• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Frontispiece
 Half Title
 Title Page
 The baby in the basket
 The horse shoe
 The mill
 Chimney-sweep Jack
 Uncle George and the cabman
 The traveller
 "Trust, doggie, trust"
 The soldiers
 How is your master, Dame Partlet,...
 The circus
 The sailor boy's song
 New boots
 Who lies there, with toes in the...
 Dolly's crib
 The bookseller's shop
 Chocolate creams
 The truant boot cleaner
 The chemist's shop
 My garden
 The writing master
 The grocer's shop
 Father's dinner
 The contrast
 The portrait
 The stag
 The artist
 The plough
 The doctor's visit
 The postman
 The concert
 Back Cover
 Spine






Title: Chimes and rhymes for youthful times!
CITATION PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00053677/00001
 Material Information
Title: Chimes and rhymes for youthful times!
Alternate Title: Chimes and rhymes
Physical Description: 95 p. : col. ill. ; 19 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Pletsch, Oscar, 1830-1888 ( Illustrator )
George Routledge and Sons ( Publisher )
Leighton Bros
Publisher: George Routledge and Sons
Place of Publication: London ;
New York
Manufacturer: Leighton, Brothers
Publication Date: [1871?]
 Subjects
Subject: Children's poetry, English   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry -- 1871   ( lcsh )
Bldn -- 1871
Genre: Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
poetry   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: England -- London
United States -- New York -- New York
 Notes
Citation/Reference: Osborne Coll.,
Statement of Responsibility: with illustrations by Oscar Pletsch ; beautifully printed in colours.
General Note: Chromolithographed half-title: Chimes and rhymes.
General Note: Date from Osborne; cf. below.
General Note: Chromolithographs by Leighton Brothers: frontispiece, illustrated plates; included in pagination.
General Note: Plates are accompanied by inserted guardsheets not included in pagination.
General Note: Baldwin Library copy lacks guardsheets.
Funding: Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00053677
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002224098
notis - ALG4359
oclc - 32070309

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Cover 1
        Cover 2
    Frontispiece
        Page i
    Half Title
        Page ii
    Title Page
        Page iii
        Page iv
    The baby in the basket
        Page 1
        Page 2
    The horse shoe
        Page 3
        Page 4
    The mill
        Page 5
        Page 6
    Chimney-sweep Jack
        Page 7
        Page 8
    Uncle George and the cabman
        Page 9
        Page 10
    The traveller
        Page 11
        Page 12
    "Trust, doggie, trust"
        Page 13
        Page 14
    The soldiers
        Page 15
        Page 16
    How is your master, Dame Partlet, dear?
        Page 17
        Page 18
    The circus
        Page 19
        Page 20
    The sailor boy's song
        Page 21
        Page 22
    New boots
        Page 23
        Page 24
    Who lies there, with toes in the air?
        Page 25
        Page 26
    Dolly's crib
        Page 27
        Page 28
    The bookseller's shop
        Page 29
        Page 30
    Chocolate creams
        Page 31
        Page 32
    The truant boot cleaner
        Page 33
        Page 34
    The chemist's shop
        Page 35
        Page 36
    My garden
        Page 37
        Page 38
    The writing master
        Page 39
        Page 40
    The grocer's shop
        Page 41
        Page 42
    Father's dinner
        Page 43
        Page 44
    The contrast
        Page 45
        Page 46
    The portrait
        Page 47
        Page 48
    The stag
        Page 49
        Page 50
    The artist
        Page 51
        Page 52
    The plough
        Page 53
        Page 54
    The doctor's visit
        Page 55
        Page 56
    The postman
        Page 57
        Page 58
    The concert
        Page 59
        Page 60
    Back Cover
        Cover 1
        Cover 2
    Spine
        Spine
Full Text



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CHIMES AND RHYMES


FOR


YOUTHFUL TIMES!





WITH ILLUSTRATIONS BY OSCAR PLETSCH.

cnantli[fUlln H frint h i &(olours.,





LONDON:
GEORGE ROUTLEDGE AND SONS,
THE BROADWAY, LUDGATE.
NEW YORK: 416, BROOME STREET.


















































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CHIMES AND RHYMES
FOR
UTHFUL TIMES!



THE BABY IN THE BASKET.

"Little baby, prithee say,
Baby in the basket;
iVhere have you been all the day,
Tell me when I ask it.

I have been a long, long way,
Coos baby in the basket;
But what I saw I cannot say,
'Tis no use to ask it.

A2








THE HORSE SHOE.

"Good Mister Smith, I've come to you,
Because my horse has lost his shoe."
Pray, sir, how did he do it ?"
"Why, riding with the hounds one day,
He kicked in such a vicious way,
That then I think he threw it."

" For ever since he's been quite lame,
So broken-spirited and tame,
He scarce can whisk his tail."
"Well, Master John, I can't refuse,
I'll make your horse some strong new
shoes,
First let me drive this nail."




















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THE MILL.

Whirr-r, whirr-r, the mill sails
All the summer's day;
Whirr-r, whirr-r, the mill sails,
And this is what they say.

Grinding, grinding, food for all,
Rich and poor, great and small;
Grinding still in sun or shower,
Grinding corn to nice white flour.

Whirr-r, whirr-r, the mill sails
All the summer long;
Whirr-r, whirr-r, the mill sails,
Listen to their song.

B 2








CHIMNEY-SWEEP JACK.
Shake hands with Sweepy, my sweet
little Miss,
Or perhaps you would like a nice sooty
kiss.
Sweep, oh! Sweep, oh!"
Oh, no! cried Miss Alice, I'd much
rather not;
Why, you are as black as my mother's
old pot.
"Sweep, oh! Sweep, oh!"
Well, Miss, I cannot help that you see,
If you had to go up the chimnies like me.
Sweep, oh! Sweep, oh !"
Your fair white skin might grow coarse
and black,
But don't be afraid of Chimney-Sweep
Jack.
"Sweep, oh! Sweep, oh!"


















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UNCLE GEORGE AND THE CABMAN.

Wake up, Mr. Cabby, wake up from
your nap,
Or with my umbrella I'll give you a rap;
I wonder that you should sit sleeping
there,
Instead of looking out for a fare.

Wake up your horse, too, and give him
the rein,
For greatly I fear we are late for the
train-
The nine o'clock train for Brighton.
Be sure
And catch it in time, I'll give sixpence
more.











THE TRAVELLER.

Your very humble servant, sir,
What may I serve to you ?
We've lemonade and ginger beer,
And soda water, too.


Or would you like a glass of ale,
We have a splendid cask;
For wine, or cider, anything,
You've only got to ask.









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"TRUST, DOGGIE, TRUST.

Trust, doggie, trust,"
Indeed you must,
That bread is not paid for, you know,
And though tempted much more,
You would not I'm sure,
Eat a bit for which people owe.

There now it is paid for, doggie, dear,
You may gobble it up without any
fear;
So says little Harry to good old dog
Tray,
Who eats up the bread, and then
runs away.

C 2









THE SOLDIERS.

Hurrah! here they come!
Our brave soldiers home,
To tell of the deeds they have done.
The long war is past,
And peace come at last,
After the victory won.

Hurrah! here they come!
Our brave soldiers home,
But a tear comes into nm eye,
When I think of 'ti brave,
Who sleep in their grave,
Far from home neathh a cold foreign
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How is your Master, Dame Partlet,
dear ?
That noisy old crowing Chanticlere,
Are you not glad that he is not here ?
" Cock-a-doodle-doo." Why, he's coming
I fear.


There was ne'er such a baby
For climbing on chairs,
There was ne'er such a baby
For getting down stairs.

Climbing on chairs! getting down
stairs!
There was ne'er such a baby her
mother declares.








THE CIRCUS.

T'was in the Christmas holidays,
The ground was white with snow,
When we all went to Astley's,
And sat in the front row.

Oh dear! the wondrous sights we saw!
A clown baked in a pie,
A boy who jumped right through a hoop,
Whilst round his horse did fly.

I think if I may choose my trade,
When I am older grown,
I'd like above all other things,
At Astley's to be clown.










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THE SAILOR BOY'S SONG.

Oh! would you be a sailor boy
To sail upon the sea ?
Oh! would you be a sailor boy?
Then sail along with me.

Then sail along with me, my boy,
Across the ocean main,
And when the year comes round, my
boy,
We shall be home again.

We'll ride before the wind, my boy,
Before the wind so free;
Then do not stay behind, my boy,
But sail along with me.

D 2








NEW BOOTS.

Tug away! Tug away !
Such boots are no play;
Try again! Try again!
With might and with main.

I'm sure they will fit
When you've worn them a bit,
Though at first they seem tight,
They will soon be all right.

And then you'll declare
There was ne'er such a pair
Of good boots to wear,
As those you have there.












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Who lies there, with toes in the air ?
Pillows were made, little boy, for the
head,
And not to be kicked to the foot of the
bed;
But we do not care,
So fat and so fair,
My saucy baby-boy lying there!


Tommy and Mary have been to the fair,
And what do you think they have
brought from there?
A doll and a donkey that wags his head,
And two great cakes of ginger-bread.










DOLLY'S CRIB.

You see good Mr. Carpenter
My doll has grown so tall,
I really don't know what to do,
Her crib is much too small.


So, I have brought it, please, to you,
To take the foot-board out.
And you must make it wider, too,
For dolly's growing stout.




















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THE BOOKSELLER'S SHOP.
Young Walter he went to a bookseller's
shop,
And took off his hat with a bow:
" I want, if you please, Sir, to look at a
book,
Have you got any pretty ones now ?"
" Buds and Flowers" was pretty you
sold me last year,
And Schnick-Schnack," I also
admired;
But now I have grown a year older,
you see,
And of those childish books I am
tired,
"Then here, Sir, I think, is just what
you want,
I am sure it will give you delight,
It's the prettiest book I have in my shop,
Full of pictures, all coloured so bright."

E2









CHOCOLATE CREAMS.

Little Miss Margaret had a sweet tooth,
And so I imagine had dear little Ruth;
For when they were asked what they
would like best,
They chose chocolate creams above all
the rest.

Chocolate creams, such chocolate
creams!
Never before were seen but in dreams,
Dreams of that wonderful Lolly-pop-
land,
Where sugar plums lie like stones on
the strand.














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THE TRUANT BOOT CLEANER.

Three pair of boots!

Four pair of boots!

Five pair in all!

Standing all in a row in the hall,

Standing there for Jack to clean;

But Jack is no where to be seen.

Yes! there he is in the wood, quite near,
And George has caught him by the ear.

" Come back and clean the boots to-day,

Before you dare go out and play."









THE CHEMIST'S SHOP.

Salts and Senna
Mix well together,
Rhubarb, magnesia,-
That's not for me, Sir;
Plaisters and blisters,
Give those to my sisters;
A bottle of mixture,
It would make me sick, sure,
"When taken, well shaken,"
Old Sir, you're- mistaken.
If fondly you think, I ever will drink,
Your horrible compounds of rhubarb
and worse,
I'll only take globules, and so I'll tell
nurse.













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MY GARDEN.

I have a little garden,
Where many flowers grow,
Sweet primroses and violets,
And daisies in a row.

Red roses too, and columbine,
Are in my garden-plot;
But still one flower is wanting there
A blue forget-me-not.

A little blue forget-me-not,
In colour like the sky,
Please, Gardener, will you get me
sofie ?
Well, little miss, I'll try.

F 2








THE WRITING MASTER.

"Oh, Tommy, this is very bad,"
Said solemn Mr. Fink,
Upon your nice new copy book,
You've made a blot of ink.

You have not copied what I set,
But scribbled on the page,
Why little Arthur does as well,
Who is not half your age.

He never draws between the lines
Long straggling tails of kites,
Nor places crowing cocks upon
The capitals he writes.





























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THE GROCER'S SHOP.

"An ounce, if you please, of the very
best tea,
Pray let its flavour be fine."
"A pound and a half of butter for me,
And a bottle of currant wine."

" My mother has sent for some treacle,"
says Jack,
Please put it into this jug."
But when he is served he does not go
back.
But stands peeping into the mug.

Poor Janet has got little money to buy,
But she has some butter to sell,
So the grocer he takes her butter to try,
And gives baby a sweetie as well.








FATHER'S DINNER.

" Now guess what we've bought you for
dinner to-day,"
Says neat little Katie Price,
" Mother told us, be sure and run all
the way,
Because it is something nice.


"I give you three guesses, you cannot
have more;
Once! twice! no, that will not do.
It is not boiled mutton, you said that
before.
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THE CONTRAST.

Miss Polly is an idle girl,
She loves a game of play,
But when she reads a book, she says,
Her thoughts all rove away.


But Freddy is a studious boy,
To read is his delight,
And when he gets a book he likes,
He'll stay up all the night.




G 2








THE PORTRAIT.

I really must request you Sir,
To take that eye-glass out;
I don't wish to be rude, but Sir,
You look a perfect lout.

Now pray don't move a muscle, Sir,
I'm ready to begin,
Put on a fascinating smile,
But do not, do not, grin.

Oh dear! oh dear! I really thought
I'd got a pretty pose,
But oh! you've moved; look there Sir,
now,
You've got a double nose!





















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THE STAG.

In the forest old,
A huntsman bold,
Is crouching in the snow;
A stag he sees
Between the trees.
The poor stag does, not know
Who lies in wait,
His life to take,
As homeward he doth go.










THE ARTIST.

Look, Robert, he is going to take
Our cottage with the trees,

I wonder if he'd like to make

A sketch of me with these.


Why I could paint as well as that,

He has not yet begun,

If he's so long beginning, at

What time will he have done.

















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THE PLOUGH.

Plough, Ploughman, plough!
Then sow the corn,
Plough, Ploughman, plough,
In the early morn.


Plough, Ploughman, plough,
Though bent with toil,
Plough, Ploughman, plough,
Turn up the soil.


In winter we scatter the seed in the
ground,
In summer we see the corn waving
around.

H 2









THE DOCTOR'S VISIT.

"Your head, you say, is very bad,
Your tongue is very white,
Pray, Nurse, can you account for this ?
"I think I can Sir, quite."

" For Master Charlie yesterday,
Stayed up, you see, to supper,
And eat six tarts and seven puffs
Instead of bread and butter."

" Well, now to-day Nurse, he must take
Six pills and seven draughts,
A warning to all little boys,
Who eat too many tarts."






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THE POSTMAN.

A letter! a letter!
From over the sea,
I hope it contains
Some good news for me.

Good news from Charlie,
Our brave soldier boy!
I scarcely can find
The money for joy.

Snap barks at the Postman,
As much as to say,
What do you want here, Sir
You'd best go away.










THE CONCERT.

Fiddle away,
Mary will play:
Hum, strum,
Fingers and thumb.
And now for the air,
You're out I declare:
Keep in time,
(What will rhyme ?)
You're too fast,
Which is last ?
You're too slow,
Does it go ?
Yes, all cry, bravo!



















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