anne 105
Crouch, Marian 102
Cruz, George 103, 156
Cruz Jr, John 116, 120
Cummings, Ivette 129, 89, 130, 10,
132
Cummings, Leland 97
Cummings, Walter 115
Cummings, Wanda 97
Currier, Karen 89, 159, 15, 91, 144,
34, 125
Currier, Robert 115, 116
Dailey, Wayne 115
Diaz, David 161
Daly, Darlene 158. 159
Damiani, Guy 97
Dancer. Laveda 105. 122, 130
Dancer, Sheila 90
Dancer Jr., Doyle 113
Dandridge, Devony 114
Daniel, Emilie 90, 145, 146
Daniel, Patrick 113, 116
Danielsen, Cheri 117, 119, 118
Danielsen, Kathie 97, 122, 5, 33
Darcy, Joan
Darcy, Michelle 105
Davila, Mark 105
Davison, John 120
Day, John 90, 40, 143
Day, Robert 114, 116
Deaton, Donna 114
Deaton Jr., William 90, 124, 140,
151
Deaton, Ted 105
Deboor, Karen 120
Deboor, Theodore 113
De Jesus, George 119, 116
De Jesus, Ruperto 35
De Jesus Jr., Ruperto
Del Busto, Iracema 105
Denis, Marc 97
DeRaps, Brian 97, 129
DeRaps, Kathleen 128, 58, 65, 139,
67, 134, 71
DeVault, Patricia 120, 42
DeVault, Michael 114
DeVault II, Raymond 105
Dexter, Kathleen 115, 117
Dexter, James 112, 116
Dexter, Michael 122, 138, 7, 133,
164, 168, 136, 71, 156, 134, 147, 82,
23. 81, 86, 67
Diaz, David 160
Diaz, Richard 119
Diaz, Ramon 105
Diaz Jr., Pedro 67
Dillin, James 115
Dingman, Henry 103
Dockery, Michael 116
Dohle, Craig 116, 120
Dohle, Jane 97, 125, 153
Dohle, John 97, 125, 107
Dohle Judy 97, 125. 99, 152
Dominguez, Rosita 97, 58
Dowell, Harry 97
Dowell, Richard 115
Dustin, Elaine 103
Edmondson, Nancy 128, 129, 90,
122, 125, 45, 91, 76, 58
Edwards, Tilda 114


Egger, Brenda 90, 130, 6, 111, 94
Evangelas, Sue -- 10
Endara, Roberto 95
Ender, Joseph 97, 132
Ender, Ralph 135, 78, 132
Escobido, Lawrence 116
Estes, Robert
Evans, Cheryl 113
Evans, David 119
Evans, Michael 122
Farnsworth, Allen 78
Farnsworth, David 114
Farrington, Kathryn 97. 122, 138
Fauber, Albert 119
Fauber, James 116
Fauber, Karen 105
Fauber, Kathleen 97
Feeley, James 119
Ferguson, Cindy 112
Ferguson, Daniel
Ferguson, Edna 97, 130
Ferguson, Trina 105, 130
Fernandez, Robert 114
Ferns, Alice 120
Ferns, Gary 120
Ferrel, Clifford 90
Ferris, Estelita 97, 145
Finneman, Thomas 105
Flores, Lori 119, 118
Flores, Wendy 159, 164, 142, 86,
67, 71, 83, 80
Fluharty, Carol 112
Fluharry, Mary 119
Fryer, George 115
Fryer, Richmond
Fontanez, Maria 90, 130, 132
Fontanez, Pedro 97
Ford, Robert 97, 163
Forsgren, Lester 113
Forsyth, Steven 105
Forsyth Jr., Ronald 97, 163
Foshee, Andrew 90, 124, 162, 144,
155, 140
Foshee, Denise 123, 159, 15, 11, 80,
71, 22, 164, 10, 11, 82, 55, 84, 78,
134
Fugleberg, Stephan 90, 140
Funderburk, John 68, 83, 164
Furr, Lisa 97
Gabriel, Clifford 105
Gabriel, Thomas 113, 116
Garcia, Linda 112
Garner, Mardette 90, 103, 130
Garner, Paul 120
Gercich, Catherine 58, 68, 80, 160,
161
Gercich, Nina 58, 97
Gewin, Jimmy 90, 127
Gewin, Rebecca 105
Gibson, Brenda 36, 68
Gibson, Leslie 112
Gibson, Mark 97
Gilbert, Susan 115, 117, 118
Gillespie, Russell 116, 118
Gillespie, William 90, 129
Godinez, Violanda 115
Goeberrus, Cornelius 97, 128, 129,
132
Goguen, Gregory 90, 122, 132
Goguen, Lynne 95
Golden, Edward 97
Golden, Sharon 68
Goldman, Henry 97
Goldman, Peter 97
Gonier, David 116, 120


Gonier, Patrice 97, 103, 129
Gonzalez, Ann 90, 58, 95, 22, 128
Gonzalez, Esther 97
Gonzalez, Francisco 155
Gonzalez, Josefa 116, 118, 42
Gonzalez, Juan 95
Gonzalez, Maria 105, 130
Gonzalez, Olga 97, 130, 131
Good, Gloria 119
Goodwin, Barbara 105, 148, 111
Goodwin, Brenda 114
Gosney, Debra 123, 130, 98, 131,
95
Gosney, Diane 130
Gosney, Jeffery 144
Goss, Randy 120
Gott, Roy 98
Goulet, Karen 105
Goulet, Stephen 23, 68
Graham, Donna 58, 49
Green, Daniel 105
Green, Matthew
Green, Zan 90
Gregg, Gail 112
Gregg, Laura 114
Gregg, Lynn 91
Gregg, Marian 58, 91
Gregg, Nancy 98, 145
Gregory, Clarissa 105
Gregory, Kelvin 120
Grier, Barbara 91
Grist, Gregory 105
Grist, Ronald 120
Gsell, Raymond 98, 91
Guerrero, Carlos 119
Grerrero, Maria 111, 130
Guilfoyle, Lorraine
Guilfoyle, Walter 113
Gutierrez, Patricia 68
Hames, Melanie 118
Hamilton, Francisco 105
Hammond, Edwin 91
Hammond, Hubert 116
Hanly, Mark 123, 91, 132
Hannah, John 68
Harden, Debra 116
Harden, Karen 105, 130
Harmon, Allen 126, 138, 139, 86,
69, 134
Harris, Jose
Hartshorn, Kimberly 105
Hartshorn, Robin 130
Hauke, Diane 122, 126, 135, 134,
127, 81, 69, 71, 80, 132
Hauke, Patricia 128, 129, 130, 135,
58, 134, 91, 7, 132
Hayden, Michael 98, 13
Heady, Brian 105
Heady, Paul 69
Heath, Cynthia 105
Helmerichs, Susan 98
Hernandez, Evelyn 115
Hernandez, Iris 106
Hemandez, Melinda 120
Hernandez, Nestor 115, 116
Heres, Isaac 10, 69, 156, 57, 80, 132
Herring, Anne 106
Herring, Joseph 155, 91
Herring, Mark 164, 69
Herring, Stephen 116
Hess, Glen 114, 116
Hess, Kathleen 129, 145, 91
Hess, Linda 120, 129, 98, 145, 153
Hieronymus, Cheryl 122, 106, 148,
111, 107







tA-Ceague Hasketball ueam Captures


Championship fame With Score 0)


Front Row: Barbara Bloemer, Roberta Cole, Aurelia Williams (captain), Marlene Rice, Linda
Hess, Nancy Gregg, Susan Zachry (manager). Back Row: Susan Mendenhall, Marian Kredell,
Jean Smith, Emilie Daniels, Beth Wanio, Kathy Hess, Estelita Ferris (manager).


r28-21


At the close of the intramural bas-
ketball season, those girls who dem-
onstrated the greatest skill and ability
were selected to play on the Varsity
of A-League Team. Each team mem-
ber had to be a junior or senior and
maintain a "C" average.
This was a year of innovation for
the Cristobal High School Girls' Bas-
ketball team. It was the first year in
which a team was composed of only
five girls. Also, for the first time
numbers appeared on the front of the
uniforms.
The 1970-71 season commenced in
September and continued until the
end of October. The girls played
teams from Balboa High School and
Canal Zone College twice each and
remained undefeated throughout the
season. To climax their successful sea-
son, the girls went on to a 28-21 vic-
tory in the championship game.


Sr
"Whatsoever you ask for you shall receive."


SCORES

CHS 35 ................ BHS 33
CHS 23............... CZC 19
CHS 33............... CZC 22
CHS 28 ................BHS 21




A dripping but happy Mrs. Harris is pulled
from the pool following her "victory dunk-
ing."


''1


Ill v






Record-4reaking football


Ceam


Lone hours of diligent practice ...


Enthusiastic support from fans at bonfires, students at pep assemblies, and fathers at football
games ...


Able leadership .


And expert coaching. ..


combined to produce results visible from the moment the team .























EDWIN M. KOZIOL Art; B.A.,
Michigan State Univ. "Find out what
your responsibilities are and prepare
to meet them in order to gain control
of your life as rapidly and completely
as possible."


\ r i











Class Portrait


*f.~


Artists waiting for an inspiration!

-. -

" s ,* ..... f


Ak. tv


In creative arts, a student learns to
express himself through different
media. With this in mind, tile tl-
lowing courses were taugh t (-t CHS
this year. Art 7, an introductu. n to
drawing, painting, lettering. c r .mrnis,
crafts, covering techniques, and the
use of tools with emph.isi pl.ied
on developing skills, ima .in.mtrn. .ind
art judgement. Art 8, a rcintricme-nt
of knowledge gained in Art v.ith
greater emphasis placed on the balric
elements of design. Art I, a btai be-
ginning art course for ill ,tudcnt
grades 9-12 which empha.iizcd thrc de-
velopment of drawing skill and the
study of design concepts It Inl'etd
drawing, painting, lettering. po.stcr-
making and a variety of cr.itrt Art [I,
an advanced art course for ill rtudcnts
grades 10-12. It involved art apprecia-
tion and a deeper investigation of de-
sign and color theory with emphasis
placed on individual organization and
the carrying out of art projects. The
student had an opportunity to devel-
op skills in the area of his choice, Art
III, which included appreciation and
advanced creative work.


With a sweep of the brush, a masterpiece is created.


Art


Brenda Gibson.






Yunior H1igh Student Association Serves


As lrifying force 3or Students
The Student Association is the
backbone of any school. This is true
of the junior as well as the senior
high school. The Cristobal Junior
High School Student association
served as a unifying force for the stu-
S dents and afforded them an opportu-
Si (nity to voice their thoughts and opin-
Sions on various issues. Through the
I S.A., students were able to participate
'- actively in the government of their
.k r school and thus aid in making it a
a more pleasant place in which to learn.
The year 1970-71 was a highly suc-

,High Student Association. Continu-
Sr-ing from the point it stopped last
11 'year, it went on to make this an active
and exciting year. Among the activi-
ties planned and carried out by the
S.A. were the Blue and Gold Intra-
mural Football games, and various
drives and dances held throughout
Front Row: Kathleen Dexter, James Dexter, Sherry Schwindt. Back Row: Mr. Cheshire (spon- the school year.
sor). Brian McCann, Surse Pierpoint, Linda Garcia, Patty Valentine, Patty Colpe, Janet Kat-
sumoto. Karen Mitte, Barbara Yerxa, Debbie Harden, Susan Austin, Eunice Zachry, Patricia
Sanchez. Carmen Bringas, Nancy White.




The Zephyr was the Junior High
counterpart of the CHS Tradewind.
The staff was composed of seventh
and eighth grade students interested
in learning the fundamentals of jour-
nalism while providing a valuable ser-
vice to their fellow students. Under
I' the guidance of their sponsor, Mrs.
Tanner, these students published a
paper once each month. Each issue
contained articles concerning events
and topics of interest to junior high
students as well as an advice column,
cartoons, and letters to the editor.




Front Row: Charles Hughes, Dee Dillian, Mark Perusse, Allen Rodriguez, Mark Novak,
Karhy Murphy. Back Row: Donna Reifsnider, Sheila Brannon, Mrs. Tanner, Glenda Mika,
KathN Meyer, Margaret Jaketic, Surse Pierpoint, Anne Richardson, Margaret Whipplc. Ruth
Hudgins, Ka[h\ Balmer, Debbie Hughes, Barbara Yerxa, Sherry Hill. Sherry Schwindt.






ROBERT RANDOLPH PHILLIPS
March/ 16, 1953
Montgomerv, Alabama
Robert has been in CHS for three c car., and in this time, had be-
come president of the Caribe Club, Vice-'resident of the NHS, a "C"
Club member, President of the Senior Class, and ROTC Battalion Ex-
Sr ecutive 011l... He lettered in football twice, and twice in baseball. He
S also attended the University of Florida for a NSF program, and attend-
ed the Naval Post-graduate School at Monterey, California. Robert
Plans to study pre-law and then go on to Law School.


Robert Randolph Phillips


Josephine Marie Porbes


Toby Ray Phillips


Ingrid Portier


TOBY RAY PHILLIPS
December 1953
Burgaw, North Carolina
This has been Toby's first year in CHS and he has lettered twice in
track. His future plan is to become a marine biologist.


JOSEPHINE MARIE PORBES
June 11, 1953
New Orleans, Louisiana
Josie has attended Canal Zone Schools tor two years. After gradua-
tion, she plans to get a job and plans on going ahead with her musical
education in piano and chorus.

INGRID PORTIER
September 28. 19 53
Djakarta, Indonesia
Ingrid has attended CHS all through her high school years. She was as-
sistant stage manager in the play, "Bell, Book, and Candle" and "The
Black Flamingo." She plans to go to the States and get a job.







4 -- 11 I
:,.- -:. jr: .' i
Ono


"Actually, it was worth breaking my leg just to be able to put my feet up in Mr. Bock's class," comments senior, Wally Russon.


o-0-







Phlaosophian Society Js formed


A new club at CtIS this year, the
Philosophian Soiicty was formed by
a group of students interested in intel-
lectual and literary pursuits. The
club's aiim was to provide students
with an opportunity for discussion
and exploration of the various aspects
of philosophy and literature. It en-
couraged studerrts to develop and im-


prove their ability to express them-
selves; either through group discus-
sion, or individually through rI iding'.
creative writing, or poetry.
Membership was open to all high
school students, but was limited to
fifteen at any one time. Interested stu-
dents applied through Mr. Fattorosi,
the club's sponsor, or through any


two members. Regular meetings were
held twice each month, with various
extra meetings scheduled for after
school and on weekends. These extra
meetings were planned for places
such as the beach, which offered an
atmosphere of informal association
that helped the club members to dis-
cuss freely and honestly.


It


i: '

Debbie Pate, Diane Hauke, Denise Foshee, Mike Dexter, Judy McLain, Shelia Alberga, Lana Boone, Allen Harmon (vice chairman), Jeannette
Cox, Donald Byrd, Robert Phillips (chairman), Maria Boone, Thomas Pursley, Kathy DeRaps (secretary), Mr. Fattorosi, Patti Hauke.


CIS Offers 3

Drivers' Sd.

Sessions
Drivers' Training was an extreme-
ly popular course among CHS stu-
dents. It was offered three times dur-
ing the school year. Each session last-
ed six weeks. Meetings were held
after school in room 341 for one hour
and forty-five minutes, Monday
through Friday. The instructor, Mr.
Reeves, presented lectures and films
in order to give students the back-
ground in traffic laws, safety, and
automobile mechanics necessary to
enable them to become good drivers.
In addition to classroom instruction,
ten hours of behind-thc-wheel driving
wer re ruired before students were el-
igible to take the road test and obtain
a license.


Driver education students brace themselves for another "horror movie."


-;I


C'









































Mr Hieronymus (S.A. sponsor) and Mi-
chael Dexter (S.A. president).


icy Edmonson (S.A. secretary).

The halls of CHS were a mass of con-
fusion on September 1, 1970, as hun-
dreds of students congregated around
the bulletin boards on which homeroom
numbers were posted. Others lingered to
chat with old friends or to make new ac-
quaintances; summertime experiences
were shared and compared. The perenni-
al excitement of the "tirst day of school"
was in the air. This enthusiasm persisted
throughout the orientation assembly, in
which students were welcomed to CHS,
new teachers introduced, and the new
Student Association officers installed.
However, with the ringing of that first
bell, order began to emerge as students
fell back into the familiar routine of
school life. Another school year had
begun.


Debbie Meeker













.. CONCERTS: Practice for the
cast and crew of various plays: Dra-
matic Productions ...


Luann WX'are, Chrimcini Loiiiiux. Linda Merrick


... all those activities without which
school life would be quite incom-
plete.


Hila Lsman. Robtrt PhI11ILP












'-V















!w
















































Lana Boone, Jay Alonis, Michael Dexter, Stephen Goulet.








Susan Mendenhall








hall Of fame Named At Christmas formal


Lewis Valdez, Judy McLain, and Sandra Al-
berga. "Don't they ever stop talking?"


The Christmas Formal, held at the
Sky Room on December 19, 1970 was
the climax of many weeks of hard
work for the members of the Senior
Class Advisory Council and Board of
Directors who made up the commit-
tees which organized and planned this
successful dance. Students danced to
the music of the "What For" amid
decorations on the theme "Right
Down Santa Claus Lane." The pre-
sentation of the Senior Class Hall of
Fame made this event one of the
most memorable of the school year.


Mark Herring, John Funderburk, Rod Lindo, Carmen Butler, and Wendy Flores. Hall of
Fame Winners.


4-,


NlfdiaeilDexter, "Mr. CHS."


- i I off -
Denise Foshee, Hila Lyman, Dennis Maxwell, Jan Bjorneby, Donald Byrd, Judy McLain,
Mark Herring. Hall of Fame Winners.








iLdmdallc


VIA


.-......__1
Mrs. Bright, Laurie Nairn "Your .ppointment i ii 11 ...I on Frida


in.


ADAMARY BRIGHT Counselor;
B.A., Florida State Univ., M.A., Univ.
of Michigan. "Life will never be dull
if you will continue to learn . "


Mr lower). I homas iehre. William S.in
tiago. Henry Boritlliono "You bt.i/ '%anr
to go to Kings' Poin "


I.
Mmiii


A final decision brings satisfaction to Ka-
thie Danielsen and Mrs Bri ht


Guidance is the process of helping
persons make the best possible de-
cisions concerning their lives, and aid-
ing them in solving their problems. It
includes helping students choose the
proper courses to take in school, and
aiding them in deciding what careers
to follow after their education is com-
pleted. Such decisions require that a
person have full and correct knowl-
edge about himself and his world.
The guidance counselors at Cristobal
High School aim to provide students
with information so that they may
make the best possible decisions in
life. The two principal methods used
for this are c_,unstling, and testing.
Counseling consists chiefly of discus-
sions between a student and his coun-
selor concerning his interests, apti-
tudes, and special problems. Testing
is an important guidance tool. Apti-
tude, personality, and intclligcnce
tests provide counselors with much


ROBERT MOWERY Counselor;
B.S. and M.S., Indiana State Univ.
"Take advantage of the opportunities
in high school."


LUKE C. PALUMBO Attendance
Counselor; B.S. Ed., N.W. Missouri
State. "There is no substitute for work
to be happy and successful."




useful information. Other important
guidance tools are books, p.imphliers.
and films used to help students decide
on courses of study and future careers.










Sophomores


Nil 6
- I



; iAA


f- 1




\w ^


4


J r


S '


S-.-


/I


Donna
Baker
,~ Timothy
Blancihard
Jcttrcv
Briem
Susan
Burge
-Gicrald
C otfin


amrncs
Barr
Paul
Bleichcr
Edward
Brings Jr.
Kathrvn
Bush
Lourdcs
Colon


I


Nilkit.it
Adam.n,


R()h.iii. i\
Bctinu iirt

Blocnimr
Mclind.i
Brow n
Jlll lc'
('hi Id rc.


(,ii

I ) nl 1 .


H < k
in Para
I.iilu
(imino


Stephen
Aponte
Michael
Bjorneby
"iJ Pam
Bridwell
Karl
Bundv

Cirulli


Marilyn
Baxter
Veffrv
Blevins
Kathleen
Brown
y/Diane
Caroll
v'/Kathleen
Colpe


B`ddl


kL -- i


U

)


;e. I
:_rrrr"4
!:31; .tr
;r.:-








Special

Education


GRACE S. PFAU Reading; B.S.,
Valley City State College; M.A., Uni-
versity of Minnesota. "If talented, ca-
pable people can match their dissatis-
faction and concern with positive,
concerted action, they should be able
to correct the ills they so rightly de-
plore."


Duke Collins and De Jesus Ruperto help Mrs. Pfau correct papers.


EARL C. SHARICK- Special Educa-
tion; B.A., M.S., Illinois State. "Work
hard and stay in school."


The Special Education department
was added to the CHS curriculum in
1960. In Special Education, students
received extra help in their academic
studies, learned crafts, and learned the
perspectives of human relationships
and civic responsibilities.
The remedial reading program pro-


vided special instruction to improve
reading skills and helped assure a stu-
dent of success in kcpini with his
ability. Sccmingl% average students
improved the quality of their reading
skills with the help of the Special
Education Department.


Reading holds the interest t o the Remedial Rc.ihn.c l.in s


Mr. Sharick helps his class drill in math
with la',h cards.






"C" Club Wins Smashing

Victory f I1st "Olympic


.


B... -.... - a "

Robert Phillips. "Determination pays!"



WI t *r I r



LI3[ 14
I^ieif-


Games")


Mike Spagna. "No wonder the girls won
this event!"


Titi Cole, Marlene Rice, Jean Smith, Sue
Mendenhall. "Ready girls?"


Mike Spagna sails into the air for two
points.


Jose Medina, Marlene Rice, Titi Cole, Joe Rosmeski. "The victors display their prize ribbons
while the defeated displa\ good sportsmanship."


Another first in the 1970-71 school
year was the Olympics held in the
CHS gymnasium on December 23,
1970 at 7 pm. This competition be-
tween the outstanding male and fe-
male athletes at Cristobal was organ-
ized through the combined efforts of
the GAA and the "C" Club.
The boys were divided into two
teams, the "Globe Clappers" and the
"Gungarias." The girls were also di-
vided into two teams, the "All-Ameri-
cans," and the "Bunnies."
The evening included competition
in basketball, battleball, volleyball,
and various relays. Sophomore girls
under the direction of Mrs. Harris ref-
ereed the games. The girls succeeded
in capturing only eight points, and
the boys scored a smashing victory
with a total of twenty-two points.
A good time was had by all, partic-
ipants and spectators alike, and it is
hoped that this competition may be-
come an annual event.








A administration


-A-



'N


To the Yearbook Staff:
"Thanks for the Memories" is the
title of a song that was popular some
years ago. As we record in this book
the events of the 1970-71 school year
at Cristobal High School we can sure-
ly say with gratitude and even a bit of
pride, "thanks for the memories."
You who have studied hard and
have given of yourselves to school ac-
tivities have shown by your Tiger
spirit that the busiest people are also
the happiest people.
Best wishes to all of you as you
continue your education here or else-
where. Although your highest com-
mitment may well be to academic ex-
cellence, you would not be wise to
pursue scholarship at the expense of
the development of an honorable
character, physical well-bl'in., or a
pleasant personality. It is hoped that
the discipline of commitment to these
qualities will earn you a happy free-
dom of spirit and a sense of accom-


I


JAMES H. PFAU Cristobal High School Principal


plishment. May you continue to mark happy memories.
each milestone with satisfaction and
James H. Pfau
Principal


9


"I'm a firm believer in the 'Tigers'!"







RKOC Cadets And Sponsors

A ttend 0. O C.


Thomas Pursley


For seven days on several week-
ends in the month of February, the
jungle surrounding Ft. Sherman be-
came the temporary "home" of a
number of students. These students
were ROTC cadets and sponsors from
Balboa and Cristobal High Schools
who were participating in the ROTC
program. The purpose of this pro-
gram was to train students to move,
shoot, communicate, and sustain
themselves in a jungle environment.
The army provided equipment and


instructors; participants paid for their
own food. The training included sev-
eral hours of classroom instruction,
numerous excursions to nearby Fort
Sherman, target detection, airborne
training, boat training, river crossing,
and a trip to the mock Viet Cong vil-
lage located on the French Canal. Par-
ticipants who graduated from the
course were given the title, "Honor-
ary Jungle Expert". This year's out-
standing graduate from CHS was
cadet corporal Orlando Reyes.


"b9 ~b:









Physical Education


BARBARA L. CAMPBELL Physi-
cal Education; B.S Ed., Black Hills
State C II :. Graduate Credit, Wash.
State Univ., Central Wash State Col-
lege and BHST "Be quick to criticize
- but if you do have a solution to
go with the criticism'"


LOUIS DEDEAUX Physical Edu-
cation, B.S., Oklahoma A&M Col-
lege; M.S., Oklahoma State Univ.
"Find out what you can do best as
early as possible, then take pride in
yourself that your doing it as well as
you can


p pi





JUNE FATTOROSI Physical
Education; B.S., Southeastern La.
Univ.; M.A., Univ. Southern Miss.
"Mature enough in developing inter-
nal discipline to gradually replace the
external disciplines required during
childhood."


V. -- -


JOAN F. HARRIS Physical Edu-
cation; A B, Canal Zone Jr College.
B.S., Barry College, M.A., New York
University. "Don't seek an escape
from the pressures accompanying
your youth through cheap thrills that
could ruin your whole life.. You
can't afford to throw away your young
years. The clock can't be stopped or
turned back."


\a


IDOUG LITTON Phy Ed ; Mas-
ter's, Miss State University "Keep
training rule and always beat Bal-
ho.i and (. i ,


Gym can be relaxing! .


S. Gym can be hard work!"


7.
.~~.'. ~
.-. ...,








Rest
Dancers
Carmen Hutler
Raul Castro


Friendliest

H1ila Cyman
Dennis Jlawell
Denise foshee








GuiddaHce

Counselor

Retires


After

36 years


At 8HS

The CHS annual staff wishes to
dedicate the 19'1 Caribbean to Mrs
Adamarv Anderson Bright, in recog-
Inition and appreciation of her man.
years of devoted service to the sru-
dents of Cristobal High School.
Mrs. Bright was born in Jackson-
ville, Florida She attended school in
Houston. Texas, during her earl)
years, but returned to Jacksonville to
complete her secondary education at
Duzal High School She received her
A.B. in Education at Florida State
College for Women in Tallahassee.
and completed her graduate work for
a degree in history at the Universitv
of Ann Arbor in Michigan
After teaching at Jacksonville Jun-


-v
m p7


T -


Kathie Danielsen smilingly receives assistance from Mrs. Bright in planning her college ca-


reer.

ior High School for a short time, she
came to the Canal Zone in 1935.
Since that time she has served capably
and well in many positions at Cristo-
bal High School. Among these are: a
teacher of seventh and eighth grade
English, social science, vocational
guidance, social studies, girls' advisor,
and the position as a Guidance Coun-
selor which she has held from 1951 to
the present. During her many years at
CHS. Mrs. Bright received a number
of Outstanding Service Awards for
her distinguished service to the Canal
Zone Schools Division.


In addition to teaching and coun-
seling, Mrs. Bright also sponsored a
number of school activities and orga-
nizations such as the National Honor
Society. It was Mrs. Bright who orig-
inated the Zephyr, and the Caribe
Club. She is truly an outstanding or-
ganizer; efficient, and hard-working.
Mrs. Bright has done a great deal
of traveling during her years at CHS,
visiting many countries in both Cen-
tral and South America, as well as in
Europe. Both faculty and students are
saddened by the journey Mrs. Bright
is about to make as she retires from
the faculty of CHS. Her guidance will
be long remembered by the countless
students whose educations and careers
she helped plan.









Mrs. Bright advises Shyla Miller on her
schedule for next year.


K'














































INTER-AMERICAN LINES
BI-Weekly-lndependent Service to From

New Orleans and Miami
and
Central America
Phone
Panama 25-4933
Cristobal 3-2528








Social Sciences


yjliap.


ROBERT BERGER Soc. Studies;
B.A., Michigan State U.; A.C., Grand
Rapids J.C. "Get the most education
you can and try to make this world of
ours a better place in which to live.


The purpose of the social science
courses offered at CHS was to help
students learn about their world; its
past, its present, and its relation to
them both now and in the future.
The aim of the social studies in-
structor was to aid the student in
learning to view history in a objective
and unbiased manner, and to give
him a broader approach to such prob-
lems as national and international
relations. Social Science courses of-
fered at CHS included Geography,
World History, U.S. History, and


MARY CONDON World Hist.,
U.S. Hist.; B.S., Northern Michigan
College. "Be sincere about everything
you do, particularly about getting an
education."


American Institutions.
Geography dealt with the study of
maps, climates, and the physical fea-
tures of various countries. World His-
tory was the study of the different na-
tions' pasts and their relationships to
one another. U.S. History provided
the student with knowledge of our
nation's past and its accomplishments
and led him to a better understanding
of our nation. American Institutions
taught the student about the work-
ings of government and the basic


WILLIAM J. GANSEN American
Institutions Social Studies 8; M.A
University of Michigan; M.A.T.E
Purdue Univ. "Treat others as yo'-
would like to be treated."


principles of economics.
The objective of all social science
courses was to lessen misundcrs.mnd-
ing of the people of other nati,.n s and
to help the students learn to rtspect
cultures other than their own.
This year, CHS social science
teachers attended a special workshop
conducted by Dr. Edwin Tent,:,n ut
Carnegie Mellon University. Pittrs-
burgh, Pennsylvania. He was an adi-.
cate of the use of original source ma.
trial in the teaching of social studies


Cheryl Cocm.an, Mrs Condon, Michael

wiho 1i on th. ono sMiide
wh~o i\ o~n thec to~n side''"


-1-
J-
F~..
si
c
9,\


Dr. Fenton gives a lecture to a U.S. History class.
Dr. Fenton gives a lecture to a U.S. History class.


-w


rvC


Ski j

















U'


C-~ 'V





0r



*1


M W .
K.^ar^
fiA'1' }


June Ilund
Katherine Kraus
Kathleen MiGilbcrry


yuniors


Irrna Mon clova
Patricia Paine


'I





Kc
.Il


James Jackson
Marian Kredell
John Meeker


Douglass Jeffries
Christina Loizeaux
Shvla Miller


Paulette Jordi
Donald Mans
Michael Minchart


Daniel Knauss
Michael McCann
Dale Mitre


granted Open uinch Zwice A Week


John Musser 11
Louise Palmer


Mary Norval
Ronald Palser


L'


Beverly Olsen
Marc Parker


Stanley Oster
Deborah Pate


44//


'dl


S

.- I 1
4


cu--
r


.11







Compliments of the
CRISTOBAL Y.M.C.A.
BARBER SHOP
"Service is our business."
Hours: Mon. Thru Sat.
8:00 A.M.-8:00 P.M.
RUPERT AND JOE BLACK
Your Favorite Barbers!
For Appointments Call 3-2797
-AIR CONDITIONED-


I


Compliments of the
MARGARITA FLORIST
"We Watch-Match-Dispatch."
Phone 3-1916
7997 First St., Margarita, C. Z.
Box 1355
Cristobal, Canal Zone


Established in 1909

BOYD BROTHERS
STEAMSHIP AGENCIES, LTD.
Box 5077
Cristobal, Canal Zone


Compliments of
E. J. BERGER
ATTORNEY AT LAW

Box 5081
Cristobal, Canal Zone








yeII KRilgs,
Seats Are
Assumed...


I.? tI


/
/, .-
I--


Patty Rodriguez, Linda Mendenhall
I


ml


K'


J


Ann Terwilliger, Dolores Santiago. Ivettc
( lrnnings, Carlos, Brown, Susann Zach-


ery, Susan
Bovland.


Burge, Christina Loizeaux, Rita


Issac Heres


Ckhe


AXL-W
-7.:z..









Compliments
of

CANAL ZONE
CUSTOMS ASSOCIATION
Box 1295
Cristobal, Canal Zone


AUTHORIZED DEALER
MEYERS MANX


NORDSTROM e HIJOS S.A.
Box 1566
Colon, Panama









Foreign alguages


"Welcome to the camp."


ANNE D. GEGG French, Latin,
B.A., Cornell University, M.S. in Edu-
cation, Cornell Univ "Learn to do
things on time Make positive contri-
butions to school and your Lommunm-
ey"


STELLA RIEFKOHL Spanish.
French; B.A, New York Univ., M.A.,
Columbia Univ, N Y. "Never to
look back into the past always to
face each day as it comes without a
thought of the future "


When will they ever learn?


cc---


.. A


TELMA 1 HOWARD Spanish.
Business Eduauton. B A Hunter
College, M A., Hunter College. "Be
obedient and respectful ititens in
your communities and set good exam-
ples of morals to vour younger peers


1,

N.^


-_


4k~
-ah


Is it third declension, accusative, masculine, plural, or comparative? I'm mixed up!








SwimmiHg Ceam Captures first Places


Edythe Marsh ... one comes up for air.


Later, interested spectators watch from the stands as a graceful diver ...


Judith Simmons ... prepares to execute a
reverse gainer.


SCORES

CHS ....... BHS ........CZC
73 ......... 159 ......... 24
89 ......... 150 ......... 15
71% . ...... 138 .........11%
83 ......... 169 ... . .. 20


And after the meet . the triumphant, or perhaps only hopeful, swimmers, relax and enjoy
the long train ride home.





























ROTC Drill Team


ROTC Color Guard


Major John Martin, iLt. Hila Lyman, ILt. Eligio Thomas.


Steve Aponte, George Rivera, Tony Lyons.


ROTC Girls' Drill Team











, % ,


I \\it


gers
ENthusiasI


Display


Sager


Afternoon
Activities


Jose Medina and Mike McCann.


-r3 \O .

rr


Jor


-~C
Q
- b~S
r 1
-w






Sophomore Class Consists Of
I A:--- Na w


141


Students


I I


Patricia Snider
Yvonne Thomas


Jame Collins. An example of utmost concentration


Mary Spivey
Judith Tomlinson


VAA

II



'LI
k r ^ B


Jose Torn L/Mlaria Toro
Elizabeth Wainio Luann Ware


*''

c
C J
S-


Mlarianne Verrunc
Susan \Willis


vM4artha Vest
v Linda Woods


Michele Kessler. "If I
stand this!"


could only under


.I


I'"
1""


r .s I unomh


Ct.


o()cmarI BctanIOurt. "I dare vot'"


1b








~II,


Front Rou. Mlichitl C.in. PulI Austin. 1.uinni- A.lcn P.ul Lih]l. Anrit] Turn. Armindo Lun.i Rik% DuI ia ,i.' R .*. Kim \WX'-cl. [akie
Johnson. Gloria G.od Suic Rig,. Lu. Bhunt. ,rl nrlth. luh., R.betrit.r. N,.1i S'i.n. ',.ni.i Th.:.nma- Ba1 i R.,u hMih.il Nmith. P.ul
Baker, Mikt Oburn. Jimm Bird Carl;s- Gicrrcru. (..irlns, Bm.,. EJIdie M"irrcll


Front Row: Garry Ilund, Michael Williams, George DeJesus, Jeff Hoffman, Dean Couts, Lori Flort.. Maurie Moore, Susan Styles. Center Row:
Charles Hughes, Michele Vrey, Jimmy Feeley, Buddy Fauber, Janet Srnti.iLa.. Mary Fluh.irr\.Jill Paulson. Back Row: Billy Kern Jose Rodri-
guez, Valdez Chavis, Susan Austin, Sarah Polite, Peggy \\hippl. Cheri Danielsen, Cindy Runion, Ralph Stone, David Evans, Guy \X'W-r








Overwhelmed With Ziger Spirit


Front Row: Doyle Dancer Jr., Andrew Wick, Patrick Daniel, Jody Short, John Bridwell, Andrew Norval, Allan Rodriguez. Center Row: Yolanda
Hunnicut, Noreen Will, Desiree Budd, Janet Katsumoto, Donna Reifsnyder, Julie Moebus. Back Row: Robert Ramirez, Steven Boswell, Lester
Forsgren, D. LaPorta Jr., Robert Austin, David Mitte, Joseph Weichert, Anthony Spooner, Kurt Bullinger.


Front Row: Donald Jeffries Jr., Thomas Gabriel, Richard Hoagland, Robert Nicholson, Alberto Wilmont, Walter Guilt;.' I\. Thomas Wilder,
Robert Moats, James Campbell. Center Row: Cheryl Evans, Patricia Colpe, Marilyn Barnett, Carmen Bringas, Nayra Mon, Kay Housley. Kim-
berly Wuodi:,k. Patricia Loyd, Kip Holloway. Back Row: Robert Br.n]b\. Charles Murphey, Diane Ruoff, Maria Ramirez, Anne Richardson,
Karen McKown, Amelia Smith, Lisandra Ruiz, Diane Baker, Dennis Stephens, Theodore De Boor.















Compliments
of


GIL MORLAND
From


C. B. FENTON AND CO., INC.
Box 5015
Cristobal, Canal Zone






Basketball tave Active Season






















SSitting: Mike Jeffries (manager). Kneeling:
Members of the Cristobal igh Pedro Simmons, Caleb Clement, Carlos
School Varsity Basketball team were Brown, Michael Beale, Paul Baitel, Gary
selected by the athletic coaches from Collins. Standing: Coach Hoffman, Francis-
those boys who demonstrated out- co Gonzalez, Andrew Foshee, Robert
standing performance in intramurals Bloemer, Joseph Herring, George Scheibe,
g pe r. Eligio Thomas.
or who demonstrated unusual ability Eligio Thomas.
during special tryouts. Each team
member was required to meet certain
qualifications in regard to scholar-
ship, height, and speed. He also had -
to be willing to attend afternoon or
evening practice sessions. All high
school boys were eligible for varsity,
but seniors could not play on the jun- A
ior varsity team which was selected in
the same manner.
This year, the Tigers competed in
six interscholastic games three
each against BHS and CZC. In addi-
tion, they participated in numerous
practice games against Rainbow City
High School and the U.S. Navy. A
highlight of the year's competition
was the Canal Zone Invitational
Tournament.
The coaches this year were: Coach
DeDeaux (Varsity), and Coach Hoff-
man (Junior Varsity). Dee Delapp
was named Most Valuable Player.


Joe Herring, George Scheibe. "Give me the
ball!"


"Look, look at that ball go!"







P.A.. Composed Of 'Cop iirl Athletes


The Girls' Athletic Association
was the female equivalent of the "C"
Club. The members were girls who
demonstrated outstanding athletic
ability through their participation in
the CHS athletic program. Aspiring
members were required to participate
in all intramural sports and letter in
at least two varsity sports. In addi-
tion, these girls had to pass a grueling
initiation, similar to that of the "C"
Club. Members of this club, under
the direction of their sponsor, Mrs.
Harris, served as officials at all intra-
mural games.
The G.A.A. cooperated with the
"C" Club in sponsoring the annual
Homecoming Dance. This year for
the first time they also competed
against Cristobal's male athletes in
the "Olympics."


Front Row: Jean Smith (treasurer), Shelly Lund (vice-president), Aurelia Williams (presi-
dent), Jan Bjorneby (secretary), Marlene Rice. Back Row: Nancy Edmonson, Jane Dohle,
Roberta Cole, Barbara Bloemer, Sue Mendenhall, Judy Dohle, Karen Currier, and Marian
Kredell.


"Up, up and awa\'"




































First Row: Peter Barr, Mike Ridge, Greg Cooper, Cheyenne Rivera, Robbie Currier, George Fryer, Richard Dowell. Second Row: Kathy Balmer,
Violanda Godinez, Kathy Murphy, Patty Valentine, Mary Richmond, Lisbet Coe, Kathy Dexter. Third Row: Barbara Yerxa, Ann O'Donnel,
Elisa Brown, Philip Wilkins, Sue Gilbert, Vicki May, Mario Pino, Pat Newbury, Leslie Nicolaison, Cathy Perret, Evelyn Hernandez, Ann
Mills, Cherri Schwindt.


First Row: Rene Ramirez, Roberto Young, Nestor Hernandez, Brian McCann, George Medina, Dee Dillin, Johnny Scott, Reggie Robinson.
Second Row: Mike Orrego, Vicki Kiyonaga, Debra Hughes, Margaret Kienzle, Susie Munoz, Barbara Higgins, \\'iler Cummings. Third Row:
Wayne Dailey, Patrick Moods. Dan Reifsn\dtr Rocky Lu.gr. Eddie Solas, Jose Vega, Frank Rorke, Bill Vest, Carl Anderson.



































Compliments
From the
MAVIS
BEAUTY SHOP
Colon, Panama


Congratulations
to the
Class of 1971
From
MADURITO'S S.A.
Colon, Panama


P 0. BOX 800
COLON. R. OF P


TELEPHONE 7.0311
TEL. RES. 7-8236


Tw=


litr" A[lofoer l4op
9th and Front Street Colon, Rep. of Panama
WE MAKE ARRANGEMENTS FOR ALL OCCASIONS


SUPPORT

YOUR

LOCAL

YEARBOOK!


Congratulations


to the
Class of 1971
From



HOSPITAL SAMARITANO
Colon, Panama


i








AVEC LES COMPLIMENTS
DE
CIE. GLE.
TRANSATLANTIQUE
FRENCH LINE


/


N


Cristobal, Canal Zone


Compliments of
NORTON LILLY
&
COMPANY, INC.
STEAMSHIP AGENTS
AND OPERATORS
United Fruit Company Building


CRISTOBAL
1837
Tel. 3-1801
1756
Balboa Port Captain Building
Tel. 2-1841
1746


Compliments of
CRISTOBAL SHOESHOP
14th Street
Cristobal, Canal Zone
Tel. 3-1260


Compliments of
DR. MELCHOR SAYOC
Dentist
Box 5006
Margarita, Canal Zone


i

















. "It almost makes eating here a pleasant
experience "


Then there were those who lust laughed, and .


... of course, those who couldn't wait to get away and ...


CFl



" al^'


S. enijo the beauties of the "great outdoor. "


restrul


-Y







S.A. SEcourages Student Partici


The Student Association has been
an important part of the school life at
Cristobal High School for many
years. It was organized in 1932 to en-
courage the exchange of ideas among
students, to create friendlier relation-
ships among students, and to increase
student participation in school activi-
ties. Its primary purpose is to func-
tion as an organization in which stu-
dents may practice realistically the
basic principals of democracy and
learn to handle the responsibilities
which accompany the privileges of
self-government.


Nancy Edmonson (Secretary), Michael
dent), Michael McCann (Treasurer).


Dexter (President), Douglas Jeffries (Vice-Presi-


Sitlln: I)i Dummond Ne Naughton. Judy Tomlinson, Sherry Kern, Toni Thomas, Kathy Kraus, Mike Fvans. CGlter Rou': Diane Dancer, Kathy
Farlrington, Kathy Danielson, Cherri Hieron\mus, Ann G(on/alic, Rita Bovland, Marlcne Rice. Beth Carter, Diane Hauke. Back Row: Edward
Brininga. Charlotte Boland, George Riveri. Rod Lindo, Greg Go guen, John Martin, Gary Scheibe, Gil Apodaca.





JAtroduciH . .
Uhe Jtall Of lame


'-El


ft


~~~~~~.-- N..4r',**rt ~ fJ~IPr~(~







I- t.


Mr.


and Miss CHtS


MAiciael Veter


- Class


Of


'77


. 4 .


'4


'I--


-C4


D)iae -Hauke






Tigers At Iomecomxiug Damce


I l^A SwV : l



I3
~I.

L~W


Harry Townsend "Where are the mem-
bers of the Pepsi Generation'"


Princesses, Jane Paulson, Hila Lyman,
Shelley Lund, and Cathy Gercich, and their
escorts join Queen Rosemary Christian and
her escort, Neil Patton in the traditional
"Queen's Dance."


"THE CHEE.F" Jimmy Barraza, Rolie
Manns, David Diaz, and Julio Aponte.


A transformed cafeteria provides an ideal setting for the Homecoming Dance.







ZChe Clck Qave Jin, /ut

Ghe Vearbook Staff

Worked On


The yearbook staff had the chal-
lenging responsibility of producing
and editing the CHS yearbook, the
Caribbean. The staff consisted of a
group of efficient students who
worked tirelessly) after school in order
to meet the deadlines established by
the publishing company. With the
guidance of their sponsor, Mr John-
son, and the help of an ambitious
group of photographers, the staff ac-
complished their duty without unnecc
essary dela.
The staff introduced many innova-
tions this year. One was a new vsstem
of editing, whereby the staff mem
bers, excluding the editor and the


copy editor, were unassigned. Each
staff member did the work which had
to be done, regardless of the subject
matter. This new system proved to be
very practical. Another innovation
was an entirely new arrangement of
the Caribbean itself. Also in order to
compensate for shortage of funds, the
staff sponsored a number of contests
to stimulate yearbook sales. As a re-
sult, staff membership enlarged to in-
clude junior as well as senior high
school students. This was done in ap-
preciation of their generous donations
and enthusiastic sales of Tiger Boost-
ers.


Alien Harmon "The subjlei is marvelous, Maritza Thomas, Jeannette Cox. "Put it
but the photography is louss'" here." "No, here."


Sheila Alberg.i "Stop grinning and get to
work!"


(17)
r
a^


Mr Johnson (sponsor). Rita
(copy editor). Beth Bleiiher.


Bo\ land, Maritza Thomas, Maria Boone, Allen Harmon, Jeannette Cox (editor), Sheila Alberga, Lana Boone
Thomas Pursley, Kathy Deraps, Debra Pate.


4)


139


-i








Mathematics


21


RICHARD W. BOCK Algebra II,
Analysis, Calculus. B.A, Univ of N
Dakota, M A, Univ of Houston
"Don't be trivial."




In this modern age, as well as in
the past, mathematics remains a basic
part of everyone's life. The CHS
math department offered all the math
courses required for success in college
as well as in the students' daily lives.
Five math courses offered were to
be taken in order as each was a pre-
requisite of the subsequent one.
These courses were Algebra I, Geom-
etry, Algebra II, Introduction to Anal-
ysis, and Calculus. General Math, and
Introduction to Algebra were also of-
fered for students not majoring in
math.
General Math captured the ele-
mentary forms of mathematics. It
pushed the students to have a mathe-
matical background.
Algebra I, the first step up the lad-
der to higher mathematics, caught the
principles of mathematics. Word
mastery of the language of mathemat-
ics was attained in this course.
Geometry dealt with the art of
drawing. Proving theorems was a
major part of geometry. The students
learned how to deal with space fig-
ures. Algebra I was also reviewed for
the students.
Algebra II taught the principles of
factoring, polynomials, logarithms,
and basic trigonometry. The pattern
of reasoning was also learned in this
course.


LAWRENCE A COWLEY Alge-
bra I, Geometry. BA., Trinity Univ.,
M.A., Southeastern State "Live life
yourself"


Introduction to Analysis went
deeper into trigonometry. Linear and
quadratic equations were studied in
great depth. Functions and relations
were the beginning notion of this
course.


RANDALL GRUBBS Math; B.A.,
William Jewell College, "Do not get
behind in life because it is hard to
catch up."


Calculus, the last step up a steep
ladder of mathematics in high school
was a college preparatory course in-
troducing the fundamentals of differ-
ential calculus.







1 -~F~~j~~~


z/ i
Math class is a time for many things, from studying to reading comic books.


son 000







Library
The library, with its vast collection
of books, was a familiar stopping
place for CHS students. Throughout
the year, they used the library and its
many resources. The quiet, academic
atmosphere made it the perfect place
for studying and peaceful solitude
found there provided an excellent


background for the reading of books.
Students made good use of the library
during homeroom and studyhalls;
checking out books for reports, using
reference books, or simply browsing
through the library's collection of pa-
perbacks and magazines.
Mr. Wells, the school librarian,


was always available for students who
needed help in locating a certain book
or in making a special report. There
were also at least two girls serving as
library assistants each period. They
helped students use the card catalog
and check out books.



I

^"1


DAYTON N. WELLS Librarian; B.S., University
of Idaho, M. Ed., University of Oregon. "Read to
help you become what you want to be."


"Peace at last!"


faith Coad, Patri Chr Jnna Lozea Terra Brown, Lana Boone, Clover Shoe, Barbara Yerxa Jeanne Calkins Library Assistants.
Faith Coad, Patricia Christian, Janna Loizeaux, Terra Brown, Lana Boone, Clover Shobe, Barbara Yerxa, Jeanne Calkins. Library Assistants.


11L_- I -







KNEM


ROYAL NETHERLANDS STEAMSHIP CO.


C.:


M CY T: 6 0 B A T 2-


'C)
U~.l~~,


Compliments of



LT. G. H. MOUMBLOW
MEMORIAL POST #3876
VFW INC.

Cristobal
Canal Zone










Congratulations
to the
Class of 1971
From



B.P.O. ELKS
LODGE #1542


( A ai


Box 1542
Cristobal
Canal Zone


lii










Juniors


r.


4 /


C,


5zizI z7Z


s'
-







It A-
6 r ,.


- IW


vj)a tie
Alger
( 7lcn
Bakcr
Frank
Berrn
Ril aird
Boot h


Brian
Allen
Barbara
Banks
Barbara
Betcher
Henry
Borscllino


At\


Iw^ ,O


-w r


Sheila
Alheriga
Paul
Baiwl
Wilhu n
B Mahri
Bonom


Martha
Anton
Mithacl
Barger
Gerianne
Blanchette
Debra
Boswcll


Michael
Apodaca
Jai me
Barraza
Robert
Bloemer Jr
Rita
Boyland


1


i\/














Front Rouw John Collins, Ricky Phares, Jim
McCarrick, Barney Norton, Duke Collins,
Jonathan Brown, Randy Goss, Luke Skra-
ble. Center Row: Gary Ferns, Thomas Sni-
der, Yvette Rodriguez, Clara Stone, Beth
Bleicher, Angel Olivera, Ralph Vasquez.
Back Row: John Austin, Richard Ramos,
Dan Kelly, Kelvin Gregory, Juan Viera,
Jack Tate, James Amason, Forest Kinsey,
Gus Coronado, John Davison.


Front Row. Michael Boswell, Anthony
Parks, John Cruz, John Kiyonaga, Barry
Simpkins, Craig Dohle, Robert Bramlett.
Center Row: Deborah Baker, Ada Norman-
dia, Janna Loizeaux, Clover Shobe, Cynthia
Smith, Sheri Alexaitis, Janet Brown. Back
Row: David Gonier, John Stephens, Gary
Moore, Juan Laboy. Glynn Moore, Alfred
Sandrock, George Brannan, Paul Garner.


Front Row: Paul Lucas, David Alger, Joe
Phillips, Ronald Grist, William Allen. Cen-
ter Row: Valerie Owen, Patricia DeVault,
Andrea Pacheco, Elizabeth Rivera, Alice
Ferns, Barbara Baitel, Ann Rutledge. Back
Row: Rita Castro, Karen Tahey, Tina Bo-
canegra, Bonnie Willis, Linda Hernandez,
Karen DeBoor, Aida Rodriguez.








Senior Class Elects


'I,
F ,


Frederick John Highley
















Stephanie Bridiga ies
Stephanie Bridiga Illies


FREDERICK JOHN HIGHLY
October 19, 1953
Colon, Republic of Panama
Fred has attended Canal Zone schools all his lite, including six years
at CHS. He participated in football intramurals.

NANCY HUSON
May 1, 1953
Colon, Republic of Panama
Nancy was in Nurses Aides for three years, and was a Pink Girl for
two years. She was homeroom representative in her sophomore year.
She participated in volleyball intramurals and in the Powder Puff
Speedball Game. Nancy plans to attend Brigham Young University.





STEPHANIE BRIGIDA ILLIES
October 2, 1953
Colon, Republic of Panama
Stephie was in the Spanish Club, Language Lab Club, and the Girls'
Glee Club. She took part in volleyball and speedball intramurals. Ste-
phie plans to go to college and become an occupational therapist.

ERIC THOMAS IRION
July 27, 1953
Oceanside, California
Eric attended CHS for five years. He participated in basketball intra-
murals in his sophomore year. Eric plans to go to I..ll.gi


Eric Thomas Irion


ROBERT RUDOLPH JOHNSON
January 8, 1953
Minneapolis, Minnesota
Robert has been at CHS for three years. He plans to travel after
graduation.

SHERRY ANN KERN
Jlu/ 19, 195i
Mobile, Alabama
Sherry was in the Caribe Club and was an S.A. representative. She
participated in Volleyball and was on the Drill Team. Sherry plans to
attend C.Z.( then go to the States to earn a degree in data processing.


RvcI t R d.l -ph J4 ......1f.


Shrr) Ann Krrr


f 1 IF












I--, -. r


ii-,

'it


re


Emilie
Daniel
/Clifford
Ferrell


" t


John
Day
Maria
Fontanez


.:/ <-












fd t



t 1ff


Jimmy
( xxwin
Ann
(;on al/lt


William
Gillespie
Zan
Green


Nadia Robles, "The feminine mystique
at work!"


k


Shelia
Dancer
Brenda
Egger


.-i

kI
William
Deaton Jr.
Andrew
Foshee


I


Nancy
Edmonson
Stephan
Fugleberg


Mardcttr
(i,.n icr
(Grcnorg
GoLucn


m


































With the ringing of the final bell at 2:15, many students rush eagerly to the
waiting buses thinking only "Free! at last!" Others also hurry anxious to
begin the extra-curricular activities which play such an important role in the life
of a student. Enj. r'.in., the company of those who share similar interests; whether
it be an advanced math or foreign language class, sports, drill team, journalism,
or dramatics, it is a pleasant and profitable way to spend an afternoon.


Stephanie Illies and Denise Foshee.


jean Smith and Jose Medina.









Class

Officers

4iemplify

"Senior


Spirit"


SENIOR CLASS OFFICERS: Kathy DeRaps, Vice President; Robert Phillips, President;
Judy McLain, Secretary; and Carmen Butler, Treasurer.


The 1970-71 school year was one
of innovation for CHS seniors. Under
the leadership of capable class offi-
cers, and with the expert guidance of
their sponsor, Mr. Fattorosi, the sen-
ior class set out to do great things.
The first project was to secure an
open lunch. A committee was estab-
lished to prepare and submit for ap-
proval a list of regulations, and the
privilege was granted. In order to pro-
vide a sounding board for the com-
plaints and suggestions of seniors, the
Advisory Council, consisting of
twenty representative seniors was es-
tablished. Another new group was
the Senior Board of Directror. made
up of representatives elected by stu-
dents in the senior class. Both groups
worked hard to make the year a suc-
cessful one.


Among the special activities of the
year were a trip to the other side to
visit Canal Zone College, the Senior
Banquet, and the Junior-Senior Prom.
School events of special significance
to seniors were the Jamboree where
Wendy Flores reigned as queen, the
homecoming game victory and the
dance which followed with Rosemary
Christian as queen, and the Christmas
formal at which the Hall of Fame
winners were announced.
It was a year which included those
once in a lifetime events which are so
much a part of being a senior; se-
lecting invitations and cards, senior
skip day, baccalaureate, and of course,
graduation. Altogether, it was a great
year one which the Class of '71
will never forget.


CLASS SPONSOR
Mr Loui, Faru r.i.si











Congratulations to the
Class of 1971
From
UNITED FRUIT COMPANY
Box 5016
Cristobal, Canal Zone


Compliments of
MOTTA INTERNATIONAL, S.A.
Box 417
Colon, Panama





Dedication


I':

/


7


r


..r

-j


Mrs. Adamary grikht


400or



















Forward March . About Face!


AMajorettes Perform Durieg

h basketballl


wames

Despite uverm helming odd,
against them, the majorettue Pattr
Hill and Tit.i Cobb, presented J tine
performance on the 1.irt Junior \'arsi
ry game. Thct carried on their trrdi
tion by performing at the bajkectb.ll
games To be a majorette. one must
be willing to devote intensive hour-
of practice over the 'ummtr, and .il-
most regular practkie .iter bhlnil
when school begins.
Tryouts were held during tlh.
month of April


Pairr Hill and Tita Cobb




















Elena Maxwell and Brenda FL',r r
If/


-I


Stephanic Illics. Almanubia Austin, Vivian Boseman, Jenn '.\ r and Carmen Butler.


Douglas Jeffries, Mr. Johnson, and Nancy
Edmonson.


A
jYew
year
/egits .


. .


IO\








Office Staff


The competent members of the
CHS office staff handled all general
clerical work for the administration
and faculty. Included among their
duties were official correspondence
and paper work. They were also in
charge of operating office machines
and the intercom system, and an-
swering the telephone. They main-
tained the record and files of each stu-
dent, mailed report cards, and sent
and received transcripts.












Jlific



The clinic was an important provi-
sion for the health and safety of Cris-
tobal High School students. The clin-
ic was staffed with trained nurses who
provided emergency first aid; and per-
formed certain routine checks on each
student. The clinic was also a place
for students to rest when unwell, and
for the storage of each students' per-
manent health records. The clinic also
sponsored tuberculosis and chest X-
rays for students in certain grades. Dr.
Levin, the Public Health Officer for
the Atlantic Side, visited the school
almost every morning. Dr. Chevelle,
the school physician for the Canal
Zone Schools, was available every
Wednesday.


.
MSIK
JkU^o W*


I


MRS. ALLEN, MRS. TAYLOR, MISS GRIFFITHS.


,4D\


DR. LEVIN, KAREN McKOWN, MRS. BLANCHETTE "Maybe this will cool your fever a bit."


I

A!


N .


m 4!*-






*r L
liit
eejiB cTy
..^^ .-jl ? fti,


p.


Rest
Dressed
Carame Kutler
Rodrigo indo


Rest
lookihq
foknm iHfnderburk
Wendy olares








9


Caribbeal 1971


Cristobal High School
Coco Solo


Canal Zone


Volume 54


4.


4pp










TEEN CLUB DANCES ...


Neil Patton, Rosemary Christian, Wally Russon.



. AND FORMALS...


Jimmy Barraza

















The deserted halls are quiet, a soft
breeze whispers through the empty
corridors there is no indication now
of the activities and incidents which
the coming day may bring.


~s~F~-r







JEAN LYNN BASSETT
June 9, 1953
Jeannie has attended C.Z. schools for ten years, five of
these at CHS. During her high school years, she was a
member of the Spanish Club, the swimming team, and the
Girls' Chorus. Her future plans include attending the Col-
lege of Bible in California, hopefully on a music scholar-
ship.

MICHAEL FRANCIS BEALE
July 16, 1953
St. Petersburg, Florida
Mike came to Cristobal High School in the second se-
mester of his sophomore year. He was a member of the
varsity basketball team. In his senior year he was elected
Homecoming "king". Mike plans to attend college in the
United States.

JAN TERI BJORNEBY
April 26, 1953
Bremerton, Washington
Jan has been an active member of the class of '71. She
was a member of the Girls' Drill team for three years, and
served as commander in her senior year. She was an S.A.
alternate in her freshman year. As a junior, she was a mem-
ber of the French Club and class treasurer. In her senior
year, she served as secretary of the GAA and as a member
of the Senior Privilege Committee. Sports have occupied
much of Jan's time. She participated in speedball, volley-
ball, tennis, band, basketball intramurals, and was a mem-
ber of the varsity volleyball and tennis teams. Jan plans to
attend college in the U.S.

ELIZABETH BLEVINS
January 2, 1952
Colon, Republic of Panama
Ellie has attended Cristobal High School throughout
her high school career. She participated in intramural
speedball during her freshman and sophomore years, and
in basketball and volleyball during all four years. As a sen-
ior, she was a member of the Girls' Drill Team. Her future
plans include study to become either an airline stewardess
or a veterinarian.

LANA GAYE BOONE
July 10, 1953
Abingdon, Virginia
Lana has been an active member of the senior class at
CHS. She was a member of the Caribe Club, and served as
treasurer of the Language Lab Club in her senior year. She
was a member of the yearbook staff for three years, and as
a senior, served as copy editor. In her junior year, she be-
came a member of the National Honor Society, and was
elected president. As a freshman, she received an Outstand-
ing Student Award, and in her junior year, an award for ex-
cellence in the Russian language. As a junior, she partici-
pated in the NSF SST Program at Loyola University. In
her senior year, she was a member of the Senior Class Ad-
visory Council and Board of Directors, and served as secre-
tary of the Student Advisory Committee. Lana's future
plans include majoring in computer science at Loyola Uni-
versity in New Orleans where she received a four-year
scholarship.

VIVIAN VICTORIA BOSEMAN
February 25, 1948
Colon, Republic of Panama
Vivian has attended CHS for each of her four years in
high school. Her future plans include the possibility of a
modeling career.


Senior Homecoming "King" Mike Beale is
escorted on royal walk around the gym.


Jean Lynn Bassett


W,

iF -


Michael Francis Beale


Jan Teri Bjorneby


Elizabeth Blevins








P !;C ,i Il .T ; ] 1 I
RII r, h R 1,0, 1


R3, cc IR n \i t .'*
R.imi M. c ii


R.13u, Ri< n
Ramwz. Rokn 11
R.cin B.HInI- lo:



R.iinos. 3Rubud I i
Reii,. ]>s 1 t"
R io,. Lesxlie 1- I I
Rcdiga. Ria oI s
Reed, ('iric. n 9
Reed. Danm
Reed. lHelcna
Reid, loannc 101
Reitsnvder. Daniel lis
Resitnvder, l)onna -- 113. 1
Reves, I.ourdes 93
Reves, Orlando 108. 160
Rhoads, Paul 95
Riue. Marlene 122, 125. 145. 93
Richardson. Allan 101
Rihardson, Anne 11
Ri hardson. Chris -5
Richmond. Marn 11
Richmond, Ralph 140, 14', 95. 156
Ridge. Michael 115. 110
Ridge, Nancy 128. 130, 131, 101.
99, 133
Ridge. Susan 93
Riggs, Susan 119
Risch. Catherine 108
Rivera. Checene 115, 116
Rivera, Elizabeth 120
Rivera. Jasmin '5
Rivera Jorge 122. 101. 56
Rivera, Jose 108
Roach, Carolann 101
Robertson. Julia 119
Robertson, Raymond 14, 101
Robinson, Alfonso 109
Robinson. Danny -- 5. '9
Robinson, Deborah 130. 109
Robinson, Rand\ 93
Robinson, Reginald 115. 116
Robinson, Tony 109
Robles. Edna 109
Robles. Eilecn 112
Robles, Nadia 90, 93
Rodriguez. Aida 120
Rodriguez. Allan 113
Rodriguez, Ivette 120
Rodriguez. Jose 119
Rodriguez, Maria 101
Rodriguez. Nestor 5-
Rodriguez, Patty 10
Romero. MNichal 114, 1 1
Rork., Francis 115
Rosado, Sarah 116
Ross, Carol 5, ')s. 41. 91
Rowley, Deborah 9k. 152
Rozmeski, Joseph I- 1,, 128, 157, 9.3
Ruiz Diana - II
Ruiz, Isaaic 9
Rui7, Lisandr.i I 3
Ruiz, Luis
Runion, Cynthia -- 11
Ruitt. I)ana 11
Ruoft, Regma 101l
Rutt, Shcrrl 10 9
Ruo .n Jr, Wallace -- 19, 151, 140,
I 5', 2(., 14 1. .(0 -1
R u'lcdge. Arnn 120
1 t.i cre. Arthur 1i'


S.n1uhc 1J ai ii
SanI hc:, )J.an *Q 1!0

Sanihc/ Ne lson I 1i
S., hr./, P.IU -a 1o12
Sainhc/, Pcicr 1093
San lhe, Siandra.i 10-i
San, hez, Terri 101
Sanchez, r, Paulo 101
Sandrotk Jr. Altred IF', 116. 11,
120
Santiago, Dolores 12s, 129, 10, 95
Santiago. Janet 119
Santiago. Juan 10)
Santiago Jr.. William 33, 109
Sasoc, Gaspar 101
Schaub, Richard 114
Schaub, Vickie 101
Scheibe, Gary 93
Scheibe, George 155, 78, 156. 80
Schill, Karen 138, 75
Schloredt, Diane- 101
Schwindt, Cherri 115
Scott, Antonio 112
Scott, Dino 118
Scott, Frank 93
Scott, Kevin
Scott, Michael 93
Scott, Theodore 101. 47
Scott Jr, Johnny 115
Senrg, Arthur 93, 140
Shaffer, Higinia 93
Shaffer, James 93
Shannon, Jerry 109
Shobe, Clover 34, 118, 120
Shobe, John 114
Shobe, Stephan 93, 127
Short, Jody 113
Shum, Nai-Yuen 51, 75, 80
Sills, Leslie 118
Sills, Ronnie 93
Simmons, Elizabeth 109
Simmons, Judith 93, 149, 148
Simmons, Pedro 101, 155, 156
Simms, Karl 110
Simms, Michael 109
Simms, Valerie 93
Simms Jr. Altonso 101
Simpkins, Barry 120
Simpkins. Brian 114
Skrable, Luke 120
Smith, Amelia 113
Smith, Cheryl 113
Smith. Cynthia- 130, 120
Smith, Elizabeth 114
Smith, Jean 157, 125, 93, 145, 95,
22
Smith, Joseph 101, 148
Smith, Kathyrn 100, 109
Smith, Michael 119
Smith, Sharon 148, 95
Smith, Sheryl 117, 119
Smith, Yvonne 112
Snider, Elizabeth 116, 13
Snider, James 118
Snider, Michael 124, 95, 127, 140,
147, 156
Snider, Patricia 102. 153
Snider, Thomas 120
Sollas, Edward 115
Souder. Janie 158, 159
Southerland, Reggie 94
Spagna, MaMtta 94. 110
Spagna, Mihdael 124, 15. 94, 1I40
Spangler, Mark 109, 148
Spangler Jr. James -- '


Spivey, Mars -- 102
Spooner. Anthony 113, 116
Springer, Ja kie 128, 75
Stamper, Linda 112
Stephens. Tennis 11
Stephens, John 120
Stephens. Kathrnn 110. 94, 152
Stern. Robert 10)
Stevens, Douglas 13 5, (6, 156, 80.
132
Stiebritz, Alice 109
Stone. Clara 120
Stone Jr., Ralph 119
Stroop Ill. Edward 114
Strube, Rhonda 130, 109
Styles, Susan 119. 118
Suarez, Lourdes
Summerlin, Anna 116, 42
Swain, Nola 119
Swain. Peter 124, 94, 140, 143
Swank, Clarence
Swank, Joe 109
Swanstrom, Susan 109
Swisher, Luanne 112
Tellefsen, Sonia 116, 118
Terwilliger, Catherine 94
Terwilliger, Dorothy 58, 94, 10
Teves, David 78
Teves, Ehukai 94
Teves, Kamalei 109
Teves, Puuloa 95
Thomas, Eligio 155, 76, 56
Thomas, Loisa 128, 129. 138, 130,
98, 135, 94
Thomas, Sonia 119
Thomas, Yvonne 122, 138, 130,
102, 41
Thompson. David 114
Tipton. Vicki 109. 111
Tom, Vielka
Tomlin. Donald 118
Tomlin. Doris 112
Tomlinson, Jidith 128, 122, 130.
102, 132
Toro, Angel 119, 116
Toro, Jose 102
Toro. Maria 130, 102
Torres, Angel
Torres, Damans 130
Torres, Toni 103
Townsend, Harry 128, 124, 94, 91,
140, 161
Tschumy, Robert 94
Tschumy, William 118
Tweedy, Danny
Ubben Ana 109)
Ubben. Mario 112
Ubben, Ramon
Urey, Michele
Valdez, Lewis 162, 1, 1 136, 76
Valencia, Jose 7o6
Valentine, Daniel -- 7, 79
Valentine, lames
Valentine, Patricia 115, 127
Vamprine, Elizabeth
Vamprine, Sylvia 130, 159, 15. 144,
76
Vamprine, William
Van Woudenberg, Frits
Vasquez, Rafael 120
Vaught, Paula
Vega, Carmen
Vega Soto, Jose 115
Verruno, Marianne 58, 102, 99
Vest. Linda 77


Vest, Bill 116
Vest, Martha 102
Vest Jr,, William 115
Vidro, Ramonta 130
Vielka, Tom 114
Viera Jr, Juan 120
Villar, Maria
Voight. Sylvia 118
Vrey, Mike 119
Wainio, Elizabeth 128. 102, 145,
99, 153
Wainio Jr., Frederick
Wallenius, Thomas 77
Walline, Terry 77
Ware, Anthony 112
Ware, Luann 102, 148, 27
Watson, Cynthia 118
Webb, Murray 112
Weigart, Joseph 113
Weigart, Katherine
Weigart, Margaret 114
Welch, David
Welch, Roger 112
Welch Jr., Clifford
Welty, Kimberly 119
Wertz, Carol 58, 75, 94
Wesley, Walter
West, Guy 119
West, Wayne 168
Westerberg, Karen 138, 77
Wheeler Jr, Ray 114
Whipple, Margaret
Whipple, Peggy 119
Whipple, Vickie 130
White, Nancy 114
Wick, Andrew 113
Wiechert, Joseph
Wilder. Thomas 113
Wilkins, Philip 115, 11118
Will, Noreen 113
Will, Robert 158
Williams, Aurelia 128, 129, 130,
125, 145. 94, 49, 152
Williams, Cheryl 112
Williams, Michael 119
Williford, Nancy 114
Willis, Bonnie 120
Willis, Susan 130, 102
Wilmont, Alberto 113, 116
Wilmont, Margarita 130
Wilmont, Robert 114, 116
Wilson, Janie
Wilson, Ricky 114
Wirtz, Jenny 6, 135, 77. 152, 13
80
Withrow, Evelyn 112
Wood, Dennis
Wood, Michael 94
Woodcock, Kimberly 113
Woods, David 114
Woods, Linda 102
Worthern, Ann 94
Yerxa, Barbara 115, 34
Young, Margarita 112
Young, Roberto 115
Zachry, Eunice 114
Zachry, Susann 129, 145, 94, 10
132
Zachry Jr., Ralph 103
Zamarripa. Margarita 112
Zavinsky, Priscilla 77
Zayas, Maria
Zayas, Maribel 94
Zayas, Marisol 94
Zebede, Alegre






Spanish Club Participates Jl Carnival Parade


Seated, 1st Row. Cornelius Goeberrus, Judy Tomlinson, Jackie Parker, Jenny Wirtz, Paulette Jordi, Jeannie Basset, Mike Minehart. 2nd Row:
Marta Anton, Susan Zachery, Doug Stevens, Diane Hauke, Raul Castro, Sandra Alberga, Patty Hauke, Maria Fontanez, Ivette Cummings.
Standing: Kathy Pursley, Rod Lindo, Isaac Heres, Paul Baitel, Ralph Ender, Mary Norval, Mark Hanley, Joseph Ender, Greg Goguen, Stepha-
nie Ilies, Sheila Alberga, Debbie Pate, Debbie Alberga, and Spanish Club sponsor, Mrs. Elfers.


The Spanish Club at CHS was or-
ganized for the purpose of encourag-
ing Spanish-speaking students to be-
come active in various activities, and
to increase their understanding of the
Latin American countries. Meetings
were held twice each month, and mat-
ters of interest to members were dis-
cussed. All discussions were conduct-
ed in Spanish.
The officers of the Spanish Club
this year were: Raul Castro, Presi-
dent; Diane Hauke, Vice-President;
Sandra Alberga, Secretary, and Jenny
Wirtz, Treasurer.
The club was sponsored by Mrs.
Elfers who helped with the organiza-
tion of various activities and attended
all meetings.


id


^~'"*


Who said that Spanish had to


be spoken only at Spanish Club meetings?







Higgins, Barbra 115
Highley, Frederick 70
Hill II, Kenneth 127, 50, 91
Hill, Patricia 59, 95
Hill, Sherry 116
Hoagland, Richard 113
Hoffman, Jeffry 119, 106
Hoffman, Melody 106
Hogaboam, Doris 114
Holloway, Kip 113
Holt, Harry 106
Honerbaum, Mark
Hopkins, Paul 112
Horn, Nancy 129, 130, 98
Housley, Kay 113
Hudgins, Ruth 114
Huff, Linda 98, 103, 153
Huffman, James 106
Huffman, William 124, 154, 140,
143, 156, 91
Hughes, Charles 119
Hughes, Deborah 115, 118
Hughes Jr., Bobby
Humphreys, Marcia 130, 106
Hunnicut, Yolanda 113
Hunter, Bruce 118
Hurlbut, Dennis 98
Hurlbut, Ronald
Husband, Pamela 106
Husband, Priscilla 112
Huson, Nancy 70
Huster, Harold 98
Illies, Stephanie 6, 135, 22, 70, 79,
132
Ilund, Garry 119
Ilund, June 129, 130, 92
Irion, Eric 123
Irion, Leif 147, 70
Irizarry, Angel 106
Jackson, Bruce 112
Jackson, Deborah 106
Jackson, Debra
Jackson, Donna 98
Jackson, Raymond 111
Jackson Jr., James 124, 92, 140, 156
Jaketic, Debrah 98
Jaketic, Margaret 114, 118
Janosik, Jan
Janosik, Joyce 106
Jansen, Rex 112
Jeffries, Douglas 122, 6, 92, 147, 95
Jeffries, Michael 106, 154, 155, 147
Jeffries Jr., Donald 113
Jimenez, Jenny 130, 106
Jimenez, William 106
Johnson, Jacqueline 119
Johnson, Jose 98, 147
Johnson, Robert 70, 43
Johnston, Roger 95
Jones, James 106
Jones, Karen 106
Jordi, Paulette 128, 129, 130, 92,
132
Kardonski, Steven 114
Katsumoto, Janet 113
Kaufer, Norine 112
Kaufer, Sandra 106
Kelly III, Daniel 120
Kern, Sherry 122, 70, 79, 152
Kern III, William 119
Kessler, Michele 98, 102, 103
Kienzle, Margaret 115, 117
Kilmer, Paul 98
Kinsey Jr., Forest 120
Kiyonaga, John 120


Kiyonaga, Vicky 115
Klasovsky, Antonia 71
Knauss, Daniel 92
Knauss, Frederick 148, 71
Kononen, Clifford
Kononen, Michael
Kraus, Katherine 128, 122, 159,
144, 92, 64
Kraus, Katie 98
Kredell, Marian 58, 125, 145, 49,
91,92
Kredell, Thomas
Kresge, Cheryl 106
Kresge, Richard
Laboy, Juan 120
La Porta, Jr., D. 113
LaRoche, Angeline
LaRoche, David
LaRoche, Mary 112
LaRoche, Maxine 95
LaRoche, Neal 71
Lasher, Christian 98, 148
Lauritzen, Ann 128, 71
LeDoux, William 140, 148, 95
Lee, David 106
Lee, Joel 95
Lee, John 98
Lee, Robert 116
Lee, Victor 106, 133, 107
Lindo, Rodrigo 122, 164, 147, 86,
72, 83, 80, 132
Loibl, Paul 119
Loizeaux, Christina 128, 92, 10,
148, 27
Loizeaux, Janna 117, 134, 118, 120
Loizeaux, Linda 112
Loizeaux, Scot 98, 148
Love, Brian 98
Loyd, Ann 106
Loyd, Patricia 113
Lucas, Laura 106
Lucas, Paul 120
Luger, Rockwell 115
Luna, Armando 119
Luna Jr., Louis
Lund, Shelley 128, 34, 125, 86, 160,
161, 72, 49, 80
Lyman, Hila 164, 84, 160, 72, 27,
56
Lyman, Mounyen 98, 58
Lyons, Ricky 112
Lyons, Tony 106, 56
Maestas, Lawrence 98
Mans, Donald 92, 156
Marohl, Kim 106
Marsh, Edythe 98, 135, 149, 148,
103
Marsh, Esther 130, 111
Martin, John 122, 72, 79, 56
Martinez, Jaime 72
Mason, Deshea 106
Maxwell, Dennis 164, 84, 72, 79,
80, 71
Maxwell, Elena 6, 100
May, Sandra.- 106, 107
May, Vicki 115
Mayoni, Pusha 114
Mayani, Sheila 130, 100
McCann, Brian 115, 117
McCann, Michael 122, 123, 138,
20, 52, 127, 95, 92, 50
McCann, Sharon 114
McCarrick, James 120
McCullough, Susan 106
McDonnell, Michael 116


McGilberry, Kathleen 123, 58, 92
McKenney, Mark 100
McKown, Karen 113, 32
McIlwain, Paris 114
McLain, Judy 126, 162, 163, 164,
71, 134, 65, 85, 72
McLean, Sarah 72
McNaughton, Robert 122, 148, 108
Medina, George 115, 116
Medina, Jose 138, 159, 157, 20, 133,
73, 140, 143, 22, 86, 160, 156
Meeker, D. 130, 100, 101, 99
Meeker III, John 92
Mendenhall, Linda 10, 100
Mendenhall, Susan 157, 125, 145,
23, 152, 148, 86, 73
Mendoza, Susan 112
Menges, Judith 100
Merrick, Karen 108
Merrick, Linda 100, 27
Metivier, John 108
Metivier, Susan
Meyer, Katherine 112
Mika, Glenda 114
Miller, Peggy 100
Miller, Phillip 108
Miller, Shyla 92, 5
Milligan, Kathryn 58, 73, 80
Mills, Anne 115
Mills, Mary 112
Minehart, Daniel
Minehart, Michael 92, 108, 132
Mitte, David 113
Mitte, Karon 112
Mitte, Dale 92
Mize, Janet 118
Moats, Robert 113
Moebus, Julie 113
Moebus, Patricia 108
Mohlman, J. 100
Mon, Nayra 113
Moncivais, Maria
Moncivais, Maricela 112, 116
Moncivais Jr., John 114
Monclova, Irma 138, 130, 92, 95
Monclova, Pedro 108
Montenegro, Aleida 73, 80
Moody, Barbara 100
Moody, Patrick 115
Moochler, Lawrence 112
Moore, Gary 120
Moore, Glynn 116, 120
Moore, Jane 108
Moore, Maurie 119
Morrell, Edward 110
Morrell II, Glen
Morrell, Kimberly 112
Moses, Patricia 114
Mowery, Stephanie 114
Munoz, Cristobal 108
Munoz, Manuel 100
Munoz, Rosa 108, 130
Munoz, Susie 115
Murphey, Charles 113
Murphy, Kathleen 115
Murphy, William 73, 80, 86
Musser, James 112
Musser II, John 92, 140
Nairn, Laurie 33
Newbury, Patricia 115
Ney, Renee 112
Nicholson, Robert 113
Nicolaisen, Leslie 115
Nieves, Alexis 114, 116
Nordstrom, Robert 129, 100


Normandia, Ada 120
Normandia, Alexis 78
Normandia, Ivan 108
Norton III, Barney 120
Norval, Andrew 113
Norval, Anne 108
Norval, Mary 128, 129, 58, 132, 10,
92, 91, 11, 95
Novak, Mark
O'Donnell, Ann 115
O'Donnell, Thomas 108
Olivarez, Gloria 112
Olivera, Myrta 130, 100
Olivera Jr., Angel 120
Olsen, Beverly 123, 130, 131, 92,
127, 148, 153
Olsen, Cheryl 148, 108
Olsen, Don 14, 140
O'Neal, Samuel 108
Orrego, Michael 105
Orrego, William 108
Ortiz, Ada 130, 131, 100
Ortiz Alvarez, Noelia 130, 131, 100
Ortiz Alvarez, Wanda 130, 108
Osborn, Michael 119, 127
Oster, Robert 116, 118
Oster, Stanley 92
Ostrea, Viana 58, 100
Overstreet, Terri 129, 130, 135, 58,
100
Owen, Valerie 118, 120
Pacheco, Andrea 120
Pacheco, Peter 109, 127
Padro, Jorge 108
Paine, Patricia 128, 130, 92, 127, 91
Palmer, Louise 92
Palmer, Maryann 108
Palser, Elizabeth 92, 100
Palser, Ronald 47
Parker, Jacqueline 128, 129, 123,
130, 91, 96, 131, 132
Parker, Mark 92, 95
Parker, Scott 114, 116
Parker, Anthony 116, 120
Parsons, William 108
Pate, Deborah 128, 129, 126, 135,
92, 139, 134, 132
Patton, Neil 159, 140, 142, 73, 26,
143, 85, 161, 160, 156
Paulson, Jane 161, 160, 73, 49, 80
Paulson, Jill 119
Peralta, Paul 100
Perez, Rosa 100
Perret, Andre 118
Perret, Catherine 115, 117
Perrett, Charles
Perusse, Mark 112
Phares, Richard 120
Phallips. Robert 128, 159, 157, 133,
27, 136, 71, 140, 143, 74, 134, 160.
156, 65, 82, 86
Phillips, Toby 140, 74
Phillips, Warren 128, 100, 140
Phillips Jr., Joseph 120
Pierpoint, Surse 118
Pino, Mario- 115, 116, 117
Polite, Sarah 119
Porbes, Josephine "74
Porbes Jr., Charles 108
Portier, Ingrid 74, 80
Price, Caroline 116
Pritham, Robin 93
Pruse, Mark 116
Pujals, Madeleine 112
Pursley, Mary 58, 132







Auditorium f Mell, aook And Candle


Diane Caroll and Donald Byrd, "No peek-
ing!"

CAST
Gillian Holroyd .........
Diane Caroll
Shepherd Henderson .......
Donald Byrd
Miss Holroyd (aunt Queenie)..
Judy McLain
Nicky Holro d ............
Andrew Foshee
Sidney Redlitch ............
Lewis Valdez
Pyewacket ...............
"Sinbad"
D director ................
Mrs. Terence Elfers
Stage Manager ............
Sue Mendenhall
Assistant Manager ..........
Ingrid Portier


Diane Caroll and Donald Byrd, "Now, this is my Grandmummy's secret brew!"

j IsHal


Judy McLain and Donald ByrdOoh This chair feels lumpy"
Judy McLain and Donald Byrd, "Ooh! This chair feels lumpy!"


" ,1;


Robert Ford, Jeff Briam, and Ronnie Forsyth, THE LIGHT CREW.












1


/ M





JAMES E. STEARNS Spanish II,
III, IV, Russian II; B.S. Ed., M.A.,
University of Florida. "Spend more
time on the subjects that are hard for
you than on your favorites."


WILLIAM L. WILL Spanish 7 and
8, English 9; B.S. Econ., Xavier
Univ.; M. Ed., Univ. of Florida.
Mr. Will is a native Isthmian. He
taught in Florida before coming to
CHS. His hobbies are golfing, swim-
ming, team sports and reading. Life is
short, so be satisfied in what you are
doing."
,... ::. .,.' ,. ; i.
S o: ..., ,- ; ,;..,..


The foreign language department
at CHS was a wide and interesting
one. Its aim was to increase a stu-
dent's understanding of the history
and culture, as well as the language of
countries other than his own. In order
to fulfill this aim, CHS offered cour-
ses in three modern languages;
French, Spanish, and Russian. Three
years of each language were offered,
students being placed in the level ap-
propriate to their development. In ad-
dition, a second year course in Latin
was offered.
In all language courses, speaking,
writing, reading, and understanding
of the language were stressed. The
Audio-Lingual Method, ALM, was a
new system used to teach Spanish and
Russian. This system involved inten-
sive oral practice in the language lab-
oratory.


Toni Thomas. "It's right, isn't it?"


S I I I

"How can I concentrate on "Hablar" when I'm thinking of HIM?"


Mrs. Howard. "I'm no model!"


.x.

1(1~111111~







hI lidley And freestyle RKlays



















Seated: Cheryl Hieronymus. Debbie Carey, Cheryl Olsen, Christy Loizeaux, LuAnn Ware, Maria Boone, Edythe Marsh, and Carol Baker.
Standing: 1st Rowuu: Scott Loizcaux, Joe Smith, Gerald Coffin, Fred Knauss, Beverly Olsen, Barbara Goodwin, Robert Bloemer, Mike Spagna,
Drummond McNaughton, and David Blcicher. 2nd Row: Chris Lasher, Paul Bleicher, Ronnie Ramos, Sharon Smith, Judy Simmons, Susan
M!rlndri, ill. Richard Booth, and Bill LeDoux.

The 1970 Swimming season began
in late October. Practices were held
each day after school for two hours.
The individual work-out totaled al-
most a mile, and the swimmers also
did sprints and relays.
CHS had looked forward to a very
promising season, but they only man-
aged to capture second place. Individ-
ual performances, however, were out-
standing on both the boys' and girls'
teams; and CHS captured a large
number of first places in medley and
"Swimmers, take your marks, get set ... freestyle relay competition through-
out the season.
Quite a number of swimmers
earned letters this year. In order to
earn a letter, a swimmer must earn an
average of approximately three points
per meet, and must attend practice
sessions regularly.
CHS had a number of good swim-
mers this year. With the help of these
veterans and a number of promising
young freshmen, next season may
well be a victorious one.


GO!" They're off, swimming rapidly until ...


148







ZNger


Victory At Palm / owl


Appeared on the ticld . throughout
the season, beginning with victory in
the Jamboree . and continuing


with victories in each of the regular
season games, the defeat of the All-
Stars in the annual Palm Bowl ...


Co-captain, Neil Patton, Queen Wendy Flores, Co-captain Wally













(


LOUIS J FATTOROSI English III. DOROTHY H SMITH English 12,
B.S, M Ed. Ruiger LIr,~trrir N1 B S Ohio No.rrh.rn i' M Drr'.rr
tyranny is more inmoltrabile thn ithji %I LlnIreltr%\
the seli-righteou rl'ormer .r the c]r
zealous philanthropist The o,:rlid nr, he
destroyed by too muh hatrcJ or t~i
much love, but the later is mote dnrger
ous because It Ii more nsidious "


d J
GLENDA STRONACH English and
Musi- B NMu E.d A., Trinity U.
Mrs Srr,..na.h i, from Texas and
raught in turundu before coming to
CHS She cnio., ielhgy, and sports. "To
th% oavn :ll be true'


MARTHA TANNER English; A.B.,
U.N.C. "Live everyday to the very fullest
- enjoy!"


4i


TONI WILFERD English; B.S., Flor-
ida State. ". 'these times' will be anoth-
er period that I will add as one I've lived
through."


Tha ome
"That was some Llais


Mr Dobbinm I deervc this rest


L


"I hope I don't forget the idc.e ot th.r pl.i befoNre Ja ii .our


REBECCA WILLIAMS Geography 7,
English 8 and 9; B.A., Anderson C..;:r:'
Mrs. Williams' home state is West
Virginia. She has traveled thrt Ul. many
states and enjoys reading and -" imn.;.'
"Use your head think! listen' rr d


Mrs. Elfers


-I


a


























A
Ci


Susan
Helmerichs
Donna
Jackson


I/Roy
Gscll
Dennis
Hurlbut
' Paul
Kilmcr
Srot
Loilcaux
VEdythe
Marsh


Toni the TIGER!


v Michael
Hayden
Harold
Hunter


S"-


S1~


r- 4


Dcbra

Linda.


lakcn,
v/ K.itic
Krmius
V A\


V Rv
( att

L morn
1 N H,
iti rit


/ .uman
I r nan


L, Nancv
G I -d. i- %
t/ Linda
Huff
Mkhclc

John
Lecc
SLa.wrentc
Macts .,


7_./


\
s,
J -


Igo


\CNN


r,









kr+1'C


~3~f g ~e
~1 ..i
II








boosters


Maritza Gitz
Mrs. Povide Gitz
Cornelius Goebertus
Carol O. Goerra
Mr. and Mrs. Howard Golden
Jeanne J. Goldman
Mr. and Mrs. Henry Goldmann
Gabrielle H. Gonzalez
Ed Gordon
Debra Gosney
Mr. and Mrs. Gott
Capt. and Mrs. Thomas W. Goves
Mr. and Mrs. Randall H. Grubbs
Mr. and Mrs. William R. Graham
Roger A. Graham
W. Grant
Robert Greer
Gene Gregg
Mr. and Mrs. Grtg.rn
Mr. and Mrs. D. E. Grier
Miss Jacinta E. Griffiths
Mrs. Grist
Mr. and Mrs. Juan J. Guevara
Tirama Hall
Mr. and Mrs. Arnold F. Hames
Mr. and Mrs. Eugene E. Hamlin, Jr.
SGT and Mrs. D. H. Hammond
Mr. and Mrs. Robert J. Hancock
David R. Harburger
Ronald L. Hargis
Mr. and Mrs. P. B. Hartwell, Jr.
Diane Hauke
Mrs. James Hauser
Thomas Head
R. J. Helmericks
L. Hess
Mr. and Mrs. Paul Hieronymus
Mr. and Mrs. T. H. Higgins
Mr. and Mrs. L. G. Highley
Mr. and Mrs. Roy Hill
Mr. and Mrs. \\Wli.im G. Hill
Richard Hines
Maj. and Mrs. Vernon W. Hinkel
Mr. and Mrs. R. M. Hirons
Capt. and Mrs. L. H. Hixon
Insula Hogaboam
Mr. and Mrs. M. Holcomb
Mr. and Mrs. \Vltrcd Hold Jr.
Judy and Bob Holden
Emilia Holgerson
James L. Homer
Mr and Mrs. Hopkins
Mr. M. C. Howard
Mr. and Mrs. Charles W. Howe
Mr. Roy Howell
R. F. Huldtquist Jr.
Mr. and Mrs. Dennis R. Huff
James J. Husnik
Capt. and Mrs. N. R. Hutchinson
Dr. and Mrs. O. C. Irion
Mr. and Mrs. Ronald Jacobs


A. E. Jaketic
Phillips James
Mrs. Ralph James
Mr. and Mrs. Jaquez
Rex Jarsen
Mr. and Mrs. Paul J. Jeffries
N. Jensen
Jessick
Mrs. Barbara Johnson
H. N. Johnson
Irene A. Johnson
Joyce Johnson
Mrs. Rhett Johnson
Mr. and Mrs. Walter Johnston
E. A. Jones
Reverend James Jones
Mrs. G. E. Jordan
Mrs. M. Jove
Charles R. Kalb
Karen Kandrin
Mr. and Mrs. K. P. Karpinski
Hinayuki Katsumato
Mr. and Mrs. Ted Kaufer
Mr. and Mrs. William L. Keller
Mrs. Bill Kendall
Trifonia Kendall
Mrs. J. R. Kerwin
Mrs. Sylvia Kestler
Anne Kienzle
Dorothy King
Mr. and Mrs. John M. Klasovsky
Mr. and Mrs. John Knight
Mr. and Mrs. Koziol
Mrs. Kroft
Jane La Roche
Mr. and Mrs. Jorgen Lauritzen
Mr. and Mrs. R. D. Lawrence
Mr. and Mrs. L. E. Layman
Mr. and Mrs. Warren E. LeDoux
Mr. and Mrs. Lentz
Dr. and Mrs. B. K. Levin
Mrs. Linanes
G. A. Link
Ben Linschoten
Mr. and Mrs. Lloyd
Mr. Trivett Lloyd
Janna Loizeaux
Laura Loizeaux
Marc Loizeaux
Marcia Loizeaux
Dr. P. H. Loizeaux
Mrs. P. H. Loizeaux
Spooky Loizeaux
Turpi Loizeaux
Mr. and Mrs. Andrew I..nig'.rk
Mr. and Mrs. G. W. Lopp
Mr. and Mrs. Jack B. Love
Jerry Love
Patricia Loyld
Michael Lubrano
Rey D. Lucas


Mr. and Mrs. Howard Lund
Mr. and Mrs. \'s rrtn W. Lyman
Fabio Mabilia
Mr. and Mrs. D. MacElrevey
Mrs. Rita MacMeeker
Frank Madigar
M. L. Malo
R. Manns
Mr. and Mrs. W. E. Marek
Mr. and Mrs. Alfred G. Mare
Mr. and Mrs. Tom Marsh
Mr. and Mrs. Louis E. Martin
Mrs. S. F. Mason III
Juan Mata
Capt. and Mrs. Robert S. Mata
Mr. and Mrs. McCorrick
Mr. and Mrs. Maurice McCullough
R. E. McCullough
Capt. and Mrs. G. A. McDonald
Capt. and Mrs. Pat McDonald
Mrs. Tashiko McDonald
Pat and Patti McDonald
Lt. Col. and Mrs. James McKenny
Karen McKown
Capt. and Mrs. Arthur McLean
Mrs. James McMade
Capt. and Mrs. Drummond McNaughton
A. McZeno
Jaime Medina
Capt. and Mrs. J. Finley Meehan
Mr. and Mrs. Dabney B. Meeker
Capt. and Mrs. John W. Meeker
M. W. Menger
Mr. and Mrs. Paul M. Menges
Harvey Michael
Mr. and Mrs. Charles R. Miller
R. E. Miller
Mr. and Mrs. Jack Milligan
Mr. and Mrs. Thomas E. Minehart
Mr. and Mrs. Dave Minskew
George Mitchelle
Thomas Mizener
Mr. and Mrs. Mizrachi
Frank Modizar
Mrs. N. G. Moncevais
Aleida M, nr.n .r,.
Mrs. V. N. M. rg In
Mrs. Joseph Morrisen
Mr. and Mrs. Robert L. Myers
Mrs. Luida Nelson
Donnie Nettles Jr.
Wilbert L. Ney and Family
Mr. and Mrs. Andreas Nicolaiscn
Mr. Nicolette
Mrs. Maria I. Nieves
Maj. and Mrs. G. P. Noble III
Mr. Norman
Mrs. M.lr. trit.i N. rm n., I
Mr. and Mrs. R. E. Oberholtzer
Mrs. Ochoa
Robert O'Connor






Circle raH ais"

Promotes


Interest



7rance


Dolores Santiago, Susann Zachry, Susan
Je l'aime!"


Burge, and Rita Boyland. "French is not that hard!


"Le Circle Francais" met twice a
month in order to stimulate student
interest in the language, history, and
culture of France. To achieve this
aim, special guest speakers or selected
members presented reports on various
subjects.
The club was sponsored by Mrs.
Gegg. Only those students who ob-
tained a "B" average in French were
eligible for membership. These stu-
dents were initiated at a banquet held
at the Brazos Heights Golf Club.
Each initiate was required to recite a
poem, sing a song, or perform a skit.
The French Club members were
involved in a number of interesting
activities during the year. They spon-
sored French Week and elected the
annual "Miss France." They also vis-
ited the famous passenger liner, "The
France."


Front Row: Ivette Cummings. Susann Zachry, Martha Anton, Cornelius. Goebertus, Paulette Jordi, Jackie Parker, Linda Hess, Susan Burge,
Jeannette Cox. Center Row: Nancy Edmondson, Patricia Hauke, Mary Norval, Debbie Pare, Aurelia Williams, Maritza Thomas, Sheila .\Alb ria.
June Ilund, Nancy Horn, Rita Boyland, Terri Overstreet, Dolores Santiago, Mrs. Gegg. Back Row: Stephen Aponte, Brian DeRaps, Frank
Berry, Edward Bringas, Robert Nordstrom, Bill Gillc.pic. Melinda Brown, Patrice Gonier, C.uir Hess.


'I e


r i r


Idi i c









PATTY ANN CHRISTIAN
June 20, 1942
Bluctield, West Virginia
Patty was a member of the Pep Club at her school in Vir-
ginia before coming to CHS. She was a member of the year-
book staff here, and in her senior year, served as publicity
chairman of the Thespian plays. Patty plans to return to Vir-
ginia after graduation, and enroll in a beautician school.

ROSEMARY CHRISTIAN
October 5, 1953
Coronado, California
Rosemary has attended Cristobal High School for three
years. She participated in "B" League basketball in her sopho-
more year, and the Girls' Drill Team in her senior year. As a
senior, she was selected queen of the Homecoming Dance.
Rosemary plans to attend Texas A&I University where she
will pursue the study of medicine.

CALEB CLEMENT
October 17, 1953
Gatun, Canal Zone
"Cubby" is one of the outstanding athletes in the class of
'71. He has participated in football, baseball, basketball, and
track intramurals, and was a member of the varsity football,
baseball, basketball, and track teams. He was a member of the
"21" Club in his freshman year, and of the "C" Club for the
other three years. "Cubby" plans to attend Canal Zone Col-
lege.

FAITH EMILY COAD
February 26, 1953
Flint, Michigan
*, Faith entered CHS in the second semester of her junior
year. She was a junior varsity cheerleader at her former school
S in Michigan. After graduation, Faith plans to become a travel
agent.

FREDERICK COLE
April 13, 1953
Balboa, Canal Zone
ROTC has occupied much of Fred's time in high school.
He was a member of the Boys' Drill Team, and as a senior, a
member of Batallion Staff. He was also a member of the Na-
tional Honor Society and the Senior Class Board of Directors.
Fred's future plans include attending college.

GARY LEE COLLINS
November 13, 1952
Hampton, Virginia
Gary was president of his freshman class at CHS. He was
a member of the "21" Club in his freshman and sophomore
years. Gary participated in intramural and varsity basketball
during all four years in high school. He was a member of the
Student Advisory Committee and the Inter-school Dress Code
Committee. In his senior year, he was initiated into the Na-
tional Honor Society. Gary plans to attend Case Institute of
Te I L, ..I c., in Cleveland, Ohio.


Class


Visits


ZoIe


Frederick Cole














Gary Lee Collins
Gary Lee Collins


Pot,- Ann Chrcrl n


Kosemarv (hnrlstan


\ i


Caleb Clement Jr.





Senior faces Display 1axy Uoods ...


rc-)


---


Danny Robinson


I









-, 1- CrHH
John Martin, Dennis Maxwell


Stephanie Illies


Danny Valentine, Sherry Kern, Mr. Reeves








Seiaors


SANDRA ALBERGA
June 26, 19 51
Colon, Republic of Panama
Entering CHS in the second semester of her junior ecar
Sandra quickly became an active member of her class. She
served as treasurer of the Language Lab Club and secretary of
the Spanish Club. Sandra graduated in January 1971, and left
for Riverside City College where she plans to major in busi-
ness.

JAY ALONIS
January 25, 1953
Ancon, Canal Zone
Jay has attended Canal Zone schools for twelve years, six of
these were at CHS. In his senior year, Jay was a member of
the Caribe Club and the varsity track team. He plans to study
engineering and computer science at Louisiana Polytechnic
Institute after graduation.

ALMANUBIA ( AR MI N AUSTIN
October 13. 1952
Colon, Republic of Panama
Alma came to CHS in her junior year, having previously
attended St. Joseph's in Colon. She was a member of the
Spanish Club, and participated in *11. I.ll intramurals.
Alma plans to attend Canal Zone College and major in medi-
cal . .., e ..

PATRICIA YAMILET AUSTIN
December 13, 1952
Colon, Republic of Panama
Athletics have occupied much of Patsy's time in high
school. She was a member of the basketball and ,'.I .L.ll
teams in her freshman year and captain of both in her sopho-
more year when she also participated in tennis. In her junior
year, she lettered in three sports and also served as president
of the GAA and co-captain of the Powder Puff speedball
team. Patsy plans to attend CZC and major in physical educa-
tion.

TERRI LYNN BAKER
November 6, 1952
Anchorage, Alaska
This was Terri's first year at CHS. She participated in varsi-
ty volleyball, Her future plans include studies at the Universi-
ty of Arkansas.

ROBERT EARL BARR
March 18, 1952
Charleston, South Carolina
Robert has attended Canal Zone schools all his life, six
years at CHS. He plans to become a policeman.


Fatrlcia Y Austin


\r


Almanubia C Austin


Robert E. Barr


Sandra Alberga

















Jay Alonis





















Suddenly, the stillness is shattered
by the slamming of a locker door, the
sounds of shuffling footsteps, shouted
conversations, and noisy greetings are
heard once more. A new day has
begun, the magic of the morning is
no more.








Cristobal High School Produces



V


. .. -. .. .- ; .



Front Row: Paul Baitel, Bill Deaton, Mike Snider, Stephan Fugleberg, Toby Phillips, Ralph Richmond, Frank Cicchetto, Carlos Brown, Juan
Sanchcz. Second Row: Caleb Clement, J imJackson, Joe Rozmeski, Andrew Foshee, Harry Townsend, Frank Berry, Warren Phillips, Mike Bar-
ger, Bill LeDoux, Arthur Serig, John Musser, Mike Spagna. Third Ru'w: Neil Patton (co-captain), Jose Medina, Robert Phillips, Don Olsen,
John Day, Brian Allen, Mike Apodaca, Mattia Spagna, Robert Bloemer, William Huffman, Peter Swain, Ernest Abresch, Wally Russon (co-
captain).


This year's interscholastic Champi-
on Tigers will long be remembered as
the best team ever to play in the
Canal Zone. They achieved what no
other team has an undefeated sea-
son all the way from the Jamboree to
the Palm Bowl.
Cristobal's first taste of victory
came in the Jamboree. In the first
quarter the Tigers defeated the Bull-
dogs when quarterback, Neil Patton,
threw for 41 yards for the only touch-
down. The College Devils were una-
ble to stop the mighty Tigers in the
second quarter and once again Cristo-
bal came out on top 7-0.
The first game of the regular sea-
son once again brought victory to the
Tigers when they overpowered Canal
Zone College by a score of 22 to 6.


The quality of the performance in
that first game was typical of that in
the games which followed.
Balboa's homecoming was
smashed when Cristobal outplayed
and outscored them 33-8. This was
the high scoring game for the Tigers
this year. Touchdowns were made by
Neil Patton, Billy Deaton, Robert
Phillips, and Willie Huffman, who
scored twice.
The first home game for the Ti-
gers proved a thriller for all. The
game was undecided until the last few
seconds when "Cubby" Clement in-
tercepted a pass from College quarter-
back, Russ Bowen, thus continuing
the winning streak to three straight
wins.
The final season game, between


Balboa and Cristobal, again displayed
the Tiger superiority as they crushed
Balboa with four wins and no losses.
Cristobal became the Interscholastic
Champions for the year 1970-71.
The Annual United Fund Palm
Bowl Game brought the Tigers up
against a strong team consisting of
outstanding players from both Balboa
and College. The "Devil-Dogs" were
determined to obtain revenge for the
losses suffered at the claws of the Ti-
gers. Yet even their combined efforts
was not enough to stop the powerful
Cristobal machine. Determined to
keep their undefeated record, the Ti-
gers slipped by the All-Stars to win
7-0. It was a fitting climax to a foot-
ball season which Cristobal Tigers
will not soon forget.






'A4 "AMd "'" Ceague Players


"A" LEAGUE
Standing: Sherry Kern, Manager; Judy Dohle, Susan Mendenhall; Debbie Rowley; Teri Baker; Barbara Bloemer; and Jenny Wirtz. Kneeling:
Aurelia Williams and Cathy Stevens, co-captains.

K,


" 1U


Debbie Rowley practices "set-ups"


Jenny Wirtz, Cathy Stevens, Judy Dohle, Barbara Bloemer, Aurelia Williams. "Judy, this is
no time to be doing jumping j ik -
























Time i te life of each girl
and boy
A time o sorrow, and yet of

radmuation realization
brings,
Of tke end of many things
Classes, dances, football
games will be no more,
the magic of the kigh
school year is o'er
though some may consider
all things done,
Chey soon will lare
(ife's just begun











ps


I op__ -.
















i .' rrr K -



rip ~


l'lvan Normandia
Thomas O'Donnel
Samuel O'Nca


Rober McNaughton
l.-rinda Mendenha!l
Karen Memrrk
John Merler
Phhip Miller




Danriel Mincharr
Patrmia Mocbus
Pedro Monlora
Jane Moore
,,Cnrcobal Munon


K


Wayne West
"Straight down the hall, it's the last room on the right."


1,1


S l-Ip


L3,llham Orrego
l- Wanda Onriz
Jorge Padro
Marvann Palmer
Wrillham Parsonr





-" Charles Porbcs
RIta Reduga
Orlando Rces
Cathermne Rish
Jose R-vera


Mal^

,I. -dI






JVurses Aides Jtupart ChristiNas Spirit

ZCo People Of agarterita


First Row: W. Ortiz, R. Strube, B. Olsen, A. Ortiz, M. Olivera, R. Vidro, I). Robinson, R. Betancourt, E. Ferguson, K. Harden. Second Row: T.
Ferguson, M. Garner, R. Hartshorn, T. Overstreet, P. Hauke, A. \ Ili ii,-, N. Ridge, M. Thomas, J. Parker, P. Jordi. Third Row: Mrs. How-
ard (Sponsor), Jimenez, M. Gonzalez, T. Torres, O. Gonzalez, M. Toro, S. Vamprine, J. Cox, A. Coleman, M. Wilmont, S. Willis, D. Gos-
ney, D. Gosney, J. Ilund, J. Tomlinson, M. Fontanez. Fourth Ro': I. Cummings, D. Dancer, T. Cobb, N. Ortiz, V. Whipple, R. Cliete, M.
Humphreys, N. Horn, P. Paine, K. Stevens, T. Thomas, B. FLr ', M. Brown, D. Meeker, C. Smith, R. Munoz, E. Marsh, I. Monclova, S. May-
ani.


The Nurses' Aides Club was a very
popular organization at Cristobal
High. Its members were girls inter-
ested in nursing or another medical
profession. The club encouraged and
stimulated this interest by inviting
guest speakers, showing films, and
planning field trips to hospitals.
The most important field trip this
year was the annual visit to La Gar-
terita in Gatun Lake, on December
12. The purpose of this trip was to
give Christmas gifts to the people on
the island, especially the children


The Student Association assisted the
Nurses' Aides club this year in col-
lecting food and used clothing for
this purpose. The police division pro-
vided the club with a launch as trans-
portation.


In order to become a member of
the Nurses' Aides Club, one must be
a freshman girl, wear a cardboard
nurse' cap on the day of the initiation,
and say the pledge with the other ini-
tiates during a special meeting.


NEW INITIATES







21st Amnual yamboree Dedi


Janie Souder, Robert Will, Wendy Flores, John Sanders, Darlene Daly. "Sometimes it all seems worthwhile!"


The twenty-first annual Jamboree
provided the kickoff for the most suc-
cessful football season in Tiger histo-
ry. In Tiger Stadium on September
18, 1970, the CHS football team had
its first taste of victory in this tradi-
tional pre-season game.
The first Jamboree was held
twenty years ago. It was first con-
ceived by former CHS coach, Luke
Palumbo, as an exhibition game for
the three participating teams: BHS,
CZC, and CHS. Over the years, it de-
veloped into its present form, in
which the team scoring the most
points is presented with a trophy.
Play is divided into three quarters -


each team playing the other two once.
This year the Jamboree was dedi-
cated to two former CHS students,
John Sanders and Robert Will. These
two young men were both injured
while serving their country in Viet-
nam.
The cheerleaders, color guard, the
drill teams, the football teams, and
the spectators were all part of the ex-
citement which was highlighted by
the presentation of the Jamboree
queens: Janie Souder, BHS; Wendy
Flores, CHS; and Darlene Daly, CZC.
The pomp and splendor displayed
made the Jamboree a memorable
event as always, but it was the victory


of the Tigers over both their oppo-
nents that made it a perfect evening.
In the first quarter, Cristobal
downed Balboa when quarterback,
Neil Patton threw a pass to Willie
Huffman, who ran 41 yards for a
touchdown. Cubby Clement then
kicked the extra point, and the quar-
ter ended with a score of 7-0.
In the second quarter, Cristobal
again came out on top when Neil
Patton scored a touchdown on a pass
interception.
The third and final quarter played
by BHS and CZC ended in a scoreless
tie.







Caribbean College Club


Iosts "Senior Yight"


Diane Frcnes Hauke





_.U
14


Isaac Her Mk Sep Heng


Isaac Hcrts Mark Srephern Herrmng


DIANE FRANCES HAUKI:
August 21, 1951
Colon, Republic of Panama
Diane has been an active member of many clubs and organizations
at CHS. She was a member of the French Club, the Spanish Club, the
Philosophian Society, the Nurses Aides, the Yearbook staff, and the
Senior Board of Directors; cr' inE as an officer in several of the clubs.
She also served on the Cafeteria, Senior Advisory, and various dance
committees. Diane plans to pursue a course in business administration,
with plans for a career as an executive secretary.

PAUL HERBERT HEADY
March 6, 1953
Olney, Illinois
Paul attended CHS for only two years. At his former high school in
Salem, Illinois, he was a member of the Spanish and Pep Clubs, and
the varsity track team. He participated in the ROTC program at CHS.
Paul plans to major in Public Arts in college with a job in a radio or
television studio in mind.

ISAAC HERES
January 4, 1953
Puerto Armuelles, Chiriqui
Isaac was active in ROTC throughout his high school years, partici-
pating on the Boys' Drill team, and in his senior year, serving as com-
mander of"F" Company. He participated in basketball intramurals, and
as j tre-hrrijn .nd sophomore was a member of the varsity football
team Alrtr gradu.ai.n, Isaac plans to attend Florida State University.

MARK STEPHEN HERRING
)frr I ., 19i;
Ancon. Canal Z, ne
Mark has attended Canal Zone schools all his life. Six of these years
were at Cristobal High School. After graduation, Mark plans to learn a
trade


4 L







LCdr C W Murphy, Mrs. Linda Nelson, Capt. A. L. Gallin, Miss Leslie Berger, Mr. Mer-
rick E Banks, and Dr. Levin.


On Tuesday, January 19th, at 7:30
p.m., at the Women's Club Building
in Margarita, the members of the
class of '71, their parents, and friends
attended "Senior Night." This activi-
ty is sponsored annually by the Schol-
arship Committee of the Caribbean
College Club.
The program included a panel of
speakers from various vocational
fields and was stimulating and inter-
esting for all.
Following the meeting, refresh-
ments were served. At this time, the
seniors were given an opportunity to
question each of the speakers individ-
ually concerning his or her special in-
terests.


i




































Karen Currier, Catr
Russon. Jeannette C

*4


Student Advisory Committee Provides

Sounding Aoard Yor Student Opinion







S. j The Student Advisory Committee
4 -.- was organized at the suggestion of
S- Mr. Pfau, with the cooperation of
Michael Dexter, President, and other

School Student Association. The pur-
"- Imembers of the Cristobal High

:pose of this group was to serve in an
.n advisory capacity to the principal of
CHS. Members were carefully select-
ed in order that each club and organi-
zation in the school, and each class,
might be represented. Members
served as a sounding board, bringing
to the attention of Mr. Pfau the com-
plaints, comments, and suggestions of
their fellow students. Jose Medina
served as chairman of the group, and
Lana Boone acted as recording secre-
tary.
Meetings were held on the first
hv Carlisle, Michael Dexter. Lana BLxne (recording secretary) Wall Monday of each month. Among the
ox, Robert Phillips, Nancy Ridge. and \'ictor Lee topics discussed were the reasons be-
hind school regulations and the possi-
--. l ll ability of changing them, modifica-
tions in the dress code, and possible
changes in the athletic schedule.
Members cooperated with other orga-
nizations in planning and carr ing
out activities and projects of interest
to the majority of the student body.
Among these were: a special assembly
in cooperation with the Canal Zone
Youth Council, the 'Olvmpics" in
which the GAA and "C" Club partic-
ipated, and the Powderpuff Speedball
Game in which the Junior and Senior
girls participated.


l K. .' '. ^^^1Uk f
A -- I


"Why didn't somebody tell me there was a meeting today?" queries Chairman Jose Medina as
he and Robert Phillips hurry to a meeting.


133







aIfusitess Education



I


Would you believe the class average is 85 wpm? Would you believe 35 wpm with 3 errors?


DIANE FITE Typing I, 11, Soc.
Studies 7; B.S., East Texas State U.
Mrs. Fite likes her new home in
Panama, especially the tropical weath-
er. She is originally from Texas,
where she previously taught at Bowie
Jr. High in Irving.
Her favorite hobbies are water
skiing, boating, and fishing. Her ad-
vice to students? "Be individuals."


TNT M,




A:.70


The Business Education depart-
ment offered an excellent selection of
courses for the student planning a ca-
reer in business, as well as for the col-
lege-bound students. The skills and
knowledge taught by this department
will be useful regardless of the stu-
dent's future occupation.
General Business gave the students
a basic understanding of business
practices useful in daily living. Typ-
ing I gave students an opportunity to
develop speed and accuracy on a type-
writer. They were taught to type let-
ters, tabulated reports, manuscripts,
and business forms. Typing II was a
continuation of Typing I with em-
phasis on constant practice for in-
creased speed and accuracy. Seniors
taking Shorthand learned to read,
write, and take dictation. Another
course offered only to seniors was
Bookkeeping. In this course, students
learned the fundamentals of single
and double-entry bookkeeping and
were given practical problems for the
application of these skills.


'1
H I




tF <


George and John find girls more inter-
esting than bookkeeping.


CLARE W. JOHNSON Short-
hand, Bc.okkeeping. General Busi-
ness; B', Bemid)i State College;
M.Ed., Central Washington State Col-
lege.
During his first year at CHS, Mr.
Johnson was yearbook sponsor and
head of the Business Education De-
partment aside from his regular duties
as teacher.
He was born in Minnesota and
taught for seven year r,, lulrnt: being
principal at Adna High School in
Washington.
He enjoys fishing, bowling, and
scuba diving.
His advice is, "Spend more time
enjoying the good things about the
establishment and less time trying to
change it."


"This is almost as bad as Latin."


I"


- _t


















aMost Jntellectual


Robert Phillips


e


aua booae


i


1 II '


most
Michael Dexter


Likely


Z'o Succeed


Denise ?oshee


--


J~pwr~

iB .-































George Rivera. Working up an appetite!


Ronny Ramos
4Joann Reid
Nancy Ridge
,-Carolann Roach


Bonnie Ramos
vMllan Richardson
v4brge Rivera
Raymond Robertson


r


Debra Meeker. "You can't say she wasn't warned!"


Elsa Sanchez Paul Sanchez Jr.
Vickie Schaub Diane Schloredt
Theodore Scott Pedro Simmons
Al Simms ioseph Smith




















CLASS OFFICERS: Harry Townsend (Vice-President), Cathy Carlisle (president), Patricia
Paine (Treasurer), Jackie Parker (Secretary).


The class of '72 was the largest and
one of the most active and spirited
classes of Cristobal High School.
Through the efforts of class officers
the Juniors obtained an open lunch
on Tuesday and Thursdays of each
week. Another highlight of the year
was the selection of the class ring
which was round with a gold stone.
The Juniors will long remember
PSAT and NMSQT which are among
the many tests they took in prepara-
tion for college. The girls in the Jun-
ior Class organized and presented a
fashion show which demonstrated the
do's and don't of pants wear. Juniors
also planned and presented a Junior


Class Assembly. They were also re-
sponsible for the annual Junior-Senior


Prom
iors.


honoring the graduating Sen-


Carol Ross, Marian Kredell, Jackie Parker, Lynn Gregg, Sheila Alberga, Cathy Carlisle, Mary
Norval, Titi Cole, Karen Currier, Nancy Edmondson. The do's and don't of dress wear.


Barbara Grier Raymond Gsell
Joseph Herring Kathleen Hess


Edwin Hammond
Kenneth Hill II


Mark Hanly
William Huffman


Marian Gregg
Patricia Hauke








igcers Play Close baseball Seasoat


















Sitting, Ist Rouw: Joe Rozmeski, Ralph Richmond, Isaac Heres, George Cruz, Pedro Simmons, Mike Snider. 2nd Row: Ernest Abresch, Frank
Ciccheto, Jose Medina, George Scheibc, Paul Baitel, Cubby Clement. Standing: Willie Huffman, Jim Jackson, Doug Stevens, Robert Phillips,
Mike Dexter, Donald Mans, Neil Patton, and Coach Litton.
The 1971 baseball season was from
January 10 to March 19. CHS played
four games against BHS and four
against CZC. Also, a practice game
i against the alumni was held about
twice a month.
Tryouts were held the first week of
the baseball season. The qualifica-
1 P. I tions for each position were different,
but in general the following qualities
were desired: a good eye, long, good,
/ arms, skill in throwing and catching,
and a quick reaction. Practice was
held after school or in the evening for
approximately two hours.
SAfter the regular eight-game sea-
son, the All-Stars played the Inter-
scholastic League Champions.
This years baseball coaches were
CHS Tigers "warm the bench". Mr. Litton and Mr. Agee.


Frank Ciccheto prepares to hit a homerun.















PAUL I JEFFRIES BA Colr.id,
State College. M A Colur.ido St.irc Col.
lege; Graduate \\ork. Unix SiOuhern (-iCI
forma, Calif \''esttrn Unlicr-srs "Seck a
profession or oLcupation that i'. hallcing.
ing and enjosable Smile and be hipp "


L-
I SUPERINTENDENTS STAFF, U.S. SCHOOLS: Mr. Ross Anderson, Supervisor, Physical Education and Athletics, U.S. Schools; Dr. Ken-
neth Lake. Director of Curriculum; Mr. Stewart Brown, Supervisor, inimmnng pools and .afits. Dr. Charles Latimer, Deputy Superintendent
I of Schools; Mr. James Cook, Supervisor of Instruction, U.S. Secondary Schools; Mr. GoC rr.e Willinghl.in, Supervisor of Instruction, U.S. Sec-
I ondar, Schools; Mr. F.A. Castles, Superintendent of Schools (.,.u,./) Mr. Vernon Caturia, Supervisor of Instruction, U.S. Elementary Schools;
SDr. Victor Herr, Supervisor of Music, U.S. Schools; Dr. James Wolf, Coordinator, Special Edu, a, .n. Mr. David Speir, Assistant Superintend-
ent, U S. Secondary School; Mrs. Shirley Makibbin, Supervisor of Instruction, U.S. Schools; Mrs. Frances Sampsell, Assistant Superintendent
U.S. Elementary Schools; Mr. Zander Krowitz, Administrative Assistant; Mr. Robert Dahlstom, Supervisor, Education Data Processing.















Dear Readers.
Today is the da\ I and the other members of the ,earbook s .itt
ha.e long dreamed of reaching It marks the .rmpletion of the tre
mendous task of compiling and editing the 1ir I L.arb'l.in. As 1 help
our sponsor. Mr.Johnson, with the packaging ot our final shipment ot
cop), I recall the events, people, and places which are recorded in
these pages I also think of .a number of indil iduals a ho a ssied with
the many essential, but often unrecognicd tasks in'coled in the su,.
cessful production ot a \earbuok On behalf of the carbook staff. I
wish to extend a special thank you to Mrs. Condon who supervised
the sale of advertisements, and to Mr Gansen whu dedicated much of
his time to the photography department I also wish to thank the Tav.
lor Publishing Company. Compagnani Aleman and Quelqucicu. S A
tor their collaboration, and the busines- tirms tor their patronage
The yearbook staff had only a limited amount of time in which to
record an almost unlimited number of events, but eey effort was
made to make our coverage of the school tear as complete a.i possible
I sincerely hope that \ou have received as much pleasure in reading
this book as we did in editing it


\'er\ trul\ \our-



Jeannette Cox
Editor




Sponsor ................... ............... Mr. Johnson

Business Manager ..................... Mrs. Condon

Editor ....... ....................... .Jeannette Cox

Copy Editor.................. .............. Lana Boone

Assistant Editors ................. .......Maritza Thomas
Rita B.,\ land
Maria Boone
Margaret Jacketic
Beth Bleicher

Typist ................................... Sheila Alberga

Photographers .......... ....... ...... Danny Valentine
Debbie Pate

Artwork .................................. Allen Harmon
Advertisements ..................... .... Kathy DeRaps
Jeannie Bassett 169
Raul Castro


-


Mar>h 12. 1( 1








latecomers


Some people just don't know how to pose!


Jeff Melinda
Brien Brown
.,Denise /George
Bullinger Cruz


NOT PICTURED:
Juan Buen
iWVilliam Branner
III
Carl Couts
Marian Crouch
Robin Hartshorn
Jan Janosik
LAngeline LaRoche
Angel Torres
.-Damaris Torres

















V


Sue Ltinda
Enangelas Huff


Henry
Dingman
t/Toni
Torres


Elaine
Dusin
Ralph
Zachanr










I ",


Edythe Marsh, Kathy Brown, Michele Kessler. "Come now, it can't be that boring "


*h-T vE It" 4 1P"
Mardette Garner, Patrice Gonier. "Are you
two tip-tluein thr'ouLgh the tulips iinr


















i


~4('
S; ,





yv 3


iI'

.:.


AIM-


The setting of the sun brought a change in the appearance ct bo(h the schooll
and the students. With the coming of darkness, another of tc man\ ftcctr of
CHS was revealed. The evening activities. This was the time t;r buntirce, and
football games; swim meets and track meets; hours of practice .nd re',.ic% tbr
ROTC cadets ...










;i:'



RSfflEfflSE**









a&2



i^HH



HHHHhb





H



' Hat '>' V" M V '(''' .'!. ,;' :,' '>' L L-''i '. ,'\'. iytiflrQi






in



'rtj



- '.".-'. ' V










i a ii



Vi"



Digitized by the Internet Archive

in 2010 with funding from

University of Florida, George A. Smathers Libraries



http://www.archive.org/details/caribbean1971cris



Caribbean 1971



Cristobal Migh School

Coco Solo

Canal Zone



9



Volume 54







T)e(lication 4

Infernal 6

formal 28

faculty and Curriculum 30

Classes 60

Organizations 122



Zable

of
Contents




Sports j 40

Special Activities 15S

Editor's Page J69

Ziger Boosters no

Advertisements 173

Index j$7



Jn keeping With Zke Modern Zrend Zoward Qreater
flexibility Jn yearbook Organization. Zhe CHS Annual
Staff Js Jntroducing Jn Entirely New And 'different for-
mat J n Zke 1971 Caribbean. Departing from Zke Zradi-
tional Concept Of Separate Sections. Eack Introduced By J
Division Page, On Eack focet Of Zke Sckool jCife, Zke
yearbook Js Divided J n to Only Z wo Main Sections, for-
mal Jnd Jnformal Appearing Jn Zke formal Half Are-.
Administration And Jaculty, Class Pictures. Organization
Pictures. Zeam Pkotos. Queens And Cheerleaders, Adver-
tising. Andjndex. Zkis Section Contains All Zke formali-
ty Required Of A food yearbook. Jn Zke Exciting Jnfor-
mal Section. We Have Attempted Zo Present An Uninter-
rupted Candid Story Of School Ofe. Just As you Expe-
rienced Jt.



Dedication





1/





V





\



Mrs* Adamary bright



guidance
Counselor

Retires

After
36 years

Mens

The CHS annual staff wishes to
dedicate the 1971 Caribbean to Mrs.
Adamary Anderson Bright, in recog-
nition and appreciation of her many
years of devoted service to the stu-
dents of Cristobal High School.

Mrs. Bright was born in Jackson-
ville, Florida. She attended school in
Houston, Texas, during her early
years, but returned to Jacksonville to
complete her secondary education at
Duzal High School. She received her
A.B. in Education at Florida State
College for Women in Tallahassee,
and completed her graduate work for
a degree in history at the University
of Ann Arbor in Michigan.

After teaching at Jacksonville Jun-




Kathie Danielsen smilingly receives assistance from Mrs. Bright in planning her college ca-



ior High School for a short time, she
came to the Canal Zone in 1935.
Since that time she has served capably
and well in many positions at Cristo-
bal High School. Among these are: a
teacher of seventh and eighth grade
English, social science, vocational
guidance, social studies, girls' advisor,
and the position as a Guidance Coun-
selor which she has held from 1951 to
the present. During her many years at
CHS, Mrs. Bright received a number
of Outstanding Service Awards for
her distinguished service to the Canal
Zone Schools Division.




In addition to teaching and coun-
seling, Mrs. Bright also sponsored a
number of school activities and orga-
nizations such as the National Honor
Society. It was Mrs. Bright who orig-
inated the Zephyr, and the Caribe
Club. She is truly an outstanding or-
ganizer; efficient, and hard-working.

Mrs. Bright has done a great deal
of traveling during her years at CHS,
visiting many countries in both Cen-
tral and South America, as well as in
Europe. Both faculty and students are
saddened by the journey Mrs. Bright
is about to make as she retires from
the faculty of CHS. Her guidance will
be long remembered by the countless
students whose educations and careers
she helped plan.



Mrs. Bright advises Shyla Miller on her
schedule tor next vear.



A

New

year

Ueg'ms .




Elena Maxwell and Brenda Egger




Stephanie lilies, Almanubia Austin, Vivian Boseman, Jenny Wirtz, and Carmen Butler.




Douglas Jeffries, Mr. Johnson, and Nancy
Edmonson.




Mr. Hieronymus (S.A. sponsor) and Mi-
chael Dexter (S.A. president).




Michael Dexter and Nana' Edmonson (S.A. secret.m )




The halls of CHS were a mass of con-
fusion on September 1, 1970, as hun-
dreds of students congregated around
the bulletin boards on which homeroom
numbers were posted. Others lingered to
chat with old friends or to make new ac-
quaintances; summertime experiences
were shared and compared. The perenni-
al excitement of the "first day of school"
was in the air. This enthusiasm persisted
throughout the orientation assembly, in
which students were welcomed to CHS,
new teachers introduced, and the new
Student Association officers installed.
However, with the ringing of that first
bell, order began to emerge as students
fell back into the familiar routine of
school life. Another school year had
begun.



Debbie Meeker



The deserted halls are quiet, a soft
breeze whispers through the empty
corridors there is no indication now
of the activities and incidents which
the coming day may bring.







Suddenly, the stillness is shattered
by the slamming of a locker door, the
sounds of shuffling footsteps, shouted
conversations, and noisy greetings are
heard once more. A new day has
begun, the magic of the morning is
no more.




Zhe

Ml Kings,
Seats J re
Assumed




Ann Terwilliger, Dolores Santiago, Ivette
Cummings, Carlos Brown, Susann Zach-



ery, Susan Burge, Christina Loizeaux, Rita
Boyland.



Issac Heres



10



Morning

Routine

Resumes




n



Upon entering the classroom, a student assumes more than a seat, he assumes all
the privileges and responsibilities which accompany his position in this place of
learning the school. Having brought together the teachers and the taught, the
school has fullfilled its function what follows is determined by these individu-
als.

Often, it seems, minds are more eager and alert as the day begins, and the op-
portunities afforded by the morning hours should not be missed. To bring to
each student success at last this is the goal of every morning class.





Beth Snider. Mrs. McNaughton. Cheryl Smith





Diane Carroll




"Patches" Brown



More complaints were heard con-
cerning the lunch hour than perhaps
any other facet of school life. Lunch
was served in four shifts; those on the
early shift complained that it was too
early to eat, and those on the late
shift complained that it was too late.
Once in the cafeteria, however, no
one seemed to have any real trouble
eating.

The lunch hour provided a brief
respite from classes which was wel-
comed by all. Juniors and seniors took
advantage of their open-lunch privi-
lege to "eat out" on alternate days. In




After a satisfying lunch, students head to
the student's lounge.



spite of this, and the many meetings
scheduled during the lunch hour, the
cafeteria was always filled with hun-
gry, noisy students; eating, chatting
with friends or doing a little last min-
ute studying. Those wishing to leave
the cafeteria early, spent their lunch
hour in the pleasant surroundings of
the student lounge located directly be-
neath the cafeteria.

In spite of the frequent complaints,
most students found the lunch hour
one of the most relaxing and enjoya-
ble periods of the school day.




Senior + Open lunch + Car = Happy
Heart.




Raymond Robertson. "I'll have a chili dog and please include the hot dog!'



14





Carol Wertz. Karen Currier. "Reservation made. Fork over!



Denise Foshee. "It's the real thing ap-
petite!"





Lunchtime is a good time to make friends.



Sylvia Vamprine. "I can't help it! I'm hun-
gry'"



is



Students
Enjoy Comforts
Of Remodeled

Cafeteria





The installation of blue and gold draperies



i \



. . and a lowered, insulated ceiling gave the cafeteria a new look of elegance. Included
among the comments of students were such remarks as .




"It's like eating in a fancy restaurar
Ft




V

'Very Quiet and



'Man it's got class!"



16






Q^ffi






> r.



e?*u




It almost makes eating here a pleasant
xperience."




Then there were those who just laughed, and




of course, those who couldn't wait to get away and .





enjoy the beauties of the "great outdoors".



17



Refreshed from a relaxing lunch
hour, students returned at 11:30 to re-
sume their regular routine. Each after-
noon included three hours of classes
with the exception of seniors with
sixth-period study hall, who were per-
mitted to leave early. For some, the
enthusiasm characteristic of the
morning hours appeared to wave;
while others seemed to have awak-
ened at least. All, however evidenced
an increased restlessness as the hour
approached 2:15 and the ringing of
the final bell.




18








19




^1



asp"* ; ^ *%








-%







Zigers 'Display Eager
Enthusiasm J or Afternoon

Activities




553 si'ss: = ssT5'






ss^ESsS



P



1 VfJtMff




36 Qtjj




Jose Medina and Mike McCann.



20




^. t A\\



Cathy Carlisle




^K' : <-




21




With the ringing of the final bell at 2:15, many students rush eagerly to the
waiting buses thinking only "Free! at last!" Others also hurry anxious to
begin the extra-curricular activities which play such an important role in the life
of a student. Enjoying the company of those who share similar interests; whether
it be an advanced math or foreign language class, sports, drill team, journalism,
or dramatics, it is a pleasant and profitable way to spend an afternoon.




jTOBL ,




Stephanie lilies and Denise Foshee.



Jean Smith and Jose Medina.



22







Susan Mendenhall



23




The setting of the sun brought a change in the appearance of both the school
and the students. With the' coming of darkness, another of the many facets of
CHS was revealed. The evening activities. This was the time for bonfires and
football games; swim meets and track meets; hours of practice and reviews for
ROTC cadets .



24




25




TEEN CLUB DANCES




Neil Patton, Rosemary Christian, Wally Russon.



. AND FORMALS



Jimmy Barraza




26



. . CONCERTS: Practice for the
cast and crew of various plays: Dra-
matic Productions .




. . all those activities without which
school life would be quite incom-
plete.



27




A Place Of JC earning
Js Zo Ceam.
And ]/et from
Day Zo Day
Jt Also becomes
J Place Zo Cive.
A bridge Zhat
Spans Zhe Qap
Of Age And brings
Zogether Zhe Zeachers
And Zhe Zaught.



Zhe Human Mind
Must Keach Jn
Jts Own Direction

Zoward Jts Own Qoal.
Along Zhe Path Of
Cife One May
Meet A Hundred
Joes Or A Zhousand
Jriends



Administration




JAMES H. PFAU Cristobal High School Principal



To the Yearbook Staff:

"Thanks for the Memories" is the
title of a song that was popular some
years ago. As we record in this book
the events of the 1970-71 school year
at Cristobal High School we can sure-
ly say with gratitude and even a bit of
pride, "thanks for the memories."

You who have studied hard and
have given of yourselves to school ac-
tivities have shown by your Tiger
spirit that the busiest people are also
the happiest people.

Best wishes to all of you as you
continue your education here or else-
where. Although your highest com-
mitment may well be to academic ex-
cellence, you would not be wise to
pursue scholarship at the expense of
the development of an honorable
character, physical well-being, or a
pleasant personality. It is hoped that
the discipline of commitment to these
qualities will earn you a happy free-
dom of spirit and a sense of accom-



plishment. May you continue to mark
each milestone with satisfaction and



happy memories.



James H. Pfau
Principal




I'm a firm believer in the 'Tigers'!



30



PAUL J. JEFFRIES - B.A., Colorado
State College; M.A., Colorado State Col-
lege; Graduate Work, Univ. Southern Cali-
fornia, Calif. Western University. "Seek a
profession or occupation that is challeng-
ing and enjoyable. Smile and be happy."





SUPERINTENDENTS STAFF, U.S. SCHOOLS: Mr. Ross Anderson, Supervisor, Physical Education and Athletics, U.S. Schools; Dr. Ken-
neth Lake, Director of Curriculum; Mr. Stewart Brown, Supervisor, swimming pools and safety; Dr. Charles Latimer, Deputy Superintendent
of Schools; Mr. James Cook, Supervisor of Instruction, U.S. Secondary Schools; Mr. George Willingham, Supervisor of Instruction, U.S. Sec-
ondary Schools; Mr. F.A. Castles, Superintendent of Schools (seated); Mr. Vernon Caturia, Supervisor of Instruction, U.S. Elementary Schools;
Dr. Victor Herr, Supervisor of Music, U.S. Schools; Dr. James Wolf, Coordinator, Special Education; Mr. David Speir, Assistant Superintend-
ent, U.S. Secondary School; Mrs. Shirley Makibbin, Supervisor of Instruction, U.S. Schools; Mrs. Frances Sampsell, Assistant Superintendent
U.S. Elementary Schools; Mr. Zander Krowitz, Administrative Assistant; Mr. Robert Dahlstom, Supervisor, Education Data Processing.



31



Office Staff



The competent members of the
CHS office staff handled all general
clerical work for the administration
and faculty. Included among their
duties were official correspondence
and paper work. They were also in
charge of operating office machines
and the intercom system, and an-
swering the telephone. They main-
tained the record and files of each stu-
dent, mailed report cards, and sent
and received transcripts.



Clinic






D3**~



_**-*




MRS. ALLEN, MRS. TAYLOR, MISS GRIFFITHS.



The clinic was an important provi-
sion for the health and safety of Cris-
tobal High School students. The clin-
ic was staffed with trained nurses who
provided emergency first aid; and per-
formed certain routine checks on each
student. The clinic was also a place
for students to rest when unwell, and
for the storage of each students' per-
manent health records. The clinic also
sponsored tuberculosis and chest X-
rays for students in certain grades. Dr.
Levin, the Public Health Officer for
the Atlantic Side, visited the school
almost every morning. Dr. Chevelle,
the school physician for the Canal
Zone Schools, was available every
Wednesday.




DR. LEVIN, KAREN MtKOWN, MRS BLANCHETTE "Maybe this will cool your fever a bit."



32




Mrs. Bright, Laurie Nairn. "Your appointment is at 11:00 on Friday/'




Mr. Mowery, Thomas Behre, William San-
tiago, Henry Borselliono. "You both want
to go to Kings' Point?"




A final decision brings satisfaction to Ka-
thie Danielsen and Mrs. Bright.



Guidance is the process of helping
persons make the best possible de-
cisions concerning their lives, and aid-
ing them in solving their problems. It
includes helping students choose the
proper courses to take in school, and
aiding them in deciding what careers
to follow after their education is com-
pleted. Such decisions require that a
person have full and correct knowl-
edge about himself and his world.
The guidance counselors at Cristobal
High School aim to provide students
with information so that they may
make the best possible decisions in
life. The two principal methods used
for this are counseling, and testing.
Counseling consists chiefly of discus-
sions between a student and his coun-
selor concerning his interests, apti-
tudes, and special problems. Testing
is an important guidance tool. Apti-
tude, personality, and intelligence
tests provide counselors with much



Quittance




ADAMARY BRIGHT Counselor;
B.A., Florida State Univ., MA, Univ.
of Michigan. "Life will never be dull
if you will continue to learn ..."




ROBERT MOWERY Counselor;
B.S and M.S., Indiana State Univ.
"Take advantage of the opportunities
in high school."




LUKE C PALUMBO Attendance
Counselor; B.S. Ed., N.W. Missouri
State. "There is no substitute for work
to be happy and successful."



useful information. Other important
guidance tools are books, pamphlets,
and films used to help students decide
on courses of study and future careers.



33



Cibrary



The library, with its vast collection
of books, was a familiar stopping
place for CHS students. Throughout
the year, they used the library and its
many resources. The quiet, academic
atmosphere made it the perfect place
for studying and peaceful solitude
found there provided an excellent



background for the reading of books.
Students made good use of the library
during homeroom and study halls;
checking out books for reports, using
reference books, or simply browsing
through the library's collection of pa-
perbacks and magazines.

Mr. Wells, the school librarian,




'Peace at last!"



was always available for students who
needed help in locating a certain book
or in making a special report. There
were also at least two girls serving as
library assistants each period. They
helped students use the card catalog
and check out books.




DAYTON N. WELLS Librarian; B.S., University
of Idaho, M. Ed., University of Oregon. "Read to
help you become what you want to be."




Faith Coad, Patricia Christian, Janna Loizeaux, Terra Brown, Lana Boone, Clover Shobe, Barbara Yerxa, Jeanne Calkins. Library Assistants.



34




GRACE S. PFAU Reading; B.S.,
Valley City State College; M.A., Uni-
versity of Minnesota. "11 talented, ca-
pable people can match their dissatis-
faction and concern with positive,
concerted action, they should be able
to correct the ills they so rightly de-
plore."




Special
Education




Duke Collins and De Jesus Ruperto help Mrs. Pfau correct papers.



EARL C SHARICK Special Educa-
tion; B.A., M.S., Illinois State. "Work
hard and stay in school."



The Special Education department
was added to the CHS curriculum in
I960. In Special Education, students
received extra help in their academic
studies, learned crafts, and learned the
perspectives of human relationships
and civic responsibilities.

The remedial reading program pro-



vided special instruction to improve
reading skills and helped assure a stu-
dent of success in keeping with his
ability-. Seemingly average students
improved the quality of their reading
skills with the help of the Special
Education Department.




f




^



Reading holds the interest of the Remedial Reading class.



Mr. Sharick helps his class drill in math
with flash cards.



35



Jrt




EDWIN M. KOZIOL Art; B.A.,
Michigan State Univ. "Find out what
your responsibilities are and prepare
to meet them in order to gain control
of your life as rapidly and completely
as possible."





Class Portrait



Artists waiting for an ins



spiration!




fr




fl



In creative arts, a student learns to
express himself through different
media. With this in mind, the fol-
lowing courses were taught at CHS
this year. Art 7, an introduction to
drawing, painting, lettering, ceramics,
crafts, covering techniques, and the
use of tools with emphasis placed
on developing skills, imagination, and
art judgement. Art 8, a reinforcement
of knowledge gained in Art 7, with
greater emphasis placed on the basic
elements of design. Art I, a basic be-
ginning art course for all student
grades 9-12 which emphasized the de-
velopment of drawing skill and the
study of design concepts. It involved
drawing, painting, lettering, poster-
making and a variety of crafts. Art II,
an advanced art course for all students
grades 10-12. It involved art apprecia-
tion and a deeper investigation of de-
sign and color theory with emphasis
placed on individual organization and
the carrying out of art projects. The
student had an opportunity to devel-
op skills in the area of his choice, Art
III, which included appreciation and
advanced creative work.



Brenda Gibson. With a sweep of the brush, a masterpiece is created.



36



business Education




Would you believe the class average is 85 wpm

The Business Education depart-
ment offered an excellent selection of
courses for the student planning a ca-
reer in business, as well as for the col-
lege-bound students. The skills and
knowledge taught by this department
will be useful regardless of the stu-
dent's future occupation.

General Business gave the students
a basic understanding of business
practices useful in daily living. Typ-
ing I gave students an opportunity to
develop speed and accuracy on a type-
writer. They were taught to type let-
ters, tabulated reports, manuscripts,
and business forms. Typing II was a
continuation of Typing I with em-
phasis on constant practice for in-
creased speed and accuracy. Seniors
taking Shorthand learned to read,
write, and take dictation. Another
course offered only to seniors was
Bookkeeping. In this course, students
learned the fundamentals of single
and double-entry bookkeeping and
were given practical problems for the
application of these skills.



? Would you believe 35 wpm with 3 errors?




George and John find girls more inter-
esting than bookkeeping.




DIANE FITE Typing I, II, Soc.
Studies 7; B.S., East Texas State U.

Mrs. Fite likes her new home in
Panama, especially the tropical weath-
er. She is originally from Texas,
where she previously taught at Bowie
Jr. High in Irving.

Her favorite hobbies are water
skiing, boating, and fishing. Her ad-
vice to students? "Be individuals."




CLARE W JOHNSON Short-
hand, Bookkeeping, General Busi-
ness; B.S., Bemidji State College;
M.Ed., Central Washington State Col-
lege

During his first year at CHS, Mr
Johnson was yearbook sponsor and
head of the Business Education De-
partment aside from his regular duties
as teacher.

He was born in Minnesota and
taught for seven years including being
principal at Adna High School in
Washington.

He enjoys fishing, bowling, and
scuba diving.

His advice is, "Spend more time
enjoying the good things about the
establishment and less time trying to
change it."




"This is almost as bad as Latin.



37



English





HERBIT D CHESHIRE English;
B.S., University- of Tampa.




J.B DOBBINS English II, Jour-
nalism, B.S., University of Virginia;
M.Ed., Univ. of Virginia. "HAM-
LET: Act I, Sc. iii Polonius to
Laertes."



English, an extensively wide field,
was one of the largest departments at
CHS. It was a required subject for all
students, since the ability to under-
stand and to use well his native lan-
guage deemed necessary for a stu-
dent's success in any endeavor.

Regular English classes included
the study of grammar, composition,
and literature. In addition to these
regular courses; the English depart-
ment also included journalism, speech
and drama, and remedial reading. In
journalism the student learned to
write in newspaper form and received
much practical experience. Speech
and drama was a course which taught
the students the art of oral expres-
sion. Besides this, the course required
a great deal of research work. Reme-
dial reading provided students who
required extra help an opportunity to
improve their reading ability.



Books read in the various classes
include; Johnny T remain, Great Expec-
tations, A Tale of Two Cities, The
House of Seven Gables, The Red Badge of
Courage, Wuthering Heights, Lord Jim,
and The Moonstone.





[

JANE ELFERS English III, Speech
and Drama, B.S., University of Wis-
consin. "Choose those goals most im-
portant to you and be perseverant in
achieving them. Don't be reluctant to
serve others and the community.
Don't be afraid to give of yourself.
Aim high, prepare painstakingly,
serve; and work."



Mrs. Smith. "My goodness! What are the
Seniors coming to!"



38




LOUIS J. FATTOROSI English III;
B.S., M.Ed., Rutgers University. "No
tyranny is more intolerable than that of
the self-righteous reformer or the over-
zealous philanthropist. The world can be
destroyed by too much hatred or too
much love, but the latter is more danger-
ous because it is more insidious."



DOROTHY H SMITH English 12;
B.S., Ohio Northern U.; M.A., Denver

University.



GLENDA STRONACH English and
Music; B.Mus.Ed., B.A.. Trinity U.

Mrs. Stronach is from Texas and
taught in Curundu before coming to
CHS. She enjoys ecology, and sports. "To
thy own self be true."



MARTHA TANNER English; A.B..
U.N.C "Live everyday to the very fullest
enjoy!"




Mrs. Elfcrs. "That was some class




Mr. Dobbins. "... I deserve this rest."





TONI WILFERD English; B.S.. Flor-
ida State. ". . 'these times' will be anoth-
er period that I will add as one I've lived
through."




"I hope I don't forget the idea of that play before class is out ."



REBECCA WILLIAMS Geography 7,
English 8 and 9, B.A., Anderson College
Mrs. Williams' home state is West
Virginia. She has traveled through many
states and enjoys reading and swimming.
"Use your head think! listen! read!"



39



foreign £anguages




ANNE D. GEGG French, Latin;
B.A., Cornell University, M.S. in Edu-
cation, Cornell Univ. "Learn to do
things on time Make positive contri-
butions to school and your communi-
ty"



STELLA RIEFKOHL Spanish,
French; B.A., New York Univ., M.A.,
Columbia Univ., N. Y. "Never to
look back into the past always to
face each day as it comes without a
thought of the future




When will they ever learn?




TELMA 1 HOWARD Spanish,
Business Education, B.A., Hunter
College, M.A., Hunter College. "Be
obedient and respectful citizens in
your communities and set good exam-
ples of morals to your younger peers."




0i




Is it third declension, accusative, masculine, plural, or comparative? I'm mixed up!



40





JAMES E. STEARNS Spanish II.
Ill, IV, Russian II; B.S. Ed., MA.
University of Florida. "Spend more
time on the subjects that are hard for
you than on your favorites."



WILLIAM L. WILL Spanish 7 and
8, English 9; B.S. Econ., Xavier
Univ.; M. Ed., Univ. of Florida.

Mr. Will is a native Isthmian. He
taught in Florida betore coming to
CHS. His hobbies are golfing, swim-
ming, team sports and reading. Life is
short, so be satisfied in what you are
doing."




Toni Thomas. "It's right, isn't it?




The foreign language department
at CHS was a wide and interesting
one. Its aim was to increase a stu-
dent's understanding of the history
and culture, as well as the language of
countries other than his own. In order
to fulfill this aim, CHS offered cour-
ses in three modern languages;
French, Spanish, and Russian. Three
years of each language were offered,
students being placed in the level ap-
propriate to their development. In ad-
dition, a second year course in Latin
was offered.

In all language courses, speaking,
writing, reading, and understanding
of the language were stressed. The
Audio-Lingual Method, ALM, was a
new system used to teach Spanish and
Russian. This system involved inten-
sive oral practice in the language lab-
oratory.




Mrs. Howard. "I'm no model!"



"How can I concentrate on "Hablar" when I'm thinking of HIM.-"



41



Home Economics




ELIZABETH McNAUGHTON Home Econom-
ics; B.S., Slate Teachers' College. "What you do (or
don't do) today affects your future."




The homemaking program placed
emphasis on three areas: foods and
nutrition, clothing selection and con-
struction, and family living. It was
the aim of the department to provide
girls with knowledge helpful for their
futures as homemakers.

Junior high home economics stu-
dents learned the basics of sewing by
making simple household articles and
garments. They were also taught the
basics of cooking which included the
preparation and serving of formal and



informal meals.

Senior high students were offered
one semester of sewing which in-
cluded personal grooming, the plan-
ning and construction of clothing,
and a study of personal and family
relationships. In the second semes-
ter's cooking classes, students were
taught the fundamentals of nutrition,
the use of recipes, meal planning,
marketing, and various methods of
preserving food.




Tina Bocanegra, Pat De Vault, Elisa Brown. "Do we have to stand in line to help?"



Josefa Gonzalez and Anna Summerlin.
"You're off an inch!"




'Cookies". "It's messy but it's fun!"



42




RONALD FITE Mechanical
Drawing; B.S., East Texas State
Univ.; M.S., East Texas State Univ.

Mr. Fite's home state is Texas. He
is the Junior Class sponsor. He enjoys
the Canal Zone and his hobbies are
water skiing and hunting.



A


^


H


TJ^7'


\


fl^



Jndustrial Arts



JESSE C. HOLLOWAY Shop;
M.S., Oklahoma State College. "Get
the best education you can."




RONALD LASSILA Shop; B.S.,
Los Angeles, Calif.; Lie, Sorbonne.

Mr. Lassila is a native Californian
and has taught in San Francisco, Eng-
land, Turkey, Phillipines, and France.
His hobby is boating. His advice to
students? "Work."



The Industrial Arts department at
CHS attempted to provide pupils
with insight into their own interests;
to develop their abilities to work with
their hands and with tools, and to
sharpen their interest in creative
crafts. The Industrial Arts department
offered four groups of courses; Me-
chanical Drawing; Wood Working,
Metal Shop, and Plastics.

Mechanical Drawing I taught stu-
dents to visualize how an object is put
together. Neatness, correct lines, mea-
surement, and following instructions
were stressed. Mechanical Drawing II
was a continuation of this course for
students planning to continue their
education in this field. Woodworking
students learned about tools, joints,
shop safety, and the operation of
power tools. They used their knowl-
edge to carry out projects. Metal Shop
I taught the basic skills of bench-
work, forging, welding, sheetmetal,
and machine operation. Plastics stu-
dents learned the properties of plas-
tics and how to shape them into use-
ful objects.




Students display varied attitudes toward mechanical drawing.




"They didn't tel! me about this when I tilled out my class selection sheet." grumbles Robert
Johnson.



43



Mathematics




RICHARD W, BOCK Algebra II,
Analysis, Calculus; B.A., Univ. of N.
Dakota; MA, Univ. of Houston.
"Don't be trivial."




I I,



LAWRENCE A. COWLEY Alge-
bra I, Geometry; B.A., Trinity Univ.;
M.A., Southeastern State. "Live life
yourself"




RANDALL GRUBBS Math; B.A.,
William Jewell College. "Do not get
behind in life because it is hard to
catch up."



In this modern age, as well as in
the past, mathematics remains a basic
part of everyone's life. The CHS
math department offered all the math
courses required for success in college
as well as in the students' daily lives.

Five math courses offered were to
be taken in order as each was a pre-
requisite of the subsequent one.
These courses were Algebra I, Geom-
etry, Algebra II, Introduction to Anal-
ysis, and Calculus. General Math, and
Introduction to Algebra were also of-
fered for students not majoring in
math.

General Math captured the ele-
mentary forms of mathematics. It
pushed the students to have a mathe-
matical background.

Algebra I, the first step up the lad-
der to higher mathematics, caught the
principles of mathematics. Word
mastery of the language of mathemat-
ics was attained in this course.

Geometry dealt with the art of
drawing. Proving theorems was a
major part of geometry. The students
learned how to deal with space fig-
ures. Algebra I was also reviewed for
the students.

Algebra II taught the principles of
factoring, polynomials, logarithms,
and basic trigonometry. The pattern
of reasoning was also learned in this
course.



Introduction to Analysis went Calculus, the last step up a steep
deeper into trigonometry. Linear and ladder of mathematics in high school
quadratic equations were studied in was a college preparatory course in-
great depth. Functions and relations traducing the fundamentals of differ-
were the beginning notion of this ential calculus,
course.




Math class is a time for many things, from studying to reading comic books.



44




ROY HOWELL Algebra IB, Gen-
eral Math A; B.S., Shippensburg St,
College; M.S., Florida State Univ.
"Accept people on the basis of their
actions, not their appearances."




CAROL J. KNIGHT Life Science
7, Math 7 and 8; B.S., Auburn Univ.
"Read as much and as varied material
as you possibly can."




BERNARD R MAZZONI Math
8, Algebra I; B.S., Lebanon Valley
College; M.A., Penn State Univ. "Ev-
eryday should be a good day, and to-
morrow is a better day."




Nancy Edmondson. "I give up, I've had




Calculus proves to be a challenging class.




'Hey, class isn't dismissed vet."



45



JHhm




EDWARD R CARWITHEN
Music; B. Fine- Arts, Univ. Florida,
M Arts, F.astman School of Music.



The following courses were offered
this year in Music. Music 7 and 8; the
exploration of all kinds of music and
music skills with emphasis placed on
music fundamentals as a step to the
enjoyment of music. Beginning In-
strumental Class; a specialized class
for students desiring to learn the basic
techniques of a band or an orchestral
instrument. It is open to all grades
but it is recommended that a student
wishing to participate in advanced
music classes begin the study of in-
struments in seventh grade Educa-
tional values stressed are: reading of
musical notation, development of
good tone and the ability to express
oneself with confidence on a musical
instrument. Also stressed are pride in
personal achievement, concern tor
group results, and the discipline of
concentrating on details to build con-
fidence and ability. Intermediate In-
strumental Class; a specialized class
for students having had one or rwo
semesters of work in beginning in-
strumental class. This class is open to
all grades. It provides a chance for
students to work with symphonic
music of easy to medium difficulty.
The educational values stressed are:
continuing exploration of musical ex-
pression, building of confidence in
personal abilities, and striving to do
one's best. Senior Band is a special-
ized class for students with at least
one year or the equivalent of begin-
ning or intermediate instrumental




The Band relaxing before class begins.




The Girls' Chorus performing at the Christmas Concert



class. This is an activity group. It
serves the school by providing music
for assemblies, football games, pep
assemblies, and other occasions. Con-
certs are planned to expose the stu-
dent to the classical and modern mu-
sical world. Students are encouraged
to participate in musical groups of all
kinds. These include college, commu-



nity, and jazz groups. Values stressed
are; self discipline, appreciation and
toleration of new sounds and musical
experience, and exploration of the
student's abilities in music. The
music program also provides courses
in 7th and 8th grade chorus and sen-
ior chorus where students learn how
to sing and read music.




Ted Scott and Steve Aponte perform at the elementary school.






MEMBERS OF THE BAND


Flute


Trumpet


Ann Launtzen


Sieve Aponte


Kaihy Dexter


Cheryl Olsen


Linda Mendenhall


Ron Palser


Deshea Mason


Ed Golden


Ann Loyd


Jim Valentine


Chns Benson


Pedro Simmons


Sue McCullough


Drummond McNaughton


Obct


Craig Robertson


Gerry Blanchett


Allen Richardson


Cathy Terwilliger


Cheycnn Rivera


Bauoon


Tim Blanchard


Susan Willis


Ray Jackson


Chern Hieronymus


Trombone


El'Sop. a.


Paul Bleicher


Ed Bnngas


Billy Gilespie


Ann Cinilli


Beverly Olsen


Clarinets


Nancy Gregg


Lmcb Merrick


Wayne West


Ann Terwilliger


George Rivera


Barbara Blocmer


Fritz Van Woondenberg


LuAnn Ware


Bobby Hughes


Debbie Jacket*


Tuba


Emily Daniel


Don Olsen


Colleen Johnson


Guy Damiani


Debbie Meeker


Bass


Linda Hess


Gregg Grist


Debbie Pate


Drums


Patry Rodriguez


Dan Valentine


Thomas Wesley


Gaspar Sayoc


Alice Stiebritz


Mike Williams


Kathy Balmer


Robert Fernandez


Jim Collins


John Alexams


Thomas Behre




Alexis Coleman




Jeancttc Hernandez




Alio Clarinet




Susan Ridge




Sylvia Vamprine




Bass Clarinets




Tony Barr




Mardettc Garner




Sop. Sax




Libby Palser




Alio Sax




Jim Childress




Karen Merrick




Roy Gott




Edythe Marsh




Joanne Reid




Tenor Sax




Robin Pntham




Ted Scott




Peter Sanchez




French Horn




Bonnie W.lln




Rita Boyland




Willie Santiago




Baritone




James Bleicher




Mike B|orncbv




James Jones




Brian Love




Jimmy Huffman





"The important thing is to act nonchalant abc t



hotographer in our midst.'



Ronald Palsei



more measures to



Physical Education




BARBARA L. CAMPBELL Physi-
cal Education; B.S. Ed., Black Hills
State College; Graduate Credit, Wash.
State Univ., Central Wash. State Col-
lege and BHST. "Be quick to criticize
but if you do have a solution to
go with the criticism!"




LOUIS DEDEAUX Physical Edu-
cation; B.S., Oklahoma A&M Col-
lege; M.S., Oklahoma State Univ.
"Find out what you can do best as
early as possible, then take pride in
yourself that your doing it as well as
you can."




JUNE FATTOROSI Physical
Education; B.S., Southeastern La.
Univ.; M.A., Univ. Southern Miss.
"Mature enough in developing inter-
nal discipline to gradually replace the
external disciplines required during
childhood."




JOAN F. HARRIS Physical Edu-
cation; A.B., Canal Zone Jr. College;
B.S., Barry College; M.A., New York
University. "Don't seek an escape
from the pressures accompanying
your youth through cheap thrills that
could ruin your whole life. . You
can't afford to throw away your young
years. The clock can't be stopped or
turned back."




DOUG LITTON Phy Ed.; Mas-
ter's, Miss. State University. "Keep
training rules and always beat Bal-
boa and College!"




h







Gym can be relaxing!




Gym can be hard work!'



48





Ill




Marian Kredell, Carol Ross, Donna Graham, Shelley Lund, Jane Paulson, Beth Carter. The
PURPLE PASSION presenting their famous act.



Aurelia Williams. Supergirl Willie is at it
again!



The importance of physical, as
well as mental development in
achieving success in a highly complex
society was stressed by the physical
education department. Its aims were
to teach good sportsmanship and a
sense of fair play, to discipline the
mind, and to educate students in lei-
sure time activities which can be car-
ried into adulthood. The department
strove to give each student, regardless
of his stage of development a chance
to develop his skills, his attitude, and
his physique.

During the year 1970-71, Cristobal
High School's girls' physical educa-
tion classes participated in basketball,
volleyball, tumbling, track, tennis,
and various other sports. The boys'
physical education classes participated
in football, baseball, basketball, swim-
ming, weightlifting, and track.
Through these activities as well as in-
tramural and varsity sports, the de-
partment succeeded in achieving its
goals.



.



M



* i '4 >



4P



l*M8SB




'iiim-fi



i



3- A



U



'I thought speedball was bad, but hockey beats them al





I




'Keep your hands on vour hips so your pants won't fall down.'



49



Science









PAUL H1ERONYMUS Chemis-
try, Math; B.S., East Centra] State
College, M.N.S., University of Okla-
homa. "Have an open mind and
then use it."




Michael McCann, Kenneth Hill. "Now this will make me healthy, wealthy, and wise.'



CHS boasted a wide-ranging
science curriculum. The student who
followed this program can be assured
of a solid foundation in scientific
knowledge. The courses offered were
Life Science, Earth Science, Introduc-
tory Physical Science, Biology, Chem-
istry, and Physics.

The seventh-grade Life Science
course taught the basis of life and the
student's role in the realm of living
things. Earth Science, offered to



eighth-graders, was an interesting
study of the structure and function of
the world and its surrounding envi-
ronment. Introductory Physical
Science was a preliminary laboratory
course. Students were taught the pro-
cedures of scientific research and dis-
covery. Biology offered a change from
the world of physical actions and
reactions. This course was highlight-
ed by three dissections during the
year. A basic course in Chemistry ac-.



quainted students with methods of
scientific thinking and problem solv-
ing. Emphasis was placed on perform-
ing laboratory experiments and reach-
ing logical conclusions. Physics, the
science of measurement, dealt primar
ily with practical applications of
science in daily life. Vector analysis
and other physical aspects of science
were the major concepts studied in
this course.





Mad scientists at work!





WvM

EMMA LOUISE MASON Life
Science 7; A.B Randolph-Macon
Woman's College, M.A., Colgate
University. "In order for students to
learn they must be an active partici-
pant which requires much more than
mere physical presence."



50





JAMES D. NORMAN Biology;
B.S., Michigan State Univ.; MA,
Oregon State Univ. "Live, love and be
happy for tomorrow we die." "Smile
and have a full life."



"Beware of this plant!





LUKE T. PALUMBO Introducto-
ry Physical Science; B.S., Northwest
Missouri State College; M. Ed., Univ.
of Florida. "Things could be better."



CHARLES T REEVES Physics,
Earth Science, Mathematics, Driver
Education; B.S., B.A., M.A., Arizona
State University. "To thyself be hon-
est and think before you act."





Nai-Yuen Shum. "I think the one I just
cut up is the one I needed."



The formula for problem No. 2 is not on the clock!



si



Social Sciences




ROBERT BERGER Soc. Studies,
B.A., Michigan State U.; A.C., Gtand
Rapids J.C "Get the most education
you can and try to make this world ol
ours a better place in which to live.



The purpose of the social science
courses offered at CHS was to help
students learn about their world; its
past, its present, and its relation to
them both now and in the future.

The aim of the social studies in-
structor was to aid the student in
learning to view history in a objective
and unbiased manner, and to give
him a broader approach to such prob-
lems as national and international
relations. Social Science courses of-
fered at CHS included Geography,
World History, U.S. History, and




Cheryl Coleman, Mrs. Condon, Michael
MtCann. "Now who is on the pro side and
who is on the con side?"




*s



* k



MARY CONDON World Hist.,
U.S. Hist.; B.S., Northern Michigan
College. "Be sincere about everything
you do, particularly about getting an
education."



American Institutions.

Geography dealt with the study of
maps, climates, and the physical fea-
tures of various countries. World His-
tory was the study of the different na-
tions' pasts and their relationships to
one another. U.S. History provided
the student with knowledge of our
nation's past and its accomplishments
and led him to a better understanding
of our nation. American Institutions
taught the student about the work-
ings of government and the basic



k



WILLIAM J. GANSEN American
Institutions Social Studies 8; MA.,
University ot Michigan; MATE.,
Purdue Univ. "Treat others as you
would like to be treated."



principles of economics.

The objective of all social science
courses was to lessen misunderstand-
ing of the people of other nations and
to help the students learn to respect
cultures other than their own.

This year, CHS social science
teachers attended a special workshop
conducted by Dr. Edwin Tenton of
Carnegie Mellon University, Pitts-
burgh, Pennsylvania. He was an advo-
cate of the use of original source ma-
terial in the teaching of social studies.




Dr. Fenton gives a lecture to a U.S. History class.








EUGENE T. GREGG U.S. Histo-
ry; A. A., CZ. College; B.A., Colorado
State; M.A., Univ. of Colorado.
"Strive to become rich."




ROANALD JACOBS World Ge-
ography; Bachelors, Southeastern
State College; Masters, Northeastern
State College. "Make the best of what
ever situation you are faced with."




ROBERT McCULLOUGH Social
Studies; B.S., St. Cloud State College;
M.A., Univ. of Northern Colorado.
"Be kind to animals."




Now this is a real classroom with real students!





Mr. Gansen. "This is an example of a good



Long live democracy!



53



KOZC guilds Men Melps Students




'E" Company







The Reserve Officers Training
Corps at CHS was established to help
prepare high school students for fu-
ture careers in the Armed Forces, and
for ROTC in college, should they de-
cide to take it. It's chief aim was to
help students achieve the maturity
necessary to become officers and lead-
ers of men.

This year the ROTC was headed
by CPT. Juan F. Mata, who was as-
sisted by SFS Murphy, SFC Picoli,
and SSG Alford. The ROTC unit at
Cristobal consisted of "E" Company,
"F" Company, Color Guard, Drill
Team, Rifle Team, and the Battalion
Staff. The staff this year included Bat-
talion Commander Major John Mar-
tin; Battalions sponsor, lLt. Hila
Lyman; Si, 2Lt. Donald Byrd; S2,
2Lt. Daniel Valentine; S3, 2Lt. Jaime
Darraza; and S4, 2Lt. Lewis Valdez.
The Drill Team was commanded by
lLt. Eligio Thomas, and sponsored by
lLt. Jean Smith. "E" Company was
commanded by lLt. Dennis Maxwell
and sponsored by lLt. Jackie Spring-
er. "F" Company was commanded by
lLt. Isaac Heres and sponsored by
lLt. Denise Foshee.

Reviews were presented by the
ROTC each nine-weeks during the
school year. A large and important re-
view was Field Night, held on March
27th. Among the types of competi-
tion included were: personal, squad,
platoon, company, and most exciting
of all. Drill Team competition. An-
other exciting competition of the
school year was the Brigade Review.
In order to make competition fair, the
Brigade Review and Field Night are
held on the Atlantic and Pacific sides
on alternate years.



"F" Company



54



become Officers Md Ceaders




CAPTAIN MATA ROTC; B.A,
Pan American College. "Accomplish
what you set out to do at all cost,
with whatever resources available."



SFC MURPHY ROTC. "Don't
make the same mistake twice. Do it
right the first time and you won't
have to do it again."



SFC PICOL1 ROTC



SSG ALFORD ROTC




'There's really nothing to it," claims Denise Foshee with a confident grin."

:... a





ROTC cadets and sponsors attend Jungle Operations Training Center.




Steve Aponte. "Gee, it doesn't look like a
very long drop to me are you sure I need
a parachute?"



55





ROTC Drill Team




ROTC Color Guard



Major John Martin, lLt. Hila Lyman, lLt. Eligio Thomas





Steve Aponte, George Rivera, Tony Lyons.



ROTC Girls' Drill Team



Zhe tighter Side Of KOZC Cife




Cadets steal a moment of relaxation during ten grueling days at leadership school.





"Hear no evil, speak no evil, see no evil.'



"So this is what they teach you at leader-
ship school."




"F" Company Commander Isaac Heres "drops for ten" with a smile.



57



girls' 'Drill Zeam Wins
Veteran's Day Parade





The 1971 Girls' Drill Team at
CHS consisted of twenty-nine girls.
They were under the expert leader-
ship of Commander Jan Bjorneby.
The girls performed during halftime
at all home football games in the
Tiger Stadium. They also marched in
the quarterly ROTC Reviews. As an
additional activity, they participated
in the annual Veteran's Day Parade.
At this time, they were selected as the
outstanding girls' drill team on the
Isthmus. The girls considered this an
honor which made the long hours of
after-school practice well-worth the
time and effort it required.

The Drill Team also helped with
Orientation Day for the new students
of CHS. They provided guidance and
assistance when necessary.



Roberta Cole

(squad leader)
Lynn Gregg

co-commander)
Nance Edmondson

(squad leader)
Linda Brock
Pattie Hauke
Kathy Deraps
Viana Ostrea
Ann Terwilliger
Ann Gonzales



10. Kathy Milligan


19.


Terry Overstreet


11. Kathy Pursley


20.


Gigi Colon


12. Marian Kredell


21,


Katie McGilberry


(squad leader)


22.


Mary Norval


13. Carol Ross


23.


Cathy Gercich


14. Barbara Bloemer


24.


Nina Gercich


15. Janet Brandenburg


25.


Regina Dominguez


(squad leader)


26.


El lie Blevins


16. Donna Graham


27.


Carol Wertz


17. Sherry Coleman


28.


Marrianne Verruno


18. Mounyen Lyman


29.


Jan Bjorneby



(co-comdr.)




mmJmE



G r r



f Pi < .< ( <



.


Majorettes Perform "During

basketball
Qames





Despite overwhelming odds
against them, the majorettes Patty
Hill and Tita Cobb, presented a fine
performance on the last Junior Varsi-
ty game. They carried on their tradi-
tion by performing at the basketball
games. To be a majorette, one must
be willing to devote intensive hours
of practice over the summer, and al-
most regular practice after school
when school begins.

Tryouts were held during the
month of April.



Patty Hill and Tita Cobb



59




CHS

Commences

year With

Jive New

Zeachers



NEW TEACHERS: Mr. Lassila, Mr. Johnson, Mrs. Williams, Mr. Fite, Mrs. Stronach

MMitiypuiiwi

Cristobal High School teachers
began the 1970-71 school year on Au-
gust 31. On this date, the faculty at-
tended a special meeting at which
school policy and plans for the com-
ing year were discussed. Mr. Speir, as-
sistant Supervisor of U.S. Secondary
Schools and Mr. Cook, Supervisor of
Instruction, U.S. Secondary Schools
attended and were introduced to the
faculty. Following speeches by Mr.
Pfau, Mr. Jeffries, and Mr. Speir; cof-
fee was served to the new teachers in
the home economics room.







We must be prepared, tor a new school year begins.





Varying expressions reflect the faculty's concern for the new school year.



Mr. Pfau (principal of CHS) gives last
minute advice and information to the rest
of the faculty.



Car We Club Sponsors Cultural Exchange
Program With Colon Migh Schools




"I knew I should have brought my lunch!"







'Mrs. Fattorosi won't let us on the gym floor in our oxfords."



In order to provide students from
a Panamanian school with an oppor-
tunity to observe the workings of the
U.S. school system, the members of
the Caribe Club invited the students
of St. Mary's and St. Joseph's acade-
mies in Colon to visit CHS. On the
morning of December 9th, the entire
senior class of St. Mary's Academy
and a number of students from St. Jo-
seph arrived by bus. Each girl was as-
signed to a member of the Caribe
Club and whom they accompanied to
class. They had originally planned to
leave at noon, but refreshed by a
lunch provided by the Caribe Club,
they attended afternoon classes as
well. Both Panamanian and American
students agree that they had profited
from this cultural exchange.




"You're kidding! I'm glad I came so I can
catch up on the news."



61



Seniors




Sandra Alberga




Jay Alonis




Almanubia C. Austin



SANDRA ALBERGA

June 26, 1951

Colon, Republic of Panama

Entering CHS in the second semester of her junior year
Sandra quickly became an active member ot her class. She
served as treasurer of the Language Lab Club and secretary of
the Spanish Club. Sandra graduated in January 1971, and left
for Riverside City College where she plans to major in busi-
ness.

JAY ALONIS
January 25, 1953
Ancon, Canal Zone

Jay has attended Canal Zone schools for twelve years, six of
these were at CHS. In his senior year, Jay was a member of
the Caribe Club and the varsity track team. He plans to study
engineering and computer science at Louisiana Polytechnic
Institute after graduation.

ALMANUBIA CARMEN AUSTIN

October 13, 1952

Colon, Republic of Panama

Alma came to CHS in her junior year, having previously
attended St. Joseph's in Colon. She was a member of the
Spanish Club, and participated in volleyball intramurals.
Alma plans to attend Canal Zone College and major in medi-
cal technology.

PATRICIA YAMILET AUSTIN

December 13, 1952

Colon, Republic of Panama

Athletics have occupied much of Patsy's time in high
school. She was a member of the basketball and volleyball
teams in her freshman year and captain of both in her sopho-
more year when she also participated in tennis. In her junior
year, she lettered in three sports and also served as president
of the GAA and co-captain of the Powder Puff speedball
team. Patsy plans to attend CZC and major in physical educa-
tion.

TERRI LYNN BAKER
November 6, 1952
Anchorage, Alaska

This was Terri's first year at CHS. She participated in varsi-
ty volleyball, Het future plans include studies at the Universi-
ty of Arkansas.

ROBERT EARL BARR

March 18, 1952
Charleston, South Carolina

Robert has attended Canal Zone schools all his life, six
years at CHS. He plans to become a policeman.




Terry L. Baker




Robert E. Barr



62




Michael Francis Bcale




Elizabeth Blevi



JEAN LYNN BASSETT
June 9, 1933

Jeannie has attended C.Z. schools for ten years, five of
these at CHS. During her high school years, she was a
member of the Spanish Club, the swimming team, and the
Girls' Chorus. Her future plans include attending the Col-
lege of Bible in California, hopefully on a music scholar-
ship.

MICHAEL FRANCIS BEALE
July 16, 1953
St. Petersburg, Florida

Mike came to Cristobal High School in the second se-
mester of his sophomore year. He was a member of the
varsity basketball team. In his senior year he was elected
Homecoming "king". Mike plans to attend college in the
United States.

JAN TERI BJORNEBY
April 26, 1953
Bremerton, Washington

Jan has been an active member of the class of '71. She
was a member of the Girls' Drill team for three years, and
served as commander in her senior year. She was an S.A.
alternate in her freshman year. As a junior, she was a mem-
ber of the French Club and class treasurer. In her senior
year, she served as secretary of the GAA and as a member
of the Senior Privilege Committee. Sports have occupied
much of Jan's time. She participated in speedball, volley-
ball, tennis, band, -basketball intramurals, and was a mem-
ber of the varsity volleyball and tennis teams. Jan plans to
attend college in the U.S.

ELIZABETH BLEVINS
January 2, 1952
Colon, Republic of Panama

Ellie has attended Cristobal High School throughout
her high school career. She participated in intramural
speedball during her freshman and sophomore years, and
in basketball and volleyball during all four years. As a sen-
ior, she was a member of the Girls' Drill Team. Her future
plans include studv to become either an airline stewardess
or a veterinarian.

LANA GAVE BOONE
July 10, 1953
Abingdon, Virginia

Lana has been an active member of the senior class at
CHS. She was a member of the Caribe Club, and served as
treasurer of the Language Lab Club in her senior vear. She
was a member of the yearbook staff for three years, and as
a senior, served as copy editor. In her junior year, she be-
came a member of the National Honor Society, and was
elected president. As a freshman, she received an Outstand-
ing Student Award, and in her junior vear, an award for ex-
cellence in the Russian language. As a junior, she partici-
pated in the NSF SST Program at Lovola University. In
her senior year, she was a member of the Senior Class Ad-
visory Council and Board of Directors, and served as secre-
tary of the Student Advisory Committee. Lana's future
plans include majoring in computer science at Loyola Uni-
versity in New Orleans where she received a four-year
scholarship.

VIVIAN VICTORIA BOSEMAN

February 25, 1948

Colon, Republic of Panama

Vivian has attended CHS for each of her four years in
high school. Her future plans include the possibility of a
modeling career.




Senior Homecoming "King" Mike Beale is
escorted on royal walk around the gym.




Vivian Victoria Boseman



63




Kathryn Rachel Burgess




Carmen Luisa Butler



Donald Patrick Byrd






"tr"




tlizabeth Paulette Carter



KATHRYN RACHEL BURGESS
March 10, 1953

Yokohama, Japan

Kathy has attended CHS throughout her high school
career, and has been a member of the Girls' Glee Club for
four years, and the Girls' Drill Team for two. After gradu-
ation, Kathy plans to attend a College of Arts and Music,
in preparation for a musical career.

CARMEN LUISA BUTLER

November 12, 1952

Colon, Republic of Panama

Carmen has been a participant in many organizations
and clubs during her years at CHS. She served as secretary-
treasurer of the Caribe and Nurses's Aide Clubs, Historian
of the French Club, Vice-President of the Language Lab |
Club, and treasurer of the senior class. She also served on
various committees and the Senior Class Board of Direc-
tors. In her senior year, she was elected to the National
Honor Society. Carmen plans to enter Barry College in
Miami and study computer science.

DONALD PATRICK BYRD
June 6, 1952
Balboa, Canal Zone

Donald has attended Canal Zone schools all his life.
Throughout his high school years, he has been interested
in dramatics, playing leading roles in several Thespian pro-
ductions, and serving as treasurer of the Thespian Society
in his senior year. In the summer of 1970, he attended a
summer institute in drama. Donald plans to attend Canal
Zone College for a year, and then transfer to the U.S.










Armando Cabrera




/



Raul Eduardo Castro



64



"Cubby" Clement, Kathy Kraus.

just naturally have beautiful legs."
ARMANDO CABRERA
April 26, 1953
Santurce, Peurto Rico

This was Armando's first year at CHS. He previously at-
tended Antilees High School In Puerto Rico where he par-
ticipated in varsity track. His future plans include. the
study of accounting and business administration at the
University of Puerto Rico.

ELIZABETH PAULETTE CARTER
March 3, 1953
Gartersville, Georgia

Beth came to CHS from Georgia where she was active
in athletics and other school activities. She participated in
soccer, softball, badminton, and archery intramurals, and
was co-captain of the varsity soccer and softball teams. She
was also a cheerleader, a member of the FHA, vice-presi-
dent of the FTA, secretary of the Debate Club, and a mem-
ber of the yearbook and newspaper staffs. She was vice-
president of her freshman class, and secretary of her sopho-
more class. This year she was a member of the Senior Class
Advisory Council and Board of Directors. Beth plans to
study psychology, planning a career in social work or per-
haps teaching.

RAUL EDUARDO CASTRO

July 20, 1953

Colon, Republic of Panama

Raul has participated in many clubs during his five
years at CHS. He was a member of the Caribe Club, the
French Club, the yearbook staff, and served as president of
the Art and Spanish Clubs and vice-president of the Lan-
guage Lab Club. Raul served on the committee for the Jr.-
Sr. Prom, and as a member of the Senior Class Advisory
Council and Board of Directors. Raul plans to attend Am-
herst College in Massachusetts and take a liberal arts
course.



Class

Officers

Simplify

"Senior

Spirit"




CLASS SPONSOR
Mr. Louis Fattorosi




SENIOR CLASS OFFICERS: Kathy DcRaps, Vice President; Robert Phillips, President;
Judy McLain, Secretary; and Carmen Butler, Treasurer.



The 1970-71 school year was one
of innovation for CHS seniors. Under
the leadership of capable class offi-
cers, and with the expert guidance of
their sponsor, Mr. Fattorosi, the sen-
ior class set out to do great things.
The first project was to secure an
open lunch. A committee was estab-
lished to prepare and submit for ap-
proval a list of regulations, and the
privilege was granted. In order to pro-
vide a sounding board for the com-
plaints and suggestions of seniors, the
Advisor)' Council, consisting of
twenty representative seniors was es-
tablished. Another new group was
the Senior Board of Directors, made
up of representatives elected by stu-
dents in the senior class. Both groups
worked hard to make the year a suc-
cessful one.



Among the special activities of the
year were a trip to the other side to
visit Canal Zone College, the Senior
Banquet, and the Junior- Senior Prom.
School events of special significance
to seniors were the Jamboree where
Wendy Flores reigned as queen, the
homecoming game victory and the
dance which followed with Rosemary
Christian as queen, and the Christmas
formal at which the Hall of Fame
winners were announced.

It was a year which included those
once in a lifetime events which are so
much a part of being a senior; se-
lecting invitations and cards, senior
skip day, baccalaureate, and of course,
graduation. Altogether, it was a great
year one which the Class of '71
will never forget.



65




Patty Ann Christian




Rosemary Christian




Caleb Clement Jr.



PATTY ANN CHRISTIAN
June 26, 1942
Bluefield, West Virginia

Patty was a member of the Pep Club at her school in Vir-
ginia before coming to CHS. She was a member of the year-
book staff here, and in her senior year, served as publicity
chairman of the Thespian plays. Patty plans to return to Vir-
ginia after graduation, and enroll in a beautician school.

ROSEMARY CHRISTIAN
October 5, 1953
Coronado, California

Rosemary has attended Cristobal High School for three
years. She participated in "B" League basketball in her sopho-
more year, and the Girls' Drill Team in her senior year. As a
senior, she was selected queen of the Homecoming Dance.
Rosemary plans to attend Texas A&I University where she
will pursue the study of medicine.

CALEB CLEMENT
October 17, 1953
Gatun, Canal Zone

"Cubby" is one of the outstanding athletes in the class of
'71. He has participated in football, baseball, basketball, and
track intramurals, and was a member of the varsity football,
baseball, basketball, and track teams. He was a member of the
"21" Club in his freshman year, and of the "C" Club for the
other three years. "Cubby" plans to attend Canal Zone Col-
lege.

FAITH EMILY COAD

February 26, 1953
Flint, Michigan

Faith entered CHS in the second semester of her junior
year. She was a junior varsity cheerleader at her former school
in Michigan. After graduation. Faith plans to become a travel
agent.

FREDERICK COLE
April 13, 1953
Balboa, Canal Zone

ROTC has occupied much of Fred's time in high school.
He was a member of the Boys' Drill Team, and as a senior, a
member of Batallion Staff. He was also a member of the Na-
tional Honor Society and the Senior Class Board of Directors.
Fred's future plans include attending college.

GARY LEE COLLINS

November 13, 1952
Hampton, Virginia

Gary was president of his freshman class at CHS. He was
a member of the "21" Club in his freshman and sophomore
years. Gary participated in intramural and varsity basketball
during all four years in high school. He was a member of the
Student Advisory Committee and the Inter-school Dress Code
Committee. In his senior year, he was initiated into the Na-
tional Honor Society. Gary plans to attend Case Institute of
Technology in Cleveland, Ohio.



Class
Visits
Zone




Faith Emily Coad





Frederick Cole




Gary Lee Collins



66



Of '71

Canal
College




Jeannette Ramona Cox




Michael Edward Dexter



JEANNETTE RAMONA COX
August 31, 1952
Managua, Nicaragua

Jeannette was a member of the French Club for four years.
She was a member of the Nurses' Aides Club, and served as
secretary for two years. She was also active in Pink Girls.
Jeannette worked on the year book during each of her four
years in high school, and in her senior year, served as editor.
Jeannette was a member of the National Honor Society, and
served as secretary. She was also a member of the Student Ad-
visory Committee and the Philosophian Society. Jeannette
plans to attend Canal Zone College and later the University
of Florida, studying for a career in medicine. She also plans to
study Spanish during the summer, before attending CZC, in
Mexico or Spain.

KATHLEEN ANNE DERAPS
June 25, 1953
Ancon, Canal Zone

Kathy was a member of the Caribe Club for three years,
and was a mamber of the advertising staff for the yearbook in
her senior year. Kathy participated in volleyball and speedball
intramurals and was a member of the junior Powder Puff
team. She worked on many committees, and was vice-presi-
dent of the senior class. Kathy plans to attend college in San
Antonio, Texas where she will obtain her Bachelor of Science
degree for her career as a registered nurse.

MICHAEL EDWARD DEXTER
July I, 1953
Fort Benning, Georgia

Mike came to CHS in his junior year, and rapidly became
an active member of the class of '71. In his senior year, he was
president of the CHS Student Association. Mike continued his
participation in athletics at CHS, playing on the varsity tennis
and baseball teams. Mike was a member of the Caribe Club,
the "C" Club, and the National Honor Society. Mike plans to
study engineering at William and Mary or the University of
New Mexico.

PEDRO JUAN DIAZ
February 26, 1952
San Juan, Puerto Rico

Pedro attended CHS for three years. He was a ROTC pla-
toon leader, and a member of the Boys' Drill team. Pedro
plans to enlist in the Army's Special Forces, and Ranger train-
ing, and to attend Officer Candidate School.

WENDY MARIE FLORES
November 1 1 953
Leesville, Louisiana

Wendy was the 1SF0 Jamboree Queen. She was a member
of the Girls' Drill team in her sophomore year. Wendy was a
member of the Senior Advisory and Jr.-Sr. Prom Committees.
She plans to attend CZ.C for two years, and then transfer to
the United States.

DENISE ANNETTE FOSHEE

February 24, 1953

New Orleans, Louisiana

Denise was a cheerleader and an ROTC sponsor in her sen-
ior year. She lettered in tehnis in eleventh grade. Denise was
vice-president of the Caribe Club, and a member of the
French Club and the National Honor Society. Denise plans to
attend college and earn a teaching degree.




Pedro Juan Diaz




Wendv Marie Flores




Denise Annette Foshee



67




Brenda Lee Gibson



Sharon Louise Golden




\



Stephen Armand Goulet

V


Patricia Gutierrez


1*


£



John Michael Hannah



Allen Scott Harmon



JOHN B. FUNDERBURK
January 3, 1953
Tucson, Arizona

John participated in varsity track and football during his four years
at CHS. He served on the Jamboree Parry Committee. John plans to
become either a machinist or a diesel mechanic after graudation.

CATHERINE ANN GERCICH
January 1. 1953
Lynnwood, California

Cathy has attended CHS for four years. She participated in volleyball
intramurals during her freshman and sophomore years. As a senior, she
was a Member of the Girls' Drill Team. Cathy also served on theJr.-Sr.
Prom Committee. Her future plans include study at a college in Cali-
fornia or Florida.

BRENDA LEE GIBSON

December 6, 1953

Fort Bragg, North Carolina

Brenda entered CHS at the beginning of her sophomore year. Sh
participated in swimming, tennis, basketball, and volleyball intrami
rals, and was a member of the varsity tennis team. After graduatioi
Brenda would like to attend a junior college, travel extensively, an
pursue a career in hairdressing and art.

SHARON LOUISE GOLDEN

April 15, 1953
Anniston, Alabama

Sharon was a member of the CHS senior band for five years, playing
the flute. She officiated at varsity basketball games in her freshman
year. After graduation, she plans to attend a a nursing school in Miami,
Florida.

STEPHEN ARMAND GOULET

September 22, 1952
Somerville, Massachusetts

Stephen entered CHS at the beginning of his senior year. At his for-
mer high school he was a member of the A.F.S., the Chess Club, the
Math League, and the Science Club, and received an award for being
the best chemistry student in the junior class. He also participated in
varsity track and football. Stephen plans a career as a math teacher.

PATRICIA GUTIERREZ
July 20, 1952
Fayetteville, North Carolina

Pat has attended CHS for each of her four years in high school. She
was a member of the Drama Club and assisted with various Thespian
productions. Pat plans to become a woman jockey.

JOHN MICHAEL HANNAH

June 26, 1953

Waynesville, North Carolina

John enjoys motorcycling. He was active in ROTC during his fresh-
man and sophomore years. He served as a cheerleader in the Powder
Puff game, and as a member of the Jamboree Parry Committee. John
plans a career in aeronautical engineering.

ALLEN SCOTT HARMON
September 23, 1952
Annapolis, Maryland

Art is one of Allen's major interests. He was a member of the Art i
Club for two years, serving as president in his junior year. He was also
art editor of the newspaper and the yearbook in his senior year. Allen
was also active in the French Club and Drama Club. He participated in
several plays, and became a Thespian in his senior year. Allen won the
"Voice of Democracy" contest at CHS in his junior year. He plans to
attend the U.S. Merchant Marine Academy, or Chapman Floating Cam-
pus in California. He would like to become an architect or a commer-j
cial artist.



68



Caribbean College Club
Mosts "Senior flight"




DIANE FRANCES HAUKE

August 21. 1951

Colon, Republic of Panama

Diane has been an active member of many clubs and organizations
at CHS. She was a member of the French Club, the Spanish Club, the
Philosophian Society, the Nurses Aides, the Yearbook staff, and the
Senior Board of Directors; serving as an officer in several of the clubs.
She also served on the Cafeteria, Senior Advisory, and various dance
committees. Diane plans to pursue a course in business administration,
with plans for a career as an executive secretary.

PAUL HERBERT HEADY
March 6, 1953
Olney, Illinois

Paul attended CHS for only two years. At his former high school in
Salem, Illinois, he was a member of the Spanish and Pep Clubs, and
the varsity track team. He participated in the ROTC program at CHS.
Paul plans to major in Public Arts in college with a job in a radio or
television studio in mind.

ISAAC HERES
January- 4, 1953
Puerto Armuelles, Chiriqui

Isaac was active in ROTC throughout his high school years, partici-
pating on the Boys' Drill team, and in his senior year, serving as com-
mander of "F" Company. He participated in basketball intramurals, and
as a freshman and sophomore was a member of the varsitv football
team. After graduation, Isaac plans to attend Florida State University.

MARK STEPHEN HERRING
June 15, 1953
Ancon, Canal Zone

Mark has attended Canal Zone schools all his life. Six of these years
were at Cristobal High School. After graduation, Mark plans to learn a
trade.

On Tuesday, January- 19th, at 7:30
p.m., at the Women's Club Building
in Margarita, the members of the
class of '71, their parents, and friends
attended "Senior Night." This activi-
ty is sponsored annually by the Schol-
arship Committee of the Caribbean
College Club.

The program included a panel of
speakers from various vocational
fields and was stimulating and inter-
esting for all.

Following the meeting, refresh-
ments were served. At this time, the
seniors were given an opportunity to
question each of the speakers individ-
ually concerning his or her special in-
terests.




LCdr. C. W. Murphy, Mrs. Linda Nelson, Capt. A. L. Gallin, Miss Leslie Berger, Mr. Mer-
rick E. Banks, and Dr. Levin.



69




Stephanie Bridiga lilies



Eric Thomas Irion



Senior Class Sleets



FREDERICK JOHN HIGHLEY

October 19, 1953

Colon, Republic of Panama

Fred has attended Canal Zone schools all his life, including six years
at CHS. He participated in football intramurals.

NANCY HUSON

May 1, 1953

Colon, Republic of Panama

Nancy was in Nurses Aides for three years, and was a Pink Girl for
two years. She was homeroom representative in her sophomore year.
She participated in volleyball intramurals and in the Powder Puff
Speedball Game. Nancy plans to attend Brigham Young University.



STEPHANIE BRIGIDA ILLIES

October 2, 1953

Colon, Republic of Panama

Stephie was in the Spanish Club, Language Lab Club, and the Girls'
Glee Club. She took part in volleyball and speedball intramurals. Ste-
phie plans to go to college and become an occupational therapist.

ERIC THOMAS IRION

July 21, 1953
Oceanside, California

Eric attended CHS for five years. He participated in basketball intra-
murals in his sophomore year. Eric plans to go to college.



ROBERT RUDOLPH JOHNSON

January 8, 1953
Minneapolis, Minnesota

Robert has been at CHS for three years,
graduation.



He plans to travel after



SHERRY ANN KERN
July 19, 1953
Mobile, Alabama

Sherry was in the Caribe Club and was an S.A. representative. She
participated in Volleyball and was on the Drill Team. Sherry plans to
attend C.Z.C., then go to the States to earn a degree in data processing.




Robert Rudolph Johnson



Sherry Ann Kern



70



ftoard Of 'Directors




ANTONIA KLASOVSKY
March 12, 1953
Cristobal, Canal Zone

Toni was on the Student Advisory Committee and the Board of Di-
rectors. She plans to attend a junior college in Florida and major in
humanities.

FREDERICK EUGENE KNAUSS
October 15, 1952
Nashville, Tennessee

Fred was on the Swim Team and earned his letter. He plans to join
the Army and become a helicopter pilot. He wants to go to Vietnam.



Antonia Klasovsky



Frederick Eugene Knauss



NEAL A. LaROCHE
August 28, 1952
England

Neal attended CHS for only one year. He plans to become an art
teacher.

ANN MARIE LAURITZEN
May 24, 1955
Baltimore, Maryland

Ann Marie was in the Caribe Club and the Band. She plans to attend
college and major in Biology and Oceanography.




Neal A. LaRoche



Ann Marie Lauritzen




SENIOR BOARD OF DIRECTORS
Front Column: Diane Hauke, Carmen Butler, Mike Dexter, Judy McLain. Center Column: Robert Phillips, Wendy Flores, Raul Castro, Kathy
DeRaps. Back Column: Lana Boone, Beth Carter, Dennis Maxwell, Denise Foshee.



71







%



>



* I




Rodrigo Lindo



Shelley Madison Lunu




Hila P Lyman



John Hartley Martin






Jaime Martinez



M



Dennis Paul Maxwell




Judy Ann McLain



Sarah Louise McLean



RODRIGO LINDO

April 23, 195 3

Panama City, Republic of Panama

"Rod" was a member of the Spanish Club tor four years and was sec-
retary-treasurer in his sophomore year. He worked on several commit-
tees. Rod plans to attend college.

SHELLEY MADISON LUND
June 10, 1953
Buffalo, New York

Shelley was a cheerleader for two years and participated in basketball
and volleyball. She was a member of the G.A.A. and the Caribe Club.
Shelley plans to attend college in New York and become an English
teacher.



HILA P. LYMAN
October 14, 1933
Bremerton, Washington

Hila lettered in swimming in both her sophomore and freshman
years. She was secretary of the junior class. Hila was on the Girl's Drill
Team, and was Drill Team and Battalion sponsor. Hila plans to attend
Secretarial School.

JOHN HARTLEY MARTIN

March 14, 1953

Panama City, Republic of Panama

John was president of the junior class. He was ROTC Battalion and
Drill Team Commander. He played intramural basketball for four
years. John plans to attend a Military Academy or join the Armed
Forces.



JAIME MARTINEZ

August 5, 1952

Colon, Republic of Panama

Jaime was active in ROTC and was on the first Drill Team to com-
pete in the States. He plans to join the Army as an officer after college.

DENNIS PAUL MAXWELL

April 19, 1953

New York City, New York

Dennis was vice president of his sophomore class. He was in ROTC
four years and was "E" Company Commander. Dennis plans to study
architecture at the University of Florida.



JUDY ANN McLAIN

April 2], 1953

Colon, Republic of Panama

Judy was in Nurses' Aides and the Thespian Society, and was presi-
dent of both in her senior year. Judy won several acting awards and had
parts in several plays. She plans to attend college.

SARAH LOUISE McLEAN
December 9, 1952
Cristobal, Canal Zone-
Sally played basketball and volleyball. She worked on the Junior
Privilege Committee and the Senior Advisory Council. Sally plans to
travel in Europe after graduation.



72




Jane Man- Paulson



JOSE JAIME MEDINA
March 29, 1953
San Jose, California

This was Jose's first year at CHS. He was an S.A. representative, a
member of the Tradewind and Caribbean Staffs, and a ROTC platoon
leader. He was also a member of the varsity football, baseball, and bas-
ketball teams.

SUSAN WARD MENDENHALL
December 23, 1952
Springfield, Ohio

Susan has attended CHS for only rwo years. She was very active in
athletics and other school functions in the U.S. and continued her in-
terest at CHS. She participated in varsity and intramural swimming,
tennis, basketball, and volleyball, and was a member of the GAA.
Susan plans to attend Miami University in Oxford, Ohio, majoring in
physical education.

KATHRYN MARIE MILLIGAN
April 23, 1953
Bozeman, Montana

Kathy was a member of the Nurses' Aides Club, and of the Pink
Girls. She served as a student assistant. Kathy played volleyball in her
freshman year. She also served on various decorating and publicity
committees for plays and dances. In her senior year, she was elected
Carnival Queen. Kathy plans to attend Canal Zone College or Monta-
na State University, majoring in elementary education. After college,
she plans to attend airline stewardess school.

ALEIDA MONTENEGRO

February 14, 1953

Colon, Republic of Panama

"Monty" attended CHS for two years. She was a member of the
Spanish Club and participated in volleyball and basketball intramurals.
Monty plans to attend college and pursue a career as a computer pro-
grammer.

WILLIAM A. MURPHY
July 7, 1953
Fayetteville, North Carolina

"Murph" attended CHS for rwo years. He participated in basketball
intramurals and varsity basketball and football. He was active in
ROTC, and a member of the Boys' Drill Team. He was selected out-
standing MI for the fourth nine weeks. He was also a member of the
senior privilege committee. "Murph" plans to specialize in electronics
in college.

DON ALME OLSF.N
June 6, 1953
Whitefish, Montana

Don was active in the sports program at CHS, participating in varsi-
ty football and swimming and football intramurals. Don plans to at-
tend Canal Zone College, and perhaps transfer to an oceanographic
school.

NEIL CLIFFTON PATTON

February 7, 1952

Colon. Republic of Panama

Neil was one of CHS's most outstanding athletes. He participated in
varsity baseball, track, and football, and lettered every year. He was se-
lected most valuable player of the 1969-^0 school year, and also made
the All Zone Football Team. Neil plans to become an aviator or a den-
tist.

JANE MARY PAULSON
April 10. 1953
Ancon, Canal Zone

Jane participated in volleyball, basketball, and speedball intramurals.
She worked on committees for the Sadie Hawkins Day Dance and the
Jr.-Sr. Prom. Jane plans to attend secretarial school.



73





ROBERT RANDOLPH PHILLIPS
March 16, 1953
Montgomery, Alabama

Robert has been in CHS for three years, and in this time, had be-
come president of the Caribe Club, Vice-President of the NHS, a "C"
Club member, President of the Senior Class, and ROTC Battalion Ex-
ecutive Officer. He lettered in football twice, and twice in baseball. He
also attended the University of Florida for a NSF program, and attend-
ed the Naval Post-graduate School at Monterey, California. Robert
Plans to study pre-law and then go on to Law School.




TOBY RAY PHILLIPS
December 7, 1953
Burgaw, North Carolina

This has been Toby's first year in CHS and he has lettered twice in
track. His future plan is to become a marine biologist.



JOSEPHINE MARIE PORBES
June 11, 1953
New Orleans, Louisiana

Josie has attended Canal Zone Schools for two years. After gradua-
tion, she plans to get a job and plans on going ahead with her musical
education in piano and chorus.

INGRID PORTIER

September 28, 1953
Djakarta, Indonesia

Ingrid has attended CHS all through her high school years. She was as-
sistant stage manager in the play, "Bell, Book, and Candle" and "The
Black Flamingo." She plans to go to the States and get a job.



Josephine Marie Porbes



Ingrid Portier




"Actually, it was worth breaking my leg just to be able to put my feet up in Mr. Bock's class," comments senior, Wally Russon.



74




CHRIS BAILEY RICHARDSON
December 26, 1952
Seattle, Washington

Chris participated in varsity and intramural volleyball during her
three years at CHS. She received a "Driver of the year" award for the
year '69-' 7 0. In her senior year, she was sponsor of "E" company. Chris
was married and plans to continue her education.

JASMIN ANNA RIVERA
October 51. 1955
Cham, Germany

Jasmin was a member of the French Club at CHS. Following gradua-
tion, she plans to attend college, major in languages, and then travel.



DANNY RAY ROBINSON
April 20. 1953
Covington, Kentucky

Danny was a member of the Tradewind Staff, the Caribbean Sports
Parachute Club, the Civics Club, the Drama Club, and the choir. He
played basketball in his sophomore year. Danny plans to attend college
in Texas, Kentucky, or North Carolina.

NESTOR JOHN RODRIGUEZ

September 18. 1955
Sanrurce, Puerto Rico

Nestor has attended CHS for two and a half years. He plans to study
music and architecture after graduation.



Danny Ray Robinson



Nestor John Rodriguez




KAREN LYNN SCHILL
April 25, 1955
Gabon, Ohio

This was Karen's first year at CHS. She was a member of the Span-
ish Club, the G.A.A., and the newspaper staff. In her senior year she-
was editor of the second page (editorial page) of the Tradewind. She
also played tennis in her freshman and senior years. Karen plans to
major in medical technology at Canal Zone College.

NAI-YUEN SHUM

September n, 1955

Macau, China

Nai-Yuen has attended CHS tor two years. He hopes to become a

chemist.



JAMES H. SPANGLER

March 18. 1955

San Pedro, California

This was Jim's first year at Cristobal High School. He participated
in intramural and varsity track at his former school. After graduation.
Jim plans to become an automobile mechanic.

JACQUELINE FAITH SPRINGER
December 8. 1955
Ft. Eustis, Virginia

Jackie was a member of the Caribe Club. She marched with the
Girls' Drill Team, and in her Senior year, was the sponsor of "E" com-
pany. Jackie plans to become an x-ray technician.



Jacqueline Faith Springer



75




Douglas Robert Stevens






Eligio Fernando Thoi





DOUGLAS ROBERT STEVENS

April 11,1

Panama City, Republic of Panama

Doug was a member of the Spanish and Language Lab
Clubs. In his senior year, he served as historian of the first,
and vice-president of the latter. He lettered in baseball in
both his junior and senior years. Doug plans to attend col-
lege in Texas, majoring in languages and history with
plans for a career in the diplomatic corps.

ELIGIO FERNANDO THOMAS
January 7, 1951
Panama City, Republic of Panama

Eligio was active in ROTC at CHS, and in his senior
year, was commander of the boys' Drill Team. He also par-
ticipated in junior varsity basketball. Eligio plans to join
the army, and perhaps later attend college.

LEWIS EDWARD VALDEZ
November 19, I9i5
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

ROTC and dramatic have occupied much ot Lewis'
time in high school. He has attended Leadership School
and participated in several Thespian productions. He
played football in his junior year, and was also elected to
the National Honor Society. Lewis plans to attend college,
and perhaps later join the army.

JOSE F. VALENCIA

jum 8, 19S3

San Juan, Puerto Rico

Joe was ,i membei of the varsity baseball, track, and
swimming teams He was also active in ROTC, marching
on ilic Hoes' Drill Team, anil in his senior year, serving as
cm i uiiu ottic ei ol I ( ompam Joi pi ins to att< n.l

Brooklyn College in New York

DANIEL PAUL VALENTINE
October 13, 1953
I >etroit, Michigan

Danny was t lit- yearbook photographer tor four years.
Ik u.is a homeroom alternate in ninth and tenth gtades,
and in his junior year, served as treasurer ot the SA. He
was also active in ROTC Danny plans to attend college,
join the Air Force, and pursue a career In the field of avia-
tion.

SYLVIA ANN VAMPRINE

November i. )'> s ;

New Orleans, Louisiana

Sylvia was a member of the Nurses' Aides Club and
served as historian tor one year. She played in the CHS
band for tour years, and was a member of the Tradewind
Staff Slu served on various dance committees, and was a
varsitc cheerleader in her senior \e.ir Sylvia plans to major
In law at L.S.U.






Daniel Paul Valentine



Linda Alice Vest





Sylvia Ann Vampnne



Thomas Kenneth Wallenius





LINDA ALICE VEST

November 6, 1952

Ft. Clayton, Canal Zone

THOMAS KENNETH WALLENIUS
April 24, 1952
Helsinki, Finland

TERRY LEE WALLINE

November 22, 195 3

Fort McClellan, Alabama

Terry participated in swimming and water polo. He was
active in ROTC, a member of the Color Guard in his jun-
ior year, and of the Boys' Drill Team in his senior year.
Terry plans to attend college in California, majoring in ar-
chitectural engineering.

KAREN WESTERBERG
August 15, 1953
Flint, Michigan

During her high school years, all of them at CHS,
Karen was a member of the Caribe Club, the swim team,
the Girls' Chorus, and the Tradewind Staff. After gradua-
tion, she plans to study computer programming.

JENNY DEL MILAGRO WIRTZ
March 18, 1951
San Jose, Costa Rica

Jenny was a member of the Spanish Club, and served as
treasurer during her junior and senior years. She partici-
pated in varsity volleyball during her freshman and sopho-
more years. Jenny plans to become a nurse.

PRICILLA ANN ZAVINSKY
January 22, 1953
Terrell, Texas

This was "Penny's" first year at CHS. She was a mem-
ber of the Nurses' Aides Club. In her junior year, she re-
ceived a $25 savings bond for her bookkeeping. Penny
plans to attend Fayetteville Beauty College.




Jose F Valencia



Rosemary Christian. Michael Beale, Hila
Lvman. The attractive senior float was a



f -

ajor attraction at the Homecoming Pa-

de.




Karen Westcrbcrg






Jenny del Milagro Wirt*






u.- A&




ft




ft


I


1 ^g




V- *T




>



PriciUa Ann Zavinsky



1



daces Without J acts .





s



Susan Couts





*



Alexis Normandia



George Scheibe




Davie Teves



And Jacts Without daces



MICHAEL R. ANDREE
June 5, 1953
Annapolis, Maryland

i/DAVID RAYMOND DIAZ

September 9, 1955
Baltimore, Maryland

David played varsity football during his junior year at CHS, and
helped plan the Jamboree party. He plans to attend technical school
after graduation.

DANIEL WESLEY FERGUSON
June 26, 1951
Macon, Georgia

RICHARD ALLEN KRESGE
October 9, 1953
Ancon, Canal Zone

Ricky plans to attend trade school after graduation.



THOMAS ADDISON PURSLEY

July 9, 1952
Suffern, New York

Tom was active in sports during his high school years, participat-
ing in intramural football and wrestling, and playing on the varsity
football team. He was a member of the "C" Club, and in his senior
year, served as secretary. He was also a member of the Math Club
and the Rifle Team, and was active in ROTC. Tom plans to attend
the United States Military Academy at West Point, New York.

DANNY DALE TWEEDY
December 23, 1952
Victerville, California

Danny was a homeroom representative in his sophomore year.
He plans to enter an apprenticeship program in Tucson, Arizona,
planning a career as a carpenter.

MARIA DE LOS ANGELES ZAYAS

January 4, 1952
Mayaguez, Puerto Rico

Maria was a member of the Spanish and Pep Clubs. She plans to
become a psychologist.



78



Senior laces 'Display Many Moods




Stephanie lilies



John Martin, Dennis Maxwell

mm





Dannv Valentine, Sherrv Kern, Mr. Reeves



79



PARADES



Camera Captures Brief QUmpses Of Senior Cife .

ELECTIONS







Ellie Blevins, Jane Paulson, Rod Undo, Shelly Lund, Carnival Queen Kathy Milligan
Denise Foshee, Dennis Maxwell, Cathy Gercich, Wendy Flores and Beth Carter.

CLASSES .
CONVERSATIONS .




-



Diane Hauke and Sandra Alberga.




Aleida Montenegro, Jeannie Basset, and

Vivian Boseman.

AND MORE CLASSES .




Nai-Yuen Shum, Mrs. Smith, Doug Stevens, "Cubby" Clement, and Issac Heres.




Alma Austin, Lana Bonne, Ingrid Porticr. Jenny Wirt., Isaac Heres, Armando Cabrera, William Murphy, Jane Paulson, and George Scheibe



80



Introducing .

Zne Mall Of fame Class Of '71







Michael Dexter



Mr and Miss CMS



Diane Mauke



81




Most Jntellectual



Kobert Phillips



i



N>(












\



Most jCikely Zo Succeed



Cana Koom




Michael Doctcr



'Denise Joskee



82



7







ftest
Cooking

floliH Junderburk
Wendy 3 lores



Best
Dressed

Carmen Sutler
Kodrigo C'mdo




83



tfest

dancers

Carmen ttutler
Haul Castro





friendliest

Mi la CyttiaH

Demi's Maxwell

Devise Joskee



84



I



Most
M^letic

Patsy Austin
JO til Patten



^



Most
Zalented

Judy McCain
Donald Myrd




85



Also Presenting Kunners-Up




\ V- t WW

Zj/ R(W.' Robert Phillips Mr. CHS, Most Likely To Succeed; Shelly Lund Miss CHS. 2nd Row: Michael Dexter Most Intellectual; Lana
Boone Most Likely To Succeed. 3rd Row: Raul Castro Best Dressed; Wendy Flores Best Dressed. 4th Row: William Murphy Wit-
tiest, Best Dancer; Beth Carter Best Dancer. 5th Row: Jose Medina Best Personality; Susan Mendanhall Most Athletic. 6th Row: Allen
Harmon Most Talented; Rodrigo Lindo Best Looking.



Md Zkose ftot Pictured



Wittiest

Patricia Gutierrez
Mark Mcrring



West
Personality

(Jan Bjomeby
Tienms Maxwell



Kumers-up:



Sandra Alberga Most Intellectual

Rosemary Christian Best Looking

Toni Klasovsky Best Dressed, Most Talented

Sherry Kern Wittiest

"Cubby" Clement Most Athletic

Hila Lyman Best Personality



86





J time in the life of each girl

and boy
A time of sorrow, and yet of

graduation realization

brings,
Of the end of many things
Classes, dances, football

games will be no more,
Zhe magic of the high

school year is o 'er
though some may consider

all things done,
Zhey soon will learn
Cife's just begun



cmt*



87



{Juniors





AJ&\







Sheila


i/Pattie


Brian


Alberga


Alger


Allen


Paul


Glen


Barbara


B.utel


Baker


Banks


William


Frank


Barbara


Bebe


Berry


Betcher


Maria


Richard


Henry


Boone


Booth


Borsellino



Martha


Michael


Anton
Michael


Apodaca
Jaime


Barger
Gerianne


Barraza
Robert


Blanchette
Debra


Bloemer Jr.
Rita


Boswell


Boy land




Janet


Linda


Carlos


Catherine


Brandenburg


Brock


Brown


Carlisle


Helen


Cheryl


Jay


Deborah


Castro


Caudill


Caudill


Cheshire


Frank


Pamela


wAminta
Cobb


Roberta


Cicchetto


Coad


Cole


Mark


Sonia


Wayne


Ivette


Collins


Colon


Couts


Cummings



Man-
Cash

Rand)

Childress
^/Cheryl

Coleman

Karen
Currier



89




Shelia


Emilie


John


Dancer


Daniel


Day


Brenda


^/Clifford


Maria


Egg"


Ferrell


Fontanez



William

Deaton Jr.
Andrew

Foshee



/ /.-If




*



!



Nancy

Edmonson
Stephan

Fugleberg




Mardette

Garner


Jimmy
Gewin


William
Gillespie


Gregory
Goguen


Ann

Gonzalez


Zan
Green




Nadia Robles, "The feminine mystique
at work!"



90





CLASS OFFICERS: Harry Townsend (Vice-President), Cathy Carlisle (president), Patricia
Paine (Treasurer), Jackie Parker (Secretary).



The class of '72 was the largest and
one of the most active and spirited
classes of Cristobal High School.
Through the efforts of class officers
the Juniors obtained an open lunch
on Tuesdays and Thursdays of each
week. Another highlight of the year
was the selection of the class ring
which was round with a gold stone.
The Juniors will long remember
PSAT and NMSQT which are among
the many tests they took in prepara-
tion for college. The girls in the Jun-
ior Class organized and presented a
fashion show which demonstrated the
do's and don'ts of pants wear. Juniors
also planned and presented a Junior



Class Assembly. They were also re-
sponsible for the annual Junior-Senior



CLASS SPONSOR
MR. FITE

Prom honoring the graduating Sen-
iors.




Carol Ross, Marian Kredell, Jackie Parker, Lynn Gregg, Sheila Alberga, Cathy Carlisle, Mary
Norval, Titi Cole, Karen Currier, Nancy Edmondson. The do's and don'ts of dress wear.




Marian Gregg
Pacricia Haukc



Barbara Grier
Joseph Herring



Raymond Gsell
Kathleen Hess



Edwin Hammond
Kenneth Hill II



Mark Hanly
William Huffman



91




June Ilund
Katherine Kraus
Kathleen McGilberrv



James Jackson
Marian Kredel!
John Meeker



Douglass Jeffries
Christina Loizeaux
Shyla Miller



Paulette Jordi
Donald Mans
Michael Minehart



Daniel Knauss
Michael McCann
Dale Mitte



juniors Q ranted Open Cuneh Zwice J Week



92



Irma Monclova
Patricia Paine



John Musser II
Louise Palmer



Mary Norval
Ronald Palser



Beverly Olsen
Marc Parker



Stanley Oster
Deborah Pate




*




Robin Pritham
Marlene Rice



Raymond Ramos
Susan Ridge



Jose Recio
Randy Robinson



Carmen Reed
Nadia Robles



Lourdes Reyes
Carol Ross



Class Of '72 Picks yellow Stone ?or King



Deborah Rowley
Michael Scott
Ronnie Sills



Joseph Romeski
Arthur Serig
Judith Simmons



Juan Sanchez
Higinia Shaffer
Valarie Simms



Gary Sheibe
(..-'James Shaffer
Jean Smith



Frank Scott
Stephen Shobe
Michael Snider




93



^Juniors 'Display Zheir Zaletits
At {Junior Class Assembly




Reggie Southerland
Catherine Terwilliger
Robert Tschumy



Michael Wood



Mattia Spagna
Dorothy Terwilliger
Carol Wertz



Ann Worthen



Michael Spagna
Ehukai Teves
Aurelia Williams



Susann Zachry



The one and only, Brenda Egger!



Maribel Zayas Marisol Zayas




94



Catecoiners




4 M %M*




Ernest Abresh
Michael McCann
Sharon Smith



Anstey Catlett
Irma Monclova
Puuloa Teves





Gregg Goguen



Donna Graham



Roberto Endara
Marc Parker



Not Pictured: Lynne Goguen,
Juan Gonzalez, Debra Gosney,
Patricia Hill, Roger Johnston,
Maxine LaRoche, William Le-
Doux, Joel Lee, Paul Rhoads,
Ralph Richmond, Dolores
Santiago.




Douglas Jeffries. "I'm standing like this be-
cause there's no ball."




Jean Smith. "Who's on a diet?"



Linda Brock, Ann Gonzalez, Mary Norval. THREE FOR THE ROAD.



95



Sophomores




Nickilda

Adams
Rosemar)

Betancourt
Barbara

Bloemer
Melinda

Brown
James

Childress



Gil

Apodaca
Donna


Stephen

Aponte
Michael


Bisot
^/Robin


Bjorneby
vTam


Bock


Bridwell


i Patrice


Karl


Brown

Lulu


Bundy
v/Ann


Cimino


Cirulli



Donna

Baker
(/Timothy

Blanchard
Jeffrey

Briem
Susan

Burge
^/Gerald

Coffin



^/James

Barr
Paul

Bleicher
Edward

Bringas J
Kathryn

Bush
Lourdes

Colon



Marilyn

Baxter
Vjeffry

Blevins
Kathleen

Brown
\/Diane

Carol 1
VKathleen

Colpe



96




v/tavera


1/ Leland


v Wanda


i/Guy


Kathie


Cooke


Cummings


Cummings


Damiani


Danielsen


Brian


Jane


John


,/Judy


Rosita


Deraps


Dohle


Dohle


Dohle


Dominguez


v

Kathryn


^Kathleen


Edna


Estelita


Ender


Farrington


Fauber


Ferguson


Ferris


Robert


Ronald


Lisa


V Nina


Mark


Ford


Forsyth Jr.


Furr


Gercich


Gibson


Edward


^/Henrv


,/Peter


S Patrice


Esther


Golden


Goldmann


Goldmann


Gonier


Gonzalez



Marc

Denis
Harry

Dowel 1
Pedro

Fontanez
Cornelius

Goebertus
Olga

Gonzalez



97




y/Debra

Gosney

Linda

Hess

Deborah
Jaketic
V Katie

Kraus
/Brian
Love



V Roy


v/ Nancy


/Roy


Toni the TIGER!


Gott


Gregg


Gsell




(/Nancy


l/Linda


Dennis




Horn


Huff


Hurlbut




/Jose


Michele


/Paul




Johnson


Kessler


Kilmer




Christian


John


Scot




Lasher


Lee


Loizeaux




j Mi nun en


\/Lawrence


VEdythe




Lyman


Maestas


Marsh





98



Sophomore Jloat Jn Homecoming Parade

v





CLASS OFFICERS: Beth Wainio (vice-
president), Nancy Ridge (president), Deb-
bie Meeker (Sec. -Treasurer).



This year's sophomore class was
outstanding both as a group and as
individuals. Scott Loizeaux and Paul
Bleicher received High Honors dur-
ing the first semester.

The sophomore class was active
both in special class activities and
school events as a whole. They organ-
ized a float for the Homecoming
Game Parade, choosing Debbie
Meeker and Jan Janosik as their rep-
resentatives.

In cooperation with the Freshman
class, the sophomores sponsored the
Freshman-Sophomore dance on Feb-
ruary thirteenth. Ted Scott and Barba-
ra Bloemer became king and queen
for the evening.

Another sophomore worthy of
mention is Edythe Marsh winner
of the "Non-French Student" contest
sponsored by the French Club during
the French Week.

The enthusiastic sophomore offi-
cers planned several exciting events
for the spring.



CLASS SPONSOR
Mr. Norman




Marrianne Verruno. Proud Winner of "Nobel Art Award"








V*



#



Judy Dohle. Practicing for the future?




99





k/Elena Maxwell
Judith Menges

i/Barbara Moody
Viana Ostrea



I I



Sheila Mayani
Linda Merrick
Manuel Munoz
Terri Overstreet



Mark McKenney
vPeggy Miller

Robert Nordstom
Ureter Pacheco



i/Debra Meeker
Jack Mohlman
Myrta Olivera
Elizabeth Palser



'










\^'V




Ada Ortiz v/Noelia Ortiz

Paul Peralta Rosa Perez

Warren Phillips Betty Queen



Paul Bleicher tries his hand at typing.







George Rivera. Working up an appetite!




Ronny Ramos
..-Joann Reid

Nancy Ridge
/Carolann Roach



Bonnie Ramos
l/Allan Richardson
^Jorge Rivera

Ravmond Robertson



Maria Rodriguez
Terri Sanchez



i/Regina Ruoff
Gaspar Sayoc







'







.



Debra Meeker. "You can't say she wasn't warned



Elsa Sanchez
Vickie Schaub
Theodore Scott
Al Simms



Paul Sanchez Jr.
Diane Schloredt
Pedro Simmons
^Joseph Smith



101



Sophomore Class Consists Of 141 Students





James Collins. An example of utmost concentration.



Patricia Snider
Yvonne Thomas



Mary Spivey
Judith Tomlinson




/

U'-Jose Toro vMaria Toro

Elizabeth Wainio Luann Ware



i/Marianne Verruno v^^artha Vest
Susan Willis i/Linda Woods




Michele Kessler. "If I could only under-
stand this!"





Marian Crouch. "Who says I'm uncomfort-
able?"



osemary Betancourt. "I dare you!"



102



Catecomers




Edythc Marsh, Kathy Brown, Michele Kessler. "Come now, it can't be that boring.



Mardette Garner, Patrice Gonier. "Are you
two tip-toeing through the tulips again?"



103



dreshmen




Charles


Deborah


John


William


Susan


t-^Donald


Alberga


Alberga


Alexaitis


Andree


Arbaugh


Austin


Carol


Evelvn


Rodger


Christopher


Paula


David


Baker


Barraza


Beale


Ben sen


Blanchette


Bleicher


Arnaldo


Carl


Charlotte


George


^/P'amela


l/Laura


Bonilla


Bowers


Boyland


Brannen


Bridwell


Brock


Robert


Amber


j/Debra


Donald


Debra


^/Elizabeth


Brockman


Brown


Brown


Brown


Budd


Burgess


Ul


Mar)


Jeanne


Deborah


Alan


We


Butcher


Byrd


Calkins


Cares-


Cheshire


Christian



104




William


Renee


Debra


Alexis


James


Anne


Ciccolo


Cliette


Coe


Coleman


Collins


Crouch


Laveda


Michelle


f/Klark


Ted


l/Tracema


Raymond


Dancer


Darcy


Davila


Deaton


Del Busto


De Vault


Ramon


Karen


(/Trina


Thomas


Steven


Clifford


Diaz


Fauber


Ferguson


Finneman


Fors\th


Gabriel


Rebecca


Maria


Barbara


k/Karen


Daniel


Clarissa


Gewin


Gonzalez


Goodwin


Goulet


Green


Gregorj


Oregon


Francisco


Karan


Kimberlv


Brian


Cynthia


Grist


Hamilton


Harden


Hartshorn


Head)


Heath



105





Melody Hoffman iHarry Holt James Huffman

Bruce Jackson ^Jdyce Janosik j^Michael Jeffries




Ik



Iris Hernandez Anne Herring Cheryl Hieronymus

Marcia Humphrey ^Pimela Husband Leif Irion
fenny Jimenez William Jimenez vjames Jones

Karen Jones Sandra Kaufer Cheryl Kresge

David Lee Victor Lee Ann Loyd




Eager Freshmen impossible to hold still.




Laura Lucas Tony Lyons



141

Kim Marohl Deshea Mason




Sandra May ^Susan Mccullough



106



March 25 Speedball Qame Qives
freshmen Chance Zo Show Class Spirit




Cherri Hieronymus (secretary-treasurer), Victor Lee (president), Carol Baker (\
dent).



The freshman class this year partic-
ipated in the Homecoming parade,
the Freshman-Sophomore Brawl, the
Fresh-Soph Speedball Game, and the
Fresh-Soph Dance.

The Freshman Queen, Laura
Brock. Her escort was Phil Miller.
Reigning at the dance was Princess
Carol Baker and Prince Fred Wanio.
The Speedball game was held on
March 25. The Freshman girls played
the Sophomore girls, and half time
entertainment was provided by the
Cheerleaders.



presi-



'Be sure you get all the crumbs off."




"If you ask me, I think you two have it all wrong!"





John Dohle, Gerald Coffin. "Will you stop goofing off and get to work?"



Sandv May. "This is reallv grc



107




Robert McNaughton
i-^tinda Mendenhall
Karen Mcrhclc
John Meuviei
Phillip Miller



Daniel Minehart
Patricia Moebus
Pedro Monclova
Jane Moore
\ < ^




i^lvan Normandia
Thomas O'Donnell
Samuel O'Neal



Wayne West
'Straight down the hall, it's the last room on the right.'




U^illiam Orrego
L^-Wanda Onii
Jorge Padro

Marvann Palmer
William Parsons



V--" Charles Porbcs
Rita Reduga
Orlando Reyes
Catherine Risch
Jose Riveta



108



Alfonso Robinson
Deborah Robinson
Tony Robinson
' Edna Roblcs
Isaac Ruiz







"I thought all Indians were on reservations these days!'



William Santiago
i^-Etitabeth Simmons
Kathvm Smith



1^'Mark Spanglcr
Robcn Stem
Alice Stiebritz
Rhonda Strube
Joe Swank



Susan Swanstrom

\ David Tate

Kamalci Teves
Viclu Tipton

l^-Ani Ubben




109



m





Frits Woudenberg
Fredrick Waino



iXPaula Vaught
V /Kachcnne Wcigart




"I really hope it works.'





Debbie Carey, Cherrie Hieronymus. Cin-
derella never had it so good.




Debbie Carey. "It better evaporate in



Walter Wesley
(^fanie Wilson



Wayne West
^Dennis Wood



Paula Vaught, Renee Cliette. "Let's see, a
few boiling chips, or was it salt crystals?"




no



Catecomers




Ray Jackion



NOT PICTURED: Raymond Abete,
Randy Amburn, Carl Bowers, Earl Bundy,
Elizabeth Cimino, Michael Evans, Ester
Gonzalez, Lorraine Guilfoyle, Mark Honer-
baum, Bobby Hughes, Ronald Hurlburt.













$&,





Debbie Carey, Cherrie Hieronymus. "We are 15 going on 21?"







J




Charlotte Boyland. "I just hope that balloon can take it!'



Vicky Tipton. "How did I ever get stuck in
this vm'"



ill



Seventh And Eighth Qraders Jre




Front Row: Robert Austin, Lawrence Moochler, Roger Welch, William Cronan, Jeffrey Carwithen, Ricky Lyons, Mario LJbben. Center Row:
Marcela Moncivais, Margarita Zamarripa, Noreen Kaufer, Linda Loizeaux, Karon Mitte, Doris Tomlin, Eileen Robles, Mary Mills, Susan
Mendoza. Back Row: Cheryl Williams, James Dexter, Patricia Sanchez, John Barriteau Jr., Margaret Bradbury. Leslie Gibson, Anthony Ware,
Juan Claramunt, Margarita Young.




Front Row: Murray Webb, James Musser, Mark Perusse, Rexjansen, Paul Hopkins, Antonio Scott, Angel Irizarry. Center Row: Gail Gregg, Bil-
lie Brown, Kimberly Morrell, Mona Christian. Renee Nay, Mary Jo Beale, {Catherine Meyer. Back Row: Carol Fluharty, Gloria Olivarez, Linda
Garcia, Ines Butler, Yvonne Smith, Madeline Pujals, Cindy Ferguson, Linda Stamper, Man LaRoche, Priscilla Husband, Evelyn Withrow,
Sheila Brannon, Luanne Swisher.






Overwhelmed With Ziger Spirit




Front Row: Doyle Dancer Jr., Andrew Wick, Patrick Daniel, Jody Short, John Bridwell, Andrew Norval, Allan Rodriguez. Center Row: Yolanda
Hunnicut, Noreen Will, Desiree Budd, Janet Katsumoto, Donna Reifsnyder, Julie Moebus. Back Row: Robert Ramirez, Steven Boswell, Lester
Forsgren, D. LaPorta Jr., Robert Austin, David Mitte, Joseph Weichert, Anthony Spooner, Kurt Bullinger.




Front Row: Donald Jeffries Jr., Thomas Gabriel, Richard Hoagland, Robert Nicholson, Alberto Wilmont, Walter Guilfoyle, Thomas Wilder,
Robert Moats, James Campbell. Center Row: Chervl Evans, Patricia Colpe, Marilyn Barnett, Carmen Bringas, Nayra Mon, Kay Houslev. Kim-
berlv Woodcock, Patricia Lovd, Kip Holloway. Back Row: Robert Bradbv. Charles Murphey. Diane Ruoff, Maria Ramirez, Anne Richardson,
Karen McKown, Amelia Smith, Lisandra Ruiz, Diane Baker, Dennis Stephens, Theodore De Boor.



113









First Row: Steven Brock, Robert Day, Mi-
chael DeVault, Bryan Simpkins, Edward
Stroop, Michael Collins, Rickv Wilson.
Second Row: Donna Deaton, Shawn Ander-
son, Elizabeth Smith, Pushpa Mayani,
Ruth Hudgins, Brenda Goodwin, Margaret
Weigart, Margaret Jaketic, Marcia Coffin.
Third Row: Paris Mcllwain, Nancy White,
Stephanie Mowery, Devony Dandridge,
Tilda Edwards, Vielka Tom, Sharon
McCann, Glenda Mika.



'For-r-r-r-e!



l.fc < %




First Row: Scott Parker, Richard Schaub, Anthony Burbine, Glen Hess, Jimmy Cash, Leslie Recio, Jeff Gosney, Mike Romero. Second Row:
Nancy Wiliford, Laura Gregg, Pat Moses, Doris Hogaboam, Terri Brown, Marjorie Blair, Diana Ruiz. Third Row: Mike Cliette, Robert Wil-
mont, Ray Wheeler, John Shobe, Steve Kardonski, David Thompson, Robert Fernandez, David Woods, John Moncivais, Alex Nieves, Dave
Farnsworth, Eunice Zachry, Cindy Apodaca.







First Row: Peter Barr, Mike Ridge, Greg Cooper, Cheyenne Rivera, Robbie Currier, George Fryer, Richard Dowell. Second Row: Kathy Balmer,
Violanda Godinez, Kathy Murphy, Patty Valentine, Mary Richmond, Lisbet Coe, Kathy Dexter. Third Roiv: Barbara Yerxa, Ann O'Donnei,
Elisa Brown, Philip Wilkins, Sue Gilbert, Vicki May, Mario Pino, Pat Newbury, Leslie Nicolaison, Cathy Perret, Evelyn Hernandez, Ann
Mills, Cherri Schwindt.




Firsl Row: Rene Ramirez, Roberto Young, Nestor Hernandez, Brian McCann, George Medina, Dee Dillin. Johnny Scott, Reggie Robinson.
Second Row: Mike Orrego, Vicki Kivonaga. Debra Hughes. Margaret Kienzle, Susie Munoz, Barbara Higgins, Walter Cummings. Third Row:
Wayne Dailey, Patrick Moody, Dan Reirsnvder, Rocky Luger. Eddie Solas, Jose Vega, Frank Rorke, Bill Vest, Carl Anderson.



115




t




fra/ Row: Anthony Parker, Angel Toro, Robert Day, Robert Oster, Scott Parker, Ri
Gillespie. Center Row: John Austin, Robert Austin, Reggie Robinson, Karl Simms, Thomas
Gabriel, Mike Romero, George Dejesus. Back Row: Cheyenne Rivera, Carlos Coronado,
George Medina, Steve Brock, Alfred Sandrock, Eward Morrell, Mario Pino, Paul Baker,
Glvnn Moore.



Front Row: Billy Scott, Karl Simms, Carlos Coronado, Luke Green, Steve Barger, Mike McDonnell. Center Row: Anna Summerlin, Josefa Gon-
zales, Mary Moncivais, Caroline Price, Sherry Hill, Joanne Baronne, Sonia Tellefsen, Elizabeth Snider. Back Row: Sarah Rosado, Lawrence Es-
cobido, Hubert Hammond, Michael Dockery, Clyde Adams, Steve Herring, Robert Lee, Deborah Harden.

ftlue Scores

Victory Over

Qold

Football has always been an ex-
tremely popular sport with the junior
high school boys at CHS. This year,
for the first time, they played regula-
tion 11 -man football. In September,
over eighty seventh and eighth grade
boys tried out for the team. Of these,
fifty-six were chosen and divided into
two teams, the Blue and the Gold.
The two teams practiced on alternate
days and competed against one anoth-
er in three games. The first game
ended in a tie, with a score of 6-6.
The Blue Team won the remaining
games, with scores of 22-0 and 14-6
respectively.

Outstanding players for the Blue
Team were: George Medina (quarter-
back), Glenn Moore (fullback),
Mario Pino (end), and linemen Paul
Baker, Alfred Sandrock, Reggie Rob-
inson, Michael Romero, Carlos Coro-
nado, and Edward Morrell. Outstand-
ing players for the Gold Team were:
Alexis Nieves (quarterback), Philip
Wilkins (fullback), Craig Dohle
(flanker), and linemen James Bird,
Michael Ridge, Robbie Currier,
David Alger, and Bill Vest.




O <*> fU- £









Front Row: Mark Pruse, Pat Daniel, Anthony Spooner, Alberto Wilmont, Robert Currier,
Glen Hess. Center Row: Nestor Hernandez, Jeffrey Carwithen, John Cruz, James Dexter,
James Fauber, Craig Dohle, William Allen, Steve Barger, Alexis Nieves. Back Row: James
Bird, Clyde Adams, Robert Wilmont, Bill Vest, John Barriteau, David Alger, David Gonier,
Philip Wilkins, Michael Ridge.



116



Skit Opens Rational {Junior
Mo nor Society Initiation



On December 17, five new mem-
bers were initiated in the National
Junior Honor Society. The old mem-
bers presented an amusing skit, ex-
plaining the qualities of scholarship,
leadership, character, citizenship, and
service required for membership in
this organization. Following the skit,
a "tapping" ceremony was held. The
selected students were escorted to the
stage for the traditional candlelight-
ing ceremony. Mr. Pfau congratulated



the newly initiated eighth-graders and
presented them with pins and certifi-
cates of membership. A reception,
honoring the new members and their
proud parents was held in the home
economics room following the cere-
mony.

The National Junior Honor Socie-
ty held its spring initiation in March.
At that time, seventh-graders were el-
igible for membership.




Mario Pino, Margaret Kienzk. Cathy Perret, Barbara Baitel, and Shervl Smith. HAPPY M( )
MENT.




Mr. Pfau hands out certificates of member-
ship to the initiates.




Parents of the initiates relax at the recep-
tion.





Alfred Sandrock, Cherri Danielsen, Susan
Gilbert, and Brian McCann. "They call us
the BRAINS!"



Brian McCann, Cherri Danielsen, Susan Gilbert. Janna Loizeaux. Alfred Sandrock. and Kath-
leen Dexter. Old members wait patiently to begin the tapping ceremony.



117



{Junior Migh Debate Club Presents Assembly



The Junior High Debate Club was
organized in an effort to provide stu-
dents with an opportunity to express
their thoughts and feelings on various
issues. Many of the topics discussed
were based on events currently in the
news. The sponsor of the club was
Mr. Berger.

This year the Debate Club debated
for the different Junior High home-
rooms. The students served as judges
of these debates. The club also pres-
ented an assembly for the entire Jun-
ior High student body. The judgment
of this debate was left to the audi-
ence.





?\\o M s




-i



Sitting: Lori Flores (vice-president), Cheri
Danielsen (president), Susan Gilbert (sec-
retary). Center Row: Susan Styles, Sheila
Brannan, Margaret Jaketic, Beth Bleicher,
Donna Reifsnyder, Josefa Gonzalez, Mr.
Berger (sponsor). Back Row: Valerie
Owen, Clover Shobe, Sonja Tellefsen,
Janna Loizeaux, Deborah Hughes, Carl
Andersen, Philip Wilkins, Alfred
Sandrock.



Susan Gilbert, Lori Flores, Margaret Jaketic, Donna Reifsnyder, Beth Bleicher, Sheila Baran-
nan. "Now what was I saying?"




Front Row: James Snider, Leslie Sills, Nelson Sanchez, Russell Gillespie, Edward Blount, Francisco Burac, Surse Pierpoint. Center Row: Melanie
Hames, Vickie Alger, Janet Mize, Barbara Chavez, Barbara Bliznik, Sylvia Voight, Cindy Watson. Back Row: Andre Perret, Leo Cimino, Dino
Scott, William Tschumy, Donald Tomlin, Bruce Hunter. Robert Oster.



118




Front Row: Michael Cain, Paul Austin, Lonnie Allen, Paul Loibl, Angel Toro. Armando Luna, Ricky Diaz. Second Row: Kim Welty. Jackie
Johnson, Gloria Good, Susie Riggs, Lucy Blount, Sherlv Smith, Julia Robertson, Nola Swian, Sonia Thomas. Back Row: Michael Smith. Paul
Baker, Mike Osborn, Jimmy Bird, Carlos Gierrero, Carlos Bvmoe, Eddie Morrell.




Front Row: Garry Ilund. Michael Williams, George Dejesus. Jeff Hoffman, Dean Couts, Lori Flores, Maurie Moore, Susan Styles. Center Row:
Charles Hughes, Michele Vrev. Jimmv Feelev, Buddy Fauber. Janet Santiago. Man Fluhartv. Jill Paulson. Back Row: Billy Kern, Jose Rodri-
guez, Valdez Chavis. Susan Austin, Sarah Polite. Pegg) Whipple, Cheri Danielsen. Cindy Runion, Ralph Stone. David Evans, Guy West.



119




Front Row: John Collins, Ricky Phares, Jim
McCarrick, Barney Norton, Duke Collins,
Jonathan Brown, Randy Goss, Luke Skra-
ble. Center Row: Gary Ferns, Thomas Sni-
der, Yvette Rodriguez, Clara Stone, Beth
Bleicher, Angel Olivera. Ralph Vasquez.
Back Row: John Austin, Richard Ramos,
Dan Kelly, Kelvin Gregory, Juan Viera,
Jack Tate, James Amason, Forest Kinsey,
Gus Coronado, John Davison.



Front Row: Michael Boswell, Anthony
Parks, John Cruz, John Kiyonaga, Barry
Simpkins, Craig Dohle, Robert Bramlett.
Center Row: Deborah Baker, Ada Norman-
dia, Janna Loizeaux, Clover Shobe, Cynthia
Smith, Sheri Alexaitis, Janet Brown. Back
Row: David Gonier, John Stephens, Gary
Moore, Juan Laboy, Glynn Moore, Alfred
Sandrock, George Brannan, Paul Garner.





Front Row: Paul Lucas, David Alger, Joe
Phillips, Ronald Grist, William Allen. Cen-
ter Row: Valerie Owen, Patricia DeVault,
Andrea Pacheco, Elizabeth Rivera, Alice
Ferns, Barbara Baitel, Ann Rutledge. Back
Row: Rita Castro, Karen Tahey, Tina Bo-
canegra, Bonnie Willis, Linda Hernandez,
Karen DeBoor, Aida Rodriguez.



120



{Junior High Student Association Serves
As Unifying Jorce dor Students



fV*^




Front Row: Kathleen Dexter, James Dexter, Sherry Schwindt. Back Row: Mr. Cheshire (spon-
sor), Brian McCann, Surse Pierpoint, Linda Garcia, Patty Valentine, Patty Colpe. Janet Kat-
sumoto, Karen Mitte, Barbara Yerxa, Debbie Harden, Susan Austin, Eunice Zachry, Patricia
Sanchez, Carmen Bringas, Nancy White.



The Student Association is the
backbone of any school. This is true
of the junior as well as the senior
high school. The Cristobal Junior
High School Student association
served as a unifying force for the stu-
dents and afforded them an opportu-
nity to voice their thoughts and opin-
ions on various issues. Through the
S.A., students were able to participate
actively in the government of their
school and thus aid in making it a
more pleasant place in which to learn.

The year 1970-71 was a highly suc-
cessful one for Cristobal's Junior
High Student Association. Continu-
ing from the point it stopped last
year, it went on to make this an active
and exciting year. Among the activi-
ties planned and carried out by the
S.A. were the Blue and Gold Intra-
mural Football games, and various
drives and dances held throughout
the school year.




Front Row: Charles Hughes, Dee Dillian, Mark Perusse. Allen Rodriguez, Mark Novak,
Kathy Murphy. Back Row: Donna Reitsnider. Sheila Brannon, Mrs. Tanner. Glenda Mika,
Kathy Meyer, Margaret Jaketic, Surse Pierpoint. Anne Richardson, Margaret Whipple. Ruth
Hudgins, Kathy Balmer. Debbie Hughes. Barbara Yerxa, Sherry Hill, Sherry Schwindt.



The Zephyr was the Junior High
counterpart of the CHS Tradewind.

The staff was composed of seventh
and eighth grade students interested
in learning the fundamentals of jour-
nalism while providing a valuable ser-
vice to their fellow students. Under
the guidance of their sponsor, Mrs.
Tanner, these students published a
paper once each month. Each issue
contained articles concerning events
and topics of interest to junior high
students as well as an advice column,
cartoons, and letters to the editor.



121



S.J. Encourages Student Partici




The Student Association has been
an important part of the school life at
Cristobal High School for many
years. It was organized in 1932 to en-
courage the exchange of ideas among
students, to create friendlier relation-
ships among students, and to increase
student participation in school activi-
ties. Its primary purpose is to func-
tion as an organization in which stu-
dents may practice realistically the
basic principals of democracy and
learn to handle the responsibilities
which accompany the privileges of
self-government.



Nancy Edmonson (Secretary), Michael Dexter (President), Douglas Jeffries (Vice-Presi-
dent), Michael McCann (Treasurer).




Sitting: Drummond McNaughton, Judy Tomlinson, Sherry Kern. Toni Thomas, Kathy Kraus, Mike Evans. Center Row: Diane Dancer, Kathy
Farrington, Kathy Danielson, Cherri Hieronymus, Ann Gonzalez, Rita Boyland, Marlene Rice. Beth Carter, Diane Hauke. Back Row: Edward
Bringas, Charlotte Boyland, George Rivera, Rod Lindo, Greg Goguen, John Martin, Gary Scheibe, Gil Apodaca.



122



patio ft After Kioto us Campaign





Michael McCann, "Good things come in
little packages!"




Rita Boyland, Jackie Parker, Heidi Sweeney, Beverly Olsen. Brian Allen, and Debra Gosney.
"George, George, George of the Jungle."



Buddy Short, James Kunkel, Brandt Irion, and Denise Foshee. "Are you sure George Wash-
ington started out this way?"

Each year a nominating committee
considers long and carefully the quali-
fications of various students and then
selects those best suited for the job as
S.A. officer candidates. These candi-
dates then enter the exciting competi-
tion known as "Campaign Week."
Each candidate strives to obtain the
students' votes by hanging posters,
coining slogans, and passing out but-
tons and tags. The highlight of the
week is the campaign assembly, dur-
ing which candidates and their man-
agers speak and various amusing or
informative skits are presented. On
election day, students vote for the stu-
dent they feel is best qualified for the
job, realizing that the election be re-
sponsible for running CHS the fol-
lowing year is much more than a
mere popularity contest.




Chris Cox, "I'm only doing it for a friend!




Katie McGilberrv and Mark Hanlev. "This doesn't compare with a mini-bike tr.nl'"



123



Kace Jrom Qatun Zo Pirn Mighlights "C" Club
JmtiatioH




Sitting: Andrew Foshee, Mike Spagna, Car-
los Brown. Harry Townsend, Ernest
Abresch, Frank Cicchetto. Standing: Coach
Dedaux (sponsor) Bill Deaton, Jim Jack-
son, Will Huffman. Peter Swain. Robert
Bloemer, Mike Apodaca. Mike Snider.



Outstanding male athletes at CHS
were eligible for membership in the
"C" Club. This organization gave rec-
ognition to those who excelled in
football, swimming, track, basketball,
or tennis. All lettermen were invited
to join during one of the two initia-
tions held during the year. Aspiring
members were required to perform
humorous and often embarrassing
feats. On the final day of the initia-
tion period, the future members ran
from Gatun to Pina where they com-
pleted their "ordeal."

The "C" Club collaborated with
the GAA in presenting the highly
successful Homecoming Dance for
the victorious CHS Tigers.





"That's it, Apodaca, up and down." orders Billy Deaton.



124



0.A-A- Composed Of Zop (jirl Athletes




The Girls' Athletic Association
was the female equivalent of the "C"
Club. The members were girls who
demonstrated outstanding athletic
ability through their participation in
the CHS athletic program. Aspiring
members were required to participate
in all intramural sports and letter in
at least two varsity sports. In addi-
tion, these girls had to pass a grueling
initiation, similar to that of the "C"
Club. Members of this club, under
the direction of their sponsor, Mrs.
Harris, served as officials at all intra-
mural games.

The G.A.A. cooperated with the
"C" Club in sponsoring the annual
Homecoming Dance. This year for
the first time they also competed
against Cristobal's male athletes in
the "Olympics."



Front Raw: Jean Smith (treasurer). Shelly Lund (vice-president), Aurelia Williams (presi-
dent), Jan Bjorneby (secretary), Marlene Rice. Back Raw: Nancy Edmonson, Jane Dohle,
Roberta Cole, Barbara Bloemer, Sue Mendenhall, Judy Dohle. Karen Currier, and Marian
Kredell.




Up, up and away!'



125



Znespians Present Zwo Outstanding Plays




Sitting: Debbie Pate, Cathy Carlisle, Judy McLain, Diane Hauke, Mrs. Elfers (sponsor). Standing: Donald Byrd, Allen Harmon.



The purpose and aim of the Inter-
national Thespian Society was the ad-
vancement and improvement of thea-
ter arts in secondary schools. The
CHS chapter attempted to arouse in-
terest in the dramatic arts and gave
students interested in drama a chance
to work with its many facets; make-
up, direction, and acting. Any high



school student who earned ten points
was eligible to become a thespian.
Mrs. Elfers was the sponsor.

This year the International Thespi-
an Society at CHS produced two plays
presented to the public in the CHS
auditorium, one in November, and
one in March. The fall dramatic pro-



duction was the romantic comedy
Bell, Book, And Candle. The cast in-
cluded veteran actors, Judy McLain
and Donald Byrd and newcomers,
Diane Carroll, Lewis Valdez, and An-
drew Foshee. The play was well re-
ceived by both CHS students and the
general public.



126



"Debate Club broadens Minds




The Debate Club was organized
with the aim of providing students
with an opportunity to express their
views on controversial issues of the
day. Over-population, the dress code,
euthanasia, and other topics provided
subjects for weekly debates.

For each debate, the club members
were divided into two groups, pro and
con. Either the sponsor, Mr. Gregg,
or one of the students served as a
judge. Each team member was given
one minute in which to present his
arguments, then the opposing team
offered its rebuttal.

The highlight of the year for this
club was the Speech Festival, in
which they competed with a debating
team from Balboa.



Steve Shobe, Mike McCann, Patricia Paine, Mr. Gregg (sponsor), Beverly Olsen, Michael
Snider, Jimmy Gewin, Rita Boyland, Kenneth Hill. Maria Boone.



Safety Club Encourages Safety Practices



The Safety Club was formed in
order to encourage safety practices
among the students of CHS. Mr.
Reeves and his assistant, Mr. McCul-
lough, aided the student members in
carrying out their aims. Among these
aims were the organization of month-
ly fire drills and demonstrations of
correct methods for putting out small
fires. These fire drills and demonstra-
tions played an important part in
keeping CHS students prepared for
emergencies, not only at school, but
also at home and elsewhere.




Sitting: Mr. Reeves, (safety advisor). Mr. McCullough. (safety assistant advisor). Standing:
Carl Anderson, Mike Osborn. Diane Hauke. Peter Pacheco. Pattv Valentine.



127



Caribe Club Members Zeach
Jor Entire School T)ay

I 1




Front Row: Martha Anton, Nancy Edmond
son. Mar)' Norval, Patti Hauke (historian
Robert Phillips (president), Lana Boone,
Deborah Pate, Susan Burge, Jeannette Cox.
Center Row: Ann Gonzalez, Ann Lauritzen,
Jackie Parker, Paulette Jordi, Sheila Alber-
ga, Aurelia Williams, Maritza Thomas,
Christy Loizeaux, Cathy Carlisle, Barbara
Bloemer, Patti Paine, Rita Boyland, Do-
lores Santiago, Mrs. Gegg (sponsor). Back
Row: Gil Apodaca, Elaine Austin, Elizabeth
Wainio, Cornelius Goebertus, Joseph
Rozmeski, Warren Phillips, Harry Town-
send, Shelly Lund, Judy Tomlinson, Jackie
Springer, Linda Hess, Maria Boone, Nancy
Ridge.




#

*



K.uhy Kraus and Kathy Deraps welcome parents on Visitors' Day, on October 27.




The Caribe Club (Future Teachers
of America) was formed for the pur-
pose of promoting a better under-
standing of the teaching profession.
All students with a "B" average were
invited to join following the second
semester of their freshman year. On
November 18, 1970, the new mem-
bers were initiated at the Initiation
Banquet held at the Brazos Heights
Golf Club.



In February, the Caribe Club spon-
sored Teacher Appreciation Day in
honor of the faculty of CHS. This
was the sixth year for the club to
sponsor this activity. The members
also sponsored the successful Student
Teacher's Day on April 22. This year
was the first time that the students
taught classes for the entire day. All
agreed that this was a challenging and
rewarding experience. The club also



visited Coco Solo Elementary School,
and a Latin American school in
Colon, Republic of Panama.

Another activity of the Caribe
Club was their tutoring program.
Members aided weaker students who
needed help in their studies. Fre-
quently, members took over entire
class periods for teachers when substi-
tutes were not available.



128



'Xe Circle Jrtwcais"
Promotes
Merest

France




Dolores Santiago, Susann Zachrv, Susan Burge, and Rita Boyland. "French is not that hard!
Je l'aime!"



"Le Circle Francais" met twice a
month in order to stimulate student
interest in the language, history, and
culture of France. To achieve this
aim, special guest speakers or selected
members presented reports on various
subjects.

The club was sponsored by Mrs.
Gegg. Only those students who ob-
tained a "B" average in French were
eligible for membership. These stu-
dents were initiated at a banquet held
at the Brazos Heights Golf Club.
Each initiate was required to recite a
poem, sing a song, or perform a skit.

The French Club members were
involved in a number of interesting
activities during the year. They spon-
sored French Week and elected the
annual "Miss France." They also vis-
ited the famous passenger liner, "The
France."




Front Row: Ivette Cummings, Susann Zachrv, Martha Anton, Cornelius. Goebetfus, Paulette Jordi, Jackie Parker, Linda Hess, Susan Burge,
Jeannette Cox. Center Row: Nancy Edmondson, Patricia Hauke, Man- Norval. Debbie Pate, Aurelia Williams, Maritza Thomas, Sheila Alberga,
June Ilund, Nancy Horn, Rita Boyland, Terri Overstreet, Dolores Santiago, Mrs. Gegg. Back Row: Stephen Aponte. Brian DeRaps, Frank
Bern-, Edward Bringas, Robert Nordstrom, Bill Gillespie. Melinda Brown. Patrice Gonier, Cathy Hess.



129



Nurses Jirfes Impart Christmas Spirit
Zo People Of Cagarterita




First Row: W. Ortiz, R. Strube, B. Olsen, A. Ortiz, M. Olivera, R. Vidro, D. Robinson, R. Betancourt, E. Ferguson, K. Harden. Second Row: T.
Ferguson, M. Garner, R. Hartshorn, T. Overstreet, P. Hauke, A. Williams, N. Ridge, M. Thomas, J. Parker, P. Jordi. Third Row: Mrs. How-
ard (Sponsor), J. Jimenez, M. Gonzalez, T. Torres, O. Gonzalez, M. Toro, S. Vamprine, J. Cox, A. Coleman, M. Wilmont, S. Willis, D. Gos-
ney, D. Gosney, J. Ilund, J. Tomlinson, M. Fontanez. Fourth Row: I. Cummings, D. Dancer, T. Cobb, N. Ortiz, V. Whipple, R. Cliete, M.
Humphreys, N. Horn, P. Paine, K. Stevens, T. Thomas, B. Egger, M. Brown, D. Meeker, C. Smith, R. Munoz, E. Marsh, I. Monclova, S. May-
ani.



The Nurses' Aides Club was a very
popular organization at Cristobal
High. Its members were girls inter-
ested in nursing or another medical
profession. The club encouraged and
stimulated this interest by inviting
guest speakers, showing films, and
planning field trips to hospitals.

The most important field trip this
year was the annual visit to La Gar-
terita in Gatun Lake, on December
12. The purpose of this trip was to
give Christmas gifts to the people on
the island, especially the children



The Student Association assisted the
Nurses' Aides club this year in col-
lecting food and used clothing for
this purpose. The police division pro-
vided the club with a launch as trans-
portation.



In order to become a member of
the Nurses' Aides Club, one must be
a freshman girl, wear a cardboard
nurse' cap on the day of the initiation,
and say the pledge with the other ini-
tiates during a special meeting.




NEW INITIATES



130




Mrs. Howard, Brenda Egger, Beverly
Olsen, Debra Gosney, Jacqueline Parker,
Nancy Ridge, Olga Gonzalez, Noelia
Ortiz.

The Pink Girls helped their com-
munity greatly during the summer
months. They voluntarily offered
their services at Coco Solo Hospital.

In order to be eligible for this pro-
gram, each girl was required to take a
two-week first aid course. In addition,
a one-week training period, during
which the basics of hospital work
were taught, was required. The girls
learned how a hospital functions and
how to care for patients with various
needs.

In order to become a full-fledged
Pink Girl, each girl had to work a
total of 125 hours. In the hospital, the
Pink Girls were casually referred to as
"Pinkies." They were expected to ad-
here to the commands and advice of
their superiors who were registered
nurses. The fun-filled summer of
hard, but rewarding work was cli-
maxed by a private graduation cere-
mony attended by the group's spon-
sor, Mrs. Howard, and various civic-
minded citizens.



Pink Qirls Work
125 Hours






Ada Ortiz resuscitates "Annie."




Mr. Byrd instructs the Pink Girls on First Aid.



131



Spanish Club Participates Jn Carnival Parade




Seated, 1st Row: Cornelius Goebertus, Judy Tomlinson, Jackie Parker, Jenny Wirtz, Pauletre Jordi, Jeannie Basset, Mike Minehart. 2nd Row:
Marta Anton, Susan Zachery, Doug Stevens, Diane Hauke, Raul Castro, Sandra Alberga, Patty Hauke. Maria Fontanez, Ivette Cummings.
Standing: Kathy Pursley, Rod Lindo, Isaac Heres, Paul Baitel, Ralph Ender, Mary Norval, Mark Hanley, Joseph Ender, Greg Goguen, Stepha-
nie lilies, Sheila Alberga, Debbie Pate, Debbie Alberga, and Spanish Club sponsor, Mrs. Elfers.



The Spanish Club at CHS was or-
ganized for the purpose of encourag-
ing Spanish-speaking students to be-
come active in various activities, and
to increase their understanding of the
Latin American countries. Meetings
were held twice each month, and mat-
ters of interest to members were dis-
cussed. All discussions were conduct-
ed in Spanish.

The officers of the Spanish Club
this year were: Raul Castro, Presi-
dent; Diane Hauke, Vice-President;
Sandra Alberga, Secretary, and fenny
Wirtz, Treasurer.

The club was sponsored by Mrs.
Elfers who helped with the organiza-
tion of various activities and attended
all meetings.




Who said that Spanish had to be spoken only at Spanish Club meetings?



132



Student Advisory Committee Provides
Sounding Hoard ?or Student Opinion




Karen Currier, Cathy Carlisle, Michael Dexter, Lana Boone (recording secretary), Wally
Russon, Jeannette Cox, Robert Phillips, Nancy Ridge, and Victor Lee.




The Student Advisory Committee
was organized at the suggestion of
Mr. Pfau, with the cooperation of
Michael Dexter, President, and other
members of the Cristobal High
School Student Association. The pur-
pose of this group was to serve in an
advisory capacity to the principal of
CHS. Members were carefully select-
ed in order that each club and organi-
zation in the school, and each class,
might be represented. Members
served as a sounding board, bringing
to the attention of Mr. Pfau the com-
plaints, comments, and suggestions of
their fellow students. Jose Medina
served as chairman of the group, and
Lana Boone acted as recording secre-
tary.

Meetings were held on the first
Monday of each month. Among the
topics discussed were the reasons be-
hind school regulations and the possi-
bility of changing them, modifica-
tions in the dress code, and possible
changes in the athletic schedule.
Members cooperated with other orga-
nizations in planning and carrying
out activities and projects of interest
to the majority of the student body.
Among these were: a special assembly
in cooperation with the Canal Zone
Youth Council, the "Olympics" in
which the GAA and "C" Club partic-
ipated, and the Powderpuff Speedball
Game in which the Junior and Senior
girls participated.



"Why didn't somebody tell me there was a meeting todav?" queries Chairman Jose Medina as
he and Robert Phillips hurry to a meeting.



133



Philosophian Society Js domed



A new club at CHS this year, the
Philosophian Society was formed by
a group of students interested in intel-
lectual and literary pursuits. The
club's aim was to provide students
with an opportunity for discussion
and exploration of the various aspects
of philosophy and literature. It en-
couraged students to develop and im-



prove their ability to express them-
selves; either through group discus-
sion, or individually through reading,
creative writing, or poetry.

Membership was open to all high
school students, but was limited to
fifteen at any one time. Interested stu-
dents applied through Mr. Fattorosi,
the club's sponsor, or through any



two members. Regular meetings were
held twice each month, with various
extra meetings scheduled for after
school and on weekends. These extra
meetings were planned for places
such as the beach, which offered an
atmosphere of informal association
that helped the club members to dis-
cuss freely and honestly.




IM



Debbie Pate, Diane Hauke, Denise Foshee, Mike Dexter, Judy McLain, Shelia Alberga, Lana Boone, Allen Harmon (vice chairman), Jeannette
Cox, Donald Byrd, Robert Phillips (chairman), Maria Boone, Thomas Pursley, Kathy DeRaps (secretary), Mr. Fattorosi, Patti Hauke.

CMS Offers 3

Drivers Sd.

Sessions

Drivers' Training was an extreme-
ly popular course among CHS stu-
dents. It was offered three times dur-
ing the school year. Each session last-
ed six weeks. Meetings were held
after school in room 341 for one hour
and forty-five minutes, Monday
through Friday. The instructor, Mr.
Reeves, presented lectures and films
in order to give students the back-
ground in traffic laws, safety, and
automobile mechanics necessary to
enable them to become good drivers.
In addition to classroom instruction,
ten hours of behind-the-wheel driving
were required before students were el-
igible to take the road test and obtain
a license. Driver education students brace themselves for another "horror movie.'




134




Douglas Stevens (vice-president). Sitting: Raul Castro, Diane Hauke, Ralph Ender, Sheila Alberga (president), Lana Boone,
Sandra Alberga (treasurer). Standing: Jenny Wirtz, Kathy Brown, Maritza Thomas, Stephanie lilies, Deborah Pate, Deborah



Sitting on Floor:
Patricia Hauke,
Alberga, Edithe Marsh, Terri Overstreet



language Cab Club

Promotes J n teres t

Jn foreign Nations




The LANGUAGE LAB CLUB is

an organization for tri-lingual stu-
dents who are skilled in the operation
of the language lab equipment. These
students assist the teachers of the var-
ious foreign languages by setting the
equipment in the lab and taking con-
trol of the console.

Members attend bi-monthly meet-
ings held in the language laboratory.
Matters of interst are presented to the
members by the officers, and lively
discussions often result. The sponsor,
Mr. Stearns is always present to make
certain that order is maintained.

Several interesting field trips are
scheduled during the year. Members
visit passenger liners of the countries
whose languages the members have
studied. These excursions provide the
members with an opportunity to con-
verse with native speakers and to
learn something about their culture.



Language Lab members operate the lab for the benefit of other students.



135



Reverend Payne Quest Speaker At Ml





Uli



wmm



Jeannette Cox, Michael Dexter, Robert Phillips, Lana Boone. Moments before the assembly
begins, old members of the NHS relax on stage.





Robert Phillips speaks on Character, one oi
the four cardinal virtues of the NHS.



Jnitiation Of National Mo nor Society





like Dexter lights the green candle of
adership, symbolizing growth.



rui &



Mrs. Valdez, Jeannette Cox, Lewis Valdez, and Rev. Clarence Payne, admit the approving
smiles of interested onlookers as the initiate lights his candle.




Mrs. Valdez, Carmen Butler, Mrs. B ;
Mike Dexter. Rev. Payne. The candlel




NATIONAL HONOR SOCIETY MEMBERS: First Row: Jeannette Cox (secretary-treasur-
er), Lana Boone (president), Robert Phillips (vice-president). Second Row: Carmen Butler,
Denise Foshee, Michael Dexter. Third Row: Lewis Valdez, Fred Cole.



Membership in the National
Honor Society has become nationally
recognized as one of the highest hon-
ors which may be bestowed upon a
high school student. The Canal Zone
Caribbean Chapter was formed for
the purpose of providing recognition
to those students who have excelled
in all aspects of Cristobal High
School life.

Students who have a minimum
grade point average of 3.00, and have
demonstrated outstanding leadership,
character, and service are eligible for
membership in this society.

Two initiation assemblies are pre-
sented to the student body each year,



one each semester. At the fall initia-
tion, only seniors may be inducted.
This year, the assembly was held on
November 19th. The theme for the
program was, "Where do we go from
here?" and Reverend Clarence Payne
from the Canal Zone Youth Council
spoke on the subject of young rebels.
New members announced at this time
were: Sandra Alberga, Carmen Butler,
Fred Cole. Gary Collins, Denise
Foshee, and Lewis Valdez. At the
spring initiation, not more than 159r
of the senior class, and not more than
5% of the junior class may be consid-
ered for election.




Silting: Karen Schill, Kathy Farrington, Irma Monclova, Maritza Thomas (managing editor), Karen Westerberg. Standing: Michael McCann,
Jose Medina, Michael Dexter, Toni Thomas, Allen Harmon, Paul Bleicher.



Pink Uok Qives Zradcwind
J might Zo CMS



This year's TRADEWIND staff
worked toward faster publication and
a more entertaining newspaper. Work
sessions were held after school three



days a week. The editors, reporters,
typists, and photographers devoted
many hours of their own time to the
paper.




'The answer to CHS problems?"



In order to get the entire student
body involved in making the
TRADEWIND a vital and inter-
esting part of our school, new ideas
were necessary. One such idea was
THE PINK BOX. This box served
as a "catch all" for school happen-
ings. Students were encouraged to
drop in letters to HELP (the new ad-
vice column), letters to the editor,
poems, bits of gossip, and anything
they felt might be interesting and
amusing for their schoolmates.

Mr. Dobbins was TRADEWIND
advisor this year; it was his second
year in this position. He devoted
much of his time and energy to pub-
lishing an interesting, informative
newspaper.

The staff consisted of many mem-
bers, each with varied and vital tasks
to perform. The hours of hard work
required for the publication of a good
paper all seemed worthwhile when
the TRADEWIND returned from
the press.



131



Zhe Clock Qave Jn ; Kut

Zhe yearbook Staff

Worked On



The yearbook staff had the chal-
lenging responsibility of producing
and editing the CHS yearbook, the
Caribbean. The staff consisted of a
group of efficient students who
worked tirelessly after school in order
to meet the deadlines established by
the publishing company. With the
guidance of their sponsor, Mr. John-
son, and the help of an ambitious
group of photographers, the staff ac-
complished their duty without unnec-
essary delay.

The staff introduced many innova-
tions this year. One was a new system
of editing, whereby the staff mem-
bers, excluding the editor and the



copy editor, were unassigned. Each
staff member did the work which had
to be done, regardless of the subject
matter. This new system proved to be
very practical. Another innovation
was an entirely new arrangement of
the Caribbean itself. Also in order to
compensate for shortage of funds, the
staff sponsored a number of contests
to stimulate yearbook sales. As a re-
sult, staff membership enlarged to in-
clude junior as well as senior high
school students. This was done in ap-
preciation of their generous donations
and enthusiastic sales of Tiger Boost-
ers.






Allen Harmon. "The subject is marvelous, Maritza Thomas, Jeannette Cox. "Put it Sheila Alberga. "Stop grinning and get to

but the photography is lousy!" here." "No, here." work!"



I *4*}



I; i : 'lfi 'i




Mr. Johnson (sponsor), Rita Boyland, Maritza Thomas, Maria Boone, Allen Harmon, Jeannette Cox (editor). Sheila Alberga, Lana Boone
(copy editor), Beth Bleicher, Thomas Purslev, Kathv Deraps, Debra Pate.



139



Cristobal Migh School Produces








~j*Jk-?.C^



Front Row: Paul Baitel, Bill Deaton, Mike Snider, Stephan Fugleberg, Toby Phillips, Ralph Richmond, Frank Cicchetto, Carlos Brown, Juan
Sanchez. Second Row: Caleb Clement, Jim Jackson, Joe Rozmeski, Andrew Foshee, Harry Townsend, Frank Berry, Warren Phillips, Mike Bar-
ger, Bill LeDoux, Arthur Serig, John Musser, Mike Spagna. Third Row: Neil Patton (co-captain), Jose Medina, Robert Phillips, Don Olsen,
John Day, Brian Allen, Mike Apodaca, Mattia Spagna, Robert Bloemer, William Huffman, Peter Swain, Ernest Abresch, Wally Russon (co-
captain).



This year's interscholastic Champi-
on Tigers will long be remembered as
the best team ever to play in the
Canal Zone. They achieved what no
other team has an undefeated sea-
son all the way from the Jamboree to
the Palm Bowl.

Cristobal's first taste of victory
came in the Jamboree. In the first
quarter the Tigers defeated the Bull-
dogs when quarterback, Neil Patton,
threw for 41 yards for the only touch-
down. The College Devils were una-
ble to stop the mighty Tigers in the
second quarter and once again Cristo-
bal came out on top 7-0.

The first game of the regular sea-
son once again brought victory to the
Tigers when they overpowered Canal
Zone College by a score of 22 to 6.



The quality of the performance in
that first game was typical of that in
the games which followed.

Balboa's homecoming was

smashed when Cristobal outplayed
and outscored them 33-8. This was
the high scoring game for the Tigers
this year. Touchdowns were made by
Neil Patton, Billy Deaton, Robert
Phillips, and Willie Huffman, who
scored twice.

The first home game for the Ti-
gers proved a thriller for all. The
game was undecided until the last few
seconds when "Cubby" Clement in-
tercepted a pass from College quarter-
back, Russ Bowen, thus continuing
the winning streak to three straight
wins.

The final season game, between



Balboa and Cristobal, again displayed
the Tiger superiority as they crushed
Balboa with four wins and no losses.
Cristobal became the Interscholastic
Champions for the year 1970-71.

The Annual United Fund Palm
Bowl Game brought the Tigers up
against a strong team consisting of
outstanding players from both Balboa
and College. The "Devil-Dogs" were
determined to obtain revenge for the
losses suffered at the claws of the Ti-
gers. Yet even their combined efforts
was not enough to stop the powerful
Cristobal machine. Determined to
keep their undefeated record, the Ti-
gers slipped by the All-Stars to win
7-0. It was a fitting climax to a foot-
ball season which Cristobal Tigers
will not soon forget.



140



Kccord-Ureak'mg Jootball Zeam



Long hours of diligent practice




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Enthusiastic support from fans at bonfires, students at pep assemblies, and fathers at football
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Able leadership




And expert coaching







combined to produce results visible from the moment the team



141



Zigcr Victory Jh Palm ftowl



Appeared on the field . throughout
the season, beginning with victor}' in
the Jamboree . and continuing





with victories in each of the regular
season games, the defeat of the All-
Stars in the annual Palm Bowl .



Co-captain, Neil Patton, Queen Wendy Flores, Co-captain Wally Russon.





142



Climaxes Undefeated Season




Jamboree:




SCORES




Sept.
Sept.
Oct.


18

25

9